Blender 3D for Beginners: Model a Jack-o'-lantern | Harry Helps | Skillshare
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Blender 3D for Beginners: Model a Jack-o'-lantern

teacher avatar Harry Helps, Professional 3d Artist

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      1:57

    • 2.

      Setting Up Our File

      7:06

    • 3.

      Modeling the Pumpkin

      23:52

    • 4.

      Modeling the Pumpkin Stem

      12:40

    • 5.

      Carving the Jack o' lantern's Face!

      28:07

    • 6.

      Modeling the Candle

      18:08

    • 7.

      Shading the Jack o' lantern (Part 1)

      17:27

    • 8.

      Shading the Jack o' lantern (Part 2)

      16:05

    • 9.

      Lighting the Jack o' lantern

      10:34

    • 10.

      Rendering the Jack o' lantern

      8:37

    • 11.

      Our Class Project!

      1:32

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About This Class

In this course, I’ll walk you through the simple and beginner friendly process of creating a Jack-o’-lantern in Blender.

Jack-o’-lanterns are a classic symbol of Halloween, and are actually pretty easy to make in Blender! They’re also a model that can be easily customized to your liking!

We’ll be going through the entire process of creating this Jack-o’-lantern from a beginner’s perspective to avoid as much confusion as possible. That means I won’t be skipping any steps or going too fast for you to keep up with me.

We’re using Blender for this tutorial, which is an amazing and totally free 3d software. The only barrier to entry is having a computer to run the software on.

In this class you can expect to learn:

  • Blender Interface and Tools: We’ll learn about many basic tools and interface elements within Blender while creating our Jack-o’-lantern.

  • Modeling: To create our Jack-o’-lantern from scratch, we’ll use basic modeling tools and modifiers such as Boolean and Solidify.

  • Lighting: We’ll set up a spooky lighting scheme including volumetric lighting.

  • Shading: Which can give objects the appearance of pumpkin, candle wax and flames.

  • Rendering: Lastly, we’ll render our final image in Blender so you can share it with your friends and family on social media.

When we’re done you’ll have all the skills you need to create a Jack-o’-lantern of your very own! 

For our Class Project, you'll be doing just that! I’d like you to create a new Jack-o’-lantern with a unique face or design and share it with the class!

I’ll personally review every project uploaded to the gallery and give you feedback on what you’ve done fantastic, as well as anything that could use some adjustment.

I hope you’ll join me on this fun beginner’s journey through Blender by making your very own 3D Jack-o’-lantern!

Meet Your Teacher

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Harry Helps

Professional 3d Artist

Top Teacher


Hi, I'm Harry! I have over a decade of experience in 3d modeling, texturing, animating and post-processing. I've worked for a lot of different types of companies during my career, such as a major MMORPG video game studio, a video production company and an award winning architectural visualization company. I have worked as a Studio Director, Lead 3d Artist, 3d Background Artist, Greenscreen Editor and Intern UI Artist. My professional work has been featured in "3d Artist" magazine with accompanying tutorial content. I have extensive experience with Blender, 3d Max, VRay and Photoshop.

I love sharing my passion for 3d art with anyone wanting to learn!

Get full access to all my classes and thousands more entirely free using this link!See full profile

Level: Beginner

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, my name is Harry and I'm a professional 3D artists with over a decade of experience. I've marked most recently as a studio director of an award-winning architectural visualization studio, where you're seeing on screen now are examples on my past professional work. In this course, I'll walk you through this simple and beginner friendly process of creating a jacket, lantern, and blender. Jacqueline add-ins are a classic symbol of Halloween and are actually pretty easy to make in Blender. There are also a model that can be easily customized to your liking. Will be going through the entire process of creating this Jacqueline. And from a beginner's perspective, to avoid as much confusion as possible. That means I won't be skipping any steps are going too fast for you to keep up with me. We're using Blender for this tutorial, which is an amazing and totally free 3D software, the only barrier to entry is having a computer to run the software on. In this class, you can expect to learn the blender interface and its tools. Will learn about the many basic tools and interface elements within blender while creating our Jacqueline modelling. To create our Jack London from scratch, we'll be using modeling tools and modifiers such as Boolean and solidify lighting. We'll set up a spooky lighting scene including volumetric lighting, shading, which can give objects the appearance of pumpkin, candle wax or flames. And lastly, we'll render our final image in Blender. You can share it with your friends and family on social media. When we're done, you'll have all the skills you need to create a Jacqueline. And it'd be very good for our class project. You'll be doing just that. I'd like you to create a new Jacqueline with a unique face or design and share it with the class. I'll personally review every project uploaded to the gallery and give you feedback on what you've done fantastic, as well as anything that could use a little bit of adjustment. I hope you'll join me on this fun beginners journey through blunder, but making your very own 3D, Jacqueline 2. Setting Up Our File: If this is your first time taking a Blender class, I'd highly recommend you start with my complete beginner's guide to Blender first, this class was designed for the absolute beginner to Blender and 3D Art in general, we cover every single necessary topic in order to get you up to speed and running in Blender will accomplish this with short and focus lessons that cover each topic from a beginner's perspective. Utilizing a well-organized starter file, we end the class within easy projects where you set up and customize your very own cozy camp site. That out of the way. Let's continue with the lesson. In this lesson, we'll be going over some settings to prepare a file for future rendering. Let's begin. We're going to select the general file type to begin our project. We can click this. Let's start by going up to Edit and then preferences. Now we're going to go to the system tab here on the left. And then in this top one new here, we're gonna be checking on the different pieces of our hardware that the cycle render will have access to. If you have the option to use optics here at the top, getting use that. However, if you don't, you can always use cuda. I'm going to switch back to optics for mine because I have the option to. The reason why you would want to use optics over cuda is because optics is a bit more modern and it's a little bit faster. However, if you only have the option for cuda, that's fine. You're render just be a little bit slower. Now with optics enabled, I just want to make sure that I have both of these boxes here checked. Yours is going to say something different here unless you have an identical computer to me, which is probably unlikely. The top one here is my GPU. The bottom one is my CPU. I want to have both of these boxes checked. If for some reason you have multiple graphics cards, you'll want to have all of these boxes checked. So you might have three options here. So just make sure every single option you see here, regardless of how many other are, they all have the checkbox next to them. With that done, we can now close this window. Now let's set up our render settings. Over here on the right side, we want to go to this tab that looks like the backside of a DSLR camera. Then at the top, we're going to switch our render engine from EV two cycles instead. Now we wanna go down to device and switch this from CPU to GPU compute. Now this will allow it to use our GPU as well as our CPO. Under the viewport settings, make sure you have noise threshold turned on. So this little checkbox that makes sure it's set to 0.1. Then for our max samples, we're going to change this from 1024 down to 100 instead. This will just make our render a little bit faster in the viewport. We don't need 1024 samples just for the viewport. Now we're going to scroll down here. And just below the settings we changed. There's a little box here that says D noise. We're going to check that one. Twirl that little, that little arrow down. And we're going to change the noise or from automatic to optics instead. The optic denoise or is just a lot faster than the other one. And we don't really need quality so much as we need speed for the viewport. Moving further down the list, we can now go down to our render settings. So these are the settings that we'll be using for the final render. Whereas the last ones where the settings that will just be using within this viewport here. Again, for our render settings here we're going to have noise threshold turned on. So little blue checkbox. Then we'll have this set to 0.01, which will make our final render a bit less noisy than the viewport would be. Then we're going to change our max samples from 40 96 all the way down to 200. So twice as much as the viewport, but still much less than the default. Then finally, let's go down here to the de-noise. We're going to twirl this down because it's already checked on, which is good. We're going to throw down the options and just make sure that you're de-noise or is set to open image denoising. This case, we do not want to use optics because optics is a little less high-quality, but it's faster. In our case, we want the higher-quality for our final image. So we're going to use the open image de-noise for the de-noise are instead. Now we can change our output properties, which are up here. So it's this little tab here that looks like a printer printing out a little photo. So we can click on this to switch to that tab. Then we're going to come up here to the top. The only thing we're going to change here is just our resolution of our final output. So we're going to switch this to 2048. Make sure I type it right. 2048. And then the same thing here, 2048. We're going to be making a square render for this tutorial because our pumpkin is gonna be mostly circular, so it'll fit nicely into a square root image. Now let's save this file in a location we can find easily for future lessons. We're going to go up to File. Then we're going to choose Save As. So we can click this. Alternatively, you can just click Shift Control and S at the same time when your keyboard, where you can just click this option here with this window up. Now we can use this left side menu here to navigate to the location that we'd like to save our file. I suggest saving it somewhere that's obvious to you. Somewhere you're going to be able to find easily next time. Because we're gonna be using this same file for the rest of this tutorial. So make sure you don't save it somewhere that you're going to accidentally delete or possibly lose. With geolocation chosen. We can now get on here to the bottom and change the name of Our File. I'm going to call my file Jack. Hyphen 0, lantern underscore 01. The reason I added this underscore 01 at the end, it's just in case I want to branch this File, saving new version of it, I can just call the new version of it 02. And then if I want to branch it again, 0304. So it's just a good habit to number your files. That way it's obvious which file is older, which files a different branch of something. It just keeps things more tidy with our file named. Now we can just hit Save As we can now see that instead of having an empty bar here at the top, we have the location that we saved our file in, which means that we actually have saved our file. This is a good way to know whether or not you've saved your file or not. If you see a location up here at the top, that means you've at least saved your file once. You do want to get into the habit though, I'll just hitting Control S while you're working to save your file. So you can see down here at the bottom it says saved Jack-o'-lantern, no one dot blend. That way. We don't lose any work while we're working in case something goes haywire, we make a mistake or the file crashes for some reason. It's just a good habit to continue saving your file once you've done a fair bit of work. With these settings changed, we're ready to proceed with the project. The next lesson, we'll be starting the modeling of our Pumpkin. I'll see you there. 3. Modeling the Pumpkin: In this lesson, we'll be modeling the base of our Pumpkin. Let's begin. We'll start by selecting the default cube and then deleting it because we won't need it for this tutorial. Now let's hit Shift and a on our keyboard. We can give to mesh. Then we're gonna go to UV sphere. We're going to select that. Now before you click off or do anything else, we're gonna go down here to the bottom left and twirl open this menu because we need to change the many settings Quick. We're going to start by just making this a little bit smaller. We're going to type in 0.4 m because this is a little bit closer to the size of an actual Pumpkin. Then for the segments and the rings, we can leave these at the default. However, if yours are different, just make sure your segments are set to 32. Your rings are set to 16. Now with that done, we can zoom in here on our sphere. Then we're going to right-click and we're going to choose a shade smooth. That'll make our sphere look nice and smooth. Before we get into any modeling, let's organize Our File a little bit. The first thing we're gonna do is rename this sphere to Pumpkin. Instead, we're just gonna go up here, it's at the top-right. Double-click on the name sphere, and that would allow us to change the name to Pumpkin. We can type in Pumpkin and then hit Enter to accept. Now inside our viewport, we can hit M on our keyboard for move to collection. Then we're going to choose new collection. We're going to name this new collection pumpkin as well. We just type in Pumpkin. Then hit Okay. We can see here that it's moved this Pumpkin object to a new collection. These collections you can think of is just folders. They're essentially just hold a bunch of different objects that you put in there. It can be anything you want and it just keeps things separate. And that way you can either easily turn off an entire layer or turn own and entire layer. And also just visually organize this things. Let's double-click on the word up at the top here where it says collection. We're going to call this render scene and then hit Enter. So let me know anything devoted to making the render scenes such as the lighting or the camera can go here, and anything for the Pumpkin can go into the Pumpkin collection. The last thing we need to do now is just click this little white box next to the word Pumpkin on the Pumpkin collection. What this means is anytime we create something new, will automatically go into the Pumpkin collection rather than the render scene collection, because this is now the default. With all of this out of the way, Let's begin Modeling. Now we're gonna go into our front orthographic view. That way it's easy to model our Pumpkin. So there's two different ways we can do this. So we can either click on one of these orbs up here. So in this case the front view is actually the negative Y orb. I click this. It'll just pop us into this view, which is a perfectly, perfectly straight from the front view. As soon as I rotate my camera, it'll pop me back out of that. Because I can only be in a perfect view when I'm in one of these orbs here, if I click X, it's a perfect view from the negative x-direction. And then same thing for the negative Y. So in this case, this is our front view. We can see that up here at the top. Now another way to get into it, which is probably, probably the better way to do it, but this way is fine too. If I rotate out of this to make sure I'm not in the orthographic view anymore, I can hit the Tilde key on my keyboard, which is the sort of little squiggly accent key next to the one and above the tab on your keyboard. If I hit that, it'll bring up a radial menu. And then this has all of the different views that I can choose. So in this case I can choose top, back, right, left, front, bottom. I can jump into my camera, or I can do view selected. So in this case, I'm just going to hit the Tilde key to bring up this menu. So in this case, I'm just going to hover over front and then click that button. We're now going to begin the shaping of the sphere into the general shape of a Pumpkin will be doing this by pushing and pulling the vertices using x-ray mood and proportional editing. Now let's select our pumpkin. And then we can hit tab on our keyboard to enter our edit mode, which is how will we actually moving around these vertices and faces on our sphere to turn it into a Pumpkin. By default, it started us in Face mode. However, we want to be working in vertex mode. So we're just going to hit one on the keyboard to switch into vertex mode. Alternatively, you can just click on each of these symbols to switch into the different modes. Now I mentioned we were gonna be using something called X-Ray mode. Would X-Ray mode does is it allows us to select entirely through the model, to select vertices and faces on the backside of the model as well. So by default, if I just click and drag across this model It looks like it's selected through the entire model here, I've selected all the visible vertices. However, if I rotate my camera, I can see here it only selected what was visible from the view I was at. And that's because we're not in X-Ray mode. To enter your x-ray mode, hit Alt and Z together. And I will put you into an x-ray mode where you can see through this model and it comes sort of like a see-through gray. Now if I do that same thing and I select across the model, we can see here that it selects through the entire model. And that's a really important thing when you're modeling. Because if you're modeling from the front view, so if I hit Tilda and then go to front view modeling from this view and I think I'm selecting through it because I can't see through the model. I'm doing all this work on this side. Soon as I spend my model around, I realize I've only worked in the front side of the model and all of these changes haven't been duplicated on the backside. Which means you'll have to go back through and redo all your work. So it's very important to remember when you're working on your model to go into X-Ray mode, if you're doing things that you want to be done symmetrically across the entire model on both front and back. So we're going to stay in our x-ray mode here for a little while. We won't always need to be an X-ray mode and sometimes will go out of it. But a lot of times, you can almost always default to being an x-ray mode unless there's a reason not being an x-ray mode, at least while you're modeling. The second thing I mentioned, we were using something called proportional editing. Proportional editing is a tool that allows us to move multiple vertices at one time. This makes our model act almost like clay, which makes shaping it a lot easier, especially when we're doing organic shapes. So as a quick example, if I just select one of these vertices here. So I just select this. I switched to my move tool and I move this vertices. We can see here it's just moving this vertices. It's taking this single point and it's moving it by itself. I hit Control Z to undo that. Then I go up here to the top and turn on my proportional editing. Now when I grabbed this, we can see here it's moving a whole bunch of vertices along with it, but not, not all of them all at the same time. So down at the bottom you can see those are moving a lot less. And that's because they're further from the selected object. In this case, this vertices, we can change the amount of influence this has by using our mouse wheel and scrolling up or down to make this influence. So we can see here now we can see this ring either smaller or larger. So the smaller it is, the less influence it'll have. So it'll be a little bit more of a sharp pool. Then the larger it is, the more influence it will have. So it will act a little bit more, like I said, like clay and it'll be a little bit more soft. Again, you'll be using your mouse wheel and you have to do this after you've started moving something, you have to click on something and then start moving it. And then you have the option to adjust the fall off with your mouse wheel up and down. Down will make it larger. Then Up will make it smaller. I'm going to place that and then hit Control Z to undo that. So again, the way you turn on proportional editing is up here. So it's just this little blue bullseye. So when it's blue, that means it's turned on. When it's gray. That means it's turned off. In our case, we're going to turn this back on. Now we can use this to start shaping this Pumpkin. So just double-check that you're in X-Ray mode. So you should be able to S3 your model here. We can see here that I'm seeing this grid through the edge. Also, you can just look up here. So this little blue button here, this is also a way you can toggle x-ray mode on and off. So if it's blue, that means you have it turned on. Now we can begin shaping this. So let's start by dragging, selecting over this bottom vertex. We're gonna pull this up while making our influence here good bit larger because we went, this would be a pretty soft, soft movement here. We're just gonna kinda flatten out the bottom here. We'll pull it up to about here. We can see here now this vertex here is kind of pulling up on the inside of the sphere. Which in real life this is where the bottom is Stem of our Pumpkin would be. Then at the top here, we're going to select this one by drag selecting over it. We can pull this one up a little bit. We're going to make this influence a bit wider. So that shape looks about right now. Now we can pull this one back down with a much smaller influence. We're just going to scroll up when our mouse wheel to make a tinier. We're going to pull that down to about here, a little bit past the first line. Now let's just like widen up the top a little bit so we can just drag select across all of these vertex here, this whole line. Pull this up a little bit about there. Then let's widen the middle here. So we're going to drag select over the middle. And instead of moving this time we're just going to hit S on our keyboard for scale To make this influence a bit wider, then we can just scale this up. We can move that up a little bit. So again, we're just trying to kinda give us a little bit of a sort of maybe a cartoony shape, but a cartoony pumpkin shape. So it's a little bit, it's flat on the top and bottom. It's a little bit wider at the bottom than it is at the top. And it has nice round sides. Now that we're done shaping it, Let's clean up the top of the Pumpkin a little bit. We're going to hit Alt Z to Exit x-ray mode. Then we're going to turn off proportional editing with this little bullseye at the top. Now we can rotate our camera so we can see the top of the Pumpkin. We're gonna do is try to get rid of this really sharp point that we here at the top. We're going to try to flatten this out. We're gonna be doing something called snapping in order to make this nice and even a flat at the top. First, just select this vertex here at the very top. Make sure you have your move tool turned on. We have that turned on. Now we can click this little U-shaped here, which is actually a magnet. In this case. We're going to click this, which turns the magnet on, which is our Snapping. And then this menu here to the right will change what it's snapping to. In our case, we want it to snap to other vertex. So we're going to choose vertex. Now we can go back here. We're just going to grab the blue handle here to move it up in the z-direction. Now whatever we hover over, you can see this little orange dot is following us around. And that's what it's snapping to me. We'll move this around. It's snapping to different vertex. So in our case we want it to snap just to the vertex ring that's just beyond it. If we move over just one of these little vertex here, we can see the little orange dot moves with us. Now when we stop, we can see it's nice and flat here. So it's perfectly lined up with this ring of vertex around it. This will give us a nice flat area for the Stem. Later on though we modeled a sit in. Another. We're done snapping. We can turn that off just by clicking this little icon up here to turn off the magnet. And then one last thing to point out is if the top of your pumpkin here doesn't look exactly like mine, don't worry about it. It really won't matter because we're gonna be doing a bunch of other things that will round out the top of this. So some of you might have the pointy shape at the top here where it comes to a ridge around the top of your Pumpkin. Other people might have a flat top on the Pumpkin where it goes down into this flat spot. It really doesn't matter. Don't worry about it for now. We're going to be smoothing it out anyway. Let's hit tab to exit our edit mode. Now we're going to be applying something called a modifier. We're gonna go over here to this little blue wrench icon, which is our Modifier tab. Let me zoom out here a little bit. We're gonna be adding a modifier that will give our Pumpkin thickness on the inside. So as, as if we have carved out the inside of our pumpkin. And we'll be doing that with a modifier called Solidify. So let's choose Solidify here. So it's in the second column down near the bottom. This modifier will make an exterior or interior shell for your model. Will be using this to give the walls of our Pumpkin some thickness. This will make the carving of the face into the Jack-o'-lantern look a lot better. We can see exactly what this modifiers doing by hitting Alt and Z to enter our x-ray mode. Now we can see here that says a bit of thickness going around the edge of our model. If I just turn off the influence of this modifier here in the viewport just by clicking this little computer monitor. We can see here this is what our model used to look like. So we can see it just has a single orange line going around it, which means it's just a single wall here. Now if I turn this back on, now we can see that our model has some thickness. Now in this case it's much too thin. A Jack-o'-lantern would have a lot thicker walls than this. So we can change the thickness of these walls by going over here and changing the thickness value. We're going to set this to 0.08 and then hit Enter. Now we can see here that it's made the walls of our Jack-o'-lantern a lot thicker and a lot more realistic. Now that are pumpkin has thickness. Let's apply this modifier to the model. So it collapses these changes down directly into the model. We're gonna be doing that by just clicking this little drop-down menu here on the solidify modifier. Then clicking Apply. When we do that, this modifier disappears, but it leaves behind the effect of the modifiers still baked into the model. If we hadn't applied that modifier when we hit Tab to go into edit mode would have actually made that thickness disappear. Make sure you're now in edit mode. We're going to hit Alt and Z to exit our x-ray mode me because we won't need that, are actually make this part a little bit harder if we're in X-ray. So we want to be outside of that. Then we're going to switch into face mode by hitting three on my keyboard, or just clicking this little icon here at the top. We're going to start modeling the ridges of our Pumpkin now by extruding faces outward. The way we're going to be doing that is by selecting bands vertically on this Pumpkin, then extruding them outward to give them some depth. So let's start that process now So we're gonna hold down Shift and Alt at the same time. Then we can click on one of these faces. So if we click this face here, we can see it's selected vertically. Now in this case, if you select a little bit too far to the side, it will select horizontally instead, the way to prevent that is to select the sort of between the line of the loop that you'd liked it to follow. So if I select too far left, it'll select horizontally. If I select the top or the bottom, it'll select vertically. Again with Shift and Alt held down. We're going to click here. Then here. The ALT is what is allowing it to select the band, so the vertical or horizontal band. And then holding down shift means that we can add to the selection just by clicking more of those bands. The first selection you make, you want to line up with one of these axes here. So in this case, I picked the part where it ran directly into the green AXI. We have that one selected and now we're going to go around to each of these four sides and do the same thing. So remember it hold down Alt and Shift at the same time. Or else you'll lose your original selection. Going to click here and here. So we can see we have two bands selected. Again. Now when the green side Alt and Shift select it, and then I'm going to left-click Alt and Shift left-click both of these. Now I have four of these bands selected. Now going to select the middle band between all of these as well. So still holding down those modifiers, we can just go through and select the two, leaving a two gap between each of these bands. Now we have our Pumpkin selected here and we have vertical bands selected all way around and sort of a striped pattern. Now with all of these selected, we can hit Alt and E to bring up our extrude menu. We're going to choose extrude faces along normals. So what this does is it allows the faces to be extruded along the curve that we originally selected them. If we had just hit E to extrude and didn't bring up that menu, they would have all extruded in the exact same direction. So they would have all gone in the x-direction, are all in the Y. So in our case, we want them to actually all follow the curvature that we originally selected them from. So while this is moving, we can just move this out to just kind of an arbitrary measurement here. So about here. And then we can see down here, we're actually able to change what we originally click contract to. We're going to set this offset value here, 2.03 and then hit Enter. We can see now that it's set it to all of these now 2.03 m. With that done, now we can hold Alt and Shift. And then we're gonna go through here and select each one of these that we haven't already selected. So Alt and Shift. And just go around here and select each one of these loops here that we haven't selected. Then you might be thinking, why didn't we just select all of these all of the same time? Why did we do them alternating? And that's because if we had done all of them all at the same time, it would have extruded all of these faces out and it wouldn't have left grooves between them. So by doing them in two different steps and alternating them all the way around the Pumpkin. We're ensuring that we leave the ridge gap between each of these ridges that we're extruding and not just extruding all of the faces all outward, all of the same time. We hit Alt and E again, let's bring up the extrude menu. Extrude faces along normals. Just drag it out to some random value and then go down here, 0.03 and then hit Enter. Now we can see here that if we zoom in a little bit, you can see that we've actually have a little bit of a gap between each of these. And that's because like I said, when we altered them, alternated the selection of them for each ridge. We've imposed these gaps, which is what we want. We want to make ridges on this outside of this Pumpkin. Now we can click off of it, and now we can see we have something that's a lot more pumpkin shape now. Now we can get in the process of smoothing this out. So we're going to hit one on our keyboard to switch into our vertex mode. And then we're going to hit a to select all of the vertex. Now we can right-click and then go down here and choose smooth vertices. What this is doing is essentially just smoothing all of these vertices out by averaging the distances them and pushing and pulling them so that it's smooth as the shape of the model out. And we can adjust the amount of smoothing down here at the bottom left. So make sure you have this menu open. And then we can slide this smoothing value up or down. So if we start it all the way down to zero, it's essentially doing nothing. And we're going to want to turn our as all the way up to one, which will allow it to do a lot of smoothing on this model. We're doing this to round off all of the hard edges we made during the extrusion process with the stone. Now we can just click off the model and see how much more this looks like a pumpkin. Now. Lastly, let's finish off our basic Pumpkin by smoothing off the whole thing using a modifier. So we're going to hit tab to exit our edit mode. We're gonna go over here to our modifier panel. We're going to go to add modifier. We're going to choose subdivision surface. So when we click this, it'll apply this modifier. This modifier adds cuts between each of the edges on your model, then smooths between them. I progressively more and more cuts as you set the subdivision values higher. Over here we can see we have our values set to one into the top. Our value here is just showing you what it's going to smooth the viewport as. However, on the bottom it, this is what it's going to use for the smoothing, for the render. If you want your value to always be the same. So if you want it to be what the render looks like as exactly what your view port looks like. Make sure both of these numbers are the same. However, if you need a really high smoothing value, but you don't want your viewport to be really slow because of all the additional polygons it's adding. You can have your viewport value set lower, and then you're render value set to the appropriate value. In our case, we don't need a lot of smoothing for this. We can see already this looks pretty Pumpkin like. We're just going to have both of these here set to two. Other Pumpkin, nice and smooth. Let's apply this modifier as well. So commits these changes and bakes them into the model. We're gonna go up here, then click the drop-down arrow, and then choose Apply. Now in most cases you wouldn't want to be constantly applying your modifiers here model for normal projects. However, in the case of this Jack-o'-lantern, there's a very specific order of things we need to do in order to make sure that the carving process, so putting the face and the Pumpkin goes smoothly. So that's why we're applying most of these modifiers. Under most circumstances, you can usually leave your modifiers just default as I, as they are just on the model. So you don't always have to collapse them in because once you've collapsed them, you can no longer edit them. I just want to make sure that you know that this isn't a super typical process. We're not always in every model always want to collapse your modifiers in. But in the case of this Jack-o'-lantern, we are gonna be collapsing them in because it makes the carving of the face a lot easier. In our next lesson, we'll be modeling a simple stem for the top of our Pumpkin. I'll see you there. 4. Modeling the Pumpkin Stem: This lesson, we'll be modeling a simple stem for the top of our Pumpkin. Let's begin. Let's start by hitting Shift and a on our keyboard. Then going over to mesh. Then we're gonna go down to cylinder. So if we can see here and paint the cylinder really large, which is fine, we can change that now. The option box here down at the bottom left before we do anything about moving or clicking or anything, we want to change these values here. We're going to set this to 0.0 for the radius. Then the depth. We're going to set this to 0.15 and then hit Enter. Nobody can see here the little orange highlight here is much more manageable, more of the size of our actual Stem. So let's go over here on the right side where it says cylinder under the Pumpkin collection. We're just going to double-click this name, this stem. Now we can go back to our move tool. Then we're just going to drag this up here to the top of the Pumpkin. We just want the bottom of the stem here to just intersect a little bit into the bottom of the top of the Pumpkin rather. Now we can right-click on this cylinder and then choose Shade smooth. Let's begin now with the shaping of this Stem into something a little bit more Stem shaped instead of this perfect at least smooth cylinder. We're going to hit Tab to go into our edit mode. And then we're going to hit Control and are tend to our cutting mode here. We can see here wherever we place our mouse, it's allowing us to place a yellow cut wherever we click. In this case, we want a cut going horizontally here. We can see this yellow line. We're just going to click once. And that will allow us to place a cut here. And then we can reposition this cut by clicking or by just dragging after we've clicked a place of the first time, you click once when it's yellow to place the cut. Now we can drag it to where we want it. So we're going to move it down here near the bottom. So we're gonna make an edge for this to flare out on the bottom. So we're gonna put it about here. Since we click the second time here, that'll confirm the location of that cut. Now without doing anything else, we're just going to hit Control. Enter. One more time. We're going to hover over this top line up here, get another yellow horizontal line. Click once to place the cut. Then we're going to drag this one down again. And we're going to have it about even in terms of distance with the other one about here. So now we have two cuts here on the bottom, breaking this bottom part up. We're going to hit three on our keyboard to switch into our Face mode. Now we're going to hold Alt and click on one of these bottommost faces here. So we have the bottom one here selected, select it around. And then we can hit S on our keyboard. And we're going to scale this up so that it goes out into these ridges just a little bit. We don't want to super far out. And also if it seems like it's moving too fast, you can just hold down Shift while you're scaling this. And that'll allow it to move a lot slower, a lot more gradual. I'm going to scale mine out to about here. Again, this doesn't need to be perfect. Everybody's pumpkin here is going to just look a little bit different, which is fine. It makes sense. Pumpkins aren't produced on a manufacturing lines, so they would all be a little bit different. We're just going to flare out the bottom here using that scale. Now let's rotate our camera up a little bit. We're going to click on this top face. We're just going to move this down in the z-direction. It's a little too tall right now. That's fine. We can that was the full length of the stem we had there, but we're going to want to pull it down so we can add a little bit of a curve to it. I would pull it down to about here. Then you're going to hit E on your keyboard. This will just allow you to extrude this line upward. So we're going to extrude it up about the same length that it is already. So about double the length that it was about, about there. We can always adjust this after the fact that Let's rotate around. So there were roughly in the front of our Pumpkin. We'll remember that the negative Y. So this little word here. So this is showing us an orientation of actually how we're looking at the scene. So we want to be looking so that the negative Y is the direction that we're looking. This here is the front of our Pumpkin. And then we're just going to hit R. So we're gonna, I'm gonna align myself up here, so I'm looking straight down the flat of the top of the Stem. Going to hit our way. I can just rotate this and I'm just rotating this based on the screen space, which is why I just rotated myself so that I'm roughly flat. This really doesn't need to be perfect. Which is why I didn't bother going into an orthographic view. I'm going to rotate it about there, about 30 ish degrees. Now I can move this over a little bit to add a bit of a curve here. We can see now we're kind of bending this off to the side. I'm going to scale this down a little bit, so tapers a bit at the top because it looks a little weird that it's so thick at the top. Will taper it down to about that. You should look pretty similar to mine right now. Now let's switch into our edge mode by hitting to when the keyboard or clicking this button here. We're going to hold Alt and then click on this horizontal loop here. So this edge. Then we're going to rotate this to almost match this. I would go about half the rotation, so about 15 ish degrees, maybe 20. Through routing, it's silly to match this. Then we can move this after we've rotated it to just make this curve a little less, less abrupt, I guess a little less harsh. We can also scale that down just a little bit so that it continues this taper upward. So it gets slightly smaller as it moves to the top. Now that we have our general shape set up, let's give this a little bit of smoothing. And we're actually going to model the smoothing in rather than just using a modifier to do it right away. We're going to be doing that is by using something called devil. So we're going to hold Alt and then click on this edge here. So we're still in edge mode. Hold down Alt so it's selected this entire loop around. Now we can hit Control in B, tend to our bevel mode. Now that we're in Bevel mode as we move our mouse, it will change the distance of this pebble. This is essentially just cutting off the corner and adding new vertices in between a new edges and new faces. As we move it out and we can change the size of the bevel. Then if we use our mouse wheel. So if we scroll up on our mouse while we're doing this, we can add more roundness to this by adding more cuts. We don't need to add a ton of cuts to this. So I'd say it looks like two cuts is enough. And we're just going to round this off, rounded off to a about, about here. We don't want to run it all the way up to this edge because we're also going to be beveling this and we need some distance in order to bevel this edge. I guess in this case it actually is three segments because it's counting the faces, not the cuts. So it's three segments that we've added to this bevel. Now we're going to hold Alt. Select this edge here, hit Control a and B at the same time to enter bevel mode. We can see it remembered the last settings from our last bevel. So we can just leave that as, as we don't need to add anymore. We're just going to bevel this up. We don't want to run any of these edges into each other and we always want to leave a little bit of a gap. Otherwise we'll end up having overlapping phases. That's nice and level. We're just gonna do this here for the last one. Control and be thinking bevel this one out a little bit further about there. Then this middle one here is our last bubble. We won't be bubbling the top just yet. So let's switch back into our face mode and with three on the keyboard. And then we're gonna be adding the ridges to this Pumpkin Stem. Because of Pumpkin Stem isn't really nice and smooth like this. It also is ridged, just like the Pumpkin itself. Let's deselect these faces we had selected last. We have nothing selected right now. Then we can hold down Alt and Shift and our keyboard, and then select one of these vertical lines here. And in the case of the stem, we're actually going to be doing every other instead of doing two and then skipping to, we're just gonna do one, skip one, and then select another one. So we're just gonna do this all the way around the Pumpkin Stem. So we have this kind of stripy look going all the way around it. We're doing this to break up the grooving on me, the Pumpkin from the stem. As well as the fact that this stem has a bit of a different groove pattern than the Pumpkin does. The Pumpkin is a lot wider and more shallow, whereas the stem is going to have more grooves and they're also going to be a little bit deeper. Now we have all of these selected. We can hit Alt and E. To bring up our extrude menu, we're going to choose extrude faces along with normals, just like we did for the Pumpkin. We can extrude these outward. Down here. We're going to change the offset value 2.00, 80.008 and then hit Enter. And that's the value that we're going to be extremely hazardous. And we're not going to be extruding the in-between values here. We're just going to be extremely every other. We can now switch back into vertex mode using one on the keyboard. We're going to hit a to select all. And now we can right-click, then choose smooth vertices. Then we're again going to turn this all the way up to smoothing value of one. We can see here it's just smooth out this bottom here. And it's also started to collapse the top here. That will be adjusting that with the further modifier here. But don't worry about this for now at the top, with the stem smoothed out, we can go back into face mode. We're just gonna hit three on the keyboard. We're going to select just this top face here. Then we're going to hit I on our keyboard for inset. We're going to inset this face here and we don't need to. Instead it all way down to the middle, but we just want to insert it a good bit. About half the distance may be of the diameter here. So something like mine. And that's going to make sure that our next modifier, the subdivision surface, which is what we use to smooth the Pumpkin out in the last one, doesn't crush the top here. So the subdivision surface kind of gets weird If you just have a huge face here with no cuts or any vertices or anything in it. So by adding this inset here, we've made sure that the subdivision surface knows where to stop. It's going to smooth up to this point. Then it should, for the most part, leave this part here alone. Now we can hit tab to exit our edit mode. We're going to go over here to our modifier panel. The little blue wrench icon, click Add Modifier. Then we're going to choose subdivision surface. We can see here we really don't need to smooth at much more than what we see in the viewport, which is one smoothing. We can turn down the render value down to one. So we have both of these set to one, which means they're both identical now, both render end viewport. I think that's enough. Since we won't be doing any further modeling on this Stem, we don't need to collapse this modifier into it. So in this case, we can just leave the modifier as is and let the modifier work on the model without collapsing it into it. Now if we zoom out here and we can deselect, can see here that are pumpkin is looking sort of like a regular pumpkin. Now, it's now in the next lesson, we'll be Carving the face into our Jacqueline. I'll see you there. 5. Carving the Jack o' lantern's Face!: In this lesson, we'll be using a modifier to carve out our Jack-o'-lantern's Face. Let's begin. The first thing we need to do is hit Shift and a to bring up our Add Menu and then go to Mesh and then cube. So we can see here as soon as you make R cube, it's gigantic, which is fine. We're just going to change the size here, down at the bottom left and the option box, change the size from 2 m, two instead, 0.15 m, then hit Enter. Then we're good. So now we can move this box here forward to the front of our, our pumpkin here, which will remember is the negative Y side. This side here is the front. Now we have it out in front of our Pumpkin. We're going to make this cube into a triangle, which we're going to use for both of the eyes, as well as the nose of our Jack-o'-lantern. They were gonna do this by going into the edit mode and using tab. Then we're going to switch to our vertex mode by using either one on the keyboard or just clicking the icon here at the top. Now we want to select the front two pairs of vertices. So we don't want to select all of the top ones, we just want to select to front ones. And then after we're done with these, then we'll be selecting the two back. Let's start with the front. So I'm just gonna drag select over both of these. So make sure you have both the front vertices selected and nothing else. With those selected. Now we can hit M on our keyboard for Merge. And then we're going to choose Merge at center. That's gonna do is combined both of these vertices into one single vertices at the center point between them. So you can see now we have a triangular here on the front, but we need to do that on the back. So let's just select both of these. We're going to M again and then merge at center. So now we have a nice sort of prism shape that we're gonna be using for the eyes for a Jack-o'-lantern as well as we're going to scale this down to use it for the nose. Now we can hit tab to exit our edit mode. Now we're gonna go back into our front view. Again, we can either just click on this little negative Y bubble at the top, or we can hit the Tilde key and then choose the front view. Okay, so now we want to move this I, this I objects. Now it's roughly where we'd like. The first is, the one thing we have to consider is how thick are the walls on the inside? So we're probably gonna wanna go into our x-ray mode using ALT and Z. And then make sure that we don't drag the eyes so far outside of the walls that when we cut this through and actually cut into the walls, we want to essentially just punch straight through one side of the walls without intersecting any of the others. With your X-ray mode on, just make sure any of your face elements stay with inside this smaller cavity on the inside. That'll make sure that when we go through and cut out these individual elements that we don't run into an any weird intersections here with the thickness of the wall going backwards. We're just going to find a nice spot for I. This is kind of personal preference, but I would suggest you have it roughly where I add mine. We'll say right about there as fine. Now let's make a duplicate of this. I, we're going to hit Shift and D to start the duplicating process. And then we're going to hit X to make sure that it binds it just to the x-axis so we can move it just horizontally. We're going to place this roughly where the other one was. Then we're gonna go back here and make sure that these are exact, but just kinda get it somewhere in the right spot. Now, just decide which of these eyes you think looks better in terms of the center point. So how far it is away from the center. We'll say the left eye in our case here, looks the best. With that selected. Now I can hit N on my keyboard to bring up this side menu. Then up here I can see that the X value is negative 0.12 and then a bunch of smaller numbers. So we don't have to really worry about that. Let's just make this 0.12. It's a nice even number. So we know that it's shifted negative 0.12 m to the left. If we want to make sure that the right eye is exactly as far away from the center point is this one is we can just copy this number. So I just click it control C. Now I can click the other eye and we can see here this one was shifted a little bit too far over. So I'm just going to click here, paste that number in which with Control V. And then I just need to get rid of this negative, that weight stays on the right side of the Pumpkin instead of going to the left. It's now if I get rid of the negative and then hit Enter, I know that these eyes are perfectly symmetrical. They're both exactly 0.12 on either side of the center blue line. It's now let's create the nose. We're gonna hit Shift and D with either one of these is selected. It doesn't matter which. We're just going to move it down roughly where the nose is. Now we'll notice this nose is really big and it doesn't really leave much room for the mouth. So first let's make sure this nose a bit smaller. So we're gonna go over here with this side menu. Still open, which is N. By the way, just make sure you have that open So down here at the scale, we're just going to click and hold on the X and then drag down to highlight all three of these at the same time. So click and hold on the X dragged down and that'll highlight all of them at the same time. And now whatever number we type in here, which in our case we're going to type in 0.6 and then hit Enter. It'll change all of these values all at the same time. That way we don't have to go through and hand type each one of these N. So make sure your nose is scaled down to 0.6 for the scale to make it a bit smaller. Then also we want to make sure that this is exactly in the center. So right now we can see it's almost centered. But we just want to type in for the X value, just type in zero. But they zeroed out. Now let's zoom in here. And then we're just going to drag this notice directly up and just the z-direction. And we basically just want to have it line up with the bottom of the eye. And this really doesn't need to be perfect. Just have it visually lined up. So you want this bottom line to match with the top point of the nose. Will pull it about here. We can see here that the bottom of these eyes are just above them. This grid line for me, it might be different for you, Don't worry about that, but you might be when to use your grid as an example of roughly what would be equal. I'm just going to have mine go a little bit past the grid. Means that they're pretty much lined up with the eyes and the nose done. Now let's begin the mouth. This case, we're actually going to rotate our camera and to get out of the orthographic view, the front view, we're going to make another cube. So we can just hit shift and a to bring up that menu, go to Mesh, and then choose cube. Now it's going to remember the last settings you had, Which is fine for this. So we're going to leave it at 0.15 m. Then we're just going to drag this again outside the Pumpkin here to the front. Now we can go back into our front view again using either the negative bubble, negative Y bubble rather, or the Tilda, and then choose for it. Now let's zoom in here. And then we're just going to slide this mouth down below the nose. Remember we wanna make sure we stay within this interior cavity of the Pumpkin here. So just make sure you don't go past this. So probably about halfway, kind of equalized the distance from the top and the bottom. So I think right about here, it looks good. We can now hit N to hide the side menu we won't be using it for right now. So just give us some more visual real estate here. Let me zoom in a bit on the mouth. Collapse this. Okay, So we're gonna be now shaping this mouth here into the general generic Jack-o'-lantern smile with the two teeth here. In the process I'm going to be taking you through is going to feel a little bit mechanical. It's going to feel a little bit abstracted for you. But the processes I'm doing here can be applied to pretty much any Jack-o'-lantern geometric cut mouth for any the Jack-o'-lantern's you might want to make for the class project. The only reason this is going to feel so mechanical is because I've done this already. In my testing here. I've went through and recorded all the values that are used for extrusions and movements and stuff. So the mouth I'm making now with you is going to be identical to the mouth that I've made for my my tests. Now you wouldn't have to do this mechanically for your mouths. You can just wing it and just do whatever looks good to you. But for the purposes of this tutorial and to make it a little bit easier to follow along, we'll be going step-by-step to recreate the mouth that I've already made. So let's start by hitting tab on our keyboard to enter the edit mode here. For these this mouth cube. Then make sure you're also an x-ray mode, which again is Alt Z. To make sure that you're in X-Ray mode. Or just click this little button up here. Okay, so now you need to switch into face mode, which is three on the keyboard or this little button here. Then we're going to be selecting from the front view here. So what I'm doing here is a way to get around having to switch back and forth between views. But you could also just as easily do this from a perspective view and then go back into the front view. But I'll show you how to do it just from the front view here that we know how to do it without having to jump around views. So start by just clicking off of the cube to deselect all of the faces. Then we're going to click and drag across the center of our cube here. So we're going to select basically everything going around the cube, but not the top of the bottom. Now we're going to hold down control, which will now de-select the things that we drag select over. By holding control and dragging over this. We've now de-selected in the middle. So essentially what we've done is we've only selected the far left and the far-right face while de-selecting everything else. Now that wouldn't have been possible. Typically from the front view without doing that sort of drag select method where we select a bunch and then deselect. But you don't have to follow along here. But essentially all we've actually done is if you were just in your perspective view here, you could have just selected this will shift Selected that and then gone back into your front view. So it's a matter of preference. I just don't like hopping views all the time. So I usually try to stay in the front view if I can. Now we have both of these faces selected. We're going to hit Holt and then E to bring up our extrude menu. Then we're going to choose extrude faces along normals. Now we can start to extrude these outward. So we're going to extrude these outward to make the smile a little bit bigger. Then here at the bottom, make sure you have this option box open. And the offset value that we went down here is 0.105. And then hit Enter without value set, or actually just going to hit Alt E again to bring up the extrude menu again. And then we're going to choose extrude faces along normals again. And we're going to extrude this out a little bit here. Then we're going to change the offset for this new extrude to 0.058 and then hit Enter. Now we've extruded out twice here. We have two more cuts that we can work with. Now let's switch into our vertex mode by hitting one on the keyboard or just clicking this symbol. And then we're going to pull this top here into the sort of a rounded shape here to create the top of the smile. So I'm gonna hold, just drag select over this left corner here. Then I'm gonna hold shift and drag select over the right corner here. So I only have these two corners selected. Now I can pull these up. We're going to pull it up to probably about the midpoint of the nose. So about as high as the halfway point in the nose, right about there. Then we can do the same thing here. So we're going to just drag select over these to deselect the others, and then select these new hold Shift to add to that selection to grab the other side. Then we're going to pull these up a little bit less to make like a rounded curve here. And we can see here that this is making the top part of the smile for the Jack-o'-lantern. So about there, maybe a little bit below the bottom of your nose. You can see here I've kept it a little bit below that. Now let's switch to edge mode, be either clicking this or hitting to when the keyboard. Now we're going to drag select over this portion here. So we're getting all the edges going around this. And then we're going to hold Shift. And then select this side as well. So we have both sides selected. Now we can right-click and then just choose sub-divide, which is just going to add a single cut down here through the middle. Now we could change that if we wanted to. In this case, we're going to leave it on one. But if for some reason you needed to and you could add more cuts by changing this value down here. Again, we're just going to be using one for this. Now let's go back into our vertex mode. By hitting one on the keyboard. Then we're going to select the top of each of these, these cuts that we just made. So I drag select over this hold Shift, drag select over this one. Then we're going to pull these down to create the teeth. Now we can see it's starting to turn into an actual mouth. Now, these teeth here you can pull down as relatively as far as you like. You don't want to make them really, really long because it's going to make the bottom section a little bit harder to create, but you could pull them down relatively far. I'm going to pull mine down, make them a little bit shorter. So it's a little less of a spooky look for the mouth. I'll keep them a little shorter, a little more blunt. So that looks pretty good. Now let's rotate our camera out of this orthographic view so we can see the side. Then we're gonna be combining some of these vertices here to make, making the rounded edge on this mountain bit easier. So let's zoom in here. We're going to start by drag selecting over just these front two bottom ones. So we want the, the cut that's responsible for the point of the tooth, as well as the cut to the left of, in this case suggests these front two. Then we're going to hit M, merge at center. That'll merge those at center. Then we're gonna do the same thing here on the back. So just drag select over just these two. We only want these two selected it M and then merge at sensor. Now we just want to do the same thing over here. You might be wondering why we're not just selecting all of them. I'll show you. Why don't I don't follow along with this. So if I select all of these here and hit em and then merge it center, it's going to collapse all of them inward. To avoid that, we need to make sure we're only selecting the ones that are on the same plane. So in this case these are both parallel to each other. We can select just these. And then we're going to hit M rigid center. Then just do the back M merge and center. Okay, so now we've combined these lines here. And that's going to allow us to move them in towards the center to give us more room to round the edge here. Let's drag select over the right-side here to get both of these new ones that we just merged, they're going to hold Shift and drag select over these as well. Now we have both sides selected. Now we can use our scale tool. We're going to switch to the scale tool over here on the left. We're just going to scale these in the red or the x-direction. We're going to scale them in We're gonna move them pretty close to the center line. We don't want to run them over the line here. We don't want to run them directly on top of it. We want to have it stopped just before it. So right about there. Now, this will change depending on how long you made your teeth. The longer you made your teeth, the less you're going to be able to move this in, the shorter you made your teeth that further you'll be able to move it. Now, either case, rather they're short or long. You don't want this to overlap. If your teeth are a bit longer than mine, you're not gonna be able to move this over as far because it'll start intersecting the tip of your teeth. Move this over as far as you can without intersecting either the tip of the teeth or going over top of this line here at the bottom. So in my case, I can move them to about here. And as long as you followed a pretty similar length through your teeth, you should be able to get yours to about here as well. Now let's switch into our edge mode. We're going to hit two on the keyboard. And we're going to select both of these corner edges. So I'm gonna select the one hold Shift to select the other one to add to the selection. Now I have both of these selection. Then we're going to hit Control and be, to start beveling like we did before. We're going to bevel this pretty much as far as we can write about the same, same deal here. You can only bevel it as far as these lines go. You don't want anything to overlap. So I'm gonna move mine to about here. And then we can move up on our mouse wheel. So if you scroll up, it'll start adding more cuts. And we're going to add probably around 25 cuts to make it sure it's nice and smooth. We can see down here at the very bottom center, it shows you the amount of cuts. I'm not sure if you can see that number scrolling around down at the bottom it says segments. We'll do 25 segments. And then don't worry if you didn't get exactly 25 here because you can always change it on the option box here. So if you didn't get 25, once this option box pops up, if it didn't pop up and if it's, if it's collapsed, you can just click this little arrow here to open this up. Either way you should see the word bevel down here. Regardless of whether the option box is open or not, you can just open it up and then just type in 25 and then hit Enter. So with that done, we can now hit tab to exit our edit mode. Then we're going to also hit Alt and Z. To exit the X-ray mode. We're going to start smoothing this out. Now. Let's right-click and then choose Shade Smooth, which we can see it makes it smooth, but it also ruins the look of it. It kinda looks really lumpy and kind of oddly weird. So let's, let's change that. We can go down here to this green symbol, which is the object data properties. Once you click this, we can go down to the section called normals. Twirl that open. Then we're going to check on the box called auto smooth. What auto smooth is going to do is by default, when you just do right-click Shade Smooth, it smooths the entire thing out. Visually, it smooths every edge is if you want the entire thing to be smooth. Which works really nice for objects like our Pumpkin, which are relatively round there, doesn't, it doesn't really have any hard edges. So it works fine for that. But these things where it has a combination of smooth parts as well as sharp parts like these corners. Shade Smooth is just going to make the whole thing really smooth and kind of weird looking. So by checking on auto smooth, auto smooth, does it in a little bit more of an intelligent way. So it looks at areas based on an angle threshold. So this, this area or this angle here. And it just tries to figure out like areas here like this here would be nice and smooth. But it knows that this 90 degree angle here should not be smooth. So it's going to keep this area flat. And that's based on this angle threshold. So as we turn this up, more and more of our models start to get smooth until it eventually hits, I believe it stops at 90, actually know it goes to 180. So we can see soon as we went over that 90 threshold, it broke that Face all the way up to 90. It's fine. Now in this case actually, we have some more angles here that it's trying to smooth out. So as we lower this value will start getting that corner back. There. We can see that that corner comes back because it's roughly looks like it's about 40 degrees. This is essentially telling it makes sure you don't smooth anything past this angle threshold for these phases. So we're just going to leave ours at 30. But that's how the auto smooth works and auto smooth, we'll solve a lot of your issues when it comes to a complex shape like this. So again, that's in this little object data properties, eternal open normals and then just check on auto smooth. And then you can set the angle threshold. Now that we have our Jack-o'-lantern face model, we're going to start using these objects to essentially use them as if they're cookie cutters to cut out the Pumpkin. So now we need to start moving these back so that the intersect the walls of the Pumpkin completely. So all the way into the interior cavity and then all the way through to the outside. And then we're gonna be using a modifier eventually to use these up, these shapes here as essentially, it's almost like a cookie cutter. So we're gonna be cutting out the shapes where they intersect. Let's start by going into our x-ray mode, hitting Alt and Z. And we're gonna move this mouth back. We're going to need to start scaling these things here so that All the way through into the central cavity and then all the way to the outside. I'm going to switch to my scale tool here. I'm just going to scale this one up only in the y-direction in this case, don't worry about how skewed this mouth is looking because it only matters what it looks like from the front view. So it looks like here, we have it going all the way through. So I can see here, right here is the inside line and the outside line of the thickness of the Pumpkin. So as long as you've completely gone through that, but it's not intersecting the backside or the inner walls here. You're good. I would make yours about as big as mine. Now I'm going to go back to the nose, move this in, switch to my Scale Tool, and then just do the same thing. They won't all need to be so large. We'll make the nose about there. That's plenty long enough to make sure it goes through the walls. I'm going to drag select over both of these objects. Move them backwards using the Move tool. And then with both of them selected, I can just scale both of them at the same time. Then we're going to switch to our scale tool and scale this only in the y-direction as well. So it looks like now I can see that it's every piece now is intersecting this front wall of our Pumpkin. As long as yours are doing that as well. And we should be ready to start using these as our cookie cutters. But first we need to combine all these objects into one object. That way we don't have to click each one of these to use them as a cookie cutter. With the top I selected. Basically we're just going to select all of these. So you can just drag select all of them without selecting the Pumpkin. You only want these pieces of the face selected. Or you can just select one and then hold shift and select each one as well. So any of those methods work. I'm gonna switch back to my move tool here. Just make sure everything looks good. Make sure it's all intersecting correctly. Then we're going to hit Control and J, which will join these objects together. So you can remember that with the J equaling join in this case. Now we can see here they've all turned into the same color highlight. So they're all the same selection now. And we can look over here on our list. And it just says cube O3 because now they're all combined together. So let's just rename this. We're just going to call this Face and then hit Enter. Eventually we'll be deleting this object, but just to keep it clear for now, we're going to name it face. We can now hit Alt Z to exit our edit or X-Ray mode rather. Then we're going to select the body of our Pumpkin. Then we can go over here to our Modifier Tab to this little blue wrench. Click Add Modifier. And the thing we're going to be adding is the Boolean modifier, which I'm guessing that this is probably the name of the person who invented this modifier. Honestly, I'm really not sure where the name come from, but the Boolean modifier is what we're going to be using as that sort of cookie cutter effects to cut out the face of our Jack-o'-lantern will choose Boolean. And then this is a relatively simple process for this case. So all we're going to do is click the eyedropper here. So this is choosing the object that we're going to use as the cookie cutter. So in this case we're going to be using the face as the cookie cutter for this object. So we'll click that. And we can see it's started doing something here around the face. But we won't be able to see that until we hide this. So we're just going to click the little eyeball up here to hide the face so we can see past it. We can see here now, it's actually cut out the face of our Jack-o'-lantern. Now, in some cases, it really can't tell you exactly why does this, but sometimes on the exact model or solver. So if you see down here by default it's set to exact some time. The exact, we'll just omit a piece. So like you'll be missing one of your eyes for some reason. It will cut out everything else, but it just won't cut out one of the eyes are both eyes or the nose and mouth. If that happens, switch it's a fast and see if that fixes it. If switching It's a fast, doesn't fix it. Try selecting individual parts of your face and just moving them just like a millimeter to the left or right, or up or down. And that will help the Boolean modifier recalculate. It might just be getting confused by a single piece based on the location because of the way the geometry is falling. So just try shifting around any one piece of your face and then go back and see if you're Boolean modifier has updated correctly. We can see around the sides of her face here It cut out the shapes correctly. But it's doing that kind of weird shading where it's getting confused about what should be smooth and what should be flat. And we just learned that the auto smooth can come to the rescue in this case, with our Pumpkin still selected, we're gonna go down here to the object data properties, go down two normals and then just audit our check on auto smooth. We can see here almost like magic. It just gets rid of all of that weirdness and leaves nice smooth flat faces where they should be, and then smooth faces where they should be as well. Then the last thing we're going to do is we're going to bake in this Boolean modifier into the model. So we're just going to go back to our Modifier tab here, the little blue wrench. We're gonna go up here, and then we're going to choose Apply. Click this little, little drop-down arrow, and then choose Apply. Now we've applied these changes to the model. And now when we go into tab to go into our edit mode, we can see that we can actually see this geometry here. Had we not applied that when we hit tab, this would just look like a regular pumpkin again, because it's not looking at the Boolean modifier when we're editing the base mesh, I can hit tab to exit that. Now we're done cutting out the face for our Jack-o'-lantern. We can go up here and then delete the face object as we won't need that anymore. Now we're just left with our pumpkin and then our stem as well. In the next lesson, we'll be modeling the Candle inside of our Jack-o'-lantern, as well as setting up our camera. I'll see you there. 6. Modeling the Candle: In this lesson, we'll be modeling the candle inside of our Jacqueline, as well as setting up our camera. Let's begin. We'll start by hitting Shift and a to create a mesh. And then we're going to choose cylinder for the measurements for our cylinder here. We're going to change these 2.06 for the radius and then 0.13 for the depth. With that done, now we can just right-click and then choose shade smooth. Let's go up to the top here and rename this cylinder to candle instead. You can just double-click on that. Then type in candle. Let's zoom in here on our cylinder and see what we have to work with. It's a little small inside here. We'll have to peak kinda close to this as we model. And we can see here it's doing that kind of weird shading thing where it's, it's smoothing out more than it should. So we're just gonna go down here and turn on our auto smooth. So click your little object, data properties, this little green triangle symbol. Then check on auto smooth. Now let's move our candle down so that the bottom of it intersects with the bottom of our pumpkin here. Because we want it to look like it's sitting on the inside of the pumpkin. So we're just going to slide this down with our Move tool until it just intersects it a little bit. So that's fine that it goes through the bottom a little bit, that's fine. Let's hit Tab to go into our edit mode. And then we're going to hit Control Enter R to start placing a cut. We're gonna be doing a process pretty similar to how we did the stem. It will deviate eventually here soon, but we're going to start out basically recreating the stem. So we're just going to click here to make a horizontal cut. And then we're going to slide it down here to the bottom. We're going to assign it to pout here. So we're going to leave a little bit of space here at the bottom. We're going to hit Control R again to create another cut up here on the top. Click and then slide it down to about here. And then click again to place the cut. Now we can switch into our face mode with three on the keyboard. Then we're going to hold Alt down to make sure we select this loop. We're going to select one of these vertical lines here. That way it selects the horizontal loop rather than the vertical loop. So now we have this entire horizontal loop selected here at the bottom. And we're just going to scale this up by hitting S on our keyboard and then just dragging this out a bit. So we're just kinda trying to flare the bottom of the candle on a little bit to make it look like maybe it's kinda ran down and pulled at the bottom. We're going to be keeping this candle relatively simple. So we're not going to be adding drips or anything, but we just want to give that a little bit more of an interesting shape. And let's rotate up so we can see the top of our candle. We're going to select this top face. Then we'll hit I on our keyboard to inset. And then we're going to inset this face in right about here. So essentially what we're doing here now is going to be making this melted pool here in the middle where the catalyst kind of melted downward. So you want to insert it enough that it looks like the candle is melted, the center of it, but not so little that it looks like it's about to melt the outside. We're giving the candle a bit of like almost like a thickness, like a wall. We've inserted about that much. In this case it was 0.01, but this is more or less just personal preference. Now we're going to hit E to extrude. We're going to extrude this down to make the depth of this kind of melted pool. Just a little bit. In this case. Very little. So 0.009. Okay, with that extruded down, now we can hit S on my keyboard to scale this in, to round this out, because it wouldn't melt it straight down in a straight line. It would melt it in a spherical shape. Something like that. We can see here now we have a very basic blocky shape for our candle. Now let's hit two to switch into our edge mode. And then we're going to hold down Alt and then select this bottom loop here. We're going to select all the way around the loop. Then we're going to hit Control in B. Just start smoothing this out manually with our Bevel. We're going to move this right around here and now I have a lot of cuts leftover from doing the mouth. So I'm going to scroll down on my mouse wheel. So severely less than the amount of cuts here. We really don't need that much detail on this candle. Will do something, something like that. It looks like four segments, I guess is what I'm making about there. Now. I don't want to go too far, just like when we were doing the stem because I'm going to be rounding this as well. If I make this too large, then I won't have any room to run this I'm just going to hold Alt and then select this edge loop. Control will be again the bevel. That will this out pretty close to the edge here. Same amount of segments. Then we can zoom in here at the top. Click that control B. Then same thing here. And you really don't want to go all the way to the edge because then you're not going to be a little too round the inside out. So kinda go about half the distance, right about here. Again, all click the inside, Control B, bevel about there. And then the last one on the inside here, alt, click Control B. Then this one we can round out pretty, pretty far because we want this to look like a little bit of a kind of a smooth melted pool here. So right around there. Now we're pretty much done with modelling and the candle part of it, but we still need to make our flame on the top. Let's hit Tab to exit because we're done modeling the candle at this point. Now we're going to hit shift and a on our keyboard to create a new mesh. Then what we're going to create is called an ecosphere, which is essentially a sphere except it's made up of triangles. So we're gonna go down here so we can see it's gigantic right now, which is why we can't see it. We're actually inside the sphere right now. So we're going to change the radius to 0.03, hit Enter. And now we can see it. It's roughly the size of the flame should be. We're going to change the subdivisions here, which is the amount of triangles that the sphere is created out of, up to four, so that it's a lot smoother and we have more faces to work with. Now we can right-click on this. Choose a Shade Smooth to make it nice and smooth. And then we're going to rename this ecosphere to flame instead. Type in flame. Now we haven't organized. Let's move this flame down so that it intersects with the top of the candle. So it looks like the flame is actually contacting it. Somewhere around there. It's hard to tell exactly whether or not it's intersecting. I guess we can go into our x-ray. So hit Alt and z and then see how much it's intersecting, which even that is pretty faint. So this line here, which you might not even be able to see in the video, is where the bottom of my candle is. I'm just going to pull this up a little bit, I guess around there. Now it's intersected. Now let's start shaping this flame here into something more than just the little, little sphere. Because we want this to look like more of an actual flame. Let's go into our front view by either clicking the negative y bubble or Tilda and then front view. Now we can hit Tab to go into our edit mode for our candle. We're going to switch into our vertex mode with one to start editing vertex. And then we can turn on our proportional editing up here so that we can move this a little bit more organically, something like what we were doing with the pumpkin. Let's start by just zooming in here, just drag selecting over one of these top vertices here. So this is kind of top center one. We want to select that. We're going to start moving this up, but we'll see it start moving. It's going to move the entire thing because we were working with a really large proportional fall off before. Now we're going to scroll up on our mouse wheel to make the proportional editing much, much smaller. We're just going to pull this up until it's relatively flame shaped. Around there. I'm just kinda making like a teardrop shape with this. Now let's add a little bit of a kind of irregularity to the flame. So give it a little bit of an S curve or a little bit of a wiggle to it. So we're just going to drag select over one of these points over here on the side. We're going to grab this little box here, which allows us to move it in both of these directions. We can make our influence a little bit smaller. We're just going to pull this side and a little bit. Then maybe grab the bottom one here, pulled out one in a little bit. And we're just trying to make it look a little bit more natural. Give it a little bit more of a like it's blowing in the wind shape. This is purely personal preference here I would just shape the candle flame into whatever you think looks good. If you want to follow along. This is generally the shape that I'm probably going to leave it at. Once. You're happy with the shape of your candle. You can go up here and turn off your proportional editing. Then we can hit tab to exit our edit mode. Let's rotate here out of our front view. And then we can hit Alt and z to exit our x-ray mode. So at this point we pretty much have our entire Jacqueline and model. There's really no other piece that we need to create. Now we're going to start setting up our camera. And then in future lessons we'll be starting to adding color to this and then letting it as well. So our first step for all of that is going to be placing our camera and a place that makes a nice composition for our render. Let's create a second viewport that we're going to use just to devote to what the camera sees. So we're going to do that by going up to the very top left of our viewport. So next to this button, and we'll notice when we hover at the very top left corner, or mouse turns into a plus sign. Once it's turned into a plus sign Just click and drag, and then we're going to drag to the right to drag out a new viewport here on the left side. We're going to put it about here and we're gonna leave this right side a little bit bigger than the left side. We can always change that. If you eventually find out you want your camera to be a little bit larger, you can just grab the center line and change them. We'll put it about here. Then on this side, we're going to click this little tiny camera button. What that's going to do is show us what this camera that we've left in our scene from the default is currently viewing. Well, notice that our default camera doesn't have a very good view of her Jacqueline. And right now, however, we can reposition it so we get a nicer render. So first let's go over here and we're just going to select our camera. We're going to change the focal length from 55 or 50 mm. Sorry. We're going to change that down to 36 mm, which will make a wider view for our camera, which is essentially just going to make our cameras have a little bit more of a dynamic. Kind of stretched may be distorted. Maybe it's the wrong word, but it's just going to look a little bit better. It's gonna be a little less flat for our final render. And we're going to change that now so that it's already set up so that when we start framing this, we don't frame it with a 50 millimeter lens and then go over here and change it to 36 and then realize we need to re-frame it. You want to decide what your focal length is first and then start framing your shot. Now over here on our left viewport, we're going to hit n while hovering over this. And then we're going to go to our View tab. And we're going to turn on an option here called camera to view. When we check this box. Now when we move our viewport view over here, it will actually move the camera with it. So if we zoom out here, so maybe we can get a view of our camera. So over here you can see our camera. And then as I rotate this view, it also moves our camera with it. Now by default, that wouldn't actually happen. Normally, you would have to move the camera and just move it manually over here and see what the cameras viewing. I find that pretty tedious. So I turn on the setting here to allow me to move it with my camera controls over on this side. Because by default, soon as you rotate out of your camera or as soon as you rotate while in your camera without that checkbox turned on, it just pops you outside of the camera. Kinda like how our front view works. I'm not a huge fan of that, so I like to turn on camera view while I'm inside this camera. And then that allows me to adjust it, basically just how I'm used to moving around within the viewport anyway. Let's work over here on this left side and just work exactly like you normally do using your, your normal movement controls. Where you're going to try to frame up the shot a little bit. I'd like to have the camera a little bit lower than the pumpkin, a little bit lower than the face of the pumpkin at least. So we're kinda looking up at it. I think that'll make the pumpkin look a little bit more dynamic. You can back off a little bit. I'm going to see a little bit more of the face. We want to have our view right about here now. It doesn't have to match mine exactly. But for the purposes of this tutorial, if you've already followed me along and match what I've done here, I would also suggest trying to match this camera angle as well. Zoom out a little bit. You can see this a little bit of a tedious process, but think of how much more tedious this would be with having to move it on this side and then looking to see what it does over here. So this is a very important step because you want the composition of your final render to be nice. But at the same time, it's a little bit annoying having to place it. So I'm going to say right about here is good. Now there is one thing I do want to change, and that's the bottom of this candle. I think this candle could be a little bit shorter in my case. I'm going to leave my view as it is now. Once you get your view set, I would first get your view setup so that the pumpkin looks good. If you want to adjust your candle length. Don't do that until after you've set up your camera view. Once you have your camera view, setup it N to go back to the view and then makes you turn off camera view because you really don't want to accidentally move your camera once you've set it up correctly. So I'm just going to uncheck camera view. Now way I don't accidentally move this camera. It's now I'm going to go back over here on my right side. So I'm essentially doing all my work now on the right side. And then just using this exclusively for viewing my camera. Now that we've unchecked camera to View. And we can also zoom in on this to make the view a little bit bigger over here that you couldn't normally do this with camera view checked on because then you'd actually be zooming your camera in. Once you've turned that off, then you're allowed to zoom in on it again. Okay, so now let's go over here on the right side. I'm going to select my camera or my, sorry, select my candle. Then I'm going to zoom in on that. I think my candles a little bit too tall for this view. I don't like how the top of the flame is getting cut off. So if you've also made your camera or roughly where mine is and your candle is a little bit too tall. That's fine. So we're just going to select our candle, hit tab to enter our edit mode. All z to make sure that we can select through it with our X-ray. Then I'm just going to select all of these top vertices, pull them down to make them a bit shorter. It might shorten the bottom here too. I don't like seeing quite so much of this flare. I'm just going to select all of these, these middle vertices. I'm going to pull those down as well. Now I can hit Tab to exit that. Then I'm going to select my candle flame and then just pull this down to make sure that it is intersecting the candle. And if I zoom in here, I just don't, I don't want the tip of the flame to go past the mouth here I want to see the entirety of the flame. So I think right about there looks good. So as long as yours looks good, like this, you're good. Or if you were fine with your candle being a little bit taller, that's fine too. That's really just personal preference. Going to hit Alt Z to exit my x-ray mode here on the right side. Then I'm going to select the camera. I'm just going to click this little eyeball here, which means it's just going to hide it in this viewport. But it's still, as you can see over here on the left, it doesn't change anything about the camera. I just don't have to see it and I don't accidentally select the camera in the viewport because it's kind of close to our Jacqueline and we don't really want it that close. So we'll just hide it for now. In our next lesson, we'll be adding a little color to our jacket lantern with shaders. I'll see you there. 7. Shading the Jack o' lantern (Part 1): In this lesson, we'll be adding a little color to our Jack-o'-lantern using shaders. Let's begin. Let's start by going up here to our Shading tab and then clicking that. Now that we're in the Shading tab, we can get rid of these left two viewports because we don't really need those. We're just going to go up to the top left of this center viewport here. We're just going to click on that and then drag over top of this viewport to get rid of it. And then the same thing here down at the bottom. Click at the top-left to the bottom right viewport. And then just drag it over to get rid of that one. On the top viewport, click this little camera button here to jump us into our camera view. I can zoom back a little bit here so we can see the entire Pumpkin. Now make sure that you're in the material preview Viewport Shading, Which is this little button here, which is why we're seeing some lighting and also a kind of a blurry background behind it. We want this one selected. And then we're going to click this drop-down here and we're going to change the background that it's using. Hip do is just click on this little orb here, which will change the background. We're going to choose this background here. So the second one in from the left. Then we're going to change some of these parameters here. Let's set the rotation to 100 degrees. Rotate the light, so the rotation of the scene behind it rotating the light direction. Then we click this again to bring that map back up. And then we're going to change the strength down to 0.65 and then hit Enter because it's a little too bright right now. We're just going to dim it by lowering the strength with her temporary lighting setup. Let's begin the shading process. We're going to select the Pumpkin. So we have it selected here in the viewport at the top. Then we can click this New button down here on the bottom. This is going to create a new node group here for this shader on the Pumpkin. First, let's rename this so we can just change this for material a one to instead Pumpkin outside. We're going to start by just creating the outside skin. So the orange outside skin of this Pumpkin, this view port on the bottom is our node editor. So we can zoom in and out on this. We can also click in our middle mouse button here to pan it left and right or up and down. Let's zoom in here. If this is your first time seeing the node system within Blender, let me give you a really simple explanation of how this stuff works. So each of these blocks that we see here are called nodes. They're connected together from the left side towards the right side, so they flow from left to right. Each node has these little dots on them, which are called sockets. Sockets can be connected with wires to pass their properties from left to right. We can see here this little wire that connects these two sockets is passing the properties of this less left node here to the node on the right. By adding new nodes and SOC cutting them into our node system, we can add new properties to our shader. We're going to start working here with this left node, which is the principled be SDF node, which is kinda like the default grab all, catch-all node for making shaders within Blender, it has a whole bunch of different properties and a whole bunch of different sockets. So this is kinda like the hub for all the things that we're going to be creating and plugging into this. Now let's first, let's just change the base color of this mesh here. So right now it's defaulted to wait. We're going to change this to an orange color. So just simply select this little white box here. Then this value here. So you can either go up here to the top and then just click and drag this dot to find a color that you like. Or you can manually type in numbers down here. So if we wanted to match the exact orange that we're going to use for this tutorial, we can just type in here for the hue. So the H is the hue which changes the general color of it. We're going to type in 0.034. For the saturation. We're just going to make this one. So we can just click and drag this as a slider all the way up to one. Then we're going to leave the value at 0.8. This is the orange that we're going to use for the outside of our pumpkin here. Let's explore some of the other settings on this node that we might be using. So as we move down, this node will see a bunch of different settings here, but we're not gonna be using all of these. So I'm only going to focus on the ones that we are actually using. In this case, we'll be using specular, which we're gonna be leaving ours at 0.5. So you don't need to change this value. But essentially what the specular is doing is either increasing or decreasing the reflectivity of our object. By making it a higher number, we can see our Pumpkin gets a little shinier, make, making it lower. It gets much less shiny. In our case, we're just going to leave this at 0.5 and then hit Enter. So our next setting here is roughness, which will also be leaving at 0.5, which is the default But just see you understand what this does. It will either increase or decrease the sharpness of the reflections caused by the specular slider. So if we lower the roughness, we can see our reflections get a lot more sharp so they almost make it look like it's made of glass. So as we lower this, we can see a much, much sharper, more clear reflection. As we increase the roughness. These reflections kind of go away. So it's still reflective, but it's making the reflections on the objects so rough and so blurry that you really can't make out exactly what you're looking at. In our case, we're just going to leave this at 0.5, which is the default. Now we can use our middle mouse button here to pan down. The next setting we're going to talk about is clear coat. So clear coat adds an additional layer of reflection on top of the base reflections. This is similar to the clear coat on a car paint. You can think of this as like a clear, shiny layer laying on top of any other settings. By default, materials start out with no clear coat on them. However, we're going to add a bit of a clear coat to this. To add some more interesting reflections. We're just going to raise this all the way up to one. Now you see here it disappeared for a second. But that's just because it was loading the clear coat on top of it when it comes back. It's back to how it should be. We can see here we've added an additional layer of shininess on top of our Pumpkin. However, we're getting that kind of mirror look way. We can adjust that by changing the clear coat roughness, which only affects the the blurriness or the sharpness of the reflections caused by specifically the clear coat layer. So we're going to change are clear coat roughness 2.3 and then hit Enter. Now we can see here that we have some base level of kind of blurred out reflections from the regular specular and the roughness. And then we're adding an additional layer of clear coat reflection on top of that and making those just a little bit sharper. So we're getting two layers of blurriness and sharpness, which just makes it the material look a little bit more complex, I guess you could say. Now we're done with the clear coat and roughness. We're ready to move on to the next step. The next step for our Pumpkin material is going to be add some bumpiness to the outside of it to make it look a little bit less smooth and fake. So by adding bumpiness, we're just going to make it look a little bit more realistic given that wrinkly bumpiness that a normal Pumpkin would actually have in real life. But in order to do that, we're going to enable a free built-in add-on within Blender, but you don't have to buy this, it's already installed, you just have to enable it. So we're just going to go up here to Edit. And then Preferences. And this menu here, we're gonna go to add-ons. Then the search bar, we're going to type in node, so N ODE. Then we can see here that Node Wrangler is an add-on. Do is just check on this box next to Node Wrangler. Again, this is already pre-installed. Blender, installed it with the whole program. It doesn't cost you anything at additional, you just have to enable it if you want to use it. In this case, we do want to use it. So we're going to enable it. This add-on has a ton of different features. However, we're primarily going to be using it to easily preview some of the noise textures we're applying. This checked on. We can just close this window and now we're ready to use it. Let's zoom out here a little bit on the bottom. We're gonna be working over here on the left side because we're gonna be plugging things into this, that way they flow from left to right. The first thing we're going to do is hit Shift a. And then at the top, where did the search bar is? We're going to type the word bump. We can see here bump, we just select bump. And then when we place it, we can create a new bump node. Now we're going to hit shift and a, again, the search bar here, we're going to type in noise. We want the noise texture, not white noise. So it makes you choose noise texture. Then we're going to place that. Now let's start connecting some of these sockets together. And that way this can connect over to this. First drag your color. So the little dot here just click and drag on the dot. Drag the color over here to the height on the bump map. And then we're going to drag the little normal socket here over to the normal socket on here. And we can see here after doing a little bit of loading, now we've started you started having a very, very bumpy, kind of pretty ugly looking Jack-o'-lantern. That's because we haven't changed any of these settings here. The first setting we're going to change as the strength of the bump, which is why this looks so bumpy down here. So first let's go to the strength value here. And we're just going to click on that. And we're going to type in 0.09 and then hit Enter. So we're using a significantly smaller value than the default. We can see already right away this starts looking a lot more like a pumpkin. We have this kind of lumpiness on the outside of the Pumpkin skin. Now let's use that new add-on that we just enabled the Node Wrangler to preview what this noise texture actually looks like in black and white. We're just going to hold down Control and Shift at the same time. And then we're going to click on this noise texture node. Now when we do this, we can see a little line shoots up. If we zoom out here It shoots over here to this temporary viewer node. So it bypasses everything here in just runs just this, this noise texture directly into the output. So that's what we see up here. This allows us just to get a better idea of what this noise texture actually looks like. Because it's kinda hard to tell what it's doing when you're only seeing the result of it, not the actual image itself. So let's zoom in down here. So the noise texture again, and we can start adjusting these parameters. The way the bump node works is it'll take these black and white values that we see and convert them into height information for a Pumpkin, the white areas are going to pop out of our pumpkin, and the black areas are going to push into our Pumpkin. As we adjust the parameters on this noise texture. Just the amount of black and white in the texture, thereby changing the amount of bump in the height of the bump one that's extra here. So first let's change our scale here. We're gonna make this fairly large, so we're gonna do 25. So by making this number larger, we're actually making the noise itself smaller, which is a backwards way to think of it. But essentially a smaller number for the noise kit texture in the scale will make the noise much larger. Higher number is going to make the noise much smaller. So we're going to have are set to 25. And then we're just going to pull both the detail and the roughness down to zero. So we can see as we pull the detail down to zero, it just adds a little bit more black in. And then we're going to pour roughness down to zero as well. Which is a relatively simple thing here. But we're just going to have both of these zeroed out. Then our scale is set to 25. With these parameters set now, we can hold Control and Shift down, and then click back on this main node, which is our principal would be SDF node, that sort of hub node. So hold down Control and Shift and click on this. Now it'll go back to how it looked before. We can see here. Now we have this general sort of lumpiness to the outside of our Pumpkin. Now it looks a little bit odd right now, and that's because we're not quite done with this. So it's looking a little too strong at the moment, but it'll, it'll kind of dial it back. Once we add another node on top of this, we're now going to add a second layer of bumpiness that will be able to mix together with the first layer to make a more believable Pumpkin shader. Let's zoom in down here. We're going to click and drag over top of both of these nodes and then just move them out to make a little bit more space between. Now let's hit Shift and a at the same time. Then we're going to search, we're going to type in the word mix. Well, we want is a mix RGB node. We're going to place this here. So you can see when a drug that no directly on top of this line and dropped it, that line highlighted first. And then it automatically linked it up for us. So if it didn't do that, you can just manually link it yourself. But anytime you drop an empty node on top of another nodes wire, it will link it up for you. It's just a quick, automatic way to do that. We're seeing up here at the top that are pumpkin is looking pretty weird again, that's because we're not quite done. So it's mixing together values that are all over the place, which is why our Pumpkin looks a little, a little odd. So let's start remedying that. So first let's select our bump node. And then we're going to hit Shift and D to make a duplicate of that bump node. And we can just drag that down here. We're going to plug this normal into the color to channel for this mixed node. So now essentially with this mixed node is doing is it's combining different values together into one value that what we can output that back into the normal. Now let's create another node here. We're going to hit Shift a, go to search. This time we're going to type in mu S. We're gonna be making a Musgrave texture, which is kinda just a different style of noise, is just a different parametric, I guess maybe it's the word for it noise. So we're going to place that node here. And then we're going to plug the height for the Musgrave node into the height of the bump. Now, when this new bump node, we're going to change the value here from 0.092 instead 0.05. This one that's plugged into the Musgrave here is 0.05. And now we can start adjusting the Musgrave texture. We can hit Control and Shift and then click on the Musgrave texture to see what this one looks like. Now let's start changing the parameters down here to see what that changes. So first let's set the scale to eight, which will make it a little bit smaller. We're going to set the detail to five, which just gives it a little bit more of a ragged edge along the edges, a little less smooth. And then we're going to change the dimension to zero. Which is going to make the biggest change here, which is getting rid of a lot of those gray values and making it a lot more splattering and splotchy, which is where we're going to be getting a lot of the lake, kind of micro bumps and little tiny little bumps all over it. With the Musgrave's setup, we can hold Control and Shift and click on the original hub node over here the principle would be SDF. Now we can zoom in on our Pumpkin. See that the outside of this looks a lot more like an actual pumpkin. Now, we have all these kind of like little micro bumps and dots all over it, as well as just a general lumpiness to it. Now the Lighting for this isn't really doing a lot of help for this Pumpkin on the outside. And that's because it's using just a temporary ambient light going around it. The Pumpkin texture is going to look a lot more realistic once we set up our actual lighting and a future lesson. If for some reason you wanted the bump to lean more heavily towards one or the other. You can do that by using the mix shader and by switching the factor. If we slide it all the way to the left, it's going to prefer the color one, which is this one. So it's now using none of color to, which is the Musgrave texture and only color one. And then if I slide it just all the way over to the one value, now it's only using the Musgrave texture and it's not mixing them at all, It's just using the small bumps. So in our case, we're going to still leave this at 0.5. But just in case you wanted it to lean a little heavier into the small bumps or the large bumps. You could do that using this slider. So again, we're just going to leave ours at 0.5. In the next lesson, we'll be finishing the shading of our Jack-o'-lantern. I'll see you there. 8. Shading the Jack o' lantern (Part 2): In this lesson, we'll be finishing the shading on our Jack-o'-lantern. Let's begin. We're going to start working in the layout workspace. Just the basically the default workspace. So we're just gonna go back up here to layout. We can see we're back here now with her Pumpkin selected. We're going to now go over here to the material's property tab, which just gives us a really brief sort of simple view of our material. It doesn't show all the nodes and everything. So we're gonna go back up here and ran and click the little plus button up here on the side. Now what a new material slot to our Pumpkin. The, we're going to click New. We can click here to rename it. We're going to call this Pumpkin. Inside. We'll be using this texture for the inside with a cut portions of our Pumpkin. Let's change the base color for this texture. So we're just going to click this. We'll set the hue to 0.1. Set the saturation to 0.88. And we're going to leave the value at 0.8. So now when our left viewport, we're going to go up to this top bar here. We're going to click in our middle mouse button. So clicking the mouse wheel, then we're going to drag across this bar and that'll allow us to pan this bar over because right now it's being cut off and that's because of this viewport is a little bit smaller than it should be. In this viewport, we're going to switch back into that material view. So we get that temporary lighting over here on the left side. Then we're going to be working here on the right side. First hit tab to enter edit mode here on the right. Then we're going to go into our Face mode with three on the keyboard. What we're going to be doing is selecting all of these interior faces here, just on the inside of the face here. So the actual Jack-o'-lantern's Face, We're gonna be selecting all of these interior polygons that make up this interior of the mouth, the nose, and both eyes. So there's not, unfortunately, there's not really a quick way to do this because the geometry on the outside is a little bit messy because of that cookie cutter baleen method that we did. So we're actually going to have to select these manually. Now there's not too many of them and we can drag select over them so it shouldn't take too long. But we're just going to start by, I'm going to switch up here to just my selection tool that way I don't accidentally move anything. So this little symbol appear is just for selection purposes only. And we can start out just by drag selecting over this bottom here. Then we just wanna make sure that we're as we're rotating around before we select anything new, we hold down Shift so that it adds to the selection. So just follow along with me here and just drag select. In some cases you can just click, you don't need to drag select over these single phases. So we're just gonna go through here holding down Shift when we select to make sure that we add to our selection. Sometimes you can get a better drag select if you rotate your camera like I'm doing, you don't want to just sit in one spot because then some places you can't even see. So you're going to want to rotate around and kinda get it as lined up as possible that we can get all of these polygons selected. Okay, so now I have all of these selected here. This last byte one just shows you the kind of like the last selection of the loop that you did. That's fine. This is selected. And then we're going to make sure we hold down Shift and select all of these interior polygons on the inside of the nose. And the eyes. Rotate around each of these and select all of them. Now you should have all of the interior faces on the inside of the face and the Jack-o'-lantern face selected. When you have those selected, we're going to go over here. We're going to select the Pumpkin inside material. And then we're going to choose a sign. We're assigning this material just to the selection. And we can see once we've done that, that we've actually applied this material over here on the left side. We apply this light yellow material on the inside of the cut. Now our next task is to select the inside of this Pumpkin. However, because of all this stuff being selected, there's not really a super easy way to select this without hiding some faces. So we're going to start by hiding the faces that we currently have selected in order to separate the inside from the outside to make this easier to select, to temporarily hide these faces. This isn't going to delete them or anything adjustment visually hides them. We just hit H on our keyboard for height. Now what these faces hidden? We can just hover over any of these interior faces. So this interior shell of our Pumpkin. So let's just hover over any one of them. And we're going to hit L, which means select the linked. So this is selecting all of these linked faces. Everything that's touching is selected. Now if we didn't hide these interior faces, this would have actually selected the entire Pumpkin because everything is touching, because it would have been bridged by that interior face that we just hid it since we hit them. We don't have to worry about that. Now just make sure that you have the Pumpkin inside material is still selected over here on the right. And then we're going to click Assign again. Now we can hit Alt and H together to reveal all of those hidden faces that we had And now we can just deselect. And we can see over here on the left side that we have. Now we have an orange outside. And then all the yellow is contained just to the inside, like an actual Pumpkin would be. We can now hit tab to exit our edit mode. And now we're going to switch back to the Shading tab. We're gonna go up here and click shading. Then we're going to make sure we have our Pumpkin selected. Now it should by default show down here on the bottom, the Pumpkin inside material. However, for some reason if it doesn't, you can change which slot it's looking at just by clicking up here where it says slot t2. So if you're seeing the Pumpkin outside material here instead just go up to slot two or more. It's a slot one and switch it to slot two. Now we're seeing and working on just the interior of the Pumpkin for this material. And we won't really be changing anything on the principled be SDF node. So we're just going to start by going right into making the bumpiness for the inside. So let's hit Shift and a go to Search type in bump. We're going to make that node. We can zoom in down here. Now. We're going to connect the normal socket on the bump to the normal socket over here on the principled be SDF. Now we can hit shift and a go to search. We're going to type in voronoi, we're going to type in V, or now the very top one here is voronoi texture, which again is kinda like the Musgrave is just a different way to make noise. The noise for this is going to look different than the Musgrave and it's going to look different than the noise texture that we made. But they're all pumping out a black and white image that's basically controlled by numbers. Let's connect the distance down to the height on the bump. And we can see right away, it looks crazy because the strength is very high. So we're going to change this to 0.1 to six. Hit Enter. We can see it's a lot weaker now, we can zoom in here. We can see what we're trying to do here. So this Voronoi texture is creating this kind of scooped outlook. So it almost looks like somebody cut off the top. And then they use a spoon or something and they were scraping at the inside. So you get all these kind of uneven areas where it's been scooped out more than the others, which is what we're going for. Now we're not going to be using this exact parameters. But that's essentially what we're trying to accomplish with this Voronoi. This is Optional again, if you'd like to view exactly what this war know it looks like. We can hold Control and Shift, click on the Voronoi texture and we can see what's causing that. So the black areas here are being pushed in and then the white areas here are being pushed out. When we see this cellular pattern, that, that's what was Kate creating those scooped outlooks. So down in the Voronoi texture, we're going to change the type of Voronoi from F1. We're going to change it to smooth F1. We can see here it just kinda smooth out those scoops. So it gets rid of the kind of hard ridges that we had between them and makes them a little bit smoother. Then we're just going to change the scale from five. We're going to switch that to 15, which makes it a bit smaller. So there's gonna be a lot more scoops, essentially out of the inside of our Pumpkin. With that done, we can hold Control and Shift. Click over here when the principal be S, D, F, and that'll show at the entire texture. Now we can see all these little scoop lines from somebody scooping it out with a spoon or something to smooth out the inside of the Pumpkin. Now we're pretty much done with the actual body of the Pumpkin. We're going to start Texturing the stem. So let's select the stem. Then this case, instead of making a brand new material, we're actually going to be duplicating an old material and then branching it so that we can just start from the base of the old material and use that. Instead of clicking New, make sure you have your Stem selected. So don't click New instead, click this drop-down. This will list all of the materials that are currently in the scene. So we're going to choose Pumpkin outside. Now, this is using the identical clone, an identical copy of the outside, and it's put it on the stem. Now, if we make any changes to this, it's actually going to change the outside of the Pumpkin as well. So in this case, don't follow along. But just for the sake of example, if I tried to make this green, It's going to make the entire pumpkin green. Now I don't want that obviously. So I'm going to Control Z to make it all orange again. And the way I can branch this so that I don't have to worry about them changing each other is by clicking this little number here. So this number two is signifying to us that this exact material, this instance of this material is applied to two different objects. If I want to break that instance and make this its own unique copy with my Stem selected. I just clicked this two here. And now it's gotten rid of that number, saying that this is now a unique material. So I can see it added a 0.001 at the end of this, making this a unique material So let's change the name of this to instead Stem. We know what we're working with here. Then really mostly what we're going to be doing here is changing the color and then maybe some of these parameters down here. So first let's make this Stem green. We're just going to click on this base color. Let's change the hue to 0.26, should give us a green. Then we're gonna make this little less saturated, 0.8 saturation. Then we're going to make it a lot less bright. We're going to type in 0.05 for the value. We can see here I made a much, much darker green, which is a lot closer to the Pumpkin Stem color. This is a relatively small portion of our Pumpkin render. So we don't have to go into too much depth for this. Make it a perfect Pumpkin Stem material because it's gonna be relatively dark once we get to the lighting part. And it's also such a small portion of the render. The last thing we're gonna do is just make this stem a little less reflective by changing the specular value from 0.5 down to 0.3, which will just lower the overall reflection on the stem. Now we can zoom out here. We can move down here to the Candle. So first, let's select the candle flame. With our flames selected, we can click New. We're just going to call this flame so we know what it is. Then we're gonna go all the way down here. So we're not going to change any of the base color. We're actually just going to go down here to the emission. Going to change the emission color. Which emission is essentially just something that is emitting light. So we're changing the color of the light that this is emitting. If it's set to black, that means it's not emitting anything. It's emitting black light, which essentially is nothing. We're going to change this. So the hue, we're going to change this to 0.12. We're going to change the value here. We're doing the value first just so you can actually see the color that we're making. We're on the value here, 0.875. We've brighten this up. Then we're going to change the saturation to 0.9 to five. We've made it into a flaming yellow color. Then the last thing we need to do here is change the brightness of the emission. So this is the color that it's emitting. But we can also change how bright, how brightly, and how strong it's emitting that color. And we're going to make this really high. We're going to set this to 200 because this is gonna be responsible for lighting up the entire inside of our candle, or the Candle rather is responsible for lighting up the entire inside of our Pumpkin. So we need to have this nice and bright so that it fills up the entire pumpkin and then also cast light outside of its mouth and its eyes. Now before we texture the Candle, let's switch our viewport rendering up here to the actual rendered view for the viewport rendering. So we're just going to click this little button here. So we're going to stop using our temporary lighting and instead use the actual lighting and the scene. This will make our viewport much darker. However, it will now render the actual lighting conditions of the scene rather than using those temporary settings that we had set up before. This is a close approximation to what our final render using cycles we'll actually look like. Let's zoom in here on the Candle in this top viewport. Let's zoom in on the top view port here so we can see a better view of the Candle. Now let's select the Candle and click New to create a new material for it. We'll rename this candle. Then hit Enter. Let's zoom out on this node, will go up to the base color. We're just gonna give this a little bit of a kind of a tan color here. So we'll type in 0.14, 0.14 for the hue. Then for the saturation, we'll do 0.5, such as a kind of an ivory color for the Candle. We'll go down here and we're going to switch the roughness to 0.65. Let's make it a little less reflective. Are a little less sharp for the reflections, a little more blurry. Then Lastly, let's make the Candle look a little bit more like wax by adding a property called subsurface scattering. Subsurface scattering allows light to pass through and scatter inside of an object. This effect exists in real life on actual wax. So let's add it to our Candle in 3D. We can do this simply by moving up to the top of this node here. We're going to change the subsurface value here from zero to instead point to and then hit Enter. We can see right away now that this, the brightness of this candle flame is actually going through the thin portion of the top of the Candle. And then as it goes down, it's scattered is less and less until eventually it's not emitting inside the Candle anymore. With our last object textured, we can now switch back to the Layout tab at the top. And then we can switch our view port here on the left. Instead of using the temporary material preview lighting, we can again switch this over to the actual rendered lighting. In the next lesson, we'll be making our lighting a little bit more spooky. I'll see you there. 9. Lighting the Jack o' lantern: In this lesson, we'll be making our lighting a little bit more spooky. Let's begin. First thing you'll wanna do is make sure that your left viewport is using the rendered viewport Rendering. And again to pan this, this bar at the top, just click and hold your middle mouse button. And then you can slide it all the way over so that you can see this viewport Rendering and then choose the furthest right one. Now on the right viewport, we're gonna be doing a lot of our work over here and just looking at the left. Let's create a plane for our Pumpkin to sit on. Let's hit Shift a, go to Mesh, and then choose plane. Now let's hit S and then eight to scale that plane up eight times. So it's much, much bigger. Now we just need to pull this plane down in Z. So the blue handle, we're going to pull it down just so the Pumpkin just slightly intersects it. Right about there. We can see just a little bit of the Pumpkin is poking through. Let's add a really simple material to this Pumpkin. So down here in our material properties tab, once we're in here and we can just click New with the plane selected. We're going to change the base color to black. So we're just going to lower the value all the way down. Then we're gonna go down here to the roughness. And we're just going to set the roughness to 0.2. That'll make this plane reflective down here. So we can see a little bit of a reflection of our Pumpkin in it. With that done, we can actually start adjusting our lighting. Now. The first thing we're going to do for the lighting is by going over to the world Properties tab, which is this little red globe icon here on the right. And we're going to switch this color to black. So what this is doing is this gray value we're seeing here is what's being cast across our entire scene. So again, remember from the emission talk where black is essentially just no light. So if we make this black, now we're only getting lighting from the actual lights and are seen were not getting any of this ambient. Just projected lighting across the entire scene, which is what we want. We want to be able to control everything about our lighting. Now let's go up here to the top-right, and we're going to click the little white box next to the render scene collection. That way any lights we create will be populated into this. Instead of the Pumpkin collection. We're going to select the light that we left in our scene. If you've for some reason, if you deleted the light, that's fine. It's really easy to add a new one. So we can just hit shift and a goto, the bottom here, right here at the bottom center. So let me go to light and then we can choose point. And that'll just add a brand new light here on the origin. And then you're basically back to where we were. So I'm gonna get rid of that late for now. And I'm just going to select the light that wasn't are seen already in which is way up here. Now, we're going to rename this pain light. So MATIN light. So we know that this is the main light for our scene. There are light selected. Let's go over here to the object data properties. So this little green light bulb, we're going to first change the color. So let's switch the color here. We're going to set the hue to 0.075 and then hit Enter. Then we're going to switch the saturation to 0.8 and then hit Enter. Now let's lower the power of this late from 1,000 all the way down to 65. It's going to make it a lot dimmer, but we're also going to be moving this closer so we don't have to worry about that. Then the radius, we're going to make this a bit larger. So it makes the shadows from this light a bit softer. So a larger light, We'll cast more evenly dispersed lighting, but also create less harsh shadows. With all these parameters set. Now we can actually position this late. So we're going to move this down much closer to the Pumpkin. We're going to be placing it to the far right side of it. We don't want it too far in the front because we want most of the lighting to becoming from just the side that we begin, nice shadows being cast by the ridges of the Pumpkin. We can adjust the height of it and maybe we lower it down just a little bit. Somewhere around here. So as long as you're lighting over here looks like mine, you should be fine. If you'd like to know exactly where this light is. These are the parameters here. So it's X is 1.8, Y is 0.001, so pretty much almost zero. Then the Z is 1.06. Okay, I'm gonna hide that. Now we're done with our main light here. We want to add some other additional supporting lights to add some more colors to this. We're going to hit Shift and D to duplicate this light. And we're going to move it over here to the left side Let's change the color of this. So we're going to make this one actually blue. So it has almost like a full moon kind of color to it. On this slide, we're gonna make the hue, hue value here, 0.63, and then it entered the saturation. We're going to make it a little bit more saturated. So 0.93 for the saturation. And then the value we can leave at one for the power. We're going to make that 175 for the power because this blue light has a lot more dim based on the color of it. Then we're going to make the radius even larger. We're going to set this one to a full 1 m so that it's nice and soft. Now we just need to position this late. This one we're going to keep LOW. So maybe about that height. Then we're going to move it backwards a bit as well. We're going to move it behind the Pumpkin, so we won't want a nice reflection on the top-left of it. We don't really want to illuminate much of the center. We want to keep this whole sensory area kind of dark. We're getting some nice orange lighting on this side. And then some kind of almost like blue moonlight coming from behind on the left side. Now let's add some fog towards seen to make the lighting a little bit more dynamic. It's, we're going to go back to the world Properties tab over here. We're going to twirl down the volume. And then we're going to choose wonder none. We're going to switch this instead to the principled volume. So it's right about here, right below the other principled values. We're going to choose principled volume and then click that. We can see right away that are Rendering got a lot darker. But you can also see we have some fall get arsine, kind of giving it that spooky look that we're after. Let's scroll down here on the right side. And we can adjust them as parameters to make the fog look a bit better. So the first thing we're going to change is the density. We're going to switch this just to 0.1. So essentially we're making it a tenth of as dense as it was. So we lessen the amount of overall fog present within our scene. Now, the render itself looks a little bit more like it did bone. Now we have this nice soft background that we're getting from all these lights. Then the last thing we're going to change is the Anisotropy. So this value here is a little bit hard to explain. Essentially it's going to focus the influence of the fog around the late more as you turn the value up. So we can just, let's just start by dragging this up to show you what it does. So as we turn this value higher, we can see that there's less general fog in the scene, but the fog around the lights is a lot stronger. So we don't want it quite that strong. We're going to set ours to 0.7 and then hit Enter. So we're getting a much more vibrant color here on the left side and a little bit less of that kind of just general fog across the entire scene. Now that we have our volumetric fog setup, let's add one more accent light behind the Pumpkin. We're going to have our blue light selected here. Actually, before we duplicate this, Let's rename this light. So we're gonna change this from main light 0.001. We're going to call this blue light. So we know exactly what it is. Now we can duplicate it. So let's hit Shift and D to make a duplicate. We're going to move it here behind the Pumpkin. Then we can start adjusting the parameters of this. So we're going to go back to our material, or sorry, the object data properties. So we're going to click this little green light bulb here. We're going to click on the color and we're going to make this one like a really vibrant sort of like almost like a black light purple. We're going to click the color. We're going to switch the hue 2.7. It entered. We're going to make it fully saturated. So we have this really vibrant purple. We're going to lower the power a bit to 125 watts. Then we're going to set the radius to be much smaller. So it's a lot tinier and more of a sharp light, 2.35 m. So it's much smaller. Now on the right side here, Let's position our light. So it's just behind the Pumpkin above it. And then we're going to lower it down in the Pumpkin as well. Again, you can also use this viewport to move things as well. So now that we're in this viewport, we can just click and drag these things were just making this soft purple glow, filling up this area that was originally just kinda black. If you want this purple glow to be even more like pronounce, you can just increase the power. So if we wanted it to be a bit stronger, you can just click and drag on this and just make that purple glow even stronger behind the Pumpkin. So if you wanted a stronger purple glow, we could go with maybe 200. If you wanted the lower one, you could go with one-to-five. With our lighting done, the only thing left to do is render our Jack-o'-lantern. I'll see you in the next lesson. 10. Rendering the Jack o' lantern: In this lesson, we'll be Rendering the final image of our Jack-o'-lantern. Let's begin. We'll start by doing a quick check when all of our render settings just so we're sure that everything is correct. So let's start by going up to Edit Preferences. We'll go over here to the system tab on the bottom left. And just make sure you have both of your ears options here checked on or however many you have, make sure they're all checked. And then make sure you're using optics if you have the option to or cuda if you don't have the option. Let me can close that. Now we'll go over here to our render properties. So this little camera icon, make sure you have your render engine set to cycles. Your device set to GPU, compute your noise threshold set to 0.1. Max samples sets you 100. For the viewport. Your de-noise is checked on. For our de-noise or we have it sets you Optics. For the renderer. We're going to have it sets up 0.01 for the noise threshold, which means the final render will be less noisy than the viewport was. Then our max samples we have set to 200. De-noise is checked on and or D noisier is set to open image de-noise for the final render. Let's go to our output properties, which looks like a little printer printing out a photo, scroll up to the top and just make sure your resolution is set to 2048. By 2048. Without other way, Let's go up to our Rendering tab at the top. So we're going to switch to the Rendering tab. You can zoom out a little bit. And then this is where we're going to be rendering the image. So there's two ways we can do it. You can either just hit F12 on your keyboard, which will start a single frame render. Or we can go up here too next to the Edit button, choose render and then choose render image. So now we're going to sit here and wait for the render to finish up here we can see where it's counting the samples. Once it reaches 200 samples, the render will be done. And then the, the DMARD noisier will kick in and it'll smooth out all the noise that we've left behind. I'll see you in a moment. Once this renders finished, the render is done and it looks pretty good. But there is one last detail that we can add to make it look even better. We're gonna go up here to our compositing tab. We can go down here to the dope sheet and just drag this down. So grab this little middle line here and make it smaller. And we don't really need the dope sheet for this process. Then we're gonna go over here to the top right and then click and drag out a new viewport from the right side. Now we can just hit N on both of these to hide that side menu. We won't need it on either of them. We're going to switch this right viewport into the image editor. So we can go up here to this little symbol and the top, top-left corner of the rightmost viewport. We're going to click this. We're going to choose Image Editor. Then we can choose this little drop-down here in the middle next to the New button. And we're going to choose viewer node instead of the render results, we're going to choose viewer node. Now we can have that here. Now let's go back to the left viewport. We can choose use nodes, and that will show us our node system for the compositor. And this should look pretty similar to the shader editor that we were working on before. We can just space this out. So we have a little bit more room because we're going to be adding some nodes here. The first thing we want to add is a viewer node. We're going to hit shift and a to bring up the Add menu. And then the search bar just type in. Viewer will create a viewer node in place that here we can see it's gone black right away because this is trying to view the viewer node, but nothing's plugged into it yet. We just need to plug in the image socket into the viewer node. Now we can see it shows up on both. Now, the default workflow is to actually work on top of the image with the image behind it, which is using this backdrop. We don't want to really do that because we already have it. We set it up on the right side to be viewed over here. So we can just click this Backdrop Button to get rid of it. And now over on the right side, we can just zoom out. So I find this a lot easier to work with using it on the right side rather than having to work on top of my image and have things in the way. I'd rather just see the entire image by itself obstructed on the right side. The node that we're going to be adding to add a little bit more of an additional effect to this is called glare. We're going to hit Shift and go to Search and then type in glare, GLA or we can see glare. Then we can just drop this glare node right here on this first line. Now it's only going to hook it up for this one. But we can just drag this socket when the end of the glare node backup to the viewer node so that it's being pumped out into both of these. We can see soon as we do that. Now, our right side, it looks a lot different It has all these streaks going all over it. So essentially what the glare node is doing is you can use it to make light streaks, you can use it to make echoed lighting. Or what we're going to be using it for is just a soft glow, which we're going to be focusing around the flame of the Candle. So we're just adding some bloom and glow to that Candle to make it look a little bit more realistic. Now we're first, we're going to switch the type of glare that it's using. So right now it's set to streaks. There's a bunch of different ones here. So there's ghosts, which does a whole bunch of crazy stuff. There's streaks was the default. And then there's simple star which does what streaks does except it has more of a star shape. But the one we're going to be using is just called fog glow, which is just kind of like bloom. So you can see it's just a nice soft glow coming outside of this. We're going to switch the quality from medium to high, just so it's the highest quality bloom that we can get around this. We can see it's kind of tying it up a little bit. It was getting a little bit messy around the edges because he was trying to glow a little bit too much by changing it to high-quality. It's doing a better job of interpreting what it needs to have glow. And then if you'd like to change the amount of glow, so how, how wide the glow is, you can either make the number larger, which this unfortunately only goes up to nine for some reason it stops at nine. So if you have it set to nine, that'll be the most glow it can have. Or you can set it down to one. And it'll make the global really, really tight and really small, almost basically imperceptible. Actually six. So this is a six to nine sliders. So six to nine is your options. We're going to set ours to eight. I thought that looked fine. We can see we have a nice glow around the flame here, making this flame look a lot more realistic. It gets rid of those hard edges on it and makes it look more like an actual flame. We're also getting a little bit of glow, kind of peeking over the edge of it. And we're seeing a little bit of glow around here on the eyes. Now we can zoom out here, see what our entire render looks like. As long as we're happy with it and we can save it. We're going to want to save it from this view port because this has all the effects applied to it. It's, we're gonna go up to Image and then we're going to choose Save As on the right side over here, and we can change the file format. These are all the different final five-minutes that you can save it as JPEG and PNG would probably be the best. I'm going to choose PNG because it's a little bit higher-quality, quality of an image. And then for the color. So this just changes whether or not it's a black and white image in RGB image or an RGB with alpha image. We don't need the Alpha because this has no Alpha channel in it. So we're just going to switch this to RGB, or going to leave the color depth that eight. And then compression at 15% is fine. It's now down here we can change the name of the file. We're just going to call this Jack, Oh, lantern, underscore 01. That way if we want to make different versions of it from maybe different angles, we can give them different numbers to differentiate them. With our name set, we can just hit Save As image. Now that you've saved your Jack-o'-lantern render, you're ready to share this with all your friends and family on social media. In our next and final lesson, we'll be discussing our Class Project. I'll see you there. 11. Our Class Project!: Congratulations, you've completed your Jack-o'-lantern. Now that you've learned how to make a simple Jack-o'-lantern with me. I'd like you to create a new one of your very own and share it with the class. I recommend you look through Google for some inspiration on what your new Jack-o'-lantern could look like. When you've found one you like, use that image as a reference. Here are a few that caught my eye as I was researching for my class project. I made this goofy fella. This Jack-o'-lantern was created utilizing all of the same techniques we learned during this class. After you've finished your new Jack-o'-lantern, post the render to the project gallery to share with me and all of the other students. I'll personally review each project posted to the gallery and let you know what I love about your project, as well as anything that could use a little bit of adjustment. I can't wait to see what you all come up with. Thank you all so much for taking my class. I really appreciate it. If you enjoyed the class and want to know when I release new ones, please click the Follow button here on Skillshare. Please consider leaving an honest review for the class so you can let other students know if it's worth their valuable time. If you liked this course, please check out my teacher profile. You might find another class that you're interested in. Thanks again, and I hope to see you in another class soon.