Blender 3D for Beginners: Model a Low-poly Sword and Environment | Harry Helps | Skillshare
Drawer
Search

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

Blender 3D for Beginners: Model a Low-poly Sword and Environment

teacher avatar Harry Helps, Professional 3d Artist

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      1:58

    • 2.

      Setting Up Our File

      4:38

    • 3.

      Modeling the Sword Blade

      22:45

    • 4.

      Modeling the Sword Hilt

      21:11

    • 5.

      Modeling the Rock

      23:13

    • 6.

      Modeling the Grass

      28:36

    • 7.

      Texturing the Scene

      34:59

    • 8.

      Lighting the Scene

      23:43

    • 9.

      Creating Our Final Render

      14:13

    • 10.

      Our Class Project!

      1:39

  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

409

Students

45

Projects

About This Class

Hi, my name is Harry and I’m a professional 3d artist with over a decade of experience. I’ve worked most recently as the Studio Director of an award winning architectural visualization studio.

In this course, I’ll walk you through the simple and beginner friendly process of creating a low-poly fantasy sword and environment in Blender.

We’ll be going through the entire process of creating this low-poly fantasy scene from a beginner’s perspective to avoid as much confusion as possible. That means I won’t be skipping any steps or going too fast for you to keep up with me.

We’re using Blender for this tutorial, which is an amazing and totally free 3d software. The only barrier to entry is having a computer to run the software on.

In this class you can expect to learn:

  • Blender Interface and Tools: We’ll learn about many basic tools and interface elements within Blender while creating our low-poly scene.

  • Modeling: To create our sword and environment, we’ll use basic modeling tools and modifiers such as Bevel.

  • Lighting: We’ll set up a dynamic lighting scheme to highlight our low-poly sword and tell a story.

  • Shading: I’ll show you how to make metal, stylized rock and more as we add color to our environment.

  • Rendering: Lastly, we’ll render our final image in Blender so you can share it with your friends and family on social media.

When we’re done you’ll have all the skills you need to create a low-poly fantasy sword of your very own! 

For our Class Project, you'll be doing just that! I’d like you to create a new sword with a unique design and share it with the class!

I’ll personally review every project uploaded to the gallery and give you feedback on what you’ve done fantastic, as well as anything that could use some adjustment.

I hope you’ll join me on this fun beginner’s journey through Blender by making your very own low-poly fantasy sword and environment!

 

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Harry Helps

Professional 3d Artist

Top Teacher


Hi, I'm Harry! I have over a decade of experience in 3d modeling, texturing, animating and post-processing. I've worked for a lot of different types of companies during my career, such as a major MMORPG video game studio, a video production company and an award winning architectural visualization company. I have worked as a Studio Director, Lead 3d Artist, 3d Background Artist, Greenscreen Editor and Intern UI Artist. My professional work has been featured in "3d Artist" magazine with accompanying tutorial content. I have extensive experience with Blender, 3d Max, VRay and Photoshop.

I love sharing my passion for 3d art with anyone wanting to learn!

Get full access to all my classes and thousands more entirely free using this link!See full profile

Level: Beginner

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
    Exceeded!
  • 0%
  • Yes
  • 0%
  • Somewhat
  • 0%
  • Not really
  • 0%

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, my name is Harry and I'm a professional 3d artist with over a decade of experience. I've worked most recently as the Studio Director of an award winning architectural visualization studio, where you're seeing on screen now are examples of my professional work. In this course, I'll walk you through the simple and beginner friendly process of creating a low-poly fantasy sword in Blender will be going through the entire process of creating this low-poly scene from a beginner's perspective to avoid as much confusion as possible. That means I won't be skipping any steps or going too fast for you to keep up with me. We're using Blender for this tutorial, which is an amazing and totally free 3d software, the only barrier to entry is having a computer to run the software on. In this class, you can expect to learn the Blender Interface and it's tools. We'll be learning about the many basic interface elements within Blender while creating our low-poly scene Modeling. To create our sword or environment, we'll be using basic modeling tools and modifiers such as Bevel Lighting. We'll set up a dynamic lighting scheme to highlight our low-poly sword and tell a story. Shading. I'll show you how to make metal, stylized rock and more as we add color to our environment. Lastly, Rendering, we'll render our final image in Blender so you can share it with your friends and family on social media. When we're done, you'll have all the skills you need to create a low-poly fantasy sword of your very own. For our Class Project, you'll be doing just that. I'd like you to create a new sword with a unique design and share it with the class. I'll personally review every project uploaded to the gallery and give you feedback on what you've done fantastic, as well as anything that could use a little bit of adjustment. I hope you'll join me on this fund beginner's journey through Blender by making your very own low-poly fantasy sword. I'll see you in the first lesson. 2. Setting Up Our File: If this is your first time taking a Blender class, I'd highly recommend you start with my complete beginner's guide to Blender first, this class was designed for the absolute beginner to Blender and 3D Art in general, we cover every single necessary topic in order to get you up to speed and running in Blender will accomplish this, but short and focused lessons that cover each topic from a beginner's perspective. Utilizing a well-organized starter file, we end the class with an easy project where you set up and customize your very own cozy camp site. With that out of the way, let's continue with the lesson. In this lesson, we'll be going over some settings to prepare a file for future Rendering. Let's begin to begin with on your splash screen here, we're going to choose the general new file type. Now we'll start by going over here to the render properties tab and clicking on this. It looks like the backside of a digital camera. And it's at the very top of this list on the right. Throughout this class, we'll be going back to this tab to enable different Render Settings. But to start with, let's just go through a few of the ones that we're going to set up to begin with. But that's up here and you'll see the render engine that we're using. In this case, we're going to be using EV, this one. Sure that we get the look that we want for our image, as well as keep our render times the lightening fast. Now if we scroll to the very bottom, the list here on the right, when I go down to where it says color management, twirl that open and then we'll have to scroll down again. Then here where it says view transform. You want to make sure that you have it set to filmic, which should be the default. But if it isn't, switch it to filmic. And then down here where it says, look, we're going to switch this from none to very high contrast. This will just ensure that for our render, the base level of contrast will be very high directly out of blender that we don't have to do any other adjustments. We know right away that the image is going to have very bright brights and very dark darks. Now let's switch to the Output Properties tab, which is up here. It looks like a little printer printing out a little photo. So we can click on this. Now scroll all the way up to the very top. We're going to change the resolution. It's alright now it's set to 1920 by ten at, which is a default HD resolution, which is probably what your monitor is. However, we're going to switch this and we're going to make this a square image. So we're just going to type in 2000, hit Enter, then 2000, and hit Enter. So both the X and Y are now both to set to 2000. And you can see over here that the camera is actually switched to a square aspect ratio. But those few initial settings out of the way, let's make sure we save this file in a location that we can find it again later. So first, go up here to File, and then go down to Save As. Alternatively, you can hit Shift Control and S at the same time and that'll, that'll also do Save As. So I'm going to click Save As here. Now you'll want to navigate to a location that you can find again later. So we're gonna be saving our file here, as well as saving out the image that we're going to produce at the very end of this class, we're going to save it here as well. I would suggest either making a folder on your desktop or saving it in your Documents folder or wherever else you would typically save files that you want to get back to relatively easily. You can use these folders here on the left side here to navigate to the location that you'd like. Now before we save the file, let's give it a new name down here where it says untitled. I'm just going to highlight that. Now we can type in low space, poly space Sword. And then I'm going to put an underscore 01 at the end of this. The reason I'm doing this is just in case where we get to a point where we need to split the file and we want to leave the original file untouched and then maybe try something different, go in a different direction for the new version of it, I can simply just do another Save As and then change the number to say underscore 02. And then I know I have two different unique versions of this file. So just giving it a number right away is an easy way to differentiate between files that might crop up in the future of the name finished. Now we can just click this blue Save As button down here. With these settings changed, we're ready to proceed with the project. In the next lesson, we'll start modeling the Blade of our sword. I'll see you there. 3. Modeling the Sword Blade: In this lesson, we'll be modeling our Sword Blade. Let's begin. Let's start by selecting the default cube here in the middle. It's what is left-click on that. And then we can delete it by either hitting delete or X on our keyboard. And then just choosing delete. Now we're going to hit shift and a at the same time to bring up our Add menu. We're gonna go to Mesh and then go back to cube. I know, I know that seemed pretty redundant, but it's easier to delete the original cube and then make a new one at an exact size than it is to scale down the original cube and habit at some arbitrary size that may or may not match my exact size and the tutorial. So by deleting it and then using this option box down here at the left to very specifically define how large this is. For the size here we're going to type in 0.15 and then hit Enter. We know that everybody's cube following this tutorial is exactly 0.15 m. It's not just kinda close to 0.15 or a little bigger or little smaller. We know everybody following this is using this exact same size. If you don't see this option box down here, it might be collapsed. So yours might look more like this. And if that's the case, just click this little arrow. That'll twirl that open and allow you to change these sizes. Now that we're done resizing this cube, Let's go up here to the top right where it says cube. We're just going to double-click on that and we'll rename this Blade BL ADE, then hit Enter. Now before we get into Adjusting this cube into a Sword Blade, let's get Our File organized. Start by making sure that you have the new cube selected either in this list or in the viewport. Either one matte doesn't matter. Now we're going to hit M on our keyboard. That'll bring up the Move To Collection option box. So we're going to choose here new collection. Then it'll ask us what the name of the new collection is. And we're going to type in Sword and environment. And you can shorten this up if you want, if you don't want to type out the whole word, but sword and environment and then hit. Okay. So we can see over here on the right side that now this Blade object is now been moved into a collection code Sword and Environment. Now we know going forward that all of our sword and environment parts, all of the models that comprise those two elements will go inside this collection. Now let's go back up here to the original collection that's just called collection currently, that has our camera and our default light inside it. We're going to double-click on that and we're going to rename that Render Scene. And then hit Enter. So we know anything that in regards to our render scene will go in here. This will be things like lights as well as our camera. Then the last thing we wanna do is click on this little white box next to the Sword and Environment collection that won't share any brand new model that we create defaults going into this collection rather than the original render Scene Collection. It just saves us a step of having to drag things from one collection to the other. Basically from now on, as long as this little box is highlighted, anything we create brand new, we'll just go right into this collection. Now we can begin shaping our cube into a Sword Blade. So to start with, make sure you have the cube selected. So you can either select it over here on the list where you can just select it in the viewport. Now we can zoom in here and we can see the cube is much smaller, but that's because we want to make this sword sort of somewhat realistic in terms of its size. So we're going to be making a very cartoony sword. But the Sword size over the overall like World size, we want to keep somewhat realistic. Now that we've zoomed into the cube, we can hit N on our keyboard to bring up our side menu. Then you're gonna wanna go up here to the item tab, which is the very top one. Then we're gonna go down to the scale section. And for the Z scale, we're going to type in 0.05 and then hit Enter. Now we can see here that it's squished R cubed down to the thickness that we want the edge of our Blade. So essentially right now we're, we're flattening this entire cube out so that it's as thick as we want the Sword of the cutting edge on the sides of our Blade. It's relatively thin right now. Now will be thickening the middle of it up to make it look more like a, kind of like a fantasy cartoon style sword. But this is how thick we'd like our edge. Now before we close this side menu out, we're going to hit Control and a the same time to bring up our apply menu. And I want you to notice how the scale currently. So I'm going to mouse over this first. So over here, right now it says the scale for the X and Y is one because we didn't adjust that, but our scale for our Z is 0.05. So Blender currently knows that we squished this object down really, really small and just the Z. However, if we hit control and a to bring up our apply menu We choose scale. Will now see that Blender now thinks that this is the original full-sized one scale, like 100% scaled objects. So we've now told blender to apply the scale and now consider this current shape, the default size. Why that's important is for further on, some things that you do when you're modeling, such as beveling, is going to take into account how much an object has been scaled. So if it's been scaled really heavily on one direction and you haven't applied that. It's actually going to squish certain modeling operations that you're doing and make them not really look like what you expect them to look like. So to avoid that, after you've squished something down, very often, you'd like to apply it, the actual scale to it. So that Blender now considers this the default size for that object with the scale now applied. So these are all saying one, we can hit N to hide that side menu. Now we can hit tab to enter our edit mode for this cube. Then we're going to hit Alt and Z tensor, our x-ray mode, so that we're able to select through the model. Now, right now it's defaulted us into the face mode, which allows us to select the faces. However, what we want to select all the vertices. So we're going to hit one on our keyboard so that it switches to the vertex mode. Now I want you to drag select over the vertices on the positive Y. So not the negative Y. This would be the negative Y side. I want you just look up here and then select the vertices on the regular Y sin. We're just going to drag select over these. Remember you have to be an X-ray mode in order to select through Model. If you can't see through the model like this and you're not an x-ray mode with this little button highlighted up here, make sure you switch back into X-Ray mode. Now go over here to your left side and select your move tool. So we can now see the move gizmo here. I'm just going to zoom out a little bit here. Now with these vertices selected on the Y side and our move tool turned on, we can just move these just a little bit. It doesn't really matter how far you move these because we're going to be typing in an exact value. Just move it a little bit off to the right. And now we should see this option box. And again, if you don't see the option box, if it looks more like this, just click this little arrow here and that'll make it larger. So you can actually type in values. In the value we want to type in here is for the y-value, just type in one, hit Enter, and that will move at exactly 1 m to the right, or in this case the y-direction with that first move made. Now let's switch into our top view. And there's two ways we can do this. The first and easy way to do this, at least visually, is to go up here and then just click on this little Z bubble here. And when we click that, it'll put us into a perfectly top view. This is an orthographic top view. When you're in any one of your orthographic views. However, the only thing you can do as pan, if you try to rotate your camera at all, you can see it immediately pops you out of that orthographic view and goes back to your perspective view. So that's one way to get into any one of your orthographic views. You can just click on the corresponding bubble and it will look at your model from that specific direction. The other way you can do that is by hitting the Tilda key, which is the key above your tab key. And to the left of the one key on your keyboard. It's a write-up the top-left of your keyboard below the escape key as well. It's kind of in that little plus sign area there. So we're going to hit that. That's going to bring up a radial menu. And we can see here that this has all the different views that we can just choose from from this list here. If we wanted to go into the top view after hitting Tilda to bring up this, we can just mouse over the top view and then click that. And that'll also put us into the top view. I personally would recommend that you try to get used to using the Tilda and the radio menu here to get into your different views. It's just a lot faster and there's a couple of different options here that you don't get on this. But if you'd prefer just to click the bubbles because it's a little bit easier to visualize exactly which view you're going into. That's fine as well. To begin with, just make sure that you're in your top view with all those vertices that we just moves still selected. So if you don't have them selected, it's the side here, the Y side. Just drag select over them to make sure you have all of them selected. We're not going to switch to our scale tool. And then we're gonna be scaling this just in the x-direction. So we're only going to be using this red handle here. If we just click and move this, we can see we start scaling it this way. And again, we don't really need to be perfect here. Just move it to just a little bit so that it brings up the option box down here. Now that we have this option box popped up, we're actually going to type in two for the X scale. So we're going to double the width of the top of our sword So we've typed in two. Now this top of the Sword is nice and wide. Now we can hit two on our keyboard here to switch into our edge mode. So two, and now we can see up here and we've switched to edge mode. And also the view display here has changed. We don't see the vertex anymore. Now we want to drag select over the top center and the bottom center here of our sword. So we're just going to drag from the very top here, all the way down to the very bottom. So that we drag, select and select both of these edges as well as both of these edges. Now we're going to add a cut down the center of our Blade here so that we can give our sword of point. And to do that with both of these, top and the bottom edge is selected, we can right-click. Then we're going to choose sub-divide. When we do this, it's already going to start out by adding a single cut right down the middle, which is all we need. However, if for some reason you needed more, if you were doing a different projects, you would just need to change this number here. We can see on our sword that it's updated the amount of cuts that it's adding. Now for this tutorial, make sure you're only adding a single cut. In this case, just number of cuts should be set to one with that single cut added. Now we can switch back to vertex mode using one on our keyboard. Now we're going to drag select this top center here. So we're selecting these new vertices that we added to the top center of our bleed. We're gonna go back to our move tool. And now we can move these up just a little bit. Then we're going to type in the value that we went here. In this case, we're going to change this y-value, 0.2 m and then hit Enter. Now we've added a point to our sword. So if we zoom out here, it's starting to look a little bit more like a sort of a cartoon fantasy sword. Now that I was sword has a point on it. Let's begin the process of giving our sword a little bit more dimension. Because right now it doesn't really look a ton like a sword because it's completely flat. Right now. It's kind of paper thin. But it has the overall shape of the Sword Blade. We're going to rotate here into our perspective view. And you remember if you're in the top view here and you just rotate out of it, it will immediately pop you back into this perspective view. Now that we're in our perspective view, we can zoom in here down on the point of the Sword. So we want to see about this much. Now we're going to start using a tool called the knife tool. The knife tool ads cuts to the model, but allows you to very specifically place the cuts on your model. It's not like sub-divide worth just kinda mathematically figures out where the middle or the third, the fifth, or whatever it is of your model is. It's actually going to allow you to click your points here. So I'm gonna click from vertex, the vertex and tell it to put a cut exactly from here to here. So start with, we're going to hit K for knife on our keyboard here, and that'll switch us to the knife tool. May can see your mouse has changed now until a little knife. Now we're going to select one of these back vertices here. You'll notice as you move this around, there's a little green box that follows the edge of your model. So what we wanna do is as we mouse over right near this vertex here, we'll see that little green box gets a little red, red outline around it. It's pretty subtle, but you might be able to see it on your screen. And we can tell it, snaps to it as it slides here, just kind of pop. It's lapse rate to this vertex here. We want to click from this vertex with it's snapped on it. So the green box with a little red outline on it, we're going to click once. Now we can see here we've chosen our first point. Now we need to choose the next point for this cut. We're gonna go all the way down here. So this next vertex, wait until it snaps. And once that snapped onto that, we can click again. And now we've placed our first cut. Now that we've placed this cut, we can right-click to stop this chain of cuts that were making. So that's our first cut and we've made here, I'm going to rotate down underneath our model because we want to see the bottom of the Sword and, and mimic the same cut on the bottom. We're going just gonna do the same process again. It doesn't really matter whether you start from the back of the front, whichever you find easier. I'm just going to start from the back here. Mouseover, this vertex, wait for it to snap. Snapped onto it. Now I'm just going to drag it to the front. Wait until it snaps again, and then click. Now I can right-click again to stop cutting on that same exact contiguous line. Now with both of our cuts placed, we can hit space on our keyboard to commit those cuts. By hitting the spacebar retell the knife tool that we're done making cuts. We're not going to be making anymore. And now it should actually apply those cuts to our model with those cuts placed. Now let's actually give our Blade some thickness. So first we're going to switch over here to our scale tool. And we're going to drag select over these two new points that we just created. With those two new points selected. We can now scale this just in the blue direction, which in this case is our Z. We're just going to scale this just a little bit up in the Z until we get this little option box down here. Then we're going to type in an exact value For the Z scale, in this case, we're going to use 7.5 and then hit Enter. We can see here now that the end of the blade is much, much thicker. However, as it tapers back, it goes back to being perfectly flat at the end. Now at the end here, we're going to select both of these vertex. So the two and the center at the bottom of our Blade. Again, we're just going to scale them just a little bit in the Z so we can get the option box. For this Z value. We're going to type in a smaller number. We're going to use 3.5 and then hit Enter. Let's now the back of our Blade does have a little bit of thickness. It's not perfectly flat at the back, but it is thicker at the front. Again, we're doing this to keep this kind of stylized, video gamey fantasy look for our sword. Now the final thing we wanna do for our sword here is to make the front of it not quite so boxy right now. It has the overall thickness that we want and the general shape that we want. But I'm not a huge fan of these hard corners we have at the end. I want to make this round so that's a little bit more soft here at the edge. So let's switch to our Edge mode using two on the keyboard. So we're now in edge mode up here. Now we're going to hold down Alt on our keyboard. And then click on this edge here. So hold left-click. And by holding down the Alt key, we're telling blender to select this entire edge loop going around this object, had we not held down the Alt key. So you don't have to follow along here. This is just an example. If we didn't hold down Alt, it would just click and select a single edge by, by holding down the Alt key. It tells Blender that we want to select the entire loop going around the model. Now that we have this edge selected going all the way around our sword here at the tip. We can begin something called beveling. Into Bevel, we need to make sure we have the edge selected, which in this case we do. Now we can hold down control. Hit B for bevel on our keyboard. Now that will allow us to move our mouse and beginner, sort of beveling or rounding out that corner there. As you move your mouse, that'll make the Bevel larger. If you use your mouse wheel to scroll up, it'll start adding more cuts, which will make the, the overall curve smoother. So the more cuts we have, you can see the smooth ER, this curve gets. So I'm just going to bevel this out to, like I said, about an arbitrary value here, because we will get an option box to type in exact values. So just make yours look something similar to mine. And then we're gonna be changing these values here. Now we have this option box open for the width. We're going to type in 0.18 and then hit Enter. And then for our segments, we're just going to add one more in this case. So I want to have seven segments. Now that we have the tip of the Blade and rounded out, we can hit tab to exit our edit mode because we're done actually changing the shape of the bleed now. Then we can hit Alt Z to exit our x-ray mode so that we can see what the Blade looks like more in the shaded, solid view. Well notice our Blade looks pretty good at this point, except that as some lines going across it that look a little bit ugly. So down here, you might notice them, they're pretty faint. It has these kind of lines here where we can see where we rounded out the blade will also notice them on the side as well. Luckily, those lines are pretty easy to get rid of. We'll be using something called auto smooth to remove them. The first thing we needed to do is make sure you have your Blade selected still. And we're going to right-click. Then we're going to choose Shade Smooth. Now we'll see right away that are Blade goes blobby and it no longer really looks like the Sword that it did before. It actually used to look better. However, that's because we haven't enabled the auto smooth yet. So right now, we've just told blender to smooth the entire thing out as if the entire sword is smooth and it's all in the same planes, we basically removed all these nice hard edges that we had that made it look more like a sharp Sword Blade. To add those back in, but maintain some of the smoothness that we have here that actually looks better. We're going to use auto smooth. So first, go down here to the object data properties, which is this little green triangle. We're going to choose that. Now twirl open normals. Then we can see here the only option within here is auto smooth. So we're just going to check this on. Now we'll see that the blade looks a little bit better, so it's a little bit closer to what it was before, except we're still missing some of those hard edges that we actually liked on the last version of it. However, it did give us our corners back on the sides. So the way auto smooth works is it's using an angle threshold to determine which edges are going to be smoothed out entirely and which ones that'll allow to have an, a hard corner, kinda like the edge of our Blade here. Right now it's defaulted to a value of 30 degrees. So the higher this value is, the more it's going to be smoothing out, it's gonna get closer and closer to the just right-click Shade Smooth that we did before where it made the whole thing looks kind of blobby. So if I turn this up, you don't have to follow along here. But just for the sake of example, eventually we get to an angle point where it's, it just turns into that same sort of blob that was before. However, if you go lower, the lower you make the value. If you make it all the way down to zero, then it's essentially what it was originally, where it's not smoothing anything. Every single face is being shaded and smooth individually. We want to find a nice, happy medium between them where it's smoothing the parts that we want to keep smooth while leaving the heart edges that we still want to keep. In the case for this tutorial and the Sword Blade here, we actually want to use 14 degrees. The only way you would know 14 degrees works here is if you just slide it down and you just go down degree by degree until you find roughly where every, everything that you want smooth is turned smooth and everything you want hard edged is still hasn't hard edge on it. I've done this tutorial before, obviously in preparation for this. So I know 14 degrees works. But if you were making a different model or if your sword was a different shape, you would have to find the unique degree that works for your sword shape. With our Blade smoothed out, we're ready to move on to the handle for the Sword, also known as the Hilt. We'll be finishing that last part of our sword model in the next lesson. I'll see you there. 4. Modeling the Sword Hilt: This lesson, we'll finish modeling our sword by creating the Hilt. Let's begin. We're going to start by making the guard for the Sword. That's the metal T-shape above the grip. We'll start by hitting Shift and a going to mesh and creating a new cube. Down in the bottom-left option box, we're going to set the size of the cube to 0.27 and then hit Enter with the size set. We can now go up here to the top right. We're going to double-click on the word cube and switch it to guard, and then hit Enter. Now let's go into our top view by either clicking the little Z bubble up here, or we can hit Tilda. It's bring up our radial menu and then choose top. Now let's zoom in on this cube. Then we're going to hit Alt Z to go into our x-ray mode so that we can see through both of these models. Now let's switch to our move tool. We're going to slide this cubed down just in the screen direction. And the Y. We're going to move it down here so that the center of the cube, this little orange dot, is right at the bottom of our Blade. It doesn't need to be perfect, but just put it roughly at the bottom. Now let's switch to our scale tool. Over here on the left. With our scale tool selected, we can now scale this just in the y-direction. We're going to make this thinner so that it's not so thick vertically. So start by just scaling out a little bit in this green direction, the Y. And it doesn't matter where you put it because we'll be typing in a value. So I'm just going to scale it down to here. Then down here at the bottom-left and our option box for Y, I'm going to type in 0.22 and then hit Enter. Now we're going to go into our side view by their clicking this little negative X bubble up here or hitting Tilda and then choosing the left view. So now we're going to our left view and now we're going to again scale this down. I'm going to scale this just in the blue direction or the Z direction. Scale this down roughly square. Then again, we're just going to type in a value here and we're going to type in the exact same thing, point to two, so that we make this a perfect square. Now. Now let's switch back to our top view again, or the Z button up here, or hit Tilda and then top. Now we can hit Tab tend to our edit mode for this guard. And then we're going to switch into our edge mode, which in this case I'm currently in right now. But if you're not just to on the keyboard to switch into edge mode. Now we're going to drag select over the middle of our guard here. We're selecting the top and the bottom of our guard. Then we can right-click and then choose sub-divide. Again, we're only going to be using one single cut for this because we want to match the cut that runs down the center of our Sword Blade. We're mimicking that same detail here on our guard. Now, rotate your view. We're back into our perspective view. I'm going have to zoom out a little bit. Now I can see my garden. And I'm going to hit three to switch into my face mode. And then I'm going to select each end of this guard. I'm going to select right near this dot. So if you select near the dot, that will allow you to select the face. If you select way off away from the die, you actually select through the model. So you need to select somewhere near this dot. Then I'm going to rotate around. And now we need to hold Shift to make sure that I add to the selection of I don't hold shift is just going to select this and then deselect the first one. So while holding Shift, select the dot on the other side as well. Now I have both sides of my guard selected. Now that we have both of these selected with my Scale Tool still used, I'm going to select this little floating red square here. So not the red handle. I don't want to scale them just in the X. I want to scale them in the little red box here, which is actually going to scale them in the Z and the Y at the same time. I'm just going to select this little box here. Start scaling them down. And again, this just be, you can just make it an arbitrary value here, just scale them down a little bit. So we're actually able to select both of these views simultaneously so we can change them both at the same time. We're just going to click and hold on why. And then quickly drag over top of Z and then let go of our click. You have to do that all in one motion. So click and hold on. Why hover over Z and then let go. And that'll allow us to type in a view or a value here. For our value, we're just going to type in 0.3 and then Enter. Alternatively, if you find that a little bit difficult, you can just click on each one and then just type in 0.3 and just do it manually. Now with our guard tapered on the ends. We can see here what we were trying to achieve. So we have a guard that mimics the shape of our Blade because we can see our Blade through here And it's also tapered here at the end is just to make it a little bit more interesting. So now we can hit Tab texts at our edit mode because we're done editing our guard. Then we can hit Alt and Z to X at our x-ray mode because we don't need that at the moment. Now we're going to move on to the next part of our Hilt, which is the whole bottom part of the Sword here we're gonna meet making the grip next, which is the actual part that you hold onto. So to start with, we're going to hit shift and a spring Up Our Add Menu and then go to Mesh. Then choose cylinder. We can see right away it makes the cylinder huge and it's covering the entire, entirety of the Sword at the moment. And that's because the default values here. So let's adjust some of these default values. So we'll set the vertices to six and then hit Enter. And the vertices here is essentially just how many sides the cylinder has. So we can see as we lowered that value, the cylinder got a lot more blocky. And that's, we're doing that to help kind of mimic the overall low-poly look that we're going forward for a sword. Now let's change the radius, which is how wide the cylinder is. We're going to set this much smaller. We'll set this to 0.05 and then hit Enter. Now for the depth, we're going to type in 0.32. And that's how long this cylinders with those parameters set. We can now go over here and we're going to rename this from cylinder. So we're just going to double-click on that. We're going to call this grip G rip, and then hit Enter. Now let's quickly rotate this grip so that it's laying flat along with the Sword. A quick way we can do this. So instead of just going to our Rotate tool here, grabbing the red handle here, and then we can hold down control. That's one way we can rotate it. So we can rotate it down to 90. You could do that way if you prefer. Where am I going to? I'm going to Control Z this. So I'll undo that. And then a quick way you can do that. It doesn't matter which tool you're on. So I'll be in the move tool here. I can instead just hit R to start rotating and then hit X to bind it to just the X axis. Now we can just type in 90 and then hit Enter. So that might have seemed kind of slow to begin with, but it's actually, it's relatively fast. So you just hit our X 90 and then hit Enter. And you can type in any value you want there. You could type in RX1, 20, or our Z, 15, whatever you want. But it will allow you to very quickly rotated an exact amount on a specific axis by just doing that chain. So rotate axis and then the value you'd like to rotate it with. Now that it's been rotated, let's slide our grip down. We're just going to slide this one just the y-axis. We're going to slide it down here. We wanted to intersect just a little bit. About as much as I have there. Actually, it doesn't need to be perfect, but you don't want it to. You don't want it to only intersect in the middle because then you have this gap here at the edge. You actually need to slide it in until it starts intersecting on the far ends of it as well. So the left and the right side. So right there is fine. You can slide it in just a little bit more if you wanted to. Okay, It looks fine. Alright, so now let's start shaping this handle. Will notice right now it's a little bit too thick and that's because it's right now it's perfectly circle. So we're actually going to flatten this out into more of an oval shape. So first let's go up here to our scale tool. And then we're going to scale this just in the z-direction. So just the blue handle. We'll scale this down and just scale it roughly to the right height. But we'll be typing in a value here anyway. So for this C value that we just scale, we're actually going to set this to 0.4. So we're gonna make it a little bit thinner than I just did there. Okay, so now I have it set the 0.4. We can see here that it's mimicking the same, the same sort of angled shape. So I'm trying to make sure that all these angles match up. They don't need to be perfect, but we want it to be visually sort of similar all the way down through the Sword. Now that we have it flattened out, what's taper the bottom of it as a little bit as well. So we'll hit tab to enter edit mode with the grip selected. Then hit three to make sure that you're in your face mode. I was already in face mode. Now we're just going to select the bottom part of the script. So just this bottom face here. And then we're going to scale it just in the x-direction to taper it and make it a little bit thinner. So it's not quite as wide at the bottom. So we're just going to grab this little handle, scale it in a little bit. Then for the value here, we're going to type in 0.65 and then hit Enter. Now it just tapers a little bit. If we zoom out a little bit, we can see it gets a little bit thinner as it goes towards the back At this point we have the general shape of our grip completed, but we can add a little bit in more detail to mimic a simple wrap pattern that goes around the grip. Similar to as if it was wrapped with a chord or maybe leather. While we're still in our edit mode, we're going to hit Alt and Z to go into our X-ray. Now hit to, to go into your Edge mode. And then drag select across all the middle edges here. So we're selecting all the way around the center of our grip. Now we can right-click and then choose subdivide. This time instead of just using a single cut, we're actually going to make five cuts. So we can just click and type in five. Or you can use these little arrows and just click the amount that you want. So we'll have our set to five. Now we can click off of our model. We're just going to click off so that it deselects all these edges. Then we're going to exit our x-ray mode because we won't need this now. So I'll tie again to exit the X-ray mode. Now we want to select each one of these cuts that we just made on the Modeling. To do this, we're going to hold down Alt to make sure that we are selecting the entire loop, but we're also going to hold down shift at the same time. You should have Alt and Shift held down. And now we're going to left-click on one of these loops. Then we're just going to go down the line and collect our click. Each one of these loops here. It's now we have all five of them selected. And we have them selected all the way around as well. I'm going to zoom in a little bit here so we can see a little bit better what we're doing. Now we're actually going to bevel these edges that we just selected. However, we're not babbling them for the typical reason why you would might usually use Bevel, which is to round off an edge. In this case, we're actually going to be beveling this to add additional geometry here that we're going to use later to push into the model to make the look as if it's wrapped in leather or a chord. With all of these I just selected, we're going to hit Control and then be to start babbling and then just Bevel them out a little bit. You can see here it has a whole lot of cuts in it because it's remembered that the last time you beveled, we had a lot of cuts in it. So instead of that, we're going to switch this down to two segments. Now we have just a cut right in the center here of each of these bevels, which is what we want. Then we're going to make these a little bit, a little bit small. So we're going to set this to 0.003. For the width that hit Enter. You should have your width set to 0.003 and then the segments set to two. But that Bevel set, we can now again, we have to click off the model because we want to make sure we're only selecting the edges to be one before it had all those edges selected. Now again, we need to hold down Alt and then shift. And now we're going to left-click just on the center of each of these bevels. So we just want this middle line again, selecting this by holding down Alt and Shift. Select all the way around the model as well as add to each selection rather than replacing it. Now I have every one of these center lines selected on this group. Now with our scale tool, we're going to select this little green box here. This will allow us to scale them down in the z-direction as well as down in the x-direction as well. We're just going to scale these in just a little bit. And you can see right as we do that, we're actually making ridges in this grip. Now we move that just an arbitrary amount here. But if you want to follow along it with the exact values down here, we're just going to click on each one of these and type in 0.95 and then hit Enter. So it's a very small scale that we're doing, but it's just enough to add the impression that this grip here is actually wrapped in something or even if it was made of metal or whatever it was made of wood, there's just some gripped or grip lines here to either add a little bit more traction for your hand or to just give it a little bit of a decorative detail. We're now done with the grip and we can hit tab to exit edit mode. Then let's finish our sword by creating the end of the grip called the Palmer. So to start and we're actually just going to select our grip here, or rather our guard. So we're selecting the guard here at the top. Then we're going to shift in D to start duplicating. But we want to hit Y as well. So we're going to hit Shift and D. And then once it starts duplicating it, why? To make sure you bind it just to the y-direction. We want to slide this new, new guard here down to the bottom. We just want to, I'd up and just put it at the very bottom of the sword here, right about there. And we want to make sure that again, it's intersecting a little bit similar to how we did for the guard. What we just did there was actually duplicate the guard model to use as a base for the palm role model. Because our palm oil is going to look very similar to the guard. And there's no point in us going through all these same settings and scaling the ends down, putting a cut in the middle. When we can just duplicate this and use it as a clone. And then just make adjustments to this new clone to make it more like what we want. We do want to remember to rename this though. So Vernor list, we have to go over here. We can see it gave it the exact same name guard, but it added 0.001 at the end of it to let us know it's a duplicate. So we're just going to double-click that And we're going to name this palm oil, which is P 0 M M E L. And that's what the name of this little cap at the end of our sword is called. Now we can hit Tab tend to our edit mode on the palmar. So we can begin to Adjusting this. Now let's go into our x-ray mode so we can select through the model Alt and Z. Then we're going to add one to go into our vertex mode. Now you might already have the ends of your model already pre-selected because it's remembered what the last thing we did on the guard was. But if they're not, that's fine. We can just I'll just deselect as if there was nothing selected. So again, I'm in vertex mode. I'm just going to drag select over this end. And then I'm going to hold Shift and drag select over this ends that they add to the selection. With each end selected. Now we can scale this just in the x-direction. So we're going to scale this inward so that we make it a little bit shorter. It doesn't need to be as wide as the guard is. We're going to scale this in. Then down here, we're going to type in 0.5 for the X scale. So we've made it essentially half as wide as it was. Now let's switch to our move tool, selecting it up here on the left. We're going to rotate our camera down a little bit so that we can see from the top, we don't need to go in the actual top view. We can just make sure that we can see roughly from the top here. We're going to direct select over just the bottom half of this palm oil. Now. The bottom half of it selected and then the top half remains unselected. We're going to slide this down just a little bit. And then we'll be typing in a value. Then down here, and we're going to type in negative 0.02 and then hit Enter. Now that'll move it downward. Negative 0.02 m, which are given a little bit thicker shape. It was a little too thin before. Snouts a little bit thicker. It looks like a little bit more of a substantial weight here at the end. And with that last move done, we can hit tab to exit edit mode and then Alt Z to X at our x-ray mode. And at that point the Pamela's done. We also have the entirety of our sword completed. So if I deselect here and we can rotate around, and I think it looks pretty good. It's a pretty simple style, but it's definitely a low-poly and cartoony fantasy styled sword. Now that we have all the pieces of our sword made, Let's parent them together so that we can move them as if they were one single piece. This will allow us to position and move and rotate the Sword as if it was all attached together while still maintaining the edit ability of them all being separate pieces. Which means when we get to the texturing stage, a lot easier to texture each of these individually because they are individual models. Start by making sure you have nothing in your scene selected. We're going to start by selecting our palm oil here. The first thing. Then we're going to hold down Shift and then select our grip. Then we're going to select our guard. And then lastly, we're going to select the Blade. Now in this case, it didn't matter the order of the first three objects. We could have selected a guard grip and then pano or grip, palm old guard. It didn't really matter for that. But what was important is that the Blade was selected last. The last object you select in this chain here is going to be the parent of the other objects, which means if I move the bleed, then it will move the other objects. However, if I selected the grip and then move the grip, the grip can be independent of the others. Now with everything selected, we're going to hit Control in P to bring up the Parent menu. We're going to choose this very top option here that just says parent object. Okay, So now we have it all parented together. And you'll notice over here on the right side, all of those objects have disappeared. And they've moved up underneath the blade here. So they're actually in a little drop-down menu underneath the Blade. And so we know that the blade is the parent of all three of these other objects. So you can either leave this twirling open or if you'd like to, you can just totally close again. And I believe this is actually the default, is having a closed. It's now let's see if we select our Blade here. By just selecting the Blade, we don't have anything else selected. If we move the bleed, we can see that it also moves all the other objects with it. I'm going to Control Z to undo that movement. However, now if I select the guard here, or rather the grip. So if I select the center here and I move this, this will move by itself and you can see that it's not moving anything else with it. That's true of all three of these smaller pieces. So if I select any one of these pieces and I tried to move it, it's not going to move the Sword with it. The only way I can move the entire sword is by selecting the Blade. That's because the bleed is the parent of these child objects. With our sword created, we're ready to create the environment for it. Now, in the next lesson, we'll be modeling the Rock Center scene. I'll see you there. 5. Modeling the Rock: In this lesson, we'll start modeling the scenery for our sword. Let's begin. We'll start by creating the large rock that our sword is going to be leaning against. So to start with, we're going to be hitting Shift a to bring up our Add menu. Then we'll go to Mesh. And then this time we're going to choose Ico sphere will choose this. Now we can see here it makes a triangulated kind of lumpy sphere essentially. And we're going to be changing our parameters here. Two subdivisions will have it set to, which may or may not be your default. And then for our radius, we can just leave this at 1 m. If it's not set to one, you can just type in one and then hit Enter. So subdivisions set to two and then radius set to one of the top-right. We're going to name this I ecosphere. We're going to just change this to big Rock. So now we know this will be the biggest rock within our scene. And now hit tab to enter edit mode with our big Rock selected. Then Alt and Z denser our x-ray mode. Not begin shaping this Rock. We're going to be using proportional editing. This will allow us to move more than a single vertices at a time while utilizing a falloff to make sure our edits are a little bit more smooth. So we can go up here to the top center and then just click this little bullseye here so that it turns blue. Now let's go into our front view. And to get into your front view, and you can either choose negative Y over here, which is the front view, or you can hit Tilda and then just use for hit the one key to make sure that you're in vertex mode. Then we're going to drag select over the bottom vertex here. So the very bottom pointed vertex. Now that we have our proportional editing on, we're going to start moving this up. We'll see here that we have like a circle here. And now it's a little bit hard for me to point to it, but right here. So we see this circle here, and that's the falloff for proportional editing, which right now the default is probably fine. However, if you needed to change the size of it, if you scroll down on your mouse wheel, that will make the proportional falloff bigger. And if you scroll up, it'll make it smaller. Now in my case, the ball was fine, learned about in this large. So I'm going to move this upward until it almost turns flat at the bottom. So it doesn't need to be perfectly flat, just needs to be similar to visually flat. Right here, I've moved this verticies up until it's now about flat at the bottom. Now I'm going to drag select over these newly flattened vertices. So I'm just going to track select over all of these. So I have this whole flat part at the bottom. Then I'm going to pull these up. I might need to scale up my proportional editing a little bit. So I'm going to scroll down my mouse wheel just a little bit, one-click. Maybe. I'm going to move these up until these turn, pretty much flat. So right about here again, this doesn't need to be perfect. We're gonna be pushing this into the ground. We just want to have a general shape here at the bottom that's kinda flat. Now one last time we're going to drag select over all of these vertices at the very bottom that are pretty much flat at the bottom. Then we're going to move them up in the z-direction one more time. We're going to stop these just before it hits the red line here. We don't want to go past the red line because the red line is where our ground is going to eventually be. And we want this rock to sit in the ground as it gets buried a little bit. So we'll pull it to about here. So it doesn't need to be perfect. Just have this bottom line here just a little bit below the red line. Now let's zoom out a little bit and then we're going to select this very top vertices. We're just going to drag select over top of it. Then we're going to pull this down to flatten out a little bit. So it's not so pointy at the top. This doesn't need to be perfectly flat. I would pull it down to right around here so that there's just a tiny bit of a point at the top. Now let's go into our top view. So we can either click the little Z bubble or hit Tilda and then choose top. Now we can see from the top view here are Rock is sort of just like a big, big circle right now and we're going to change that. So to start with, we're just going to drag select over this very top vertices here. Then we're going to hold Shift and then select the very bottom. Now we have the top and the bottom both selected the same time. Now let's switch to our scale tool. Then we're going to scale these just in this green direction, which is the Y direction. Now as we start scaling this, we're going to want to change our fall off here so that this circle that we're seeing going around our model here, we want to make this a lot larger. So we're going to scroll down on our mouse wheel We want to scale this up at the top left, right up here. Now you have to disregard what my model is doing because I'm making it go crazy here. But I love the way up at the very top here, we see this number here where it says 2.14 for the proportional size, you want to make yours pretty close to 2.59. It might not snap exactly to 2.59, but 2.62, 0.6, 555, whatever. It ends up being just somewhere in the range of about two-and-a-half. That's about how big we want this. Then we're going to scale this down to about, about here. This is really just eyeing it up. I don't want to scale it so far that the Sword starts poking through at the bottom. So I'm going to stop a little bit short of that. We'll make it somewhere in this range. We can see down here, if you wanted to match mine exactly, mine is point. We'll just make us a nice number. We'll just type in 0.6 and then hit Enter. Your Y value should be about 0.6. Then we're going to scale this in just a little bit in the, the x-value. So to start with, we're going to drag select over just these two here. We want to try to avoid getting the vertices that are a little bit further in. So just drag select over these two flat edges here. And then hold shift. And again we're going to do the same thing. Just drag select, see, only get these two edges here. Then let's just scale this in a little bit so the rocks not quite so wide, we can leave it at the same proportional editing size, which was 2.59. In my case. We're just going to thin this out just a little bit around there. It's in my case, I'll just type in 0.85. So that's a nice number. 0.85 scaled in the x-direction. Now with that done, we can go up here and turn off proportional editing because we won't need that anymore. Now let's go into our front view, which won't remember is the either negative Y bubble. We can either click that Oregon tilda front. Then the last thing we'll do here to shape this rock is we're going to flatten out this bottom here. I'm just going to drag select over all these vertices here at the very bottom. Then with my Scale Tool turned on, I'm just going to scale these in the z-direction. So I'm just going to scale them as we scale them flatter or as we scale them down rather, you can see that the bottom gets nice and flat. We're just going to scale it until it's nice and flat here at the bottom. And just make sure that wherever you scale it to, its still stays below this X, this X red line here. If it isn't, you can just switch to your Move Tool and then just pull it down a little bit to make sure that it stays underneath this red line. With that done, we can now hit tab to exit edit mode. And then Alt and Z to X at our x-ray mode. Now we can rotate to go back into our perspective view here. So now we can see generally what are Rock looks like here. And again, we're, we're keeping with this low-poly style that we add for our sword. In this case, it's actually a little bit more pronounced with our rock, but that's fine. We're going to add a little bit of rounding here, teach these edges. So normally you could go through here and you would just select each one of these edges. You might just select all of them and then Bevel them. However, there's a little bit easier way to do this and it's also a little less destructive because so if we actually went through and beveled every one of these edges rounded out, we can easily undo that. Once it's been beveled, we'd have to either undo a bunch of changes to go back to before it was beveled, which may or may not even be possible. Or we'd have to go through and delete all those rounded edges, make them flat again and then read Bevel it away. We can do that. That's much easier and much less destructive than that is by using a Bevel modifier. Get to our Modifier tab here, make sure you have your objects selected, in this case the big Rock. And then go over here to this little blue wrench icon, which is our Modifier Tab. Now we can go over here to where it says add modifier. We can look at all the different modifiers we can add, like I said before, and we're going to be using a Bevel modifier. So let's select that. Now that we've selected our Bevel modifier, you might have noticed right away and that's some of these edges got rounded out. However, it didn't do all of them. We have a few different settings over here. We can adjust to make sure that it's beveling it the way we want to. The first one is just the size. So this is just how big are these bubbles. You can see here. It's not beveling all of them though. And that's because of the angle threshold. So right now it's only beveling angles around the 30 degree mark. In our case, we want it to Bevel every single angle on here. We don't want it to eliminate anything. We're just going to set this down to zero, which means now this threshold is including every single angle over a threshold of zero degrees, which would be everything. Now we can go up here at the top and then switch this amount from whatever I hadn't drug it to. We're going to set this to 0.015 and then hit Enter. Now we can see here that are bubbles are much smaller and they just kinda ran out these corners except for getting some weird, ugly edges here. And that's because our segments here are only set to one. So if we turn this up to two, now we can see that it's actually Through and actually rounded out all of these different edges correctly. It's add an additional cut here through the center to give more geometry so that these corners can be a little bit more round. And then these intersections where they all meet can also be round. Then the last thing we need to do to make sure that this looks good, it's just right-click and then choose Shade Smooth. Now we get rid of all those small little lines that we saw between them. And we only leave these kind of nice rounded areas between each of these flat faces. That sort of completes the look of our rock. With our Rock completed. Now let's actually lean our sword against the side of the Rock. So let's start with, make sure you select the blade of your sword. In this case, it's just kind of poking out the side here. Or you could select it here from the list. I have my Blade selected. Let's just move this off here to the side. So I'm moving it to the negative Y side, which is actually the front of our scene. So right here we're at the front of our scene. This would be the back. So I've moved it to the front side of the rock. Then we're going to rotate and move this sword so that it looks like it's leaning against the side of this Rock. So the first thing you need to do is hit N to bring up your side menu, which we've used before. Then we'll be using these rotation values here. I'm going to give you the exact rotation values that I plan on using for this tutorial. However, you may find that your sword needs to be rotated a degree or two after you've placed it to match your unique version of the Rock, that's not really going to be a problem. You'll just have to start with the values that I'm giving you now and then adjust them using the rotate tool or the Move tool to suit the needs of your specific Rock. Start rotating. We're gonna go over here to these rotation values. Then go to your x-value and type in negative one. For one. That hit Enter, can see your sword moved right away and they brought everything else with it. So all the Hilt pieces came with it because we're moving the blade. So anything we do to the blade is going to be Adjusting anything that it's parented to. Now go to your y-value. And then type in 1818. And then for the Z type in negative 20, and then hit Enter. Now you may be wondering where I came up with these exact values. This is similar to what we did with the auto smooth, where I knew exactly 14 degrees worked for auto smooth. In this case, rather than guiding you through the tedious process of trying to find the exact values for all of these rotations. So the X, Y, and Z. I know for a fact that in most cases for everybody's Rock, negative 14118 and negative 20 is going to get the Rock are the Sword into the, roughly the correct position for your rock? And then you'll just have to adjust it from there. If in some cases you may be you've made your rock a little taller or a little shorter or a little wider. So now let's go into our left view so that we can start actually moving the Sword and placing it against the surface of the Rock. So again, our left view is either the negative X bubble or the Tilda, and then left. Now we can begin moving the Sword. And so I'm just going to grab this little red box here, which allows me to move it on both the Y and Z at the same time. I'm just going to move it roughly to where I want it. We'll put it up out here for now. Then I'm going to zoom in down here. I want to be able to see the tip of this blade here. I want to still be able to see the Movement Gizmo up here. I'm just going to move it on just the blue direction, just the Z when I move it up so that just the tip of the Sword here is touching this green line. Because the green line in this case from this view, this is actually going to be our ground plane. I don't want the tip of the Sword buried really deeply into the ground. And I also don't want it floating off the engine of the ground either. In this case, I just want a little bit of the Sword intersect them the ground to make sure that it looks like it's touching it. Now that I have the height set, you can zoom back out. And I'm gonna go over here to where the Sword is going to meet the rock itself. Then slide it back one just the green handle, sliding it back until it just starts to intersect here. In this case, we're probably getting a false positive in the case that it looks like it's intersecting here. But I don't think it is. So get it back to right about where I have it here, where it looks like it's starting to intersect. And then we're going to be rotating our view to make sure that it actually is touching here. Now we can rotate our view back into our perspective view. I'm just going to rotate my camera around and I'm going to angle my camera. I can see that small gap between these and I was in this case, I was correct. It wasn't actually touching even though it looked like it was touching. So it's important that this actually touches here. We don't want it to float off the edge. So in this case I'm just going to grab the handle again, the green one, and then slide it back. That gap starts to disappear. Now we can resume in, rotate around, and then just make sure that our Blade is actually touching. We don't want to push it in so far that it actually goes through the Rock. So I think I might position for my sword pretty close here. Just want to zoom in a little bit, make sure that the, the edge of my blade is and also being cut off by being pushed too far into the Sword or into the stone rather. I'm just going to rotate around. Just give everything a little bit of a once over here. Because once I place it, I don't really want to mess with it too much. I think that looks pretty good. Then the last thing you wanna do is slide your sword off to the right Right now it's kind of like the point is facing off to the left. I want to point to be more centered here in the middle. I'm going to slide this off to the right side here. To about, right about here. Kind of put the ridge of the Sword over that point of the Rock that was just below it. If I hit Alt, see here I can see that the point of the Rock was worried about here. So I'm kinda centering the ridge of my sword along that. Now, let's just give this a once over here to make sure that it's still touching the Rock, it still looks like it's actually making contact. In this case, it's not. I'm going to move it up just the y-direction until it looks like it's touching everything, they're looks good. Then again, if you have any sort of minor differences for my Rock versus yours, you can adjust these values here by either just clicking on them and dragging them to slightly adjust your angles. I can Control Z to undo it. You can do that with any one of these to make sure that it matches your rock. But in general, this is the sort of the angle that you're looking for you and your sword to be off to the right side. You want it to be leaning back onto the Rock. And you also want it to be leaning down this way. So it's, the top of it is leaning more to the right than the bottom is. Might look a little bit odd right now, but it'll make more sense once we've placed our camera. And speaking of our camera, finished our lesson by actually placing our camera within our scene. So to start with, let's hide this little side menu here and then hit N, tied that. Now we're going to create a second viewport so that we can use that for our camera view and then we can work on the others viewport. Make another viewport. We're gonna go up here to the top-left. And you can see as I hover over this, my mouse actually turns into a little plus sign. Once it's turned into a plus sign, just click and then drag to the right. We can see here now that I've made a duplicate viewport, I'm just going to drag this out until it's about half. It can be a little bit smaller here on the left side. With this viewport created, we can now click this little tiny camera icon I went that's going to do is let us view what our camera is seeing that's already in our scene. So by default, the Scene started with a camera in it. And that's because we chose the general File Type. In this case, we're and we have our camera right here. And this is actually what our camera is seeing on the left side. Now we'll notice that our camera doesn't have a very good view of our sword and our rock right now. That's not a really big problem because we can just move our camera. Now by default, the way you would move your camera would actually be using your move tool and you Rotate tool in your viewport. You can see here if I move this, we can actually move the camera and it changes with the view on the left is seeing from the camera. We can also adjust it with the Rotate tool that would rotate the camera. However, as you can see, that's it's a little bit tedious having to move, move it forward and then rotate it left. And then you have to decide, okay, maybe I'll move it down and I have to move it closer. That's kind of tedious and I don't really enjoy working with my camera doing it that way. So luckily, there is another way to do that. Way we can do that is let's first, let's zoom in here on the left side a little bit so we can make our camera a little bit bigger. So we, our view of our cameras a little bit larger. Then in the left viewport and make sure you're on the left side where we're actually looking through our camera. Hit N to bring up your side menu. Now go over here to view the view tab. Then I'm gonna make this just a little bit larger as you can read the whole thing. You don't have to do that. We're going to check the little checkbox here that says camera to view. Now when I check this, I'm gonna hide this side menu here, and I would suggest you do the same as well. So N, to hide that. Now that we have that checkbox selected and we can see we have a little bit of a dotted line around here to let us know that we're doing it. Now when I end my left viewport here, if I adjust my view from the left viewport, it actually moves my cameras. You can see my camera is moving over here on the right side. So as I move my camera, I can zoom in and it's actually moving the camera to mimic what I'm doing over here on the left night. I don't know about you, but I find that a lot more intuitive and a lot easier to place because I'm already doing this naturally as a Modeling and moving around in my scene. So this is very intuitive to me. It's very easy. I can just zoom in here and position my camera however I'd like. I don't have to worry about messing with it over here, switching back and forth between my Rotate and my move and having to do everything one at a time. I can just kinda do all this really easily using the controls that I'm already familiar with. So let's get our camera view over here on the left, looking like we want for the rest of this tutorial here. I'm going to zoom out just a little bit. I'm going to be quite so tight on it. We wanna be a little bit high on it as well so we can look down on if we're too low, we won't see quite enough of the handle here that we spent some time modeling. So do your best here to match a similar camera angle to it I'm setting Up Now. It doesn't need to be perfect, but I would suggest doing something similar to this before you try to deviate too far off the beaten path here because we'll be setting up some lights and things like that that are specifically tailored towards this camera view. Now if you, if you'd like to do your own thing and you're not super worried about producing the exact same result as tutorial, By all means can change it. But if you want to produce a result that's very similar to what I'm showing you how to make. I would suggest setting up a camera view that looks pretty similar to this. We can just continue fine Adjusting this, zooming in and out until we find something that we're happy with. My case, I think something around here, it looks fine. Now we're done placing our camera. It's very important that you bring back up that side menu on the left viewport, hit N, It's bring up the side menu and you uncheck camera view. So by unchecking that, and then I can hide this menu by hitting N again. Now, if I move this around, I'm not moving my camera. You can see over here the camera and remains in position. It's not changing anything. If I want to zoom in and out, I can zoom in on the render to see something closer without actually moving the camera closer to the object. A really important step after you've used camera view, because you don't want to find this perfect camera angle that you're really happy with. And then you accidentally zoom in or you rotate and you've completely busted up your camera angle and you have to find it again. So it's important that once you've placed it, you bring up your side menu again and you uncheck camera to view inside the View tab. And then you can add end hide that again. Now that we have our camera in place, we can focus on filling out the rest of our environment with Grass and more rocks. And the next lesson, I'll see you there. 6. Modeling the Grass: In this lesson, we'll finished modeling our scene by adding some Grass and campfire rocks. Let's begin. The first thing we'll do is hide our camera within the viewport. Now that we have our cameras placed, There's no need to have it cluttering our viewport. To hide your camera, simply select it within the viewport or in the list over here on the right. And then just click this little eyeball symbol. I will hide it within the viewport. But as you can see over here, it hasn't changed anything about our camera. Now let's start with a campfire Rock says there'll be pretty easy to create. The first thing we're going to do is on the right side, select your large rock here. So I guess we named it big rock. So select the big rock. Then you're going to hold down Alt and D at the same time. And that will start duplicating this objects. Then we can hit X to bind it to just the X axis here. And then we'll click to place it. Now you'll notice that I said Alt and D naught shift and D, Alton D will create a duplicate that is an instance of the original object, rather than a simple duplicate. Instance, duplicates share all mesh information such as vertex placement and materials. However, they can have different object properties such as scale or placement. Essentially, by using instances will make our life a little bit easier when we start texturing are seen as all of the instances will be textured at the same time. Now let me show you a really quick example of how an instance differs from a duplicate. You don't have to follow along, just watch what I'm doing. So first I'm just going to make another duplicate here. Again, you don't have to do this. This is just for an example. So I'm just going to drag out another duplicate. This time you can see I use to shift in D instead of ALT and D. I'm gonna move this up. The left one here is a simple duplicate. And then this one over here is an instance. If I make an adjustment to this, I'm just going to grab the top vertices here and I'll pull it up. You can see that this rock is changing all by itself and nothing else is moving with it. However, if I make this same change to this rock over here, I pull this up. You can see that the original rock is now changing with it. And that's because these two are instances of each other. That means that they'll share any mesh data between them. Whereas this one doesn't, this one is essentially an entirely unique object and I won't share anything with the original. If I can Control Z to undo it. Now I can show you that if I scale, this scale does not affect the original. So this is an object property here that I'm adjusting. So scale is something that won't be affected by the original. However, again, if I go in here and I pull up one of these vertices, even though this rock is much smaller, it's still duplicating that original chain or that change on the original object. And that's because I'm adjusting the mesh itself. So that's the main difference here between these two, these two types of duplicates. I'm just going to undo all these changes here that I made, set the Rock back to its original state, and then I'm going to delete my, my example duplicate here. Now before we turn this rock here into a campfire Rock, Let's rename it as such. So go over here to your list. And then right here where it says Big Rock 001, I'm just going to double-click on that. And then they miss campfire. Rock, then hit Enter. Now we can begin shaping this into a smaller and more round version of Iraq that we're going to assemble into a campfire ring here at the bottom right. Let's zoom in here. And then we're just going to scale this down. We're just going to hit S on our keyboard to begin scaling it. And it's going to scale it uniformly in all directions. So it's just making it overall tinier. So we're going to scale it down to about here. I guess once I choose a size here, I'll tell you roughly how big it is. So in this case here, it's basically a quarter of the size. So you can just assume all of these are 0.25. So again, if I wanted to change all of them, I can click on the top one, hold it, drag down to the bottom one and then quickly release my click. And then I can just type in 0.25 for every one of these. Again, if I click and hold, drag down and then let go. That's what allows me to hand type each one of these, 0.25. So now my rock is exactly a quarter the size of the original. Now I'm going to zoom in here, and then I'm gonna also scale this rock just in the x-direction to make it a little bit more circular rather than the oval that the original Big Rock was. So to do that, I'm just going to hit S and then X to bind it to just the x-axis. Now I'm just going to scale it in just a little bit to make it a little bit more circular. Now it's just a tiny bit different in shape than the original rock was. It's not just a, a carbon copy, very tiny version of it. It's actually a slightly different shape than the original. So as I said before, the intention of the smaller Rock is to make a little campfire ring that we're going to put it the bottom-right of our frame. We're actually going to be using the right, right viewport here. And we're going to move this rock so we can grab this little blue symbol here, which will allow us to move in both the X and Y directions while leaving it on the Z I'm just going to be looking at my left viewport so I can see what my camera is seeing and then I'll just move it on the right. I'm going to place my rock right about here. So it's sort of a little bit off to the right of the center of the frame. And I can tell that this is the edge of the frame here. This is that dotted line. Then it's also a little bit, you can see it's tinted on the outside, so it's a little bit darker. And then we have this little dotted line. So anything on the inside here where it's nice and bright. And on the inside of this dotted line, that's what our camera will actually see once we render. Anything outside of that will be cutoff. So now we know where our first rock is going to be. I'm going to play in that Our last rock, which we're gonna be making about for rocks here. Last rock is going to end over here. So we're just going to see just the edge of this campfire ring. So first on our right view port, so where we were moving, we're gonna go into our top view. We can either do the little Z bubble or it can hit Tilda and then just choose top. I'm going to collapse this little option box down here because it's kinda getting in the way. You can do that as well if you'd like or if it doesn't bother you, that's fine. I'm just going to click this little arrow and that's just going to make it smaller. Now on this side here and I get a nice even top view. Then I'm gonna hit Holt and D. So remember we want to make an instance not just a duplicate. So Alton D to make a duplicate over here, I'm just going to drag it out and place it roughly about here. Eventually here we're going to be making a semicircle, but it's more important and what we see on this side. So we're really concerned about what we see on the left side of the frame, little less so on the right, because we're not even really going to make a full circle here. We're only making what would be seen in the camera. Again, we're going to use Alt and D to make another duplicate. About there. I'm noticing now that I don't have quite enough room for a fourth rock, but I'd still like to get another one in there. So I'm just going to drag select over all of these. Then I'm going to use the little blue symbol here on the rates. I can move it in both the X and Y. Just gonna move it over just a little bit. Then select this last rock, Alton D. Now filling that gap that I made. Once you have these rocks placed, feel free to go through each one of them and just adjust it to make it a little bit more round if you like. It's maybe I'll move this one in a little. We can just fine tune this to make the campfire ring and look a little bit more round within our camera. I think something like that looks okay. At this point, we now have a ring for our campfire, but won't also notice here that as we zoom in, every single one of these rocks is rotated the exact same way. So this little shape here that we see is rotated the exact same way on every one of these rocks. And that's because we didn't rotate them as we were moving them, we only duplicated their positions. Now let's go through each one of these rocks and just give it a random rotation. So since we're in the top view, we can just select the Rock and hit the R key to start rotating it. It's only going to rotate it on the X and the Y because we're already looking straight down. So it's going to assume that the rotation that we're looking for is the z-direction because we're looking from the z-direction. I'm just going to give each one of these rocks just a slight, slightly different rotation and tried to look at the last one that you rotate it and make sure that the new one you're rotating isn't the exact same. There's not that many positions for these rocks to be in, but just try to rotate them and randomize them as much as you can. There are pretty symmetrical though, so you're going to find it difficult to make every single one of them super unique. But just doing a little bit of rotation will help break up all these little faces we're seeing here. I think most of these rocks look okay. However, I'm noticing that these two, if I zoom in here, these two are facing almost exactly the same way in the camera. So even though they look different here, because our cameras at an angle, they actually look the same in the camera. So I'm just going to select one of them and try to rotate it so that it looks a little bit different than the other. So it looks fine. This is just a little bit of variation here to help break them up. Now would also be a good time to go through here and maybe select one or two of these and just make them slightly bigger or slightly smaller than the others to give them a little bit of a size variation as well. I'll make that one a little bit bigger and maybe I move it off to the side. Just helps these look a little bit more varied. I think that looks good. I'm done tweaking them for now with all of our campfire rocks placed. Let's move on to making some low-poly Grass. I'm going to start by centering my camera here on the left side again, I'm just going to use my pan middle mouse button. And I will send through this. Okay? Now on the right side here, I'm going to rotate. Now we can start creating the plane for the Grass. Will hit shift and a go-to mesh and then choose plane. Now before we go any further, let's go to the option box down here at the bottom left. We're going to change the size of this plane. We're going to set it to 0.06 and then hit Enter. So we want this to be really tiny because obviously Grass would be relatively small. Now over in our viewport, we can pull this forward so that we can actually see it I'm just going to set it up right around here. Then let's go up to our list and name this Grass. So just double-click on where it says plane, then type in Grass. And then hit Enter. Let's zoom in down here on to our Grass played. Then we're going to rotate this 90 degrees. We're gonna do this the quick way again, but also you can use the tool if you prefer that. But I'm going to use the quick method. So I'm just going to hit our X and then 90, then hit Enter, that'll rotate it exactly 90 degrees on the x-axis. Now we can hit Tab to go into our edit mode. And then to, to go into our edge mode. We're going to select the top edge of this. We're going to select the top edge of the Grass now. And we're going to pull it up slightly. So we're going to make it about twice as tall as it was roughly here. This really doesn't need to be perfect, but in my case, I moved at 0.05. So as long as you're close to that, that's fine. Now we're going to hit E on our keyboard. To begin extruding. This is going to extrude more geometry off of this edge. We can see here that it doesn't really bind attending one direction. So we're going to hit Z afterwards. Make sure that it's only extruding this new face off of the z-direction. And we're going to pull it up. So that's about the exact same height as the bottom part of it. Essentially doubling it again. Roughly here. I'm going to zoom out a little bit. We're gonna do this two more times and do making sure that we make each one of these segments here roughly the same size as the last one will hit E and then Z again to make sure it only moves in the z-direction. Pulled up route here to make sure it's about the same size as each piece. And then E, Z, and then pull it up around here. Okay? Now after extreme that last edge, I realized that it's now clipping into the Sword. So I'm just going to hit tab to exit my edit mode. I'm just going to move it off here to the right side. You can do the same thing if you found that you moved it too close to the Sword and now it's clipping through, just move it off to the side so that doesn't happen. Remember to be, you have to be out of your edit mode to do that. So make sure you hit tab before you move it. Because otherwise you'll be actually moving the geometry, but not moving the origin of that geometry, which we'll get into a little bit later possibly. But for now and just make sure you're, you're out of your edit mode, you're in object mode, move it over, and then hit Tab to go back into your edit mode again. Okay, so now that are crack grasses in a better place, we're going to hit one tensor, our vertex mode. Then we're going to drag select over the top two. Now in this case, it already selected both of them because I was the last edge. But if it didn't for you, just drag select over the top two vertices here. Now hit M on your keyboard for merge. We're going to choose Merge at center. So what it's going to do is merge both of these, these vertex is here into one single vertex and it's going to use the center between them. So the midpoint between them, and that's the location of all merge them to we merge these top two to make a nice point for the top of our grasp Blade. Now let's go into our x-ray mode using ALT and Z the same time. Then we're going to go into our left view, which is either the negative X bubble or Tilda. And then the left. Zoom in down here to where your Grass Plato's, it might be a little bit hard to see. We can see here we have a black line and then we have vertex at each one of the intersections here that we made as we were extruding out the Grass Blade. So our goal here now is to bend this Grass bleed into a more of a grass blade shape. Right now it's perfectly straight. It doesn't really look like Grass. So we're going to start bending these, these vertices here to make it look a little bit more Grass Lake. So let's start out with the very first one. We're just going to drag select over the top here. Make sure you have all of them selected. And you can double-check your work down here at the left. So if you want to, you can zoom in a little bit and so you can see what you're doing. But we're going to be bending this over. And you should see that result over here on the left. Let's bend this down all the way down to here. Now we're just going to go each one of these and make this a subtle curve. Make sure each one that you're not just clicking on it, you want to drag select over top of them. That's the reason why we went into our x-ray mode as well. So that we could just drag select over because we want to make sure we're selecting both sides of the Grass Blade. Just start bending this. And it might take you a little bit here to get the shape that you want. I'll drag select over all of these now, pull them down. It's just a lot of just little tweaks here to bend this plastic grass blade down into a curved shape here. I'll just highlight my entire Grass played here so you can see the general shape that I came up with. So as long as yours looks kinda like this, you should be fine. So it starts out a little bit straighter at the bottom and then it starts curving a little bit faster, and then it curves down at the very top. I would say this little part here is the most important. You want to make sure that the, the last part of it, so the very tip of it curves down lower than the second highest one. Because that'll give us a little bit of a tip here. If it's going higher, you might not actually see the tip of the Grass. As I mentioned before, we're going, if they low-poly look for this Grass, we're going to keep it kind of blocky or we can leave it just a single polygon here. And it'll have some pretty obvious corners in it. And that's to help accentuate this low-poly video gamey look that we're going for. Now that we're done editing the Grass, we can hit tab to exit our edit mode, and then Alt and Z to exit our x-ray mode. Now let's rotate our camera here to see what we have. So here's our Grass played right now it's pretty big. What? We can always scale this down. Now on our right view port here, we're gonna go into our top view. So either the Z bubble or Tilda and then top. You can zoom in here and we're going to duplicate this three times, while two more times, I guess so it'll be three total. We're going to make I'll get a little bit of a grass clump and then we'll be cloning that Gleick Grass clump around our scene. So let's start with just hit Shift and D. So we're just making a regular duplicated here and not an instance. Shift in D, make one copy and then shift in D to make another copy. I'm going to take this copy here. I'm going to move it down. Then we need to rotate it. So we need to rotate it about, maybe about a 45-degree angle here. It doesn't have to be perfect. So I'm just going to hit R on my keyboard to start rotating it. If you hold Control, you'll notice that it rotates in segments here, so it's rotating by five degrees each time. I'm just going to hold down control while I rotate it. Tried to get it about the angle that I want and we can always adjust it after the fact. I'm going to place it about here. So I'm gonna make, I'm essentially making an open triangle here between them. So that one looks okay for now, I'm going to select the next one. Hit R and then hold down control to rotate it on a snaps. So it snaps to five degree angles. That's pretty close here. Again, like I said, this doesn't have to be perfect. Maybe I'll rotate each one of these. I'm gonna hit R and then rotate it one more, one more increments over to the right a little bit, then same thing with this one, except I'll rotate it to the left. So our hold down Control and then snap it one more to the left. That angle looks pretty good now that think that was the right angle there. Then just kinda push these together so that they make a nice little open triangle between them. Now that we have all these places, we can rotate back into our perspective view just by rotating our Viewport whenever to zoom out a little bit. Okay. We're going to select each one of these and just give it a slightly different scale, kinda like what we did with the rocks to help break them up a little bit so they don't look quite as much like copies of each other. I'm gonna select the front one here, just hit S to start scaling. Going to scale this down just a little bit smaller. Then maybe I'll select this back left one here. Scale that one down just a tiny bit smaller, not quite as much as the first. Just gives each one just this very slight variations of the other. Maybe actually scale this one down a little bit tinier. Now I have three slightly different heights, even though they're all the same exact Grass Blade that done, we can drag select over all three of these grass blades. So I just want to have all three selected, nothing else, just the Grass. Then we can hit Control and J at the same time. And that will join them together into one single object. It's now you can see on my list over here, I, you just have one Grass. What used to be three separate objects is now one singular object. However, we'll notice when we join them that the origin of this object, this little tiny orange dot here, didn't center itself out between all three Grass bleeds. It just chose one of the grass blades and use that as the origin. So it doesn't make a huge difference in this case, but we're going to center it out anyway, because if we rotate this, so you don't have to do this. But just for the sake of example, if I rotate this, you'll notice that it's rotating off kilter. It's rotating from, from that, that orange dot rather than the center of them. And we're going to fix that by centering this orange.in the middle of these grass blades. We're gonna go back into our top view to do this. So again, the Z bubble or Tilda top. We can zoom in here and we can see a little bit better of an example here. How, how far off the center of the grass blades, this is now the easiest way to center this out for us in this case is to go up here to where it says Options. We're going to twirl this down. And then we went our transform to affect only the origin. When I click this, we'll see down here my little gizmos changed. And now when I move, so if I move this, I'm just going to move this in just the y-direction. So just up in this case, I'm gonna move it here. And we can see it didn't actually move. The Modeling only moved this little orange dot, which is the origin And we can just visually place this in the center. It doesn't really need to be perfect, just needs to be more centralized. We'll place it about here. So now it's nice, nice and centered here at least by I. And what that centered, I can go back up here to the options and then turn off this textbox. So turn that off. And now when I rotate this, so just again, for the sake of example, we don't need to follow along here. If I rotate this, now it rotates around that orange dot, which is nice in the middle of the object and it rotates a little bit more logically here. With our little Grass object created, we can now begin copying this Grass Blade grouping. Render our scene that a little context. First, let's zoom out here on the left side so we can see our entire camera angle. And again, this is the area on the inside of this dotted line here. So this sort of brighter area. And then on the right side here we can zoom out and we do want to stay in our top view here. So if you're not in top view, makes you go back to top view. This will make your job of cloning these around a lot easier. Now I'm going to use a combination of my right, my left viewport to make duplicates of this Grass around the Scene. And I'm also going to be scaling them a little bit larger, a little bit smaller to help there either size, and rotating them to make sure that they're not all pointing the exact same direction. However, when we're making duplicates over here, make sure you use Alt and D to make instances of them. Reason being, when we get to the Texturing portion of this class, if we texture just one single grouping of Grass, it will texture every single Grass and our scene. We don't have to go through each individual Grass grouping and place the exact same Grass texture on each one because we forgot to use Alt and D in this step. So again, make sure you're, when you're making your duplicate, hold down Alt and D to make your duplicate rather than Shift and D. I'm going to speed this portion of the lesson up. That way you can see where I'm placing my Grass and how I'm rotating them. But you don't have to watch me place them in real time. I'll see you in a moment when I'm done placing my Grass. Okay. At this point, I've went through in place every one of my Grass pieces here. You can see I tried to hide some here maybe between the rocks. I also put one here over on the left side corner and I tried to just dot them around the Rock here. I didn't focus too much on putting anything in the back here. Because once we get to the Lighting step, this is all gonna be relatively dark because we're going with a night scene. So it didn't really seem worth the effort to go through in place Grass back here because it's gonna be mostly in shadow anyway. So I would suggest you try to do something similar to mine. You don't have to follow it exactly, but if you'd like to, you can just pause the video here and just look where I placed my Grass and roughly how large and the rotation of it. And you can follow along with that. I would suggest, however, regardless of where you place your Grass, that you do rotate them so that they're not all facing the same direction. And you do scale some larger and some smaller to help very it. With all of our Grass placed. Let's go over here to our list. Let's clean this up a little bit, because now we have a lot of these just duplicate objects here. They're all named Grass. And it's making this list really long and a little bit unorganized. So I'm going to select the very first Grass in this list. Let's scroll down, find the last one, and then hold Shift while I click this though, so select every Grass between those two points. So if you select the first one, hold Shift and then select the last one, it'll select everything in between. Now this would work regardless if I selected the big rock and then held shift and it's selected Grass, it's going to select everything between these. So it's not just looking for the same objects. It's going to just select every object between. Again, we want to only select our grass. So the first Grass hold Shift, select the last Grass and I have all of them selected. Now we can hit M for move To Collection. And we can choose here new collection. We're going to call this Grass. Then hit Okay. Now it's placed every one of these Grass objects into its own folder here it's own collection called Grass, which we can now collapse. So we don't have to see every single Grass Blade. We just know they're all inside this folder. But it also popped this folder outside of our sword and Environment folder. So we can just click and drag this. Oops, make sure you have just the, just the folder selected. So click and drag on the name here. And we're just going to drag this into the Sword and Environment folder and so dragging and on top, we'll place it inside there. Now I'm not going to worry about the campfire rocks here. And you could do that same situation that we just did. So you can select the first, select the last, and then put those into a folder. But it doesn't bother me having four of these here. I just didn't want to see nine grass blades floating around in this folder. Then last thing we need to do is we need to read default, the Sword and Environment collection. So right now we can see because we made a new collection and made that the default. So it has this little tiny highlight around it. So instead we're just going to click this little white box here so that this is now the default. The very last thing we need to create an arsine is the actual ground plane, because right now is everything here is essentially floating out in space. There's nothing really saying that this is the ground other than the fact that they're all sitting on the zero line. So let's rotator camera over here on the right viewport. Now we can hit shift and a go-to mesh. Then we're going to choose plane. Now, open this little option box if it's not open already. And then for the size, we're going to type in 20. So to zero it enter, we're going to make a really, really big plane here at to use as our ground plane. Now if you notice, depending on your camera position, this may or may not be big enough. I can see right up here at the top-right, that I can see a little bit of sliver here where the plane is not covering the camera. So I just need to make mine a little bit bigger. So I'll type in say 25 maybe for mine. It enter. That works. You can either make it a little bit larger that way or I can set this back to 20 if I want to. I can just slide it back as well. So in this case maybe I'll just slide it back. There we go. So now I can see that this, this little orange line is completely encompassed inside the frame here. I don't have to worry about anything poking out. Okay. So that looks pretty good. I'm happy with that. Now let's go over here to our list and rename this plane. Double-click. I'm going to type in ground and hit Enter with the ground made. We're officially done modeling the Sword and the environment. The next lesson, we'll be adding some color to our scene with textures. I'll see you there. 7. Texturing the Scene: In this lesson, we'll be Texturing are seen to add a bit of color. Let's begin. We'll start by going to our shading workspace located at the top center of our viewport. So we can click this. It will switch us over to the shading workspace. Now let's hide these left two viewports by clicking at the top left of our view port here. So the center, top center viewport, we're going to click and hold once we see the mouse turn into a little plus sign. And then we'll drag it to the left. It'll turn into an arrow letting you know that's going to hide that left viewport. We can not do the same thing at the bottom. So hover over this gray box here, this dark gray box. Wait until it turns into a plus sign. Click and hold, and then drag it to the left. We won't be using those. Love to viewport, so we'll just get them out of the way so we have more space to work. In our top view port. We're going to click this little tiny camera icon so that we go into our camera view for the top view port, we can now zoom out a little bit on this camera so we can see the entire scene. Now at the top-right of the top view port. We're going to select the material preview of Viewport mode. Now in this case it's already defaulted to it. However, if it didn't, just click this little box here with the circle with a checkers sign on top of it. This will allow us to preview our textures with temporary lighting illuminating our scene. We're now ready to go through each object in our scene and apply textures. Start by selecting the blade of your sword. We can just do that right up here in this top viewport. And we'll just click it and it'll highlight it. Now, down at the bottom, we're going to click this little new button. After clicking that will notice that it's created a few nodes here that we'll be using to adjust the texture. Then we can also rename the texture here at the top. Let's do that now. Where it says material a one, we're going to click that and then we'll type in Blade, be LAD, and then hit Enter. If this is the first time you're seeing the node system within Blender, let me give you a very brief rundown. Each of these squares we're seeing here, it is called a node. Nodes pass their attributes from left to right. Each node has colored dots on it called sockets. You can pass the properties of a node on the left to the node on the right. By connecting it's sockets with these little lines here called wires. To add more complex effects, you'll simply add the appropriate node and then connect it together with the other nodes in the system. We're going to keep most of our textures in the Scene very simple and stylized for this project. So we won't be using too many nodes. Now that you know a little bit about the node system, let's begin texturing our Blade. The first thing we'll want to change is the color of the Blade. And we can do that here where it says base color. We're just going to click on this. And that'll allow us to change the color of the plate. When you click on any of these colored boxes, you'll have a few different options. So we have the hue, which is the H, that changes the general color that we're going to choose. We have S, which is saturation, which is how vibrant that color is. Then we have V, which is value, which is how light or dark the color is. We also have a which is alpha, but we'll pretty much never be using this for now. We have a few ways we can adjust this color. So one we can just click on this little dot up here and click and drag it. And it will move it to wherever we want on this little color chart here and choose that color. And we can see here as we move it closer to the center, it gets more desaturated and closer to wait. The more we move it out to the edge, the more saturated it gets. We can also change the value of this color by adjusting this little slider over here, by clicking this dot. Neither dragging it down to make it darker or up to make it brighter. The other option we have, and what we'll be using for this class is just manually typing in these values here to pick a very specific color. Now normally if you're making your own project and you want to just find the color, you'd probably just be doing this and just picking out a color exactly. But since you're following a class here and you want to match exactly what I have, we'll be actually just typing in this value. For the hue. We just click on this and we're going to type in 0.5 and then hit Enter the saturation, and we're going to set 2.25. Hit enter. Then the value We'll set to 0.8 and then hit Enter. You can see here we're just picking a very, very subtle blue color. Now let's make this Blade look a little bit more metallic because right now it just looks like we painted it very light blue. To do that, we're gonna go down here on this principled be SDF node. And this here is pretty much your standard material node. Most materials you make, you're going to start with this and then you'll adjust your parameters here. Maybe we'll add a few more nodes here and connect them with the sockets. But in general, this is the typical default node that you'll be using for many of your textures. So we can zoom in here just by scrolling in on the mouse, mouse wheel rather, we're gonna go to the metallic slider. And we're just going to set this all the way up to one. We can see as we drag this up, the blade starts looking more and more like metal. So once we hit it, one, that means that the blade is now fully metallic. And we can see that reflected here in that it actually looks a lot more like metal. If it's set to one, it's not metallic at all. And if it's set, or sorry, if it's set to zero, it's not metallic at all. And have it set to one. It's fully metallic. Anywhere in between will be a blend between them. But in general, you don't really want to choose middle values with the metallic slider. You usually want to be all the way it's zero or all the, all the way at one. In real life, things aren't usually half metallic. They're usually completely metallic or non-metallic at all. Now let's make this metal a little bit more reflective. And the way we can do that is by increasing the specular slider. So we're going to set ours all the way up to one. And it's gonna be a relatively subtle change right now with our default lighting. But once we get to the class where we're going to be putting the lighting in. It'll be a lot more obvious that are Blade is much more reflective. Now, the way this slider works is if it's set all the way to one, it's the most reflective that it can be. And if it's set all the way at zero, that means that's entirely non-reflective. Now let's click in on our middle mouse button here to pan down. So we can look down further down the list. We're gonna go to the roughness. We're going to make the roughness of our reflections a little bit less than it is now. So first click on this, the roughness slider, and we're going to set this to 0.4 and then hit Enter the roughness slider, adjust the sharpness or the blurriness of the reflections caused by the specular slider. This slider here we'll make the object more or less reflective. Then the roughness slider determines how sharp or how blurry those reflections are. If we set this roughness slider to zero, that means our reflections are completely not rough. So there's no roughness at all, which will make our reflections as sharp as possible. They will almost be looking at like a perfect mirror. If we set this roughness slide are all the way to one. That means they're entirely rough. There'll be completely blurred out. They'll still be reflective. It'll just be looking at something, maybe that's been sand blasted or something like that. So it'll be really rough. You can't really look at it and like see reflection in it, but you can still tell it the object is reflective. Those few changes made to this material or Blade material is now done. Now let's move on to the guard and the Palmer material for our sword. We just need to go up here and then select the guard which is right here. Then instead of clicking the New button here, we're actually gonna go over here to this little tiny drop-down, the one that with the little circle with the checker in it. We'll click this. And then we're going to choose the blade material again. So we'll select Blade. Now we can see right away that this turns into that same sort of silvery metal that we made the Blade. Now in this case, this is actually an exact duplicate of the blade. If we made any adjustments here. Now you don't have to follow along and says just for the sake of example. But if I change anything here you can see all of this changes because these are exact duplicates of each other. So I'm going to Control Z to undo that change. The reason we chose the blade material as the base for the guard, even though we don't want them to be the exact same. Because we started out using all of the same material settings that we had set up for the Blade. Now we just need to make this guard material unique so that when we change this to gold, in our case, it won't affect the Blade and make that gold as well. The way we do then is by clicking on this little number here. This number here is telling us that this exact material, this Blade material, is currently applied to two different objects. And that's why we see the number two here. However, if we click this, it will make this specific material unique. We lose the number here because it's only applied to one single object and it gives it a new name. So now let's rename this from Blade 001. We're going to call this guard. And palm oil. Then hit Enter because we'll be using the same gold material on both pieces of the Sword. Now that we've renamed this and we no longer see the number, we're free to choose completely different material properties for this and it won't affect the bleed. Let's change the color first for this and we're going to make it a little bit more gold. So select the base color. Then we'll go to the hue. Click on this. We'll set this to 0.085 and then hit Enter. Now let's make it a bit more saturated. So we'll click on the S for saturation. 0.86. Hit Enter, and we're going to leave the value at 0.8. Now we can see up here, now the guard of our sword is nice and gold. We do want to change just one more thing here. And we're going to make the roughness a little bit more, a little bit more rough. So we're going to make the gold a little less mirrored as the blade is. We'll click on the roughness slider here. And we're just going to set this back to 0.5. So just a tiny bit more rough Now we have the garden material completed. Let's select the palm oil, which is the very end of our sword. Right here at the end. We're going to go back down to this little drop-down here. Click that. And then we can choose guard and Palmer. Now it'll apply this exact duplicate of this, this gold material that's on our guard now to the Palmer. And that's completely fine. We're okay with these being identical. So if for some reason you wanted to change this to red metal or a blue metal or a purple metal, we would probably want them to change in tandem with each other so that this kind of symmetry that we have going on your is maintained. So in this case, we're not going to make this unique. We're okay with these both being the exact same gold. Now let's select the last piece of our sword, which is the grip here in the middle. So we'll select that. We are going to click new for this, we're going to make a brand new material. Let's rename the material up at the top. We'll type in grip. Then hit Enter. Now let's adjust the base color for the grip. In my case, I think red, we'll look nice. We're going to make it a muted red. And I think that'll play well with the silver as well as the gold. Since we clicked base color and we'll get this menu here for our hue. We're going to make this a really low number because we want it to be basically read. We'll type in 0.007, then hit Enter. So it's just tiny bit slight, slightly off from red. We're going to set our saturation to 0.74. Then hit Enter. Then for our value, you can actually going to make this a good bit darker. So we'll choose the V and then type in 0.3 and then hit Enter. Now we have a nice dark, almost maroon color here that pairs well with our silver for our Blade, as well as the gold on our guard and our palm oil. That's actually the only thing we're going to change for the grip material. All the other defaults, in this case, 0.5 for the specular, 0.5 for the roughness and not metallic makes sense for our grip. So we're not going to adjust them with our sword fully textured. Let's apply a simple material now to our grass blades. We can select any one of these graphs because we used Alt and D to make them all instances of each other. Which means when we texture one of them, it will texture every single one of them. So in this case I'm just going to select this one because it's just the closest to my mouse. Now I can click the New button. I'm going to change the name to Grass. It enter. Now let's switch the base color for this. We'll click on this little box here next to base color. Go up to hue. We'll type in 0.25. It enter. Go to your saturation. It 0.8, hit Enter. Then we're going to make our value much darker at this 2.15 and then hit Enter. We can see over here now that every one of our grass blades is now green because they were instances. If for some reason when you texture to this one Grass Blade or whichever one you chose and they didn't all change. That means that you used a shift in D to make your duplicates rather than Alt and D, which means they're just regular duplicates and not instances. If that's the case, that's not the end of the world, that's fine. You're just have to go to each one of your grass blades. You have to select any Grass Blade that isn't currently textured. Then you'll have to go over here from your drop-down and choose Grass for every single one of them. Sort of similar to what we did for the Guard and the Palmer. So it'll be a little bit more tedious, but at the end of the day, you'll have the exact same result. You just didn't get it all done in one shot with the Grass textured. Now we can move on to the ground material, which will be the first material where we create an additional node. The change the look of the material. So first, just select your ground plane. You can select it anywhere you want. You just want to make sure you have this plane selected. Now go down here to where it says new, collect that to make a new material will change the name of the material to ground. Make sure I spell it right. Okay, ground it enter. We're going to start by changing a few of these parameters here, mainly the specular and the roughness won't really notice the difference right away because it's all white. But once we add the color, these will be a little bit more noticeable. So first set your specular to 0.3. So we're making it less reflective because in reality, the ground really shouldn't be that reflective because we're going to be making it more of a kind of a green muddy color. Then we're gonna go down to our roughness and we'll set that to 0.7, which will make it more rough, which means our reflections, any reflections that are caused by the specular, which is already a lower value, will be a little bit more blurry and a little less sharp. We don't want our ground plane to look like it's made of wet mud or water or something like that. We want it to be kind of nondescript and just kinda pushed into the background. With those two settings changed, we can now make our first brand new node. So let's zoom out a little bit by using our mouse wheel. Let me can pan over because we're going to be placing it on the left. Because remember these nodes pass their information from the left to right. So we're going to make a new node and then plug it into our base color. And then that will pass that information to the material output, which is actually what we're seeing in the Scene. Make that new node, when it shifted a to bring up our Add menu just like any other time in our search bar here, we're going to click that. We're going to type in voronoi, which is an odd word. We'll type in V 0, R. And that should be enough to make it pop up to the top. We see here or noise texture, we're going to choose that. Then we can just place our node here. This Voronoi texture is a procedurally generated noise texture that has different parameters that we can adjust to make it look a little bit different. But the first thing we wanna do is we're going to plug in the distance socket up here. We're gonna plug that into our base color. We can see right away up here, now that we plugged that in, we've passed, pass this parameter of the Voronoi texture over into the base color, which is now passing it further over to the right into the material output. We can see these black and white splotches across our scene. Now let's go back to our Voronoi texture over here. We can zoom in here. And the only thing we're going to change on this is just the scale. We're going to set the scale here, which will change how large this texture is. We're gonna set it to 44.3 and then hit Enter. We can see now that we've done that, it's made this much, much smaller. So it's made all these little splotches that we're seeing a lot tinier. And then our case making it look a little bit more like the ground that we're trying to replicate. At this point, we have the pattern that we want, but it's not green like Grass. Now we're going to add a new node that will change this Voronoi texture from black and white instead into the green that we want. First select your Voronoi texture here. We can move these nodes around so we can reposition them. So I'm just going to move this over here to make a little bit more room because we're gonna be putting another node in-between this to help filter this Voronoi texture into green. And then it'll put it into the base color here, which will then actually create the color that we want. So now let's hit Shift and a. To make a new node will go up to search. We're going to type in color. Then we're going to choose color ramp. So this top one here. And then it'll start, it'll create the node, and then it'll let us place it. And we notice if we hover over this wire here, it turns the wire white, which means when we click on top of this white wire, it'll automatically connect all the wires to the correct sockets and output it directly into the base color for us. Just a quick way to automatically connect nodes into a system. So if you drag a node on top of a wire, it will automatically connect any viable sockets into any other viable sockets. Now let's just the colors on the color ramp to make our ground match our grass. So first we're going to go over here In on the color ramp here. We're going to select this little white slider here. That's a little small. It's kinda hard to select. You select it near the top. It should change this bottom box to white. Now that it's white, we know that we're adjusting this specific slider, which is going to change this gradient that we see here. Now select this bottom box, just like we were doing before for the base color. So we'll just click on that. It'll bring up this menu that we've seen before. Then in the hue, we can type in 0.25. It enter saturation. We'll set it to 0.8, it enter. Then for our value, We'll set this to 0.15 and then hit Enter. So now we can see our ground in the back. It looks a lot more like Grass. However, we're not done yet. We're going to click off of that. And we're going to switch this from pure black. And instead we're going to make it a dark green. That way it's not quite so dark here where it gets the darkest. So instead we're going to click over here to select this little black node over here. Let me can click on the bottom here to switch this color. We're going to set this to 2.247, 0.247 and enter. We'll set the saturation to 0.7 for it answer, we're going to set the value really low. We're going to set it to 0.031 and then hit Enter. Now if we click off here, we have a nice dark green for the darkest. And then we have the exact same green that we were using on the grass blades for the lightest. This means that once we have some actual lighting and within our scene, the grass blades and the brightest parts of our Grass on the ground should match pretty well. We'll be coming back to this ground material in a few minutes to add another node. But for now, let's make the rock material. Now select your rock. We can just select the big rock here. And again, this will be the exact same thing with the grass blades. So if we texture this big rock, since we used Alt and D to make the campfire rocks, it should be applying the campfire. It should be applying the exact same material to the campfire rocks as well. So we only need to texture one of them. With our big Rock selected. We can now click New. Then we're going to change the name here for material. We're going to name it rock and then hit Enter. Now let's go over here to our principled be SDF node. We're going to again change the specular and the roughness. We're gonna do the same thing we did for the ground. We'll set the specular 2.3, then the roughness to 0.7, and then hit Enter. Now let's again, we're going to add another Voronoi texture. So we'll hit Shift a, go into our search bar and type in V, our choose Voronoi. We can click in place that. Now drag the distance again into our base color. This time we actually are going to be changing more than just the scale. Let's zoom in here to our Voronoi texture. Now go to this drop-down that says F1. We're going to change this to distance to edge. So each one of these makes the Voronoi texture acts that a little bit differently. In this case, we're going to use distance to edge because that's the mode that we liked for the Rock. Now that we've switched it to the distance to edge mode, you can see right away why we maybe have chosen this as the option. That's because this already looks like a cartoony rock texture. Now we'll just be Adjusting parameters on this, as well as the color ramp node that will be adding in a second. To make this look even more like Rock, we do need to change our scale. However, we're going to switch this from five. Click on that, set this to 2.6 and then hit Enter. It's going to make it a little bit bigger so that the segments of this rock that we're creating aren't quite so tiny. Now we can select the Voronoi texture, slide it off to the left to make room for the color ramp. We're going to hit shift and a go-to search. Then type in color. Then choose color ramp and place it directly on top of this wire here. Now let's go through the process here of changing the color of the Rock. Will again select the white one first because that's the predominant color and we're seeing mostly, we're going to choose the white one first because we know generally what the main color will be of our Rock. So select the little white slider here. Good, onto the bottom click on this white box. Now let's change the color. We'll set the hue to 0.55. Hit Enter that our saturation to 0.8 and then hit Enter. Then we'll change the value 2.37 and then hit Enter. In our case, we're going to be matching that kind of fantasy video gamey look by going with a stylized color for our rock. There's not too many blue rocks in the world. But I think in this case, it'll make sense within the context of the render we're creating. Now select the black slider. We're going to change this from black instead to a dark blue, similar to what we did for the ground. So select the black bar at the bottom. Then change the hue to 0.6. It enter the saturation to 0.75, hit Enter, then the value 2.12, and then hit Enter. So by changing this from black, we've gotten rid of a lot of that really harsh contrast that we had before. Now the last thing we're going to do is ramp up the contrast on this, this color here. For our Rock. I mentioned before that these were called sliders and that's because they slide. So if we click and drag this, we can move it to the left. And what we're doing is if you look at the Rock here, we're introducing more and more of this lighter color into the Rock and minimizing the amount of dark that we have in it. So as we slide it further and further to the left, the Rock becomes more and more light blue and less and less dark blue. The area we want to slide this to, in this case is down here. We can actually type in a number. We're going to type in 0.3 Enter. Now we can see our rock is predominantly this light blue and it's made these, this darker sort of crevice color, a lot less prominent, making it look a little less uniform as it was before. Before it was. So you don't have to move this here. We can see what it looked like before. It was a lot more muted and a lot less contrasty. The whole thing just kinda had the same color. As we slid it further to the left, we've made these cracks a little bit more pronounced, but we've also made the larger, flat areas of our rock a little larger as well. I'm going to set this back to 0.3 and then hit Enter. By this point, you should also notice that all the campfire rocks have been textured automatically. If not, go to each one of them and then select them and choose the material, the correct material from the drop-down A really sell this cracked rock effect that we've created, we need to add a node called bump. The bump node takes color information like are cracked stone coloring and converts it into surface elevation information. It essentially creates the illusion of bumpiness on the surface without actually adding any more geometry. It does this by reading light and dark values and converting the white into high points and the black into low points. This will give our Rock the appearance that it has high points where the color is the brightest, and cracks and crevices where the color is the darkest. To really see this effect, we're going to need to add a temporary lightener scene and switch our viewport to the rendered mode instead. So first let's switch our viewport and we're gonna go up here to the top-right. We're going to choose the furthest right circle in this case, which is the rendered mode. This will actually change our viewport into what the actual render will look like. So it's giving us a little bit closer of an approximation of what the true Render will look like. Now within our top view port, we can zoom out. We're actually going to rotate our camera here. That way we can pop out of the camera view and then do a little bit of work within, inside the Scene here. You want to zoom out until you find this light. If you rotate down a little bit, It's a little bit easier to see, or you can just select it from the list. But we have this light right here. So select your light and then go over here to the left, you'll see this little tiny arrow here. If we click that, it'll open up the sidebar that we're used to seeing. Now by default, in this view, it doesn't usually think you're going to be using the tools, so it hides it. But to open it back up, you just need to click that little tiny arrow up at the top. We're going to switch to our Move tool. Now we're going to move this light that was already in our scene. We're going to move it down here. We're going to place it roughly where our campfire is. It doesn't need to be perfect, but we do want to center it roughly where are essentially where the flame is, where we're gonna be putting this where the flame for our campfire would be if this was actually a complete campfire. I'm going to lower this down. It's right about here. So it's a little bit off the ground. Then it's centered roughly where this kind of invisible circle would be. If this circle was complete, this is roughly where the flame would be sitting in the middle of it. If for some reason you no longer have this light in your scene anymore, it's easy to add a new one. We can just hit shift and a. Then instead of choosing mesh, we're gonna go all the way down here, choose light. And then we're going to pick the point light. And when you do that, it'll pop a brand new lightened your scene. And then you can just move that light around. Instead. I'm gonna delete that original light or the new light that I added. I'm going to use my original light. I don't need this the second one, so I'll delete that. Now. I'm going to go back and select this light that I just placed. Then I'm gonna go over here to the object data properties for this light, which is this little green light bulb here. When I click that. And then I'm just going to change the power here. I'm going to set it down to 100 instead of 1,000. Right now it's really, really bright. So I'm gonna set this down to 100 and then hit Enter. Don't worry about the color for now. We'll change that in a future lesson. We just need to make sure that the brightness is correct. We don't, when it's so bright nursing that it's kinda blowing everything out. Now with our light relatively correctly placed, then the power set to 100, we can go back into our camera view by clicking this little camera icon here. Now let's zoom in so that we can see the entire frame for our camera. Now with some actual shadows within our scene, we can now fully appreciate the bump node that we're about to add. So go ahead and select your rock again. We can see here it brings it right back up. So the texture we were working on MS just hidden because we didn't have the Rock selected. Now let's zoom out. We can hit shift into a and then go to our search bar and type in bump. So BU and P, we can see it's filtered out. Now we have the bump node. So we'll click that. We're just going to place this right here. Now, zoom in and click and drag from this normal socket. So this little purply blue dot here, we're going to click and drag that. Now we'll start creating a wire. And we're going to connect that right to the other normal socket on the principled be SDF node. It's now we have our bump node plugged directly into our bass note over here. You may have noticed that plugging this in didn't really do anything up here. And that's because we're not giving this bump node any color information. In order to make this Rock bumpy. We're going to zoom out a little bit here. I'm going to click and drag over these two nodes to select both of them. I'm going to move it down a little bit closer right about here. Because we're actually going to be plugging this color ramp directly into this bump as well. That way the color, the base color of our object and the bump of our object are using the exact same color so that the bumpiness and the color and the placement of everything matches up exactly. Now let's zoom in down here, and we're going to drag from this color socket here. We're going to drag it right down here into the height node. Now we can click over here, or the color socket is. So we can just click and drag on this. And we can drag this down into the height socket for the bump node Now we can see that this is actually updated. It doesn't look very good right now. But we are actually seeing some bumpiness here in this light is causing the Rock to cast shadows where it thinks the Rock should be the bumpy adjust. While Iraq is certainly bumpy, it's obviously a little bit too much. So we can go down here to where a bump notice and we can change the strength of this bump effect. We're going to set this down to 0.25 and then hit Enter. Now we can see that the Rock bumpiness makes a lot more sense. It's not so incredibly high in really sharp and deep cuts into the Rock. That's a lot more subtle, a little bit more smooth, but we are still getting these nice little shadows here. Make our rocks look a little bit more detailed than they actually are. Now let's go back to our ground texture and add this bump effect as well. So we just need to select the ground texture. Then that'll bring us back to the ground-up material that we were working on. And we're gonna go through a similar process, will have to shift into a. Let's bring up our Add menu. Go to Search, type in bump, create a bump node. Click and drag from the normal socket on the bump node down to the normal socket on the original texture here. Now let's hit Shift and a to create a new nor Voronoi node. So we'll click Search VOR. We can choose a for annoy. Place that. And then again, we'll connect the distance down into the height. In this case, we can see here that are render up here has updated a little bit, but we're not done Adjusting this yet. So let's go down to the Voronoi here, and we're going to switch it from F1. So we'll click this drop-down. Instead, we're going to switch it to smooth F1, which is basically the same thing as the F1, which gives us the scale and the random. But if we choose smooth F1, it also lets us kind of blur this effect so it's not going to be so sharp. So we'll go down here. We're going to change our scale to 23. So 23 hit Enter. And then we're going to set the smoothness here. So right now we can see the, the bumper is relatively strong and we also haven't changed the strength yet, which we will be doing. What we are going to smooth that out. So we'll set the smoothing to point for and then hit Enter. So now we have nice ridges on our ground, but they're not super sharp. Then the last thing we need to adjust is the overall strength of all this bump. We're going to set this to 0.5 and then hit Enter. Now with the ground texture finished, we've successfully textured everything in our scene. In the next lesson, we'll be telling a very simple story in our scene by significantly improving the lighting that we see. Now, I'll see you there 8. Lighting the Scene: In this lesson, we'll be Lighting are seen to tell a little story. Let's begin. We're going to start by setting up the depth of field on our camera before we begin Lighting. Depth of field is a camera property that allows you to adjust what is in focus or sharp versus what is out-of-focus or blurry. Before we begin, make sure you're back in the layout workspace help here, the top-left. Now on your left viewport, we're going to appear to this top little bar. We're going to click in our middle mouse button. And that'll allow us to pan it to the left so we can see everything over here on the right that was hidden when we made this viewport smaller. Now in the very far right next to where the viewport modes, we're going to click this little drop-down here. We're gonna go all the way down to the bottom. And we're going to enable the viewing of depth of field within this viewport. So we're just going to check that one will notice nothing has happened and that's because we haven't set up our depth of field yet. But this allows us, this little option here allows us to actually view that depth of field within the view-port without actually having to render the image to see it. Now let's actually enable depth of field on our camera. So we're gonna go over here to our list on the top right. Image is going to click on this camera that we hit earlier, but we can still adjust the settings on it. We'll click that. Now we can go down here to the object data properties for the camera, which is a little green camera. We'll click that. Now we can check the little box next to depth of field. When you check this one, you may have noticed on the left side here, some things starting to look a little bit blurry. That's because we haven't adjust these settings yet. We're going to open the settings by clicking this little drop-down menu here. Tutorial it open so we can see everything. The main things we're going to be Adjusting are the focus distance as well as the f-stop value. Start by setting your f-stop value to a relatively low number here, we're going to set this to 0.3 and then hit Enter, which going to make a lot of your scene really blurry. And that's because we haven't set up the distance. So we've gone with a really, really shallow depth of field, which is having a very low F-stop here. So the lower this number is, the more shallow your focus plane is. Higher the number is, the wider it is. So you're gonna see more things in focus and less things out-of-focus. We wanna go with a stylized look for this Render. So I'm making this really, really low. So it's going to give it a lot of depth of field. We can begin adjusting the focus distance to make sure that things that we want to have in-focus are actually in focus. So first I'm going to zoom in on my render here. I'm going to zoom in roughly where this guard is. So I can tell, even with this being really blurry, hopefully you can tell on your side as well that right here is roughly where the guard is. So I'm just going to zoom in right around here. Now we can begin adjusting this focus distance. And right now I know that this number is a little bit too high. So I'm gonna pull this down. So I'm just going to click and drag on this and start sliding it to the left to make the number lower. As I slide it further and further to the left, you should start noticing that this area and becomes a little bit more in focus. So I'm just going to keep sliding it. I want to slide it until this, this guard area here is pretty much perfectly in focus. So if I zoom in a little bit closer here, I'm looking for this sort of intersection right here, these, these two parallel lines that we have, I want them to be nice and sharp. So I'm going to slide this slider here. And if once you start sliding it, if you hold down shift, it'll make the sliding move a lot slower. So you can be a little bit more precise with it. And I want to slide it into all the lines here are nice and sharp. So right about here, I can tell that this line here and this line here, these are all really sharp and crisp. And then as it gets further away, it starts blurring it. Now this is a situation where everybody's is going to be a little bit different that's watching this class. So you can't just use the exact value that I'm typing in here. You're gonna have to start around two point for as long as you went with a camera angles very similar to mine and you've been following along for the class. I would start around 2.4 and then start moving it and hold down Shift while you're sliding it left and right. And then really zoom in here and try to find the spot where this line here is nice and sharp and nice and crisp. So again, this is gonna be a little bit different for everybody because we're using such a shallow focus plane, gonna have to be very specific to where exactly your sword exist within this scene in relation to how far away your camera is from it. Once you get your depth of field set to a position that you're happy with. We can now go up here to the top, and we're going to switch this into the actual rendered view. We can click this here and switch this into our rendered view. And again, this is just the furthest right viewport bubble here. Up in this grouping, we can now zoom out so we can see the entire frame for our camera. We just want to make sure that all of this dotted line was within our view here. And then before we begin placing any additional lights in our scene. Let's adjust the ambient light that we're currently getting in our scene now from our world properties. To adjust this ambient light, we can go over here to this little red globe icon, that's our world properties. Then we can see here, this is the ambient color and the strength of that ambient color that it's projecting into the entire scene. And that's why in certain areas here, even though no light is hitting it and we can still see some outline of our rock. And that's because there's a very, very subtle kind of gray light that's just being pumped entirely into our scene from all directions. Let's adjust the color that it is now so that it fits a little bit better with the other lights will be placing. We can go over here and just click on this color box here. We'll go to the hue. We're going to type in 0.63. It entered. Now go down to our saturation. 0.8, hit Enter. Then for our a value, we're going to set this to 0.3 and then hit Enter. Now we've created this kind of soft blue, almost like Moonlight are skylight being pumped into our scene, which fits a little bit better with the mood that we're trying to go for. We're just going to be a nighttime moonlets Scene. A really bright and warm campfire down here in the bottom-right corner. Now we can begin actually Adjusting the real lighting and our scene. The first thing we're gonna do is go up here to our top right. We're seeing collections are. And let's click on this little white box next to the render Scene Collection. And that will make this the default. So any light we add now will go directly into this collection rather than the Sword and the environment collection. First, let's select this light that we placed in our campfire here for that temporary shadow lighting that we created in the last lesson, we're going to rename this campfire. So just double-click on this, rename it camp fire, and then hit Enter. So now we know that this light here specifically is for the lighting from the campfire. Now go to the object data properties for this light, which is this little green light bulb here. And now we can finally change the color for this late from white to a nice warm orange. So go ahead and click on this color box. We're going to set our hue to 0.04. It enter. Then we're going to set the saturation all the way up to one and then hit Enter so it's fully saturated. Now we can see right away that this lighting is a little bit more interesting because this campfire now is bright orange rather than pure white. So it makes a lot more sense. At this point, the campfire light that we just placed here is the only light that you should have in your scene other than the ambient light, obviously, that's just being cast across the entire thing. So if you have any other lights in your list here, make sure you delete them other than the campfire light that we're adjusting now. Now let's add a light that's going to simulate a full moon. So we're gonna start by hitting Shift and a over here on the right viewport. Let me go down here to light. We're going to create a spotlight. We can click spot. We can see it's greater to the light right here and we can't see it yet because we haven't moved it. Before we forget. Let's go up to the list and we're going to rename this from spot. We're going to call this moon light. That way we know what it's for. We haven't renamed. Now let's change some of the parameters quick before we adjust the placement of the light. So the first thing we'll change is the color. And click on this. We're going to make this a subtle blue color by setting the hue to 0.5, then the saturation also 2.5. So now we have a nice blue color here that will mimic something similar to a moonlight. We're going to set the power from ten. We're going to change it all the way up to 800. So we're gonna make this pretty bright. It enter. Then lastly down here, we're going to adjust the spot shape. But before we do that, let's actually get our light moved up a little bit so you can see it that way. These settings here make a little bit more sense. I'm just going to move this up here. And this is an important where you place it. This is just for the sake of example. So the first thing we're going to change as the size, which is measured by angles, which is essentially how wide is the spotlight. The smaller the angle, the tighter and smaller the spotlight is. So it's making it much smaller, little cone here. Then as we make it larger, it will make the code much larger, which makes the light go out a little bit further as well. So we're going to set ours to 35. So three-five, it enter for the size. Then for the blend. So the blend is essentially how blurry or these edges here. So as we make the blend larger, we can see that this edge here is getting a lot softer. And if we make it zero We can see we have a really harsh edge here on this light. So this edge here is probably a pretty good one to look at also down here. So we get a really hard edge if we have zero blend on it. If we turn the blend up as we make the number higher, it blurs that edge and it makes it softer. Now it also makes the light perceivable a little bit smaller, but that's fine. We really just want the softer edge on it. We don't want to really, really hard edge on our moonlight because that doesn't really make a whole lot of sense. So now we have this set to 35 for the size and then one for the blend. Now let's begin the process of placing this light. Let's go into our front view here. So we can either choose negative Y for the bubble or just Tilda. And then front. Let's begin placing this late and we can be looking over here on the left side to see what it looks like. We're replacing it. Let's slide it over to the left because we want the light to becoming from behind the behind left side of this render here. We'll place it at about somewhere about here. And you also wanted about this high as well. So this is all relative here. It's really just kind of eyeing it up, but it's about this high above my rock here and about this far to the left. Now we can rotate this by hitting our, on our keyboard. We're going to rotate this towards our scene. We can see now that it's looking a little bit more like the moonlight w1 will rotate it about here. So we went pretty much the entire rock here hit by this light as well as the Sword and a little bit past it. And we can see the bounds of this light here by following where the cone is, anything inside this cone here will be hit by the late. Anything outside of it will not be. The spotlight differs from the campfire light in that the campfire light was set to zero point, which a point light projects light in every direction all around it. So it's essentially like a little, a tiny little ball of light that just projects light in every single direction. Whereas in this case, the spotlight that we have set the moonlight to only projects light in a specific direction with inside the cone. Okay, so now that we have our moonlight roughly placed from the front view, let's go to our top view. Pay their clicking little Z bubble or Tilda and then top. Now let's move this. We're going to slide this backwards a little bit. So we're going to move it back behind the Sword a little bit more than it was before. Then we're also going to rotate this again by hitting our, on our keyboard and then rotating it back towards our sword and the Rock. We'll move it about somewhere around here. Just center it up so that's hitting most of the Rock and most of the Sword. In this case, I might want to adjust my angle a little bit. So at the top of my palm oil here, I can see that as I move it to the left, the top of the palms and really not catching any reflection. If as I move it further and further to the right, the Palmer starts catching that reflection, which is nice. So we actually want to make sure we get that reflection. I'm going to place mine right about here. And right here is the reflection that I was talking about. You want to make sure that you see a reflection on this side all the way down the side of the grip when the guard then also here at the top side of the bleed. Now before we add our last late to the Scene, Let's enable something called volumetric. Volumetric simulate fog within our scene to allow the lights to be essentially visible inside the air as if we were shining a flashlight into a smoky room or in the foggy night. To enable this, we're gonna go back to our world Properties tab, which is this little red globe icon here. We can twirl open volume. Then here where it says volume none, we can click the word None. And then we can go over here to principled volume. So we've chosen principled volume. And now right away we should see a pretty, pretty noticeable difference here. Our campfire here is turned into a sort of a raging bonfire. And that's because this campfire is really bright. And it's casting a lot of light into this fog and it's kinda dominating our scene. It's overpowering everything we see. However, it does look cool. Now, luckily, we can adjust the parameters here to make it not so obvious that the campfire is really, really illuminating all of this kind of fog in our scene. The way we'll be adjusting that is through these two parameters here called density and Anisotropy. Density makes a little bit more sense than the other. So if we lower the density, we essentially just make the fog thicker or thinner. We're going to set our density here, 2.1, which my magically just drag the slider to in this case. So I'm just type in 0.1 and then hit Enter. We can see now that the fog is a lot less oppressive in our scene. And we're able to still see the Sword and the Rock and some of the Grass. But we are getting a little bit of this fog here. So you can see that the fog from the moonlight is coming down and then the fog from our, from our campfire is also present in the foreground of our scene. The next thing we're going to adjust is the Anisotropy parameter here. So essentially what this does is it changes how focused and intense the fog is around a light source. So the higher the number The more intense the fog will be closer to the light source and the less of this kind of general sort of ambient fog, we're gonna get an arsine. In this case, let's turn our as up a little bit. We're going to set this to 0.5, it Enter. And now we should notice that there's, there's less fog generally in our scene. So these areas that were dark stay pretty dark. There's a little bit of fog here, but the fog around the actual light sources is much, much more vibrant, much brighter. So we're getting a more defined moon beam back here and a more defined fog around the campfire glow as well, with the volumetric turned on and set up. Well, notice that the lighting and are seen as much more dynamic and interesting. It allows us to essentially see the light filling the air within our Render. Now let's add one last light to highlight the Blade and our render. Over here on our right viewport, we can rotate back out of our top view. We're going to hit shift and a, we're going to create a brand new light. In this case, we want to also make a spotlight. Will choose spot. Again, it's just going to create a spotlight right here. Then we can adjust the parameters of it by switching over here to the object data properties. This little green light bulb. And now we can adjust the parameters of this new Blade highlight light that we're going to make. Before we change any of this, let's just quickly change the name so we don't forget what this is for. We'll type in Blade. Highlight. It answer. Now let's adjust some of these parameters. So first, we'll change the color and we're going to set this to orange because we want an orange highlight on the bottom of our blade to help contrasts with the blue highlight on the top of our Blade. We'll set the hue to 0.04. It entered. Make sure I type it incorrectly. 0.04 hit Enter. Then saturation will change this to one to make it fully saturated. It's now we have a very similar orange to what our campfire was. Now we can go down here to the power. We'll set this to 100. Just like our moonlight was. We have a nice bright light. Now we'll adjust the radius. We're going to make this a little bit bigger. And by making this bigger, it's going to make the light a little bit softer. So we'll set a to 0.7. Then for our size, we're going to make this late, the cone for this light larger than the last one. We'll set this to 66. Hit Enter. Then the blend, we're going to change that, make it all the way up to one. So it's nice and soft like the moonlight was as though as well. Now before we actually place this late, I'm going to move this up and show you one more slide or that we're going to adjust. I'll move this light up here. This is just a temporary placement for this. So as we can see when we move this light up here, I get a nice sort of fog glow off of this. So in most cases, this would be useful because we would actually want to see the light source. However, the location we're going to be placing this late. We actually don't want to see this fog. We only want the light from it. The way to get rid of the fog from the light, but still keep the actual illumination from it as by adjusting this volume slider here. So this affects essentially how much volume or how much it's going to light up the volume and the Scene. If we turn this all the way down to zero, we can see here, I no longer see that orange fog like cone that was coming from the light, but I do still get the orange light that it's emitting. In our case, we do want to have the elimination to create a highlight on the blade at the bottom once we place it. But we don't want all that fog in front of the blady as well. Now let's begin the process here of placing this light where it should be to place a nice highlight here on the bottom of the blade. So let's go into our front view. So either negative Y bubble up here, or tab or sorry, Tilda and then front view. So we can zoom in here. This one's gonna be a little bit harder to place, especially given that there's a very narrow angle that this highlight will be visible in the bleed. So you really going to have to kind of somewhat match where I'm placing it and then adjust it from there so that you're getting the same highlight that in. So first I'm just going to move this down here. I'm going to place it about here. So a little bit inward from where the Rock end. Then I'll lower it a little bit as well. So it's a little bit lower. Are a little bit higher than the Blade is. So it's about this much high, higher than the Blade. And that's a little bit further into the Rock than it is at the end. Now I'm going to rotate this very slightly, a little bit outward. So about here. And then now I'm going to go into my top view. So either the Z bubble or Tilda. And then top. Then we want to slide this way down here, pretty far away from the Blade. Then I'm going to rotate this outward. The way I'm going to do that is switch into my my Rotate tool here. Because right now it's pointing basically directly down at the ground. I need this to be pointing towards the Blade at this point. With my rotate tool selected and my light selected, I can grab this little red handle here. Click and drag that. We'll start rotating and outward towards the Blade. We can see over on the left side now I'm getting this highlight on the bottom of the blade. I'm going to rotate mine out and you can hold Shift while you're doing this to move it a lot slower. I'm going to rotate it out to about, let's say about here. In this case, I moved it roughly 70 degrees. You can move here as exactly 70 or just like I said, you're gonna have to I this one up because it's gonna be a little bit different for everybody. We have this rotated out. We can switch back to our move tool. Then we can shift this more left or right to focus where that highlight is going to be. In this case, I want to try to primarily get to highlight just on the bottom side of this Blade. I don't really want it too much on the top because I'm trying to get a nice contrast where I have a blue highlight on the top left side and then an orange highlight on the bottom right side. Now that I have my light pretty well-placed here, I can rotate on the right side so that can see a little bit better. I can move it and all the different directions. Now, I make moon to move this down a little bit. I'll move it a little bit lower so that the highlight doesn't go quite so far up the Blade. I want it to be a little bit more focused at the bottom. Then maybe I'll slide it a little bit to the right to help make sure that I'm not getting really any orange here on the left side, at least as little as possible. Then also, I think this light ray now might be a little bit bright for my scene. So I'm just going to lower this down. We'll set this maybe to 600 and see what that looks like. 600 is taken off a little bit at the edge here. So it's still getting a pretty nice highlight, nice warm highlight on the bottom, but it's not quite so dominating. And the Scene here, I realize this last light here was a little bit more difficult to place than the other two. But with the goal in mind, you should be able to place your light roughly where mine is, about this high, angled down and then angled a little bit away from the Scene slightly to the left with a goal in mind of keeping this little highlight here, the bottom-right, with our Lastly placed, we're done lighting are seen. In the next lesson, we'll be Rendering our final image and then polishing it up with some compositing. I'll see you there. 9. Creating Our Final Render: In this lesson, we'll be Rendering our final image, and then we'll be polishing it up with some simple compositing within Blender before we save it out. Let's begin. Let's begin by going up to the top center and we're gonna go to the Rendering workspace within Blender. So we'll just click Rendering up here. Let me zoom out a little bit. Now that we're in this Render workspace, we can render our image. So there's two ways to do this. We can either go up here to the top-left, making choose render, and then render image where you can simply just hit F12 on your keyboard. I'm going to choose Render Image. And just like that, within less than 4 s. And my case, I have a complete Final Render. Since we're using the EV Render Engine or render time should be incredibly quick, just a few seconds. The render looks great. However, there are a few things we can add to make the image just look a little bit better. The first thing we're gonna do is go up here to where it says slot one. We're going to choose slot t2 instead. That way we can compare and contrast between the changes that we're making. Now we're in slot two, were able to re-render the image and then compare it to slot one. So first let's go over here to our Render Settings. And if you're not there yet, you can go to this little camera icon and then click on that and that's your Render properties. Then we're gonna go to ambient occlusion. And we're just going to check that box on. Ambient occlusion is a shadowing effect that add shadows to the areas where two objects touch. This helps sell the effect that the objects are actually touching and making contact with each other. This is a pretty subtle effect, but it really makes the images look a lot more lifelike. Because in real life, we also get these subtle shadows between objects as they touch with ambient occlusion turned on. We can go over here and then choose render and then Render Image. Again, this should just take a few seconds. It might be a little bit longer with ambient occlusion turned on, but not significantly. Now we can see here, we're getting a lot more shadows here between these two. So we can go back up to slot one. So I'm going to zoom in a little bit so you can see a little bit better. If I go over here and then I choose slot one. We can see we lose a little bit of these shadows here. It's most noticeable behind the blade and then down here at the bottom of our Rock. So if I switch back to slot t2, which has ambient occlusion turned on, we can see we're getting a little bit more shadowing down here. And then behind our Blade, it's a relatively subtle effect, but it adds a little bit more to the realism and makes things pop out a little bit better. Now that we have our base Render done here, Let's switch to the compositing workspace and do some simple compositing right inside Blender. To do that, we'll just go up here to where it says compositing and click on that. Now we can go down here to the bottom, and we're just going to click right between these two where this line is and then pull this down to make the dope sheet smaller. We won't really be using that. Now we can hit N on this top view port to hide that side menu. And then we're going to click and drag from the top-right in this case. So top-right corner waiting to our mouse turns into a little plus sign. And then just click and drag over to the left to create a new viewport over here on the right side. On this right viewport, we're gonna go up to this top little drop-down menu here with these little boxes. We're going to choose image editor. Now at the top center where it says New, we're going to choose this little drop-down here. And we're going to choose viewer node instead. Okay, So that's everything done on the right side. Now let's go to the left side. We can choose use nodes, which is going to bring back that sort of familiar node system that we saw when we were Shading. We can separate these out a little bit. And now we need to create a new node over here. We're going to hit shift and a, let me go to search. We're going to type in viewer. So V E. That'll be enough to show. Viewer has one of the options. So we'll choose viewer. We can place that up here at the top. Now click and drag this image socket. I'm going to click and drag that into the image socket on the viewer node as well. Now we'll notice right away that the render that we've done, this showed up on the both the left and the right side. And we don't want to see it on the left side. So normally the way you would typically do this as you would be working with the viewer, the viewer node showing your actual render underneath all of the things you are adjusting on it. I'm not a huge fan of that method. I'm going to turn off this by turning off the backdrop because I just want to see the gray over here. Then on the right side, the whole point of us making this, this new side viewport over here is to see the entire render without anything sitting on top of it. So everything we do over here. Now that we've plugged it into this viewer node will also be displayed on the right side here, because we told it to look at the viewer node for its display. Now that we have everything set up, Let's begin adding some new nodes here on the left. I'm gonna drag this out to make a little bit of space between these like that. Now we can hit shift and a on the left side here. And then the search bar, we're going to type in glare. So G are And then we can see here glare pops up. Then we can just drag this on top of one of these lines. We're going to eventually need to plug this into both, but just choose one and drag it on top of it. That'll auto connected at least for one of them. Then at the top here of the glare node that we just added, drag this image socket to the image socket on the other node, whichever one you didn't drag it onto. In my case, it was the viewer. I'm just going to drag it onto the viewer. Now I have my Render being output directly into the glare node. And then the glare node is outputting into both the viewer and the composite note. Now that we have our glare node setup, Let's go in here and start adjusting some of these settings. So there's a few different things we can adjust on the glare node. But before we see any of these, we're going to have to adjust the threshold. And that's simply because the bright areas and our render aren't that bright. So the glare node doesn't even recognize that they are bright enough to apply glare to them. In order to make that the case, we're going to need to lower this down to 0.3 for the threshold. So this value right here. Now once we lower this, now we've told the glare node that these areas as low as 0.3 are bright enough to be having, having glare applied to them. Essentially. There's a few different modes that we can switch between for our glare. So by default it's set to streaks. We can see here that it's added these kind of like glow around this highlight. And then it's added these little points, each streaks off of these areas as well. It's a little bit more faint up here, but we can see it down here at the bottom left. There's a few different modes here. We can switch to Ghosts, which adds this kind of interesting faded echoey kind of ghost D on top of it. Then there are simple star which is pretty similar to streaks, which is the default. It's a little bit different. It has some things that you can adjust on it. But the one we're going to use is called a fog glow. So we're going to use fog glow to essentially simulate something called Blum. Blum is when an area is really bright in an image, it will have this kind of glowing halo around it, which really accentuates the fact that it is very bright. Now, fall glow doesn't have a whole lot of settings here. You can see it's really limited down to three. We already have our thresholds set to 0.3. We're gonna go up here to where it says medium and just switch the quality to high instead, it's a little bit more accurate as to where it's placing this group, this glow. And then we can change the size of the glow. And we can switch it up to nine, which is actually the maximum. So it's a slider that goes from six, I believe at the lowest. So six is going to be the smallest amount of glow. And we can see here it basically just disappeared around the bottom. If we zoom in here and get a little bit better an idea. So it's pretty much gone at the bottom. Then if we make it all the way up to the max which is nine, which is what we're going to set it to. We'll see the render takes a little bit of time to update, but there it is. So now we see some glow here at the bottom. Now if you'd like to see more glow present within your scene, so more areas in the highlights glowing, you're going to have to lower the threshold. So if we say lower this down to 0.2, we should start seeing a little bit more of this glow present in the Scene. Now we can see we're getting a little bit up here. We're also getting it a little bit more pronounced at the bottom, and then also in this highlight. So I think that's probably a little bit too much glow. Maybe we'll do a nice medium between the two. We'll do 0.25 for our threshold. That way it just adds a little bit more glow to our scene. I think that looks pretty good. With a little glow added to our render. Let's add one more effects to increase the distortion around the edges of our frame. Now this is an optional effect. So if you don't like it, you don't have to follow along with this. Maybe you can just watch this, see if you liked the effect and if you do, just rewind the video a little bit and then follow along. But I think it adds a little bit of interest to the render, and it just adds two more of that stylized look that we're going for. So we'll start by zooming out over here on the left. We're going to drag this glare node to the left a little bit to make room for this new node. Then we can hit shift and a go-to search. Then we're going to type in lens. So L E N, S. We're going to choose lens distortion. So we're going to place this here and we're just going to place them on the bottom one first. That'll automatically hook that up. But then we'll just take this image socket on the lens distortion and drag it up here and replace the glare one so that it's pumping it now through the glare and then also the lens distortion into the viewer node. So by just hooking this up, it hasn't really done anything. That's because we haven't adjusted any of the parameters yet. So you only good thing we're really going to adjust here is Adjusting something called dispersion. So if I make this a little bit bigger, you can see it. So we have distort and then we also have dispersion. So I'm going to set this down. I'm gonna set this a little bit too high to begin with. We'll set it to something pretty high. I'm going to set this to just point to and then hit Enter. And then we'll look at the render over here on the right side. This will take a little bit of time to update and you can see as it's doing it, it's updating it. But what this dispersion is doing is it's kind of blurring and sort of fringing the edges of our frame. So as it gets further from the center, it gets more and more distorted And as it distorts it, it kinda starts breaking those red, green, and blue channels within the image and it makes it rain Bowie and stretched on the edges. Now this isn't the kind of effect you would want on every single image. But in this case, we're already going with a stylized video gamey, low-poly look. And I think this dispersion effects kinda looks pretty cool on this image. Now again, this is optional if you don't like it, that's fine. You can make yours more distorted than mine or less distorted. But this just gives you an idea at 0.2 what this effect is doing. Now I'm not going to leave it at 0.2. I'm going to lower this down a lot, so it's a lot more subtle. I'm going to set this down to 0.05 and then hit Enter. We'll wait for this to update. Now we can see down here that rainbow effect is much more subtle. We're just getting a little bit of it or at the edges. And then it's just a little bit of character to this image. With that last compositing effect on, we're now done with our actual final image. So this is the image that will be saving out. The way we're going to save this is just by going up here. So the top, make sure you're doing this on this side. On the right viewport where our viewer node actually is. And go to Image. And then we'll choose Save As. This will bring up the option box where you get to choose where you're saving this image at. By default, it usually defaults to the location wherever the blender file is saved. In this case, it just took me right to the location where the blender file is going to let me save the image there. If I don't like that location, I can just navigate to a different file or a different location using these files over here, or navigating through the address part of the top. Over here on the right side, we can change what the file format is. So we have a few different options here. By default, it's usually PNG. But you can say about a JPEG if you'd like. In my case, I'm going to leave it on PNG. Then the only thing I'm going to change is going to change the color mode. Right now it's RGB with alpha, which is color with Alpha. We don't have an alpha channel in this. There is no transparent parts of our image. So I'm just going to change this to irregular RGB image to get rid of that alpha channel because we won't really be using it. It's not, there's no point really in including it. Then everything else here we can leave as the default. So eight for the color depth and then compression, we can just leave that at 15%. Then lastly, we just want to change the name of the image. So down here at the bottom, I'm going to highlight untitled. And I'm going to call this low poly sword. Then we'll put an underscore 01 at the end of it, just in case I wanted to render out a few different camera angles of this or maybe a version where have different colors or different lighting. I can give each one of those a different number and then I don't want to worry about overriding my original sort of dark campfire version of it. We're just going to call this low-poly sword underscore 01 and then hit Save Image. Now that Our Final Render is saved, we can share it with all of our friends and family on social media. And our next and final lesson, we'll be discussing our Class Project. I'll see you there. 10. Our Class Project!: You made it to the end of the class. Congratulations. Now that you've learned how to make a low poly sword with me, I'd like you to create a new one of your own and share it with the class. To make your sword unique, you could try things like adjusting the shape and the placement of your sword parts, Changing the colors on your sword or your environment. Or Modeling brand new objects like a small potion Model, a little fairy companion, or a sword scabbard, which is the sheath that a sword is held in when it's not in use. If you'd rather not create another sword, try your hand at another classic fantasy weapon, like a warhammer or magic staff. For my class project, I made this magic crystal staff. I created it utilizing many of the same techniques we learned during the class. After you've finished your unique low poly weapon, post the render to the project gallery and share with me and all of the other students. I'll personally review every project posted to the gallery and let you know what I love about your project, as well as anything that could use a little bit of adjustment. I can't wait to see what you all come up with. Thank you all so much for taking my class. I really appreciate it. If you enjoyed this class and want to know when I release a new one, please click the Follow button here on Skillshare. Please consider leaving an honest review for the class so you can let other students know if it's worth their valuable time. If you liked this class, please check out my teacher profile. You might just find another class of mine that interests you, such as my cute Mushroom Terrarium modeling tutorial. Thanks again, and I hope to see you in another class soon.