La 3D de Blender pour les débutants : modéliser un terrarium de champignons | Harry Helps | Skillshare
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Blender 3D for Beginners: Model a Mushroom Terrarium

teacher avatar Harry Helps, Professional 3d Artist

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      1:49

    • 2.

      Setting Up Our File

      7:57

    • 3.

      Modeling the Mushroom (Part 1)

      35:53

    • 4.

      Modeling the Mushroom (Part 2)

      22:54

    • 5.

      Modeling the Terrarium

      21:22

    • 6.

      Modeling the Log and Grass

      28:28

    • 7.

      Modeling the Frog

      15:24

    • 8.

      Lighting the Terrarium

      27:04

    • 9.

      Shading the Terrarium

      29:17

    • 10.

      Rendering the Terrarium

      16:59

    • 11.

      Our Class Project!

      1:29

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About This Class

In this course, I’ll walk you through the simple and beginner friendly process of creating a cute Mushroom Terrarium in Blender.

We’ll be going through the entire process of creating this Mushroom Terrarium from a beginner’s perspective to avoid as much confusion as possible. That means I won’t be skipping any steps or going too fast for you to keep up with me.

We’re using Blender for this tutorial, which is an amazing and totally free 3d software. The only barrier to entry is having a computer to run the software on.

In this class you can expect to learn:

  • Blender Interface and Tools: We’ll learn about many basic tools and interface elements within Blender while creating our terrarium.

  • Modeling: To create our Mushroom Terrarium from scratch, we’ll use basic modeling tools and modifiers such as Snapping and Solidify.

  • Lighting: We’ll set up a soft lighting scheme to display our terrarium in the best light.

  • Shading: Which can give objects the appearance of stylized mushroom, grass and wood.

  • Rendering: Lastly, we’ll render our final image in Blender so you can share it with your friends and family on social media.

When we’re done you’ll have all the skills you need to create a cute terrarium of your very own! 

For our Class Project, you'll be doing just that! I’d like you to create a new terrarium with a unique design and share it with the class!

I’ll personally review every project uploaded to the gallery and give you feedback on what you’ve done fantastic, as well as anything that could use some adjustment.

I hope you’ll join me on this fun beginner’s journey through Blender by making your very own cute Mushroom Terrarium!

Meet Your Teacher

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Harry Helps

Professional 3d Artist

Top Teacher


Hi, I'm Harry! I have over a decade of experience in 3d modeling, texturing, animating and post-processing. I've worked for a lot of different types of companies during my career, such as a major MMORPG video game studio, a video production company and an award winning architectural visualization company. I have worked as a Studio Director, Lead 3d Artist, 3d Background Artist, Greenscreen Editor and Intern UI Artist. My professional work has been featured in "3d Artist" magazine with accompanying tutorial content. I have extensive experience with Blender, 3d Max, VRay and Photoshop.

I love sharing my passion for 3d art with anyone wanting to learn!

Get full access to all my classes and thousands more entirely free using this link!See full profile

Level: Beginner

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, my name is Harry and every professional 3D artists with over a decade of experience, I've worked most recently as a studio director. I'm going award-winning architectural visualization studio. We're seeing on screen now are examples of my past professional work. In this class, I'll walk you through the simple and beginner friendly process of creating a cute Mushroom Terrarium in Blender will be going through the entire process of creating this Mushroom Terrarium from a beginner's perspective to avoid as much confusion as possible. That means I won't be skipping any steps or going too fast for you to keep up with me. We're going to be using Blender for this tutorial, which is an amazing and totally free 3d software, the only barrier to entry is having a computer to run the software on. In this class, you can expect to learn the Blender Interface and it's Tools. We'll learn about the many basic tools and interface elements within Blender while creating our terrarium, Modeling. To create our Mushroom Terrarium from scratch, we'll be using basic modeling tools and modifiers such as Snapping and Solidify Lighting. We'll set up a soft lighting scheme to display our terrarium in the best light Shading, Which can give the objects the appearance of stylized mushroom, grass and wood. And Lastly, Rendering, we'll render our final image in Blender so you can share it with your friends and family on social media. When we're done, you'll have all the skills you need to create a cute Mushroom Terrarium of your very own. For our Class Project, you'll be doing just that. I'd like you to create a new terrarium with a unique design and share it with the class. I'll personally review every project uploaded to the gallery and give you feedback on what you've done fantastic, as well as anything that could use a little bit of adjustment. I hope you'll join me on this fund beginner's journey through Blender by making your very own cute Mushroom Terrarium 2. Setting Up Our File: If this is your first time taking in Blender class, I'd highly recommend you start with my complete beginner's guide to Blender first, this class was designed for the absolute beginner to Blender and 3D Art in general, we cover every single necessary topic in order to get you up to speed and running in Blender will accomplish this, but short and focused lessons that cover each topic from a beginner's perspective. Utilizing a well-organized starter file, we end the class with an easy project where you set up and customize your very own cozy camp site. With that out of the way, let's continue with the lesson. In this lesson, we'll be going over some settings to prepare a file for future rendering. Let's begin. After first launching Blender, we're going to choose D general new file type to begin our project. We're going to click that. And now we're ready to start adjusting some preliminary settings. We'll start by going up here to edit, then down to Preferences. Going to drag this window over here. And then you want to go to the system tab here on the left. Then up at the top here these are the settings will be changing. This cycle render devices section here essentially just tells Blender when using the cycles render, which will be using, which software, in which hardware should it be using to actually accomplish the rendering? If Blender allows you to choose the optics tab here from the top, for some reason it won't let you choose optics due to the hardware. You can instead choose cuda. Could is just a little bit slower than optics. Optics is a little bit newer. But if you don't have the option to use optics, kudo will work just fine. You'll just notice that your renders are just a little bit slower than maybe if you were able to use optics with either cuda or optic selected, make sure you have all the checkboxes down here checked. Now what you see in these checkboxes will be different because this is actually showing the hardware that my specific computer is using. Your computer will presumably be different than mine, which means the different pieces of hardware lists will be different. However, you should still be checking all of them on because you want Blender to have access to every piece of hardware that you have in your computer in order to actually render the project. Once you have everything checked, we can now close this window. We're going to go over here to this little tab here called the render properties window. It looks like the backside of a little digital cameras. So at this tab selected, we're going to go down through a few of these settings here and then we're going to adjust them to meet the needs of this project. So to start with, we're going to change our render engine from EV, two cycles, like I mentioned before. Since we switch this the cycles, we're getting a whole bunch of different new settings. Now we're going to change the device from CPU to GPU compute, which will just allow it to use the GPU and Rendering, which will be faster than the CPU. And almost all situations. Now go down to the viewport section. We're going to leave this top number the same. So we're going to leave this checkbox on and it have it set to 0.1. However, we are going to change the MAC samples from 1024. We're going to switch these two, just 100 because we won't need that many samples. The higher the number here, the slower the render will be. Now we can scroll down. We're going to twirl open this little window here called de-noise. We're going to check this on. Now we're going to switch our de-noise or to optics. So in this case, optics will allow the de-noising to be a lot faster. And it won't be quite as accurate as maybe the other methods. But for the viewport render, which is just the viewport right here that we're seeing. We're going to want speed over quality because we're just testing things in the viewport. We're not actually final rendering anything here. If for some reason optics is not a choice, you can just leave this on automatic. Now we're going to scroll down to the render settings just below it. These settings here are responsible for the only for the final render above here. This is just for the viewport settings server, whatever we set here has no bearing on the final render, and then vice versa here. So anything we set here has no bearing on the viewport render and is only meant for the final render. Again, we're going to leave the noise threshold checked on and leave the default value here. This time we're going to change our max samples from 40 96 down to 500 better than our viewport, but not quite as high as the default value. Let's scroll down to where it says de-noise below this. Throw this open. I'm we'll notice by default de-noise is checked on, which is good. And then we want to make sure that we are using the open image denoising. We don't want to use optics in this case because optics is faster, but also less high-quality. For our final render, we want it to be the best quality possible. So we're going to use open image de-noise, which is slower but looks better. Lastly, we're going to go all the way down here to the bottom. We're going to twirl open color management. Scroll down further. Right now you should have it set to view transform, and that should be set to filmmaker. That's the default. But under look it says none. So instead of none, we're going to switch this to high contrast. So we won't notice any change here. But essentially once we get to the Rendering process of this, both in the viewport as well as the final render. It's going to increase the contrast of our final image. Just write within Blender, we will have to take its any other software to do this. Blender is just going to ramp up the contrast of our final image, which in this case we'll actually make it look better. Now we're going to go to the output properties, which looks like this little printer here, printing out a little photo. This is where we're going to change the resolution of our final image. We're going to change it from 1920 by ten at two instead a square image. So we're going to switch this to 2048. By 2048. So now we'll have a square image. We can actually see here if you notice, the camera actually switched to a square format as well. So when we're setting up our camera position will be actually able to set it up with that square framing as well. Now let's save this file on a location that we can easily find in the future. So we can use this exact same file for each lesson. So we don't want to start a new file for each lesson because one, we'll lose our progress from the previous lesson that we've done also will lose any of these settings. The settings are per File, not per program. So in this case, all these settings that we've changed, if you open up a brand new, fresh file rather than the one we're about to save now, you'll lose all the settings we've just changed. We're gonna go up here to File. Go to Save As, or you can just hit Shift Control S if you'd prefer that. We're going to click this. And then once this option box pops up, you want to navigate to wherever you'd like to save this file. I suggest, like I said, saving this somewhere that you'll easily be able to find in the future. So whether that's a folder on your desktop or in your documents folder, that's up to you. Just make sure it's easy to find. I found the location that I'd like to save mine in. Now we can just go down here and we're gonna give it a name. I'm going to call mine Mushroom, Terrarium, underscore 01. The reason I'm adding this 01 here at the end is just in case in the future, I'm doing something that I think might not look good, and I wanna be sure that I can come back to the original file. I'll put a 01 at the end of this. That way if I want to make another version, I can call it 02 or 03. And I know that I haven't overwritten the original version of it. So we're just going to have our start out at 01. It's gonna be called Mushroom Terrarium. Now we can just hit Save. As with these settings saved, we're ready to proceed with the project. The next lesson we'll be starting a model of our Mushroom. I'll see you there. 3. Modeling the Mushroom (Part 1): In this lesson, we're going to start modeling our Mushroom. Let's begin. Now before we do any modeling, make sure you've opened up the file we saved in the last lesson with all of our settings changed. If you haven't done that already, take the moment to find the file that you've saved in the last lesson with the settings changed. Open that up, then that's the file we're going to begin with. With your settings file open. We can now begin. The first thing we're going to do is select this cube here in the middle, and then we're just going to delete it. So you can either delete or X on your keyboard and then just choose Delete. Now we can hit shift and a to bring up our Add menu. Go to Mesh and then go down to cylinder. Down here at the bottom left, we'll see an option box that we can twirl open so that we can adjust the values for this cylinder here. We're going to start by leaving the vertices on 32 was just how many cuts that it has going around it. The less number we have here, the more jagged the edges will be. So we're going to leave ours at 32, which shouldn't most likely be the default. And then we're going to go to radius. We're going to set this by clicking on it. We're going to set this to 0.2 m and then hit Enter. So we're going to make it a much smaller. Now we're going to set the depth to 1.75 m. Then it entered with these parameters set. We can now go up here to the top-right. And we're going to rename this cylinder to stem. Instead. We're just going to double-click on the word cylinder. Then type in stem. So we know what this object is going to be. Then we can hit Enter to confirm the name change. With the stems still selected. We can hit M on our keyboard for move to collection. Then we're going to choose new collection here at the top. Then we're going to name this new collection Mushroom Terrarium. Then hit Okay, or enter. Now we can see here that it's actually moved this stem directly into this new collection that we've created. Just a quick way to make a new collection and then drag a new object into it immediately. The point of a collection is just to help organize our files and also lets us easily turn off and on an entire group of objects. So you can see here that by just clicking this little checkbox here, I've hit that entire group of objects, which includes the default byte in the camera, all in One-click. Let's rename this original collection here that we had. We're just going to double-click on the word collection here at the top. This is the one that has the camera and the light in it. We're going to call this render scene. Make sure I'll capitalize this first letter and then hit Enter. So now we know that anything for the render scenes, so things like the background, the lights and the cameras. We're going to put in this collection here, which is essentially a folder. It's just a way to organize the file. And then anything regarding the Mushroom Terrarium, we're going to create input into this collection. To make this collection the defaults so that any object we create will by default go into this collection. We just need to click this little white box here. So we can see there's a very faint little outline here surrounding this white box. And that just means that is now the default collections. Any new object recreate is going to default into that collection rather than the original collection. And let's make sure we have our stem selected again. We can zoom in here a little bit and I'm going to right-click. And then I'm going to choose Shade Smooth. We're going to see here that it shades the, the top and the bottom. It makes it look a little odd right now. But don't worry about that. We'll be fixing that later. Now let's go into our front orthographic view, which is a nice flat view that will be able to work in while either moving this stem or shaping it. So there's two different ways that we can do this. So the first easiest way to do this would just be to click on this little negative Y bubble up here. So as we move around our viewport here, we can see that this also corresponds with our movements. And the negative Y view here is equivalent to the front view. So we're going to consider this, the front side of this Mushroom, which is looking from the negative y-direction. So we can just click on this little bubble here. And we can see here that it pops this into a different view, which is nice and flat. We can also see the grid binded here as well. However, soon as you move your camera, so soon as you try to rotate, It's going to immediately pop you out of that view. So it's a good way to know whether or not you're in an orthographic view is where the greatest placed. So if the grid is on the background like this, you know, you're in an orthographic view. Then if you rotate and you see the greatest going flat back into space, almost like as if it's the ground, then you know, you're in a perspective view. So another way to enter that same view is to hit the Tilde key on your keyboard here. So the tilta key is the key directly to the left of the one on your number rho, and above your tab key, it has a horizontal squiggly line, as well as like a kind of almost lexicon apostrophe If you hit that, this is going to bring up a radial menu where you can choose all the different views that you have. In this case, we can just hover over the front view here and then just click this and it'll pop us directly into the front view. So this is a really quick way to just hit the Tilde key. And then you can switch to the different views that you have just by hovering over this part of the radial menu. We're just gonna go back to the front view. We're going to click that. Now we're ready to start moving and shaping this Mushroom stem. So our first task here is to just move this Mushroom stem up so that it's sitting on the zero line here. So right on this red line here, this is the x-axis. We want the bottom of this to be sitting on the 00 origin of our world. So we're just going to go up here and select our Move tool. With the Move Tool selected, we can now lift this up by grabbing the blue handle. We're just going to pull it up so that the bottom of this stem reaches the red line here. So we can zoom in here so we can see it a little bit better. I think that looks pretty good and we're pretty close. It doesn't have to be perfect. It really doesn't have to be. So we're just trying to get it pretty close here. Because eventually this is going to intersect with the bottom, the base of the Terrarium. We're either way we're going to be cutting off the bottom of the stem anyway. The stem moved up to the origin. We can now begin the shaping process. To do this, we're going to start by enabling something called X-Ray mode. To enable X-Ray mode, you just hold down Alt on your keyboard and then it Z. At the same time. We can see here that are objects kinda goes see-through. So now we're able to see this grid through it. So if I hit Alt and Z again, you can see now it's opaque and we can't see through it. Then when I enable X-Ray mode, we can see through it. Now, another way to enable X-Ray mode is up here at the top-right. This little button here, by clicking this, this is the same thing as just hitting Alt and Z. Altman Z is just the key bind, whereas this is the interface button. Okay, so now that we have x-ray mood on, you might be wondering, what does X-Ray mode do? Why do I want to see through my model? So you don't have to follow along for this part yet, but I'm going to hit tab to answer my edit mode. Now if I zoom out, I'm going to turn off X-Ray mode. If I just drag select over this objects. So first time I deselect it, I'm just going to drag select over this. Now I dragged selected over the entire model. So you would expect that it's selected the entire model here, at least through the middle. Over if I rotate my camera, I'll notice that it only selected the front faces. So it only selected basically what was facing me at the time. I do it again here. Again, it looks like it's selected everything, but soon as I rotate, it hasn't, it's only selected. What I could see. That's true of this as well. Now this would be true of all of our different editing mode. So same thing with vertex and edge. It's only going to select what I can see when I'm not an x-ray mode. So by switching into X-Ray mode, by holding Alt and Z, I'm gonna go back to my face mode here. Now when I select across it, I've selected the entire model because I've selected through the model by using the x-ray mode. So it's really important when you're working on models and you want to make sure everything remains symmetrical, especially when you're an orthographic view, when it's hard to tell what the other side of your model is doing. You have to make sure that you're an x-ray mode will be an X-ray mode a lot of the time when we're modeling. And then we'll me jump out of it. It's usually to do something like move the model or apply a modifier. Or maybe we're working on the shading at that point. But pretty much most of the time when we're working on the actual model itself and changing its shape will be an X-ray mode. Okay, so let's reset this here so we can catch back up. So I'm gonna go back to front view. And I'm currently just an X-ray mode. If you haven't gotten to this point, you just hit Alt and Z gets x-ray mode. And then make sure you're in your front view, which is either the negative Y or by holding down Tilda and then choosing front. Okay, so now we need to hit tab to enter our edit mode, which is how I'm able to select the faces, the vertex is or the edges of this model. Now that we're in edit mode, I'm going to hit two on my keyboard, which is the quick way to get into our edge mode. So edges are just these lines here connecting the vertices. Now that we're in edge mode, we can drag select over the middle of our model here. And that'll select every single one of the edges all the way around the cylinder. Now we're going to right-click. Then we're gonna go up here to the top where it says sub-divide. We're going to click that. Then we're going to change the number of cuts on the sub-divide to three. So as we turn this up, we can see that we're adding more cuts across the center of the cylinder. The more cuts we have, means we have more geometry to work with. So if we wanted to curve this or add some width adjustments, we can do that because we now have things to actually select. So before we had new cuts in the middle, so we couldn't make any adjustments to the vertices are the edges in the center of the cylinder. By cutting it up, we now have more vertices and edges to work with. So we can change the shape of the cylinder, thereby the stem a little bit easier. With our cuts placed, we can now hit one when our keyboard to switch to our vertex mode. Alternatively, we could just click this button here at the top. It's now we're in our vertex mode. And what we're gonna do is actually just tried to flare the bottom of this stem out and maybe taper the top a little bit. So let's start with the bottom here. We're just going to drag select over the entire bottom here. Now we can hit S on our keyboard to scale. Now we can just drag our mouse to scale this up a little bit. We're going to scale this up to about here. This doesn't have to be exactly what I'm doing here. You just want to visually match what I'm doing. So don't worry about if you're scaling it up exactly to 1.84 for your scale, just look at it and just try to tie it up. Now we're going to select the middle here. We're going to scale this one down slightly, just a little bit. Then we're gonna do the same thing for the next one. We're going to scale this one just even a little bit smaller than the last. Then at the top one, we're going to scale this one down just a tiny bit, maybe about the same size. This one. You can either make at the exact same size or just a hair smaller. You don't want it to be quite so tapered. Okay. It's now we can see here that we have a nice tapered, cone-shaped for the stem. Let's add a few more specific cuts to the stem to help define the shape a little bit more. We're going to hover over this bottom area here where we have the flared base. We're going to hit Control and our to start the cut mode. We can see here where we hover. We can see that we have a yellow line. Once we click, we have now placed a cut. However, we're still able to slide it back and forth. This is similar to sub-divide, except we have a lot more control over exactly where the cut lands. It's not just going to average them all out. So after your first click when you see the yellow line, now you have a cut but you can still move it. We're gonna move this down here towards the bottom, a little bit past the, or a little bit up from the bottom rather. And then we're going to click again to confirm this cut. So we can now see here we have another cut here and now the cut doesn't move because we've confirmed the placement of it. Before we do anything else, we're going to add another cut above this one. We're going to mouse over above here and then hit Control R. So we see the yellow line. We're going to click. Now we're going to leave this one pretty much in the middle here. We don't really need to move this one much. So we're just going to click again and drop it there in the middle. Now its shape the bottom of our stem here to make it a little bit more bulb-like. The bottom of a Mushroom Stan, stem tends to, at least in some varieties of Mushroom, kind of get a little bit more circular or Blake at the very base of it. So we can zoom in here. And with this vertices selected here, the last cut we just placed. So these ones here, we're just going to hit S. Now we can scale this up. We're going to scale up a little bit past where the bottom vertices are now. So you want it to kinda go a little bit outside the bounds of that. Right about here. So we can see the slight angle that we have here. Now we can select the very bottom, very bottom of the stem. We're going to ask again to scale, and we're going to scale these ends. We're rounding this off at the bottom about here. Now we can see we have most sort of a rounded shape here at the bottom. Now let's zoom out a little bit. We're going to select this row vertices here. We're actually going to slide these just upward, vertically in order to lengthen this bulb shape at the bottom. So I'm gonna switch over here to my move tool by clicking this little Move Tool symbol here. I'm going to grab the blue handle to move it up in the Z. We're just going to drag this up so that the base of this has a little bit more of a gradual slope, more of almost like a teardrop shape. We can drag it about here. And now we have a lot more gradual, kind of rounded bottom to the stem. Now we're going to add a curve to the overall stems so that the cap for the Mushroom once we place it, isn't quite so static and flat and I'll actually be at site of an angle. Let's zoom in here. We're going to start by grabbing this top set of vertices here. Then we're going to hit R on our keyboard for rotate. And now we can rotate these. This really doesn't have to be a super severe rotation here, maybe about 20 degrees. You can see up at the very top left below where it says file and edit. On the top-left of your screen, you can see the amount of degrees. So we're actually going to move it negative 20, maybe, maybe even a little bit less. We're going like the negative 20, negative 18 range. Then we're just going to drag this over by grabbing these handles here. So you can either grab the green square here so that you can still move it up and down as well as left and right. Or you can just grab the red handle here so you only move it left or right. We're just going to move this off a little bit to the side here. Balance out that rotation a little bit by just rotating it back a little bit. It seemed a little bit too severe as they move to the, to the left. Now I'm going to drag select over these middle ones here. I'm going to rotate these two somewhat match the angle a little bit more shallow than the last one, maybe closer to the ten range. Going to drag this over a little bit. Then same thing again down here. Rotate these even less, just a tiny bit of rotation. Maybe just drag these over just a little bit. You can fiddle with the shape here to get the curvature to how you want it. That's a great thing about having such low vertices count here is it's really easy to make some pretty drastic changes to your model just by grabbing a single row of them, a single loop, and just moving them up or down or left or right, you can really pretty dynamically change your model. So in this case here, maybe I want to move this row of vertices here up just a little bit more. The curvature is a little bit more spread out. Same thing with these. I'm just going to move these up a little bit. This is more personal preference if you'd like how yours currently looks. Don't feel the need to change anything that I'm changing here, just try to get a general curve. Okay, so now if you're a stem looks pretty similar to mine, you should be good. We can now rotate our camera. So I've rotate our view port here. We get out of our orthographic view and back into our perspective view. And we're going to be in setting the faces on the very top here. So first, let's switch to our face mode by hitting three on the keyboard or just clicking this little button here. Now select this top face and you'll want to select close to where these dots are. So when you're an x-ray mode, you tend to select through an object which is sort of annoying, but they tell you where you're supposed to select these faces by these tiny little dots here. So if you collect near the dot, you should be able to select a face. No problem with this face selected. Now we're going to hit I on our keyboard for inset. Since we hit I, now we can move our mouse here and we can see what it's doing. So it's sort of shrinking the central face that we had originally selected. And it's creating a whole new loop of faces going around it. So it's in setting this face. So we're just going to inset this just a little bit so that we have a small row of faces that go around it. The reason we're doing this is for the next step, we're going to be adding smoothing to this. If there isn't enough edges here, the smoothing is going to crush the top of the stem. It's going to make it really pointy and kind of cone like. Now we wanted to stay somewhat cylindrical. So by adding more faces here, we're sort of reinforcing the top of this stems that it doesn't get crushed by the smoothing. We're gonna do this here at the top, which we've done now, the top. Then we're going to rotate around to the very bottom of our stem and do the same thing because we again, don't want this to get crushed. So we're going to select near the center of this bottom face. And I for insert. And now we can insert this slightly about the same distances we, the last one right around there. So now we have a small ring of faces that go around this bottom of the stem. With that done, we can now hit tab to exit edit mode. Then we can hit Alt and Z to exit our x-ray mode. Then we're gonna go over here to this tab on the right that looks like a little blue wrench icon, which is our Modifier tab. Then we're gonna go up here to add modifier Maria. Click this drop-down. We're gonna go all the way down here to the bottom and we're going to choose subdivision surface modifier. You might have noticed soon as we click this, that it actually smooths out this object here. If I click this little monitor icon, it'll just disable this effect here only in the viewport. I'm going to turn this off and we can see what it's doing right away. So at the top here where it was a nice 90 degree angle, when we turn this back on, it's kind of rounded this off. However, it's also doing it is throughout the center as well, which is actually what we're going for. By turning this one and off, you can see how much more smooth and stem-like this is getting by just having this modifier turned on it. It's kind of smoothing it out into a nice smooth teardrop shape. We can control how smooth this is by turning up the levels on this. So right now a defaulted to one for the viewport. However, it's set to two for the render, which means that in our view port here, it's showing a single level of smoothing. But if we rendered this image, it would actually have an additional level of smoothing applied to it after the fact. In our case, we're actually just going to turn these both up to two so that both of them, so both the viewport and the render, or going to display that same amount of smoothing, which is two levels of smoothing. To give you a really quick example of what exactly this smoothing is doing, you don't need to follow along with this. This is just for demonstration purposes. But I'm gonna go up here. I'm going to turn on my wireframe so that we can see the wireframe even when we're not editing the model. And then I'm going to turn off this optimal display so that it's not showing us a nice clean version of it. It's showing us the actual version of the model. Now when I turn this off, you can see this is what we originally were working with. Then when I turn it back, one, we can see that while the model was much more smooth, it's also added a whole lot more faces and cuts to the model. That's the way that it's able to get this more smooth. So essentially it's cutting up the Model a whole bunch, adding a lot more cuts based on the number of levels of smoothing we have here. So this is the subdivision level. So you can see here at level one it has a lot less cuts, but it's also a lot less smooth As we turn this up, you can see it's getting more and more cut up, but it's also getting more and more smooth to it. To an extent at a certain point, you really can't tell it's getting any smoother and all you're doing is adding faces, which will make your render take longer. It'll make your scene run a little bit slower. So you really don't want to have more smoothing and then you need, but if you need some moving, this is a really easy way to do it. As it adds more of these cuts, it's just averaging the distance between all of these cuts and kind of blending all of these edges together and smoothing out your sides. For our situation. This two levels of smoothing here as plenty we don't need anymore of that. So we're just going to leave it on to for both of them. Now I'm gonna reset my scene here by turning back on my optimal, then going here and turning off wireframe. So it's back to how you have it. Now before we move on from the stem, Let's add one more final detail to it to just give it a little bit more life. We're going to hit Tab to go back into our edit mode. Now we can zoom out slightly. Now we don't need to go into X-Ray mode here because we're not doing anything where we're going to select through the model. First thing you wanna do is go up to your edge mode by either clicking this button or hitting to when your keyboard and that'll quickly switch to it. Now what we're going to do is hold down Alt, wondering your keyboard. Then we're going to click on one of these vertical lines here. So we can see here by holding Alt, it selected the entirety of this line all the way top and bottom, the entirety of the loop. Now it stops here because the loop breaks. But it's going the entire length of that loop. If I just clicked, it's just going to select a single segment of that. So again, you want to hold Alt before you click on one of these so that it selects the entire loop. And we're gonna be selecting for these loops on all for the different sort of cardinal directions here. We selected one here. Now I'm going to hold Alt and shift this time so that I'm making sure that I'm both selecting the entire loop as well as adding to the original selection. I'm going hold Alt and Shift at this time to select this one. So now I have both of them selected at the same time. Then again, Alt and Shift to select on this side. Then Alt and Shift and then select one roughly across from this side. It's now if four of them selected all the way around the Mushroom stem. It's important that you have all four selected at the same time for this next step. So make sure that you're using Alt and Shift to add to your selection each time you can't do this one at a time. What we're about to do. Now we're going to switch to our scale tool by clicking this little symbol here, this little box with the arrow on it. Then we're going to be scaling these inward just in the X, in the y-direction. We're going to use this little blue handle here. So this little blue square here to do that. So this means that it's going to scale in both the X and Y at the same time. So I'm going to grab this little blue handle here. Then I'm gonna start scaling them in just slightly. You can see as we do this, we've actually start adding grooves to the inside of this, the stem here. So we don't want to make these really deep. I'd say visually they should look something about like this. So we can see as we rotate it around, we have these grooves that go up the side of the stem. So it just adds a little bit more interests to the stem. So it's not just this perfectly smooth kind of teardrop shape. We've also got some indications of how it's growing. With that done, we can now hit tab to exit our edit mode and get a little bit better view of exactly what we've done. Now we have our stem here and we have the groups going up it. Now that our stem is done, let's make a cap for our Mushroom. So we're going to hit shift and a to bring up our Add menu. We're going to go to Mesh and we're going to choose Ico sphere. We can click this. Now we can see we have a sphere pop up here and it's just kinda comprised of a whole bunch of different triangles together. Down here at the bottom left, we also have the same option box like we did for the cylinder. And we can change some of these settings. So we're going to set our subdivisions here to four. We can do that just by clicking these little arrows here, just typing in four. So we can see we've added subdivisions to this, so it has more edges to it. Then we're going to make the radius just a little bit bigger by sending it to 1.1 m and then hitting Enter. With these settings changed. We can now go up here to the top-right, going to double-click on the word I ecosphere. And we're going to call this cap, cap and then hit Enter. Now you can right-click with the light goes through your selected and then choose Shade Smooth so that it's nice and smooth. Point here to make about the right-click and then shade smooth versus flat is this doesn't actually add any additional edges to this. This isn't doing the same thing as what the subdivision surface modifier, this thing here was doing for the stem. Because this is actually adding additional edges, additional cuts faces to our model to make it physically smoother. It's actually moving the geometry to make it smoother. Whereas when we're right-clicking and choosing shade smooth or shade flat We can zoom in here. So if we see here, it might be a little bit difficult to notice because it's pretty subtle. But we can see here we have these flat edges here that we're seeing all the way around our cap. When I choose to shade smooth, those don't change. All it's doing is visually shading this, visually smoothing out this ecosphere. It's not adding any additional geometry here. Nothing is moving. So you don't always need to add a whole bunch of different edges and cuts to a model to make it smooth. If it's already relatively smooth, looking from the silhouette here and you just need the surface itself to look smooth. You can just do Shade smooth or if you need so you can leave it on shades flat. So I'm gonna switch my Mac the Shade Smooth. And now we can go into our front view again, either using the tilta key by clicking that and then choosing front, or just clicking the little negative Y bubble. Now let's go into our x-ray mode by hitting Alt and Z. We can zoom in here. And now I'm going to move this cap up here, up to the very top of the stem. So I just kinda want to visually line it up so that this little orange dot, which is the center, the pivot of the cap objects. We're just going to sit it here in the sensor top of the stem that we've made, which is going to involve moving it off to the left slightly because we have curved this. Now we can hit tab to enter our edit mode. Then we're gonna go into our vertex mode by hitting one on the keyboard. Now to easily make this cap shape, we're going to be using something called proportional editing. So what exactly does proportional editing do? So by default, without proportional editing turned on. If I grab one of these vertices, I switched to my move tool here and I move it. You can see it's just moving this one single vertices. It's not actually moving anything surrounding it is just moving this one singular point. Then if I Control Z, I can undo that. What proportional editing is going to allow us to do is wherever we select, It's going to give us a falloff of influence around this. So that will me move this singular point. It's also going to move any connecting point or point close to that point along with it. So it almost moves more like it's almost like it's made of clay. So it gets rid of that really inorganic movement, of just moving a single vertices of an object and makes it move a little bit more organically similar to like it's made of something soft like clay. To enable proportional editing. We can go up here to the top. We'll see we have this little bullseye icon here next to this hill shaped object. We're just going to click this little bullseye. Now we've enabled proportional editing. So when I start moving this object or rather this vertices, we can see here that I have this big circle on my screen, and it's also moving much more than that single vertices. I'm going to Control Z, that change there. The way we're going to change the size of that influence is as you start moving an object. So you start moving this vertices here. We can scroll up or down on our mouse wheel to change the size of this influence, you can see is as I make the influence smaller, it gets a lot smaller and it makes it a little bit closer to how it was before I even had it turned on. But as I scroll down on my mouse wheel, it'll make it larger. And it makes a lot more soft and a lot more clay-like almost. You have to make sure that you're moving the vertices or the face or the edge or whatever you're moving. Before you start adjusting it, you won't even be able to adjust the falloff until you start moving the object. As you start moving it, then you can fine tune your, the size of your fall off and then actually finished the movement you wanted to start. Again. Let's Control Z. This is I was just a, just an example. Now the actual movement we wanna do is to go all the way here at the very bottom of this, we're going to select one of the bottom most vertices we have here, which appears to be this one. We're going to select this the lowest possible vertices right here in the center SCAP sphere that we made. Now with that selected, we can grab just the blue handle here. We're just going to move it up and down. And what we wanna do is make this follow up. You're really pretty large. And we're going to start moving this up until it almost starts going inside out. So you can see as we move it basically up through itself, we're starting create that shape of a cap for the Mushroom. Now if it seems like it's getting too flat, we can just scroll down or rather scroll up when your mouse wheel to make the influence smaller. So by scrolling up or making the influence smaller and we can adjust to see how much curvature we actually want in this. Make mine, it should make yours pretty similar to mine. But again, this is kind of personal preference. Every Mushroom in the wild is different, so there's no reason why yours needs to be a carbon copy of mine. We're going to move it to somewhere in this range, right about here. And then we're just going to let go. So now that'll confirm that movement and move all those vertices as well. Now we can go up to the very top of the cap here. Select this top most vertices and top center. And then if you wanted to flatten this out just a little bit, you could we can pull this down just a little bit. Now I might need to make the influence a little bit smaller. So I'm gonna scroll up on my mouse wheel. So that's not moving quite so much. I'm just going to flatten this out slightly Somewhere in that range. Now we're done moving these. We can turn off proportional editing by just clicking this button here. Then we can hit tab to exit our edit mode. Then will notice while we've changed the shape of the cap, the origin for this model is still done here at the bottom center of the stem. Which means if we rotate this, if we just hit R to rotate, it's actually rotating from the orange dot. We want to change how this is going to rotate. So I'm just going to right-click to undo that. Now with the cap selected, we're gonna go to object set origin, which is that little orange dot. Then we're going to choose origin to geometry, which means it's going to move the origin to the center of the geometry. If you choose geometry to origin, it's going to move the center of the geometry down to meet the origin. So in our case, I'm just going to move the origin and then I'll be able to place the geometry however I'd like. We're going to choose origin to geometry. And then when we click this, we can see this little orange dot here now pops to the center of mass for this. Which means if I rotate, it now rotates a lot more logically. Using our move tool here. Let's just move this down that it meets the top of our stem. Now we're going to have to move it a little bit further down into the stem. Because this line we're seeing here is actually the inside edge. So the inside surface of this cap. So we want to make sure that the stem at least intersects a little bit into this line here. We're gonna move it down here. Now I can hit R to rotate. Then we're going to rotate it so that pretty much matches the rotation of the stem. Rotated here. And then if it seems like it's rotated a little bit too much for your liking, that's fine. We don't have to exactly match the rotation of the stem. We can rotate it a little bit flatter. Maybe somewhere in that range. Then just pull it down slightly so that it'll at least goes up through the into the cap. We want it to inter, intersect with the inside of the copier with the stem. Now let's hit Alt and Z to exit our x-ray mode, because we don't really need that at the moment. We can rotate around to see our Mushroom. Now we're going to add a subdivision surface modifier, which is how we smooth the stem. We're going to add that now to the cap as well. So go over here, the little blue wrench Modifier tab, click Add Modifier, and then just choose subdivision surface. Now in this case, we'll notice that the level one of the smoothing and we're seeing the viewport actually is doing a pretty good job. This was already a relatively smooth Model. It wasn't super jagged like our stem was, so we don't really need this second level of smoothing. We're actually going to turn the render value down to one to meet the same thing that we're currently seeing in the report. So in this case, we're going to have them both set to one. And that's pretty much plenty of smoothing for our cap. It looks just as smooth as the stem does below. The bulk of the work done on our Mushroom. All that's left is to add the spots to the cap. Will be creating those spots, as well as adding a smaller Mushroom next to the larger one. In the next lesson. I'll see you there. 4. Modeling the Mushroom (Part 2): In this lesson, we'll be adding spots to our Mushroom, as well as making a smaller Mushroom next to our larger Mushroom. Let's begin. First thing we need to do is start by creating the spot. So we're going to hit Shift a, go to Mesh. And we're going to create a UV sphere. We're going to click that and then we'll see our sphere pop-up. Let's quickly change some of these settings down here at the bottom left. We're going to change the rings value from 16. We're going to turn it up to 24. That hit Enter. Now we're going to change the radius down to 0.15 m and then hit Enter. Now we can go up here to the top right where it says sphere. We're going to double-click on that. And then we're gonna change this to spot this pot and then hit Enter. Now we can right-click with our sphere selected, and then just choose Shade smooth. Let's zoom out. And then we're going to move this new spot objects up above the cap for our Mushroom. Now let's go into our front view by hitting Tab or rather hitting Tilda and then choosing front or just clicking the little bubble can now zoom in here. Hit Tab tend to our edit mode. Three to enter our face mode. And then Alt Z to enter our x-ray mode. Now, drag select over the bottom of the sphere. And make sure you include up through these dots here. So we want to actually select the entirety of the bottom half here. So make sure when you drag selecting that you go pass these little dots here that I mentioned the previous lesson about how this select these faces. It's like you pass them, that we actually select this face. Then with these faces selected and we can now delete them by either hitting delete or X. Then we're gonna go down here. We're going to choose Delete and then two faces. Now to, to go into your edge mode. I'm going to rotate my camera here just to show you what's going on here. If you don't feel like rotating your camera, that's fine. I'm going to rotate mine. My camera. Zoom in here on the bottom of the spot. Now what we're going to do is hold Alt and then click on this bottom edge here. Now you can do it from the front view, except you can't really get an idea of exactly what it's doing. So I have this now selected. Then I'm going to hit F on my keyboard for Phil. So when I hit F, it's actually going to fill this in with a new face. So rather than it being hollow like it was before, we've selected all these border edges here, hit F to fill them in with a new face. That's another thing you wouldn't be able to see from the front view. Again, you can do all this in the front of you. There's nothing wrong with that. It won't change anything. But as a beginner, I figured it might be nice for you to actually see what's going on here. So with that done, I'm gonna go back to my front view. So Tilda, then front and zoom in here. Now I'm going to hit tab to exit edit mode. So I don't need to be in edit mode for this. Now I can hit N on my keyboard to bring up the side menu here. Then we're going to switch to the item tab, which is the very top tab here. The rendering code down here to where it says scale. We're going to choose the zq scale here and click on this. And we're going to type in 0.35 and then hit Enter. We can see here that it's squashed this down into this kind of flattens, more of sort of like a bumpy spots shape that we've created. Now that we scaled this down, we went to apply this scale so that Blender knows going forward than it assumes that this current size of the object, the current scale of it is actually the default scale. So any adjustments we make after the fact, it will assume that this new shape is the default shape of it. So to apply the scale, we can hit control and a at the same time. And then we're going to choose Apply Scale. Let's now we can see over here on our right side, the Z no longer says 0.35. It says one, which means Blender now thinks that this is exactly how the model started out as won't scale down different properties going forward to accommodate that 0.35 scale that we did previously. We can now hit N, tied this menu here. Now we're going to go back into our edit mode with tab. We want to be in edge mode again, which is what we're currently in. So to on your keyboard, if you're not, now what we wanna do is actually select the loop here. So the second lowest loop, we're going to hold down Alt and then click on this second lowest loop here. And then we're going to hit X on our keyboard. Instead of deleting these edges, we're actually going to dissolve them. So if we just deleted this edge, it's actually going to delete every face that's attached to this edge as well because those faces would need that edge to exist. So instead by dissolving this edge, we essentially just remove the edge. So when I click that and we can see the edge goes away and it just completes these faces here as if the edge just never existed to begin with. So with that edge dissolved, now we can hold down Alt, then select this bottom most edge here. So the very bottom of the spot. Now we're going to hit Control a and B at the same time for bevel So when we do that, we can see that as we start moving our mouse here, it's actually going to start cutting that corner off. So as we move this metal, so it changes the size of that cutoff. If we scroll up on our mouse wheel, we add more cuts to this cutoff so we make it more round. So let's slide this cutoff here. So this bevel closer up to the edge. We don't want it to touch this edge because you can see as we touch it and then even go past it, the model turns inside out on itself. So we want to stop a little bit before then. So about here, then we're just going to scroll up to add a few more cuts. You don't need a ton of cuts here because this is gonna be a relatively small detail. So we're just going to have a few. We can click. In my case here, it pops up all these settings here. And we can see the size, which is the width here, That's how big this pebble is. And then I added six segments. So if you want to add six segments, tears just type in six for your segment count with your bevel added. Now we can hit one on our keyboard to switch back to our vertex mode. Now we're in vertex and then we can hit a to select all the vertex. And then we're going to right-click. And we're gonna go down here to smooth vertices. Smooth vertices kind of work similar to what the modifier does. So that's subdivision surface modifier we added. So smooth vertices essentially is doing the sort of averaging of positions, but it's not adding any additional geometry. So what we're doing here is we're essentially taking all of these different vertices here and we're letting Blender calculate what the average position between all these vertices is. And by doing that, it's essentially smoothing it out and making it have less corners and less features overall. We can turn up the smoothing value here up to one. And then if you want to, you can change the amount of repeats it has. So essentially you're saying, however much smoothing we have here, repeat that process however many times. What our case here, and we're just going to have the smoothing set to one. Then we're going to change the repeat back to one, so we don't need it to repeat it a whole bunch of times. We just want to smooth out a little bit of these edges here. So if I turn this back down to zero, so this is what it looks like with no smoothing essentially, we can see here it's a little bit a corner here that we're getting. So by just turning up the smoothing, it just makes it a little bit more smooth here. Now we can hit tab to exit edit mode, and we can hit Alt and Z to X it our x-ray mode. The American again change the pivot, so the origin for this object towards the center of it. So we're gonna go to Object Set Origin, origin to geometry. We can see here it pops it up right to the center. With that done, we can now zoom out. Let me can rotate our camera so that we can see our entire scene. Now in order to place these spots across the surface of our cap, which is currently rounded and angled and all over the place, we're gonna use something called Snapping. So first let's turn on our Snapping. So it's this little magnet icon we can see here. When we click on it, you can see the little magnet like waves come out of it. And that means that it's turned on. Then the options for our Snapping are here to the right. So if we click this little drop-down, we can see all the different options we have for our Snapping. In our case, we want it to snap to our face. So we want it to snap to the surface, the face of these objects. With face selected. We can now go down here and change some of these extra options. So we want it to do is snap center of the spot objects to the surface of our, the top of our mushroom, the mushroom cap. We also wanted to align the rotation of our spot to the rotation of the surface of the Mushroom. So we're going to check that on the wall. So have Project individual elements on just to make sure everything is being projected correctly. With all these settings set up. Now with our spot selected, we can just hit G on our keyboard. So we're not actually going to use the Movement Gizmo, these controls here, we're just going to hit G to quickly move this object. Now, as soon as we move it over top of the cap of the Mushroom, we can see it starts immediately Snapping to it. So you can see it's nice and nice and easy. Following the shape of our, the cap of our Mushroom. We can just move it to where we want and then click. And now we can zoom in here and see that it's nice and flat against the surface. So this makes it really easy to just spin around and just kind of place shapes and spots wherever you'd like them. The easiest way to do this is to just spin above your Mushroom. It doesn't have to be perfectly flat on view. So maybe something like this, just so we're looking down the top of our Mushroom. And then with our spot selected, just hit or just hit G and then you can move it to wherever you'd like. So I'm going to move mine roughly where I had it before. Then we're going to make duplicates of this spot and place them around the top and the Mushroom to make this duplicate. Just hit Shift and D at the same time for duplicate. And now you can see we have a duplicate that we're dragging around and then that also snaps just like the other one. So we're just going to find another spot to snap this to, maybe here. And we're just going to keep doing this process until we're satisfied with the amount of large spots that we have. So we're actually going to make three different sizes of the spots. So don't put too many of these large ones in You'll probably want to have maybe 67, maybe of these large spots. And you don't want them to get too close to the edge either. They're going to look a little bit better if you don't get any closer than probably about as far away is this from the top of your Mushroom? If you'd like to follow along with me, you can just look at where I'm placing my spots and roughly placed that yours were there at. Don't worry about the exact placement or you can just place them wherever you think looks good. Try to not make anything too symmetrical so you don't want to have like a spot on each of the four corners and then one in the center, because it's going to look sort of unnatural brick kind of going for a more organic sort of asymmetric kind of look for these mushrooms. So try not to make them to even and symmetrical. It might go against what we're going for for this scene. I'll see you here in a moment once I'm done placing these spots. Okay. Now I have all my large spots placed. And like I said, feel free to just roughly map out where mine arm or just do your own thing. Now, we're going to create the slightly smaller version of this spot. So we're going to start out by just hitting Shift and D. To duplicate this to a new location, we'll just place it here. Now we're going to hit S, just start scaling this down uniformly. And we're just going to scale this one down. Not, maybe not quite 50%, but maybe in the 60% range. So about here. Now we have a new smaller spot that we're going to also fill in these different gaps throughout the Mushroom. So again, I'm just going to speed this up a little bit. You can place yours wherever you'd like or you can follow along with me. Okay. We have now are slightly smaller spot. We'll call this the medium spot, because we have the large spot. Now we have our medium spot. Now let's create a small spot. We're going to again hit Shift and D. Just clone this to some empty location, place it here. Then we're going to hit S to scale this down and we're going to make this one smaller. Maybe around here. So probably another 50% roughly from what the original one or sorry, the medium one was. So it's about 50% of the size and the medium. And then we can again just place this spot here and fill in these gaps. Okay, so now we have all of our small spots placed. So we have all the spots placed on top of our mushroom cap. Now again, if you'd like to just kinda tweak these things around, you can just select one, hit G and just nudge them to the left or right. Or maybe you found that you put too many in one spot and you need to select one and then delete it. Or you just need to shift them around to make the spacing a little bit more random to try to get rid of some me, like maybe in this case I have a straight line of small ones. So maybe I'll just just move these around just a little bit to help break up that kind of symmetry that we had here before that we are trying to avoid. So maybe I've gotten rid of it a little bit. We're not gonna be seeing this from the top. We're going to be seeing it from a lower angle, which it makes it a lot harder to see the symmetry and the straight lines that we had before. You might also notice that as you rotate around their spots here that feel a little bit bare based on the angle that you are looking at. In this case, we can just work from this angle here. I just quickly grab a few of these. Just fill in these spots here that seem a little bit empty. You want to try to keep your larger spots towards the top center and then make them get a little bit smaller as they go out towards the edge. Now you spin around your Mushroom and you're satisfied with the placement of your spots on your cap, we can move on. Our next step is going to be collapsing all of these different modifiers we applied in preparation for attaching this Mushroom into one solid object. Right now if we go up here to our list, we could see every one of these single spots is all an individual objects. So if we try to move any part of this, it's all a whole bunch of different pieces. So we're going to remedy that by collapsing all this together into one singular Mushroom object. So to start with, let's select our Mushroom stemmed down here. And we want to apply the smoothing that we have to it by applying it were essentially baking this change into the model. We're not making an editable anymore. We're just kinda committing it to the model itself. We're gonna go over here. So this little drop-down here with the stem selected and we're on the modifier panel. We're gonna go over here and then just choose Apply. Now we can see the modifiers disappeared. However, the model is just as smooth as it was. We just can't turn the smoothing off anymore. So it's kinda baked in, it's cemented into the stem. Now select the cap for your Mushroom. Then this also had a smoothing on it with the cap selected. Just go over here and then choose Apply. With those two modifiers applied. Now, we can attach everything together So we're just going to drag select over the entire Mushroom. So we now have everything selected. Make sure you don't have your light selected. If that happens, just hold down Control and then drag it over the things you don't want to select. We can see here I have just my Mushroom selected. I can just double-check that by scrolling up through this list and make sure nothing here is selected. So I have that all selected now. Now I can hit Control and J at the same time for join. So now I've joined all of these objects together into one singular objects. Now if I move this, you can see it moves everything all at once. Make can see over here as well. I have just a singular object now, and it's called cap, because it shows cap is the base object for this join. You can determine which is the base objects, the parent object of all these. But in this case it didn't matter. So it just shows the cap. Now we're going to double-click on the word cap here. I'm running call this big Mushroom. We know that this is going to be the larger Mushroom within our scene with it renamed. Now let's apply all the transformations that this model has applied to it so that it sets it back to a default sort of one state. We're just going to hit Control a with this selected Control a. And then we're going to choose Apply all transforms. And we can see when we do that, that it actually drops the pivot. So the origin for this object down to the very bottom, very center of the stem. And it's, it did that because these Mushroom right now is currently centered on top of the origin. Had our Mushroom been sitting over here, and then we applied all transformations. It would have still moved the origin to the center of the scene. So we would've had to reposition the origin back to the bottom of the Mushroom. But because we built our Mushroom right here on the sensor, doesn't matter. It dropped a right to the bottom anyway. If for some reason you did decide to move your Mushroom off the origin point before doing all this, you can move just the origin itself to a specific spot. So to do that, you'll go up here to where it says Options. You'll twirl that down and then you're going to choose Effect only and then choose origins. So now we can see our gizmo here has changed slightly. We can now see the origins direction. Now if we move this, we can see that it's actually moving the origin of the object, not the object itself. My case, it kinda messed up the, the origins rotation here because I still had Snapping on. So if you didn't have to do what I'm doing here, but you do still have Snapping on makes you turn off Snapping. I'm going to turn that off. Now I can Control Z that, that change. So that's back to how it should be because I could tell it rotated them incorrectly because the Z was no longer facing the z-direction. Now again, if I wanted to do this, make sure I've origins checked on and then you can just move your origin to wherever it needs to be. So if, if I needed it for some reason at the top of the Mushroom, I could just move it up to the top and then turn off origins. And now my Mushroom as the origin at the top in this case, I don't want that. So I'm just going to Control Z to undo all those changes. Make sure my origin is still rotated correctly. Then I can turn this off that way. Now when I move this, it's actually moving the object itself. I'm going to Control Z to set it back to the zero point. And we've now combined our Mushroom into one solid object. Now let's make a smaller Mushroom next to our larger moon. With your large Mushroom selected, hold down Alt and then hit D. Then we can move out a duplicate of this if we want to, before we click, if we want to make sure that it stays on this loved one, it doesn't go below the zero point. We can add X to bind it just then the movement of the x-axis. So we'll do that. So we're just going to move it over here just in the X. Now we can see that it didn't move down in space at all. It stayed right on the X axis. We're gonna go up here and we're going to rename this to small Mushroom. We've named it small. Then as I said before, this is not a duplicate. This is an instance. So you'll notice that we use Alt D instead of shift D. So an instance duplicate is a clone of an object that shares all the same mesh data as the original, but it's still allowed to have different object properties such as scale. Our case here. If I scale this Mushroom, if I scale this down, you can see here it doesn't do anything to the original Mushroom. The original Mushroom stays just as large as it was. However, if I hit tab, go into my Edit Mode, then I select any one of these vertices here. So I'll say I'll select this one and then I move it. You can see here that it does change the original Mushroom based on one of two done to the small one. And that's because I'm changing the actual mesh itself. So any change I make to the mesh itself will be reflected in the parent of the instance. So they'll all share all the same different mesh data. However, the scale, the movement, the rotation that can be unique per Mushroom. So I'm just going to Control Z to change that back it tab to exit my edit mode. Now let's get an actual placement for the small Mushroom. I'm gonna move this up underneath the Mushroom originally. Then I'm gonna move it a little bit forward. Maybe around here. Then let's scale this down so that pretty much fully goes underneath this Mushroom. I don't want it to intersect at all. Maybe about that. Now we can rotate this. So I'm going to rotate this just in the z-axis, which means it'll just spin around in a circle. I'm gonna hit our and then Z my keyboard. And that'll make sure it just binds the rotation just in the z-axis. And let's rotate this so we can have it lean the opposite direction. So it will rotate it there. Now we have them both sort of leaning in different directions. While the instancing doesn't seem super important currently, based on what we just did, we could have done that with the duplicate. The instancing will make a big difference when it comes to actually applying shaders and textures to our mushrooms would allow us to just texture a single Mushroom, automatically texture the other Mushroom. In the next lesson, we'll be making the glass dome and the base of our terrarium. I'll see you there. 5. Modeling the Terrarium: This lesson, we'll be making the glass dome in the base for our terrarium. Let's begin. Now before we get into making the Terrarium glass, which is a be the first thing we're going to make. I do need to correct something from the last video and it's a really simple, easy change. So I originally had you move your Mushroom off here to the right side and scale it down and then rotate it. Which is exactly what we want to do. Except I didn't realize that I was actually looking at the backside of the Mushroom. I didn't realize I was looking from the y-direction rather than the negative y-direction. So in order to fix this, all we need to do is go into our front view. I'm just going to hit Tilda and then go into our front view or you can just click the little negative. Why bumble? We actually went our Mushroom here on the right side and not the left side. So we're just going to drag it over here to the right side. This will allow us to scale it up a little bit. So I'm just going to hit S to scale it up. Now we can still have it tucked up underneath our Mushroom here. Now we want to rotate around. Then we're gonna pull this back towards the front side. So I did everything that I wanted to do. I just did it almost backwards. With this Mushroom shifted towards the front and now on the correct side of the large Mushroom are ready to begin. We're going to start by hitting Shift and a. It's bringing up our Add menu, go to Mesh, and then choose UV sphere. Now on our settings here, we're going to change the radius to 2 m. So we're just going to type in to hit Enter and then make sure you have your segments set to 32 and your rings set to 24. Now we can right-click, choose Shade Smooth. And then we're gonna go up here and name this glass dome. So we're just going to double-click on the word sphere. Then type in glass, dome, then hit Enter. We're going to hit N to bring up our side menu here. Then for the Z location where it says 0 m, we're going to type in 1.6 m and then hit Enter. We can now hit N to hide that side menu. Now we can hit Alt Z to go into our x-ray mode. Then we're gonna go actually into our top view. And because we need to center these mushrooms here inside this glass dome shape, we're going to click the little Z button up here. So the Z bubble or you can hit Tilda and then choose top to go into your top view. Now let's zoom in here. And we wanted to select our big Mushroom and then hold Control. So over here we're actually going to hold Control and then select our small Mushroom. So that's how you add to your selection when you're working within this list. If you were doing it within the viewport, you would want to hold shift instead? With both of our Mushroom selected. Now we can move them over and we're going to center them up so that they don't go outside the bounds of this circle here. We want to visually center them within this, because this is going to be the bounds of the Terrarium glass. We can probably have them a little bit towards the back side a little bit because we want to add a little bit more room in the front than the back. So somewhere around here it looks fine. And we can always adjust this later, but just get them to roughly this position. With the Mushroom is placed. Now we can go into our front view. So we're going to hit Tilda front. Now let's select our glass dome. We're going to hit Tab to go into the edit mode for the glass dome. And then three to go into our face mode. We're going to drag select across the entire bottom of this. So we can delete the bottom of this glass dome with these selected hit X. And then we're going to choose delete faces. Hit to, to go back into your Edge mode. And then Alt, click on the bottom here to select this entire loop. Now hit E and then Z to make sure that it binds it just to this z-axis. And we're actually extruding out more faces off of this. So we're extruding these down and we want to extrude them down just a little bit past the bottom of our stem, a little bit past this red line. Somewhere around here. It doesn't need to be super far past. It wouldn't have this glass kind of go down into the base. So the mushrooms are going to sit on the base of the Terrarium. And we want this glass to go down and sit into a groove in an order to make that happen, we needed to go pass the bottom of the base. Now we can hit tab to exit our edit mode. Then we're gonna go to the Modifier Tab. So with our glass dome selected, go to the little blue wrench icon here, which is your modifier tab. Click Add Modifier We're going to add a subdivision surface modifier. And we're going to set both of these to two. So it makes it nice and smooth. Because we want our glass to be nice and smooth without any sort of jagged edges that will affect the look of the glass. With this applied, we're now going to add an additional modifier to the same stack. So you can stack additional modifiers on top of each other and they'll all work together on the same model. We're just going to go up to add modifier, and this time we're going to choose Solidify. So let's zoom in here on this edge of the class, we can see what the Solidify is doing. So Solidify is actually adding thickness to an object that by default doesn't have any thickness. We can see here that we're actually adding thickness to the walls of this class. Now the thickness that we want, we actually want to use a negative thickness here. So we're going to type in negative 0.13 and then hit Enter. And all the negative is doing is actually pushing this thickness outward instead of inward, because we already centered the mushrooms with inside this, we want the thickness of the glass to go outward from the original starting point that we made. So by using a negative value and we just say make the thickness go out. If we use the positive value, the thickness would go inward towards the center. You can have your offset here set to negative one. So this is also a way to adjust the position of that thickness. So again, we're going to leave ours at negative one. And then make sure you have the rim sets of fill. So by default, if you have this unchecked, it won't put any faces here on the bottom of the class. So it's going to make your glass hollow, which we don't want. We want the glass to act like actual glass. Normal glass would not have to interior faces. We're just going to check a fill. And now you can see here it's added a, a face here going all the way around the bottom to fill in that edge. You can rotate here into your perspective view like I have. You can hit Alt Z to exit our x-ray mode. So now it's opaque again. What we can see here that we're having some weird sort of smoothing around the edge. So it's making the bottom of this look like it's rounded. But in reality this is actually a 90 degree angle here with pretty easy to fix this with a glass dome selected. Just go over here to the object data properties, which is this green triangle icon here. Click that. I'm going to scroll down to where it says normals. Twirl that open, and then we're just going to check the auto smooth box. So you can see right away soon as I turn it on, it gets rid of that smoothing that we had, that sort of aggressive smoothing around the bottom. Now it has a nice flat face on the bottom and then nice smooth walls on the sides and the inside. Auto smooth here is just using this angle threshold to determine where the smoothing should break. So as this value gets higher, it's going to be more aggressive at what it tries to smooth. So right now it's defaulted to 30, which 30 works fine. You don't have to change this. I'm just going to show you what it does. As I turn this up. We'll eventually, once we get past the 90 degree threshold, we now run into that same issue because we're telling it, let, you know, retelling it. It can shade anything or can smooth anything under 90. So as soon as we go over 90, it's starting to smooth out these edges here that we don't want. I'm just going to set mine back to 30. Now it's saying as long as it's 30 or below, get and smooth it out. But as soon as it gets any button anywhere above nine or 30, rather, don't smooth it. So we'll notice that our glass dome is nice and smooth. Looks like a glass dome, except for the fact that we can actually see through it right now. We're going to do a simple workaround just for the viewport. Now this isn't making it actually see through. This is just letting us see through it as we're working on it. So we're gonna go over here to the object properties. So it's this little orange bracketed square icon here. We're going to scroll down here to where it says viewport display. Twirl this open. Then where it says display as where it says textured. We're going to switch this to wire. So now what it's doing is it's just displaying the wireframe for the object, but it's not actually generating any faces, at least some visual phases between these. In terms of the actual model, nothing has changed about this model. It's still has faces. It's still opaque. If we rendered this image right now, we still wouldn't be able to see through this. All we're doing is allowing us in the viewport to see through it as if it's something similar to glass. In order to select through this, we just select as long as we're not selecting on the lines for this glass dome, we can actually select directly through this glass dome. With the glass dome created. Now we can move on to creating the base for the glass dome. Let's hit Shift and a good in mesh. Then we're going to choose cylinder In the cylinder options, we're going to change our radius to 1.95 and then hit Enter. It's going to make it just a little bit smaller than the inside walls of our glass dome. So there's a tiny bit of gap between them. Then we can set our depth. We're going to set this to 0.48 m and then hit Enter. With these settings changed, we can right-click, choose Shade Smooth. And then we're going to rename this cylinder. We're going to change it to base be. See. Let's go back into our front view. So Tilda front. And then we're going to drag this base down with the blue handle, the Z handle, until it just barely intersects with the bottom of our Mushroom. We went the bottom of the Mushroom here to just barely intersect it. If you'd like to be an X-ray mode to do this, just hit Alt Z. We want this white line here and this orange line, I guess in this case, to just barely intersect this so that these actually contact the top of the surface. I'm going to hit Alt C to exit my, my x-ray mode here because we don't really need it for the things we're about to do. Now I'm going to hit Tab to go into edit mode. We're going to zoom in here to this bottom-left corner here. So it's a little bit hard to see here because of the grid, but we can see the bottom of our glass here. And then we can see the rest of our glass going up here. Let's zoom into this bottom-left corner. Now we're going to hit Control and are while hovering over top of the lines here. It may can see again that same yellow line that we had before when we were doing the stem, we're going to click when it's a horizontal yellow line. And then we're going to drag it up just below the bottom of this glass. We're going to drag it right about here. So we can see here this is the bottom of the glass here. And then I've placed my line just below it. We're not going to switch to our face mode by hitting three on the keyboard. And now we're going to hold down Alt and then click on one of these bottom faces here. When I click on it, it's going to select all the way around this base here. I'm gonna zoom back in here on the bottom-left. What we're gonna be doing now is extruding this outward and we're gonna be making a few different steps and height here to create the bottom, a slightly more interesting edge on the base of this terrarium. To do that. And we're going to hit Alt and E at the same time. And this will bring up our extrude menu. We can't just hit E in this case because we went to extrude all the way outward along this. The normals, the normals are essentially the, the direction that all of these faces are facing individually. We're going to choose extrude faces along normals. Again, I brought this menu up by hitting Alt and E the same time. To bring up this menu, we're going to choose this extrude faces along normals. And we can just extrude this out just a little bit here. It doesn't really matter where you place it because we can change it to a more exact value in a second. So just move it out roughly here and then click and down here at this option box, we're going to change this offset to exactly 0.18 and then hit Enter. You wanted to exactly 0.18 m out from where we originally started with the same faces selected. We're not gonna do anything else other than hit Alt and E again, to bring up that same menu, we're going to choose extrude faces alone normals again. We're going to again just kinda drag it out to an arbitrary place. Then down here, we can see that the value has changed. We're going to switch this to 0.14 and then hit Enter. And then we're gonna do the same thing one last time. Alt and E extrude faces along normals and extrude this out some arbitrary amount. And then again, type in 0.14 and then hit Enter. So at this point, we've extruded along normals three times. Now we can zoom back and we're going to rotate our cameras. So they go back into our perspective view and see exactly what we did here. The first extrusion we did was to extrude it out past this class. We moved it out just a little bit past the glass. And then we extruded it out one more time, a certain amount, and then again another amount. So essentially what we've done here is we've planned out where we're going to be placing our extrusions now that we've done the actual width. So we've gone out as far as we need to. However, I do want to extrude this edge up here. So these, this loop of faces up to meet the height of the interior of the base. So to do this, we're just going to hold Alt down and then click when one of these interior faces here. So the central face here that's selected the entire loop all the way around the Terrarium. Now we can hit just E. We don't need to hit Alt this time. By just hitting E and allow us to immediately extrude this. We're just going to extrude this up to, it doesn't really matter the height, just some arbitrary height. Then down here we can change the amount that it's extruded it out. So we're gonna switch this to 0.14 again and then hit Enter. Now we can see that this Around the outside is now roughly the same height as the edge on the inside. It's not the exact same height, but that's, that doesn't matter. We just need them to be visually pretty similar. It's now we can see that that groove that I talked about earlier, this glass is now sitting inside this groove inside the base of the Terrarium. In real life, this groove here would be placed in our, you'd be placing the glass dome down into the groove to prevent that glass dome from being accidentally knocked sideways and then shifting or possibly falling off or breaking. So we're just replicating that kind of realistic detail here. So let's zoom in back down here towards the groove on the bottom of this base. We're gonna go over here to the modifier tab. So this little blue wrench icon, click Add Modifier. And then we're going to choose subdivision surface again. Now we're going to add a second level here. So we're gonna have 2.2 for both of these so that it's nice and smooth. And we can see here now that it's rounded off all these corners here and made a nice rounded shape for the outside here. So the outside actually looks pretty good. However, you'll notice on the inside really crushed the shape here. That mostly has to do with the fact that this has no guarding geometry here on the inside. So there's no extra edges here. Reinforcing this curve here. So this subdivision surface has averaged out this one singular point that's sticking out in the air and just decided, well, it actually probably should be closer towards the middle back here. So it's made this really, really smooth area here. Now just like on the stem, there are ways that we can protect certain edges. We're going to be doing that by using the Control R in placing cuts in areas that we want to reinforce so that it doesn't crush those areas. So let's zoom out here. We're going to start on the outside and work inward. So let's put a reinforcing edge here on the side here. So just by hovering over roughly in the middle of one of these, these faces here, control into R. We can see our yellow horizontal line. We're going to click. And now soon as we click, you'll notice the model kind of immediately starts getting shaped up, like it strengthened the edge immediately just by putting one in the middle. We're going to actually slide this down towards the bottom. And you can see the further we slide it down towards the bottom, the tighter that edge at the bottom is getting. So we're going to slide it down to roughly here. We can see how much more tight like this corner has gotten. It's gotten a lot more crisp at the bottom. And that's because we place this edge here and we've given it Blender more information to figure out where to average all these vertices out when it decides to smooth the thing. And that's probably only one we're going to put on the outside because I don't really mind the smooth curves that we're getting here. However, on the inside, this is a pretty, pretty important area and we don't want it to be so smoothed out. So we're going to zoom in here. And then we're going to hit Control R when we're hovering over this. Now, I realized that this area here is a bit of a mass that's kind of a jumble. But try to just do your best to follow along and try to figure out exactly where I'm, I'm putting my mouse. So in this case I'm putting my mouse on the side of the face for this interior base. So right about here. I'm gonna hit Control R. And then since I click, you can see right away it starts showing up. That edge is kind of giving it a guard on that edge. So as I cited up towards the top of this edge, we get a much sharper edge on the top are much sharper corner rather. So I'm just going to place one right about here. We can see it's pretty close to the edge on the inside of this. Then that's done a pretty good job of sharing up the top of the corner. But we do also want to prevent the bottom from rounding out so much as well. So again, the same exact spot that we placed, the last one. So on this sidewall of this interior of the base, I'm just going to hit Control R. Click. And I'm going to slide this one down towards the bottom. I don't want to sign it all the way to the very bottom. I wanted to have it stopped just before. We can see here. It's prevented this corner here from intersecting into the glass. I'm going to do the same thing on the outside of this groove. So the groove, the glasses currently sitting in. I'm going to mouse over the interior wall here of this Control R. Click and then slide this down towards the bottom. This one's a little bit harder to see, mostly because it's covered up by the glass itself. But just slide it down and slide it down as far as you can go and then you'll notice it doesn't move any further. Then just slightly back it off until you see them Model move a little bit and then just click there. Now we can see that this edge is roughly about where the last one was. I'm actually inside the base right now. So I moved my camera down so that I can see inside it. Now with those few cuts out of the way, we can hit tab to exit our edit mode. Click off the model and we can see we have a much more sort of cheered up in more realistic looking shape here. It's not quite so blobby and doughy. It has some hard edges and then it has some nice soft edges as well. In the next lesson, we'll be creating the blades of grass and the Log for our terrarium. I'll see you there. 6. Modeling the Log and Grass: In this lesson, we'll be creating the blades of grass and the Log for our terrarium. Let's begin. We're going to start by creating the Log. That way we know where to place the Grass later. We'll start by hitting Shift and a two ring up our app menu, then go to Mesh and then cylinder. Now we can go down to the bottom-left. We're going to change the radius to 0.33 m. Then hit Enter. I'm going to change the depth to 1.7 m and then hit Enter. Now we can go to the top right, double-click on the word cylinder. We're going to change this to log. Then hit Enter. Now we can right-click and then shade smooth. Now let's rotate this 90 degrees on the x-axis. There's a way to quickly do this. So we can just hit R to start using our Rotate tool and X to bind it to the x-axis. And then we can just type it and it'll go 90 degrees. Then we can hit Enter to confirm. If you'd prefer to actually use the Rotate tool. We can just go over here, click the Rotate tool, then you can rotate it just one, this red axis here. So just grab this red handle and then rotate it 90 degrees. I'm going to Control Z that since mine was already 90. Now let's zoom in on our Log here. Let me go to our move tool to move this up so that it's a little bit above the surface. We're actually going to squish this shortly. And then we're gonna have to move it down again. So don't worry about getting it perfect on the surface yet, just move it up above the base. So I just have it floating a little bit above the base. Now I'm going to switch to my Scale Tool. I'm going to scale this just in the z-direction to flatten it out a little bit. I want to make sure that it's not perfectly round. I want to give it a little bit of a squished oval shape. Just a tiny bit, just very slightly oval. Now that I've squished it, go back to my Move tool. Now I can move in and then actually push it down so that it's correctly sitting on this surface here. So an easy way to tell us something sitting on the surface is to just zoom your camera and then paying it down underneath the surface. So we can see here, I can actually see how much of it is sticking through the surface. Now I can just move it so that just a little bit of it sticks through and then rotate my camera backup. Now I know it's actually contacting to position our Log in the scene. Let's go up to our top view so we can either click this little Z bubble up here on the top right where we can hit Tilda and then just choose top. Now I'm going to hit Alt Z to go into my x-ray mode so I can see a little bit better what's going on here? We'll zoom in here. I'm going to move this down to about here and then just rotate it. I want it to be at an angle and slightly underneath the mushrooms. This doesn't have to be perfect. Just try to match somewhat similar to the angle that I have overlapping a little bit underneath the smaller Mushroom. And then it's pretty well underneath the larger Mushroom with a placed. Now let's rotate our camera. Then zoom back in on our log. We can now hit Alt and Z to go back out of the X-ray mode. And we don't need that right now. We can hit Tab to go into our edit mode. Three to make sure that we're going to face mode. Now we're going to be in setting the faces on the edges here. That way we can make this Log hollow. So I'm gonna select this face here on this end. And then I'm gonna rotate around and hold Shift before I select the second one because I want to make sure I'm inserting both of them at the same time. It's know I have both faces here selected. I can hit I on my keyboard. Then I'm just going to inset this a little bit here to worry about exactly how far you're inserting it yet, because we can just go down here and type it after you've clicked the first time. We're going to just type in 0.055 and then hit Enter. Now that we have them inset, we're actually going to delete them. So we're just going to hit Delete or X on our keyboard. Then choose faces. Now hit to when your keyboard to switch into your Edge mode. We're going to hold down Alt and select this first edge loop. So we're selecting this interior border. Then we can spin around. Then while holding Alt and Shift at the same time to make sure we're adding to the selection, we're going to select this edge loop. Now we have both sides selected. Now at that done, we can right-click. And then we're going to choose bridge edge loops. And as soon as we've done that, we now have bridged phases between these two edge loops that we've selected Now we made are essentially a tube, but in our case it's going to be a hollow log. Let's switch into our x-ray mode with Alt and Z so that we can select all the way through her Log. And we're just going to drag select over the middle here to select all the edges going around the Log. Now we can right-click and then we're going to choose sub-divide. Then down here at the bottom left where it says number of cuts, we're going to type in seven. So essentially we're just adding seven more cuts around the center of this Log that where we have a little bit more geometry here to play with. When we get to the point where we're going to make the Log look a little bit more lumpy and a little less perfect. So let's begin that process now. We're going to hit one on our keyboard to go into our vertex mode. We can click to deselect all of our vertices. We don't need to have all of them selected. Then we're gonna go up here and choose proportional editing. And you'll remember from when we made the cap, this essentially just allows us to move a single vertex and then move every other vertex around it to a degree like without using a falloff essentially, so that it moves more than just one vertex at the time. So it gives us a little bit more of an organic and smooth movement. So first let's just select one of these vertices. This is, this really doesn't have to be done exactly the way I'm doing it. This is purely personal preference. I'm most likely going to speed this process up here. So you can see roughly where I'm clicking, but you don't have to follow along to every single one of these vertex. Just pick randomly across your, your blog and just kinda push and pull them slightly in and out to make the Log a little less uniform and a little bit more lumpy and kind of organic looking. With our fall off turned on. We can just grab in this case, I'm just going to pull this down in the Z. I'm gonna move it down. But we'll notice that it's moving the whole log because my fall off is really large. So I'm gonna scroll up on my mouse wheel to make it smaller. That way I'm moving just a smaller portion of the Log about here is good. So I'm just going to pull this up. Just randomly start picking places around the Log to maybe pull this one in. Grab this part of the Log, pull this one in. I'm just gonna go through here and just select a bunch of little random spots and either pull them in or out, left or right. Just, just a little bit though you don't want to make it to lumpy, just add a little bit of variation to the surface. I'll see you in a moment when I'm done with this. Okay? At this point I am done moving the individual vertex. And hopefully you've gotten to a point that you're happy with the lumpiness and unevenness of their Log. So with that done, we can now turn off proportional editing. We're going to hit three to go into our face mode. We're going to turn off our x-ray mode because it's just making things a little bit more confusing than they need to be. I'm going to hold down Alt and Z to turn that off. Now we're going to add a little bit of a broken edge to the ends of each of the ends for a log. So we want it to make it look like the tree fell over and it had a rough break there where it fell over. It wasn't so on and fell over it. So it wouldn't have this perfectly flat cut like it as now. We're gonna do that by just selecting randomly faces around here. So you want to have groupings of either 12 or three, and you want to space them out somewhat randomly. So if you'd like to follow along exactly with me, you can do that. Or you can just pick and choose what feels right to you and just pick your own random assortment. Remember when you're selecting these that you need to hold down shift or else you're going to deselect the last one that you just selected. So I'm just going to start by selecting one here. Maybe one here. We're just going to just kinda just space them out as much as I can without making them too obvious or too random. You do want to have some that are the single ones tend to look better. So don't have too many of the like two or three selections. Because those tend to look a little bit too chunky, they're a little too thick. So I would only have maybe one of the three selections and then a couple of the 2s. And then mostly it's going to be three. So in this case I've actually made mine a little bit too symmetrical. I'll move that one over. Maybe I have one there. That's probably enough for our log here. You don't want to select a whole bunch of them because then you're just extruding everything out anyway and it just looks flat again. Before we do anymore extruding on this side, we want to actually go over to the other side and select those as well. So we're going to rotate around and then make sure you're holding shift at the same time on this side as well because we don't want to deselect everything we just did over there. So I'm gonna hold down Shift and just go through here and start selecting some of these as well. This side is a little bit less important because this is gonna be turned away from the camera. I wouldn't be too picky on this side. Just select whatever you feel like I think that looks fine. Now I have both of these sides of the Log selected. So now we're ready to start the extrusion process. So to start with, we're going to hit Alt and E at the same time to bring up our extrude menu. And then we're going to choose extrude faces along normals. Again. We're doing this in this case because we want to extrude both of them at the same time. If we just hit E to start extruding, they wouldn't be extruding outward from both at the ends. They would actually be extruding both the same direction. So one side would look correct, whereas the other side would actually go inside out. It would go into the Log rather than out. So by using extrude faces along normals, both extruding correctly outward from based on the direction that they're currently facing. Just extrude this outward a little bit. It doesn't really matter where you place it because we're actually going to type in a number. Down here at the bottom. We're going to type in 0.08 and then hit Enter. So that's about how far we need to extrude these out. Then the last thing we're gonna do is just zoom in down here. At any of the ones that you had, either a grouping of two or three, you can add a little bit of variety to them by just selecting a single one of these. Then we're gonna go up here where it says global. We're going to switch this to local instead. So down here we can see that before we switch this. So if I had it set the global, it's actually just using whatever the directions are up here. So the actual world coordinate directions. However, that means when I move this in any specific direction, it goes diagonally. Now, to change that, I can make it switch and use the local orientation. So it will look at the orientation of the object that this face is attached to. In this case, the Log that has been rotated. And it will use those as the new coordinates with local set. Now we can just select one of these faces here along the 2s. Pull it back. We're just adding a little bit of variation. So that it's not just this big a block that comes out. Maybe in this one I pulled the middle one in. You don't have to do it for all of them or you don't have to do it as much even. And we can just grab maybe one of the singles and make one of them shorter. Maybe make that one a little bit longer. We're just trying to kinda rough it up a little bit, add a little bit of variation to it. So it looks okay for now. We'll just do this quickly on the back. Again. The back isn't quite as important because this is gonna be facing away from the camera. So I wouldn't put as maybe as much effort if you put a whole lot of effort on the front, maybe do a little bit less on the back just to save yourself some time. But at the end of the day, you can do whatever you'd like here. And just add a little bit of variation to these. Now that we've done that, make sure that you switch back to global. Because in most situations we want to be working in global. But in this particular case, local worked best. So before you move on, make sure you switch back to global up at the top. Now we can hit tab to exit our edit mode. And we're going to be adding a subdivision surface modifier. Make sure you're in your modify your tab, which is this little blue wrench icon with our Log selected. Go to Add Modifier and then choose subdivision surface. We're going to increase the smoothing on this Log a little bit more. We're going to turn this up to two levels of subdivision, which will add a little bit more smoothing to the edges of the Log here. In this case here, don't worry about the kind of triangulation and sort of weird smoothing we're getting around the edges here. The material we're going to be applying to this, the actual brown Log material is going to do a really good job of hiding all this. So it's really not important that this stuff looks a little bit odd right now. It'll be almost entirely invisible for the final render. Now that we have our Log done, let's work on the grass. Let's zoom out here a little bit. Then we're going to hit shift and a good to our Add menu, choose mesh, and then pick cube. Now we can go down here to the bottom-left and chased the size of the cube to 0.08 and then hit Enter. Now go up to the top right where it says cube. I'm just going to call this grass. It enter. Let's move this up out of the base of the Terrarium. We're just going to move this up towards the front. Now let's zoom in and slide it down so that the base of the cube just intersects with the base of the Terrarium. Worried about here, just a little bit of an intersection there. And we can also right-click and then choose Shade Smooth. Now, the cute cube is going to look a little odd right now. But once it's into more of a Grass shape and we apply our smoothing, you won't notice this odd shading that we're seeing now. Now let's go into our edit mode. By hitting tab. We're going to zoom in here it three, to make sure that you're in face mode. Select the backside of your grass so the side towards the mushrooms in this case. Then we're going to move this so that it's about us about half as thick as it was before. It doesn't have to be perfect. We just want to thin it out a little bit. We don't want our Grass to be so thick, we want it to be a little bit more flat and then wide So we're gonna pull that in there. So it's about half as thick because it was never going to select the top face, consume back a little bit. Then we're just going to pull it up. So that's about twice as tall as it was before or around there. So now let's zoom back. With this top face selected. We can now just hit E to start the extrusion process. And we're going to extrude this up three times, about the same length each time. So we're essentially making it three times taller over there. And then we'll hit E again. Do I start extruding? It? Will move it to about here. It's not about three times taller and it has two segments here in the middle. Let's hit S to start scaling this down. So we're going to scale the top of this town so we can start tapering this into a grass blade, will hit S, then scale it down pretty small. You don't want to make it so small that it collapses in on itself, but somewhere around here. So pretty tiny, kinda has a chisel shape now at the top. Now we can hit one on our keyboard to switch into our vertex mode. Then Alt Z. To make sure that we can select through the model. We're going to start tapering the rest of this Grass plate. Now. We'll start by selecting up here, the top, the second one down, I guess. I'm just going to scale this in. Our goal here is to make this one a little bit bigger than the top one. That way it has a cone shape. Then we're going to select the next one down. Scale this one as well. So I'm going to actually need to scale this top one down a little bit more. So we have kind of a, sort of a pyramid shape may be a really square cone if you want to think of it that way. That's roughly the shape that you'd like to have here. Now we're going to rotate our view port so you can see right down the side of it. So we're looking down the thin side of it. We're going to add a little bit of a bend to this grass blade now, all we need to do is just drag select over the top one here. And we're just going to pull this out. So somewhere around here. And we're just going to pull these out progressively a little bit less each time to make a gentle curve to this grass blade. Now it will also get a little bit more curved. Once we add the smoothing modifier to it. We can also adjust it up or down again in case it seems like you're not getting enough of a curve here, you can move it up a little bit. Then same thing on this side as well. So just move these vertices left and right up and down until you get a curve, something similar to mine. The more you curve it, the more curved your Grass played wind up being. Maybe we will leave it about here. Now let's exit our x-ray mode, Alton Z exit. Then. We're gonna go over here to our Modifier Tab, little blue wrench icon, click Add Modifier, and then choose subdivision surface. And we're going to set these both to two. Now that we've added the smoothing, we can see that the, the overall shape of the grass blade and is a lot more accurate. However, the bottom now is really rounded. It's kind of losing the base of the Grass. We're going to fix this just like we fixed other objects where the bottom is getting crushed or a corner as being lost by just hovering over this area down here at the bottom. Hitting Control R. To start our cut. Once we see our yellow line, we can click once. And then we're just going to slide this down towards the base. So I would cite it just above the base so you can still see it floating above the base of the Terrarium. It's just giving us a nice kind of squarish but still slightly rounded base to the bottom of our grass blade. So we'll click there. And that looks pretty good. We can now hit tab to exit or edit modes. Since we're done editing the blade of grass. Let's zoom in down here. Just make sure that it's still intersecting. We might need to pull it down just a little bit. Make sure that it's still actually touching the base of the Terrarium. Can zoom out. And then we're going to start duplicating this single blade of grass into a grass clump. And then the grass clump is what we're going to duplicate around the rest of the Terrarium. So first let's make this clump of grass. We'll start by hitting Shift and D. That will start a duplication process. But instead of just clicking here, we're going to hit Y first because we want to make sure that it moves just in the y-direction. We're going to move it here. Then we're going to hit shift in D again. Then this time we're going to hit X, moves just in the x-direction. We're going to place that here. Now we have our three different blades of grass. Now let's assemble them into an actual clump of grass. Let's start with this back one here. I'm going to hit R and then Z to make sure that only rotates on the z-axis. I'm going to rotate it. So essentially I'm trying to make a triangular formation here So once I rotate it here, you can see here I have another group here. Then I'm going to rotate this one to fill in this gap that we have. Someone to select this one now, our Z, rotate this, it looks like it'll fill that gap in. Slide it back. Might need to adjust the rotation of this one just to match this angle a little bit better. It's about there is fine. These don't need to be perfect. We're just trying to get them into a group. Not add a little bit more variation to these. Let's scale each of these just so they're a little bit bigger or smaller than the others. Maybe we'll make the back one here slightly bigger. So I'm just going to hit S and then scale this one up a little bit. Then we'll select this front left one here. I'm going to scale this one down just a little bit. Now after I've scaled these, they might have moved up or down. So I'm gonna have to move this one down a little bit. So that a context just about as much as the other one. And then this one needs to move up a little bit. And that's because we didn't move our pivot. But that's not gonna be a huge deal here in a second. With your three blades of grass now placed, we're going to attach all these together into one single group. Select each of these blades of grass. I have all three selected. Now hit Control and J, that'll join them together all in one. And we can see here now that our pivot is a little off to the side and a little bit too high. So now let's fix that for this object. So in this case we're actually just going to manually place it into do that. We're gonna go up here to where it says options. I'm going to twirl that down and then click the origins button here, which means now our transform tools will only affect the origin of the object. I have that selected. Now I'm gonna go into my top view so I can just click this little dizzy bubble here. In a zoom in. In this case here I can still see the highlights. I don't need to turn on X-ray, but if you'd prefer to, you can just hit Alt and Z to turn on your X-ray. We're just going to move this so that it's basically in the middle. Again, we can see here that this isn't a perfect triangle. So your origin also doesn't really need to be perfect. We just want to generally in the middle, I'm going to put it about here. So that's what it looks like from the top view. Now I'm going to go to my front view. So I can either do the negative Y bubble up here, or I can hit Tilda and then choose from. Now let's zoom in here. And then I want this dot down near the base of the grass. I'm going to put it right where it turns into this kind of rounded portion. So right about there. So a little bit higher than the actual very bottom of the Grass. Now with that done, we can go up here to the options, then turn off origins. That way we can't move the pivot anymore, the origin of the object. Then we can zoom back in and everything looks correct. Now. Now let's hit Alt and Z to turn off our x-ray mode and we won't need that for this next section. Now let's start finding positions too. But this grass in the first one, we're just going to put it right up here against this Mushroom. I don't actually want it to intersect with the Mushroom. I just wanted to be roughly next to it and we can always rotate it as well. So if for some reason like the long blade is going into your Mushroom, you can always rotate it so that the, the gap allows for the Mushroom to sit between it. Now we have our first position for the Mushroom are for the grass rather next to the Mushroom, but we need to make a whole bunch more to fill out this. The way we're going to do that is actually been making an instance again, similar to what we did for the small Mushroom. So rather than using Shift and D to make a duplicate, we're going to hit Alt D. Will me move this to make an instance duplicate of this. We're doing this for the exact same reason as we use an instance for the smaller Mushroom. That's because once we textured just a single one of these grass blades, it will adjust every single grass blade across the scene and we only have to texture one of them rather than say, 15 different grasp lead groups that we have, it'll just give us a lot more time to work on other stuff. And I'd have to tediously go through each one of these and apply the grasp material once we get to that point. Now I'm gonna go through and make instance duplicates using Alton D throughout the entire bottom of this terrarium here and just place different size grass blades scaling them up or down, rotating them to give this scene a little bit more variation. So I'll see you in a moment. So at this point I've placed all of my grass blades. You'll notice as I was placing them, I was scaling sum up really large, some really small. Just to give some variety to the heights of things in the scene and just make it overall a little bit more interesting. I was also using all D and binding on either to the X or the y-axis to make sure I didn't accidentally push it down into the ground and then have to pull it back up or push it back down each time. So these are just some little tricks there to make sure that you don't have to constantly adjust the heights. Notice now that we've placed all of our Grass over here on our list, we have a whole bunch of different grass blades. We're going to clean this up by putting them into their own collection that will just put that we'll put that same collection inside the Terrarium collections. We have a nested collection within it. So I'm gonna do is to go up here. I'm going to select grass and then go down here and select the very last grass. So I have every single one of my grass blades selected. Now. I can hit M on my keyboard, go to new collection. Now I can type in the name of this new collection and I'm just going to call this Grass, grass it. Okay. So that'll create this collection. Now, this collection by default has started outside of the Mushroom Terrarium collection. I'm just going to click and drag this Grass collection into the Mushroom Terrarium collection. Now it's in here. And then when you do that, it's going to make this the default collection. So you can see here it's highlighted this little white box. Just click on the Mushroom Terrarium collection instead so that this becomes the default. With our Grass placed, we have just one more thing left to Model. A cute little frog living inside the Log will be doing that in the next lesson. I'll see you there. 7. Modeling the Frog: In this lesson, we'll be modeling the last part of our terrarium, a cute little frog living inside the log. Let's begin. Due to the frog being relatively small and also affected by the depth of field we'll be adding to our camera Later on. We're going to make it fairly simple. Basically a cute little blob with eyes and mouth. We'll start by hitting Shift and a, bring up our Add menu. Go to Mesh and then choose UV sphere. You'll want the segments sets you 32, the rings sets at 24, and then the radius set to 0.13 m and then hit Enter. We can now go up here to the top-right, double-click on the word sphere and type in Frog, and then hit Enter. Now let's move this up towards the front of our scene. Will eventually be moving it inside the log. But for now, we're going to work on it outside of it. Now we can right-click and then choose Shade Smooth. Now let's zoom in down here on the sphere. We're going to hit tab to enter edit mode, one tensor, our vertex mode, and then Alt Z tensor, our x-ray mode. Now let's switch into our front view by either clicking the negative Y bubble or Tilda and then front view. You can zoom in here again. We're gonna be using proportional editing to turn this sphere into a wide blobby shape at the bottom. So first let's turn on proportional editing. The first thing we're going to do is zoom in with very bottom, which use the bottom-most vertex here. So I'm just going to drag select over that. I can zoom out. Then I'm gonna hit S on my keyboard. Then I'm going to scroll this, this fall off in a little bit. We don't want it so large. I'm gonna scroll it into about this size here. And then we're just going to scale this up here at the bottom. So maybe a little bit bigger. I want to make it to a shape like this. So it's almost a gum drop shape right now. It's not quite as flat as a gum drop if you know what that is. But we want it to be flared out here on the bottom like this. Now with this bottom vertex still selected, we're gonna go to our scale tool, some switching to scale, and then going to scale this down just in the blue directions. So the Z, I'm going to flatten this out a little bit on the bottom. And again, this is still using the proportional editing. We're just going to scale this until it's almost flat here on the bottom. If it start, it starts going crazy like this. You can hold down Shift and that'll make things move a little bit slower. You also find sometimes it just doesn't want to cooperate. So if that's the case, just let it go. Control Z. And I'll start from a different position. So sometimes where you put your mouse when you hit your scale key, it will affect it, it somewhat as well. So I'm going to start here again. Now. I can just move this flat. So I want to move it to about here. So I have a nice flat bottom for the frog to sit on. And we'll leave it about there. Now I have this kind of just sort of melted sphere blob shape with a flat bottom. With our general shape done, we can now turn off proportional editing. We're going to go to our Modifier Tab. Add modifier, subdivision surface. Just like all the other times we've done. Then we're going to set this to 2.2. So we want to levels of smoothing on this. Now we can add alt and Z to X at our x-ray mode. Then we're going to hit three to switch to our face mode. Now we're going to choose where the mouth of our Frog is. So in this case, we want it up near the top because we want the top of the face to be near the top of the body. So I'm going to select somewhere around here. So maybe right around here. It's not super important that you need exactly where I'm at, but roughly the top quarter of this is where I'm selecting. Then I'm gonna be selecting for faces here across. So I'm gonna hold down Shift and select two on either side of this middle line. So now I have to in the left and then two in the right. With these four faces selected. Now, we can rotate our camera to see what it actually looks like in 3D space here. And then we're going to hit Alt and E to begin the extrusion process. But again, we want the option to choose which type of extrusion. And we're going to choose extrude faces along normals. Now this will allow us to start extruding this inward. Just extruded in just a random amount. We're going to actually type in a number here. So just move it in and then click. Now down here we're going to type in negative 0.06, then hit Enter. So that's the depth that we need now for our mouth. Now I can switch over here to my move tool We're just going to move this up so that the mouth is a little bit more horizontal. It's not going down at an angle, it's going more directly into the body here. Now you might have noticed as we started extreme these faces back, that this mouth actually is nice and round where we would normally think that this would be square and very hard edge. And the reason that it's nice and round is because of this subdivision surface modifier over here. In this case, it's actually helping us that the subdivision surface mount of failure is really, really go into town on the smoothing here and it's really kind of crushing these corners. So in our case, it actually plays to our advantage because it's giving us these nice round corners rather than the hard ones that were actually extruding it on the real model. Now let's continue to use this smoothing to our advantage to give the Frog kinda like sort of a lips on the top and bottom. We're going to start out by just selecting the bottom two faces here. I'm going to hold Shift while I select both of these. Now we're going to move this down a little bit. We're giving them a little bit of a bottom lip here, maybe the bottom of the jaw, whatever you'd like to think of it as. Then we're gonna do the same thing or at the top. So I'm going to select the top two faces holding Shift. We're going to move these out. We're going to move them up a little bit. Now we can see here with just a couple of movements of some faces here, we actually have a relatively convincing Frog mouth shape. Now we can hit tab to exit our edit mode on this because we're pretty much done at the body at this point. Now we're going to zoom out a little bit, hit shift and a, and then go to Mesh and then UV sphere. Now we can go down here to the bottom-left and we're going to change the radius to 0.04 and then hit Enter. And then the other two segments and Rings should be defaulted to what it was last time. But if for some reason it's not, segments should be 32 and Rings should be 24. With that done, now we're going to move this sphere up to where our Frog is, that we'll move it over here. Then we can right-click Shade Smooth. You might have already figured out what these are for, but these are essentially going to be the eyes for our Frog. So let's move it forward a little bit when the body of the frog, because we want the eyes to be a little bit towards the front of the head rather than directly on the top. A little bit further forward. And let me want to place these. So I'm gonna go into my front view here. So the negative Y or the front, zoom in on where the eye is at and just try to roughly place it roughly where I think this I should be. I think right about there looks pretty good. Number four, we create the other eye on the other side. Let's actually make the pupil for this I, we're just going to use this exact same sphere and we're just going to duplicate it, scale it down, and then make that the pupil will hit Shift and D Start making a duplicate. But rather than moving in anywhere and clicking, we're just going to right-click. So it doesn't look like we made a duplicate, but in reality we have, we've just right-clicked so it jumped right back to the original position. We do still have two spheres sitting here though. Now with this duplicated, severe still selected, we can just hit S on our keyboard and scale this down to roughly the size of the pupil that we'd like to make. So you can make yours pretty big, are pretty small. I'm gonna do mine right in the middle. So if you'd like to follow along, you can do yours in the middle size, so about half size. We'll put it there. Now I'm going to rotate my camera again and just pull this forward till it starts intersecting with the outside of this eye, the eyeball here. We have kind of like an eyeball here and then the pupil sticks further out. Now again, I mentioned that we're going to be keeping this relatively simple. This doesn't need to be really insanely detailed because for the most part, it's going to be hidden inside this Log. It's also going to be affected by the depth of field that we are applying to our camera later on, which will make this Frog kind of blurry and kinda pushed into the background. I guess you could think of it as, we can keep this relatively simple. And it'll still look like a frog. And we add a little bit more interests to our scene, but we don't have to go all out and making this a really detailed Frog with our pupil placed on this right eyeball. We're gonna go back into our front view. I'm just going to click this little negative Y bubble. Then I'm going to hold Shift and select the eyeball. So now I have the pupil and the eyeball selected. Then I'm going to hit Shift and D to start duplicating both of them. And I'm gonna hit X this, this time to make sure I only move it in the x-direction. And then just try to align it up so that you have them sort of equally placed on either side. So think about there looks correct. Then if we want to make sure that they're a little bit better aligned here, if one seems a little further off than the other, we can just hold down, Shift, select the other side. So now I have both sides selected and then just move both of them so that they I've lineup right here with the middle of where our mouth and the top of the body is, maybe just a little bit to the left there. Okay. This doesn't have to be perfect. It'll be a little bit organic anyway, a little bit asymmetrical. And then the last thing we're going to do as add some kind of puffy cheeks to the side of our Frog here. So I'm going to select just the eyeball on both sides. So hold down Shift, and select the two larger spheres. Now I can rotate my camera so that I can see a little bit better on the side. Then I'm going to hit Shift and D, just start duplicating. Then I'm going to move these just in the y-direction. So I'm gonna hit Y. I'm just going to move them a little bit forward. Now I can rotate around, slide them down. So there are about the same height as where the cheeks would be. You can also slide them back a little bit. Now just select each one of these and just pull them out so that they don't intersect with the mouth at all. They look like the he has air in his cheeks. Maybe he's going for a Ribot here. It's not as big, puffy cheeks. And if you think they're pushing out a little bit too far and you can always slide them back. That'll just make the cheeks a little bit smaller. So if you want smaller cheeks, a little less air in them, you can do that or you can leave them really puffy. Like we have all your on the left side. I like the more puffy look. So I'm just going to Control Z that, but that's up to you, however you'd like to do it with the last piece of our Frog created. Now let's begin the process of combining all these pieces together into one single frog object. So the first thing we need to do is we're going to select the body. And we're going to apply the subdivision surface modifier that we're using to smooth it out because we don't apply this first and then we attach all these together without applying it. It's going to apply the same level of smoothing to every single object. Don't want that because these spheres here are already plenty smooth enough. They don't need to have any more geometry added. So first let's apply this with the body selected. We can go over here to our modifier panel, go down to the, the drop-down here, and then just choose Apply with that Modifier applied to the body. Now we can safely attach all these together. We're going to start with selecting the one of the cheeks. It doesn't really matter which one. Then we're going to hold down Shift and go around and select every piece of the model except for the body. Do not select the body yet. We want to select that last. We'll go through, select all these pieces, the individual pieces making up the cheeks and the eyes. And then when you're done with that, now select the body last. The reason we selected the body last in this case, it's because the last object you select when you hit Control J will be the parent or the base objects for all these join together objects. So it will retain the name frog. We won't have to rename it. And it'll retain the, the object origin of the Frog, which is right in the center of the body, which is what we want. We don't have to replace it again. If it had chosen and say the cheek, it would have moved the origin for this Frog all the way over to where the cheek is currently, by, by selecting the body last or circumventing all of that and making sure that Blender knows that we want the body to be the base object for this. So now you have everything selected, including the body last, we're going to hit Control and then J to join them together. Now we can see here, just like I said, it left the name frog. And the origin for the Frog is right in the middle of the body. Now the last thing we need to do is actually just placed this Frog inside the log. We can just zoom our camera out. And we're going to move it back here into the Log and we'll hide it back in the backside a little bit. I wouldn't worry too much about it clipping through here on the bottom-right. But if you'd like to just make sure it doesn't clip, then we can hit R and Z to rotate it. So that's looking outside the Log maybe a little bit at an angle towards the general placement of our camera, which is going to be out here. I think he looks pretty good with our little Frog done. We've now completed the last piece of our terrarium. In the next lesson, we'll be setting up our render scene and the lighting. I'll see you there. 8. Lighting the Terrarium: In this lesson, we'll be setting up our render scene and our lighting. Let's begin. We're going to start by creating a curved background plane for our terrarium. First, go up here to the top-right, and then click this little white box next to the render scene collection. That'll ensure anything we create now will default into the render scene collection rather than the Mushroom Terrarium collection. Now we can go back down to our viewport. We're going to hit shift and a to bring up the Add menu, go to Mesh and then choose playing with our plane created. Now we're just going to hit S on our keyboard to start scaling. We're going to type in nine to scale it up nine times and then hit Enter. Now let's rotate our cameras down. Then we're going to pull this plane down. So that's just barely intersecting with the bottom side of the Terrarium base. I'm just going to move this down in the z-direction using my move tool. And I'm going to pull it just until this starts poking through the bottom here. That way I know it's actually touching. Now I can rotate my camera backup. Then we're going to hit Tab to go into our edit mode. Then to, to go into the edge mode. And now we want to select this back edge back here. So that's the edge directly behind the Terrarium. So I'm just going to drag select over top of this. Now let's zoom out a bit and rotate our camera. Back here. Now we're going to hit E and then the Z to make sure that we're extruding it just in the z-direction. We want to extrude this up, basically as tall as it is wide. So we're kind of giving a second side to this kind of invisible box that we're making here. We'll pull it up to about here. This doesn't need to be perfect. The only thing that's important here is that it's high enough that once we place our camera, we won't see the top of the plane. We want to make sure that this is a fully solid, full-color background that we're putting behind our terrarium. Now we can drag select over this corner edge. So we're just going to drag select here. That's selected. Now we can hit control and be to start babbling. And we're going to drag this bevel out until just about touches the Terrarium itself. So we want to stop a little bit before. We don't want the curve to go so far that it starts intersecting with the Terrarium. So we're going to stop it around here. That looks fine. Then the amount of segments that we want here is 20. So we're just going to type in 20 to make sure that it's nice and smooth. Now with that done, we can hit Tab, texted our edit mode, and then right-click and choose Shade Smooth. Now before we move on to lighting, we want to place our camera in the scene. We know exactly where to place our lights when it comes to lighting step. To start with, move your mouse all live to the very top left of your viewport. And you'll notice as you move to the very top left corner, it turns into a plus sign. So once it's turned into the plus sign, click and hold, and then drag over to the right and you're going to drag out a second viewport. So now we can determine what we want to see in the left viewport while we work in the right viewport on this left side, now we're going to click this little camera button, which is going to put us into the view of this camera here that we have on the right side. This camera here is exactly what we're seeing through right now. And you can see when I selected it, it actually highlighted the frame here showing us the bounds of this camera. Notice that our default camera doesn't really have a great view of our terrarium currently, but luckily, we can move it. So by default, the typical way that you would move this camera would be actually just to use your move tool. So you'd have to move it up and then you'd move it over. And then you could maybe rotate it. But you can see how tedious this might be because it's difficult to use these controls here to visualize what it's going to do on the left side. Now luckily, there is an easier way to do this, which I find a little bit more intuitive because it's similar to the way that we've already been moving around the viewport. So what we're going to do is go over here to our left viewport. We're going to hit N to bring up our side menu here. Go down to View. And then down here where it says View Lock. There's two different checkboxes we can choose. The one we want to check is camera to view. So if I make this a little bit bigger here, you can see what it says. So I'm going to check camera to view. Now we can hit N to hide this menu. Now we'll notice that when we use our camera controls here on the left side, this allows us to actually rotate the camera as this, as if we were moving it with our move tools over here. But it's a lot more intuitive and similar to how you used to moving around in your viewport. Now we'll move around in our viewport here just using our regular, normal viewport Can controls here. So rotating around, zooming in painting, we can place our camera exactly where we want it. I'm just going to zoom in here. I want to make sure that I have a pretty close shot here because it's regular, relatively square. Our object here and our frame is also pretty square as well. I don't want to overlap anything. I don't wanna go to the point where I'm zoomed in so far that's cutting off anything. But I want it to be pretty tight. I'm going to have a little bit of space here on the top and the bottom. Then I'll just try to center the best they can left and right. You can also rotate our camera down a little bit if we don't want to be so high above our terrarium. So maybe we'll go a little bit lower. Angular camera up a little bit. That way we can be a little bit lower and see more of the Terrarium. Also allow us to get a little bit closer to it as well. Because I basically want to just fill up the entire frame with this terrarium since we've worked so hard on it, we want to see the most of it, but we can. Okay. I'm pretty happy with my camera position now. So the one thing I need to remember to do is hit N again to bring up the side menu. And then I want to make sure I uncheck camera view. Because if I don't uncheck camera view, then I accidentally rotate my view port here on the left side, not thinking about it. I'll actually move my camera. And I don't want to do that. Once I've found the position for my camera, I wanna make sure I leave it there. So make sure you uncheck camera view. Now hit N to hide that side menu again. And then you'll notice when you rotate this camera here on the left, it actually just pops you right outside of the camera. So it's a good way to make sure that you don't actually accidentally move it. But that means once you've turned off that checkbox, now you either have to move the camera with these controls again, which again, I find a bit tedious. Or you have to go back into that side menu, check that box back one, move your camera and then uncheck it. To get back into your camera view. We can click this little camera button here that'll help us in. Now we can actually zoom in on it as well, so we can see a little bit more of what this camera is seeing without actually zooming the camera in. I'm just going to zoom this in as much as I can so I can see as much of what my camera is seeing as possible. Now you notice here on the left side that this background plane is just outside of where my camera's view stops. In this case, it's fine. However, if you were setting up your camera and for some reason the angle that you've chosen, this is actually showing on the inside of your camera. So I'm just going to move mine to show you an example of that. You don't have to move yours. If I select this plane and I move it over, and this is what your camera, it looks like you're seeing just a little bit of a sliver of the background here. You can just move your plane over to accommodate that to make sure that you're seeing basically just plain behind your terrarium. With our camera position setup, let's apply a quick glass material to our glass dome so that it doesn't block the lights that were about to put in. Because we will remember that this dome isn't actually see through right now. It's actually still opaque. But in the viewport It's showing us just this kind of wireframe cage. We can see an example of this by switching to our rendered view here on the left viewport. So to do this, you're gonna go up to this top bar up here. You're going to hold down your middle mouse button. Click in your mouse wheel. That'll allow you to pan this left and right. Because this viewport is so much smaller over here, we have to pan to see what the entire viewport would normally show. In this case, we're going to choose this far-right little bubble here, and this is our rendered viewport. So when we click this, it's going to basically give us a quick approximation of what the render will look like in cycles. Now we'll notice right away that this is no longer see-through. And that's because it's just an opaque dome with no material on it. So let's quickly adjust the ambient light in our scene before we apply this glass material. To do this, we're going to go over to our world Properties tab and kinda looks like a globe here, a little red globe. Then we're going to click the color here. And we're gonna be changing this color from this kind of dark gray that it's currently projecting into the scene. We're going to change it to the sort of a light blue. So to change it, after you've clicked this, you'll see you have a color wheel up here. And then we have a hue, which is the H saturation, which is the S, and then value which is the V. And then a is for Alpha. We won't really be using that. In the hue. We can just click on the H here and we're going to type in 0.53. Then hit Enter for the saturation. We're going to type in 0.4 and then hit Enter. And then for the value, we can just turn this all the way up to one. Now we have a really bright blue value that's being projected into our scene from all different directions. That's essentially what this world properties color is doing. It's just projecting this even shadowless light across the entire scene. Now we can also turn down the value of this because we're gonna be adding in lights into our scene that we're hand placing. We don't want to be competing with this kind of overwhelming blue light. So we're going to turn this down to just 0.1 under the strength. And that'll make it a lot dimmer. And it's just adding a little bit of blue light in nursing. Now we're ready to add the glass material to this dome. So we're going to select the dome and you can do that either on the left or the right viewport. They share the exact same world. Whatever you do on the right side is gonna be visible on the left side and vice versa. So just select it wherever you'd like. I'm going to select it on the left side. Now we're going to go to the material properties tab, which is down here. It's this little checker box circle. Right-click that. And we can see here that this object currently has no materials applied. So we're going to add a new material. I clicking the New button. We can even rename it with right now it has a default name. We're just going to call this glass and then hit Enter So that we know what this material is. Now we can scroll down and let me see a whole bunch of different properties here for the materials, we're only going to be changing a few of these. The first one that we want to change is the base color. We're just going to click on base color. We're going to turn this all the way up so that it's pure white right now is an 80% white, which was just very slightly gray. We want ours to be entirely white. Now we can move down the list and we're gonna go to specular, which is directly below metallic here. So we're going to go to specular, and we're going to set this value 2.7. What the specular is doing is essentially the higher the number, the more reflective the objects lower the number, the less reflective it is. If it's at zero, it's not reflective at all. And if it's at one, it's the most reflective it can be. We're going to make our glass pretty reflective by setting it to 0.7. Now we're gonna go down here to where it says roughness. We're going to set this all the way down to zero. This slider here affects how sharp the reflections caused by the specular slider. Our, in our case, we're setting the roughness to zero, which means this object isn't rough at all. Which means our reflections are very sharp. If we turn the roughness all the way up to one, that would mean our object is very rough. And the reflections caused by the specular slider are also going to be very rough, which means there'll be very blurry. We want our glass tab, nice sharp reflections on it. So we're gonna set it to zero. Then lastly, we're gonna go down here to transmission. Transmission effects how refractive an object is in refraction essentially just means how much the light can pass through it. So this is essentially the slider that makes something class or not glass. So right now it's set to zero, which means it's not glass, It's not letting any light pass through it. If we turn this all the way up to one, we can see right away that it's now basically become glass. With that final property set, we're now done with our glass material. Now let's begin the process of actually lighting or seen. The first thing we're going to do is if you have this default light still in your scene and you can see here it's still in my scene. It's casting some light and chimps shadow. We're actually just going to delete this. We're not going to use this light right away. Just select this light and then delete. Now let's add a new light. We're going to hit shift and a to bring up the Add menu. This time instead of going to mesh, we're gonna go all the way down here to where it says light. Then we're going to choose sun. So we've now created our sunlight and it's down here. It's kinda sitting underneath the Terrarium and that's fine for now. We'll be repositioning it. But before we move it, Let's just adjust some of these parameters over here. So first let's change the color and we're going to make it a little bit more, more than it is now. Right now it's basically white. We're going to add a little bit of warmth to it. So we'll go up to the H, which is the hue. Click that. We're going to set this to 0.14. Hit Enter. Now go to the saturation and hit 0.32, hit Enter. Now we've made the light kind of this sort of a yellowy warm color to mimic the sudden late. With that done, now let's actually position this light. The first thing we're going to do is just move it up a little bit higher. So right now it's a little too low. Let's move it up here. Then. Actually let's go into our front view here. So it will make it a little bit easier. So hit negative Y or just the Tilda and then front view. So let's move at all the way up here. We're also going to move it off to the right because we want our son to come in sort of an angle right now it's pointing directly down. But what we're about to change that. Now we can hit R on our keyboard here to rotate the sun. And we can see on the left side here it's actually updating this view so we can see where our shadows are being placed. We're going to rotate this around here, maybe about a 45, 40 degree angle. Maybe move it up a little bit about there. Now let's go into our top view. So we're gonna go into either the Z button here, so we can click little Z button or again Tilda and then top. Now let's move it towards the front of our terrarium. It's going to move it all the way up about here. And then again, we're going to rotate it, hitting the R key to start rotating. And we're going to rotate it here at an angle. And you can see on the left side here I'm, I'm seeing this shadow. I want to make sure that that shadow stays within the frame. So I'm just going to rotate it to about right about here. That way the shadow stays with inside the frame, but we're still seeing the sunlight come in at an angle. Then the last thing we need to do for this sunlight is just make it a good bit brighter. So right now we can see it, but overall it's a little dark. So we're gonna go down here to where it says strength. Then set this to five and then hit Enter with our main light done. Let's add a few more supporting lights to our scene. We're going to hit shift and a go-to light. And this time we're going to add an area light, which is here at the bottom. Now on the right side here, we're going to need you to zoom in here and then rotate our camera down so that we can see. Now we're going to lift this light up. We're going to have this kind of coming down from the inside top of the Terrarium. So it's gonna be casting light downward inside of our terrarium. Before we do anything to the light though, let's rename it and we're going to call this top light. I way we can tell at a glance with this latest for. Now, let's begin changing some of these parameters here. So first let's change the color. And again, we're going to make this kind of warm. So we're gonna go to the hue, set this to 0.1, it entered. Then we're going to set the saturation up to 0.7 and then hit Enter. So this one's a good bit warmer than the overall sunlight. And that's because this one is more of an accent layer. This is adding to the scene. It's not the main light for the entire scene. Now we can change the power. So this is going to make the light brighter, and this is being measured invisible watts. So these numbers here aren't going to make a whole lot of sense because this isn't the typical wattage. So when we think of a light bulb, like a 40 watt light bulb or 100 watt light bulb. That's not actually what this is measuring. These values were typing in here are going to seem a little bit high. But that's just how the Blender is, is using these, these units to cast this late in the scene. In this case, we're going to type in 75750. Hit Enter to make our light nice and bright. We're going to change the shape of this slide. So this is one of the cool things about area light is you have a few different options for the shape. In this case, we're going to choose disk so that it matches the shape of our, our terrarium here. It's going to make it a circle. Now let's make this light a little bit bigger. And by changing the size of the light to 10.6 m and then hit Enter. We can see here it's made it a little bit bigger now. Now let's go back into our front view. Then we're going to drag this light up until it just about touches the inside here. We don't want this light to intersect with the thickness, the walls of this terrarium glass. So we can see the thickness here and we can follow it down here. So right about here is where the thickness of this glass is. We're just going to drag this up as high as we possibly can without going through that thickness of the glass. For me, seems to be about here. So I can see that the glass wall starts around here. So I'm just gonna give it a little bit of breathing room and I'm gonna leave it about there. Well, notice here on the left viewport that this light leaves an ugly glowing circle at the top of the Terrarium here. Let's get rid of that so that we can only see the light, but not the circle as well. To do this, we're gonna go over here to the objects properties tab. We're going to click this. Now scroll down to visibility. Twirl that open, scroll down further until you see you re visibility. Now we're going to uncheck transmission. So essentially what we're telling this late to do is be visible in all other aspects except for transmission. And we'll remember that transmission is what makes this glass material see-through. We're basically just telling this light. You can calculate and you can make shadows, you can do all of that. Just don't show through transmissive objects, in this case the glass dome. So we get all the life that we want. We don't have to see this kind of ugly white circle sitting at the top of our scene. So the last light we're going to add is a cool blue rim light on the right side. Just add a little bit more color in some kind of interesting reflections and different shadow patterns to our scene. We're going to go over here on our right view port. We can rotate it a little bit. Now we're going to hit Shift and D to make a duplicate of this light. Just move it back here. We're gonna be putting it on the back right side here. Before we do that, let's rename the light right here where it says top light, 0.001. We're going to double-click that and rename this to rim light. Now let's go back to the settings for the slight making go down here, it's where this little green light bulb is. This is the object data properties. And let's change the color of this and as well as some of the other things. The first thing will change as the Q. We're going to set this to 0.47. Hit Enter. We'll change the saturation up 2.93 and then hit Enter. Now let's adjust the power. So we're gonna make this a little bit dimmer. We're going to set this down to 500 watts. It's already set to disk, which is good. Then we're gonna make this light much larger so that the overall light being cast from it is a little bit softer, as well as making the reflection that we see also a bit larger. We're going to set this to 3.5 and then hit Enter. So first let's go into our front view and start placing this. I'm just going to go into the front view. I'm going to hit R to rotate this. I want this to also come in sort of at a 45-degree angle You can move this up a little bit as well. Right about here is fine. Now let's go into our top view. Then we're going to rotate this again back towards the, the Mushroom here. Getting a little, kind of move my mouse a little bit further away so it moves slower. So put it right around here. Then we can either move it a little bit closer or leave it where it's at. Let's see if it looks any better by moving it closer. It seems like the light stays pretty much the same. However, we are getting a little bit more reflection here. So I'd say this is a little bit more of a matter of preference. If you'd like seeing this reflection here, then the closer you put the light, the more reflection you'll get the lay to also be a little bit brighter, but this is also a dim light right now, so it's not doing a ton. So I'm gonna move mine right about here. I'm actually looking over here. As I move it on the right side. I'm using the left side just as a guide to where to place this. I'm going to leave it right about there. That looks good. Now we can see that this light that we just placed, this adding some cool blue lighting here in the back. It's kind of filling in the shadow. We're also getting a little bit of blue on the inside here on the sides of these mushrooms. This also has the added benefit giving the side of the glass here a little bit more definition. So because of this glass is relatively clear, sometimes it's hard to tell exactly where the glass dome stops. So right now having this reflection here kinda gives us a visual border to say, alright, this is where the glass stops here. And then on the left side we're actually seeing some reflections from the scene that gives us an idea of where the glass stops on the left side. With our last light placed. There's only one final step, love to do. Well, notice that the shadows cast by her glass dome are surprisingly dark. That's because by default, shadow cost ticks are not enabled. So we can see here that this shadow here seems relatively dark given the fact that we have a clear glass stone casting it. Shadow cost sticks or refractive effect that causes light passing through a clear object to be focused into beams. This is most noticeable in glass or water in real life. Now let's go through the process of enabling these cost X within our scene. We're going to start by going through all three of the lights that we've placed. Then we're gonna go down here beneath the areas where we were changing the power and the color. We're going to check one shadow cost sticks. When we check this on, we'll notice nothing has happened and that's because it's shadow cost ticks or a multipart process. There's a whole bunch of different checkboxes that we need to check one to make sure that the shadow caustic actually works. Right now, I've had my rim light selected and I checked shadow talk cost exon. So now let's select my son. Go down here, check on shadow cost sticks. Again, we'll notice nothing is updated. Same thing with the top line. Check own shadow cost sticks. Now that we've told all three of our lights to cast shadow cost X, we need to actually enable shadow cost sticks within the world to even let those lights cast the shadow cost X. We're going to go over here to our world Properties tab, which is this little red globe. Now go down to settings. Then we're going to go here underneath the surface and check on shadow cost X. Again, we'll notice nothing has happened, however, and we have now let the entire world enabled shadow cost X. So the last two steps that are missing is we haven't actually told the glass dome to allow shadow cost six to pass through it. We haven't told the ground plane. So this curved background to receive a shadow cost X. So let's start with the glass dome. We'll select the glass dome. Now go over here to our object data. This little orange box. Scroll down to Shading, twirl that open. Now on this right here we see cost X. In this case, we need the glass dome to cast shadow cost X. So the light passing through this, we'll create a shadow that we need the dome to know that it's allowed to cast shadow cost X. Then the last part of this sort of multi-step puzzle is to select our background plane. So we now have our curved background plane selected. Could see that here. We need to check on receive shadow cost X. Now that all the parts of the puzzle are in place, we've told our lights to make sure they're casting shadow cost X. We've told the world to allow shadow cost six to exist in the first place. We've told the glass dome to allow the light passing through it to create shadow cost X on the other end of it. And then we've told the plane to receive this cumulative shadow caustic on the plane itself. Now we notice over here on the left side that this shadow for our glass dome makes a lot more sense now, It's pretty much entirely clear in the flat sides. Then on the areas here on the left where it's going the lady is going through the thickness of the glass. It's a little bit darker. In our next lesson, we'll be adding color to our render with stylized shaders. I'll see you there. 9. Shading the Terrarium: In this lesson, we'll be adding color to our render with stylized shaders. Let's begin. We finished the glass dome shader in the last lesson. Now let's move on to the Mushroom. Start by going up here to the very top and choosing the Shading tab on the top of your viewport. This one, I'll move us into the shading workspace within Blender on this top view port here, like little camera icon like we did on the last slide. So that'll put us into our camera. Now we can zoom back a little bit. We can see our entire scene. Now we're going to switch back into the rendered, the more similar to the cycles viewport for the top view port here. We're going to do that by the little button here on the top-right. Now it looks like just like what we saw in the last lesson. Now we're ready to begin shading. So we'll start by selecting the big Mushroom. So we can just select it here in this viewport. Or if you'd prefer, you can make this list a little bit bigger. And by grabbing this line, then just scroll down and choose big mushroom. Now in the bottom center, we're going to click the New button. And that will make a new node group, which is our going to shade this for the big Mushroom. If this is the first time you're seeing the node system within Blender, let me give you a very brief rundown. So each of these squares we're seeing down here on the bottom are called nodes. Then we can zoom in and out of them with our mouse wheel. And then we can also click it into pan, left and right. So we can see more. These nodes pass their attributes from the left towards the right. In this case, this node here is giving all of its attributes to the node here on the right, which is the material output. Each node will have colored dots on it, which are called sockets. You can pass the properties of a node on the left, a note on the right, by connecting it's sockets together with wires like this. To add more complex effects, you'll simply add the appropriate node and then connect it to the other nodes in the system using the sockets and wires. We're going to keep most of our materials very simple and stylized for this project. So we won't be using many nodes for these shaders, for this stem and spots shader we're about to make. We're only going to be adjusting the parameters on this default principled be SDF node. Now before we begin, let's rename this material. So we're gonna go up here where it says material H2O one. We're going to type in stem and spots. That way we know what this material is actually applied to. Let's start by zooming in down here and we're going to change the base color. Let's select the color here. I'm really just going to make this kind of a very light cream color. So we're gonna go up here to the hue and type in 0.1 and then hit Enter. Now go down to the saturation type in 0.24. Hit Enter. Then we can leave the value at 0.8. So we can see here that we just made this slightly cream colored a little bit warm. Now let's click in our middle mouse button here to pan further down this list. We'll notice that this principled be SDF shader that we have here is actually the same thing we were looking at when we were working on the glass material. This just showed a quick preview of it with no nodes. Whereas in this case it's showing the entire node as well as any other node that might be attached to it. Let's go down to our roughness. I'm just going to zoom in down here to where it says roughness. I'm gonna click it and then hit 0.65. Make it a little bit more rough so the reflections are a little bit, little bit less sharp. We'll leave this specular as it is. 0.5 is fine for that. Now let's move further down the list. We're gonna go up to clear coat. And we're going to set the clear coat all the way up to one. And clear coat is an additional layer of reflection on top of the reflections caused by the specular. This is essentially like the clear coat on a car is paint. Now let's set the clear coat and roughness to point to. This slider affects the sharpness or blurriness of only the reflections caused by the clear coat, not the specular. Specular and clear coat are two different parameters. Now let's zoom out on this node. We're gonna go back up towards the top. Now let's zoom in where it says subsurface. So this subsurface slider effects have property known as subsurface scattering. Subsurface scattering happens when light hits a surface own object, but doesn't immediately stop. It continues through the surface and bounces around inside the object. This is most common own materials like candle wax or a glass of milk or a glass of orange juice. You can also noticed this on people such as their ears. If someone is standing with a bright light directly behind them. Now let's change the subsurface value. And we're going to set this to 0.25 and then hit Enter. This effect will be really subtle in this material. However, it will make a lot more noticeable differences in the future materials we add to the scene. Speaking of future materials, Let's move on to the cap material To create the cafeteria, we're gonna go up here to where it says slot one. We're going to throw that down and now hit the little plus sign next to it. This way, add another material slot to the Mushroom. Now that we have this new slot selected, instead of adding a new material, instead we're going to click this little drop-down here. And then we're going to choose stem and spots again. So essentially what we've just done is made a new slot and then apply as an identical copy of the stem and spots material to the cap. Now if we want to make any adjustments to this material, we have to branch it. Because if we make any changes to this, if we change the color to red, going to change every one of this instance of stem and spots across the entire scene. So our entire Mushroom will turn red. Now we don't want that. So we're going to branch this material. So to do this, we just need to click this little number here. This two is telling us that this specific material stem and spots is applied to two different unique objects. So to break this, we're just going to click this number. And now it'll make this version of it stemming spots 0.001 unique, which means we can now change the color or change any of the parameters, and it's no longer affecting the original stem and spots material. Now let's rename this to cap, cap and then hit Enter. The reason we did this method of using a duplicated material and then branching it to rename it is because we've retained all of these changes that we've already made. So if we know that we want the cap to look basically the same, except just have a slightly different color. We don't have to go back through here and change all of these values again, they're already set up because we use it as a duplicate and then just branched it from there. Now let's tell Blender where exactly we'd like this cap material to be placed at. So to do this, we're gonna go up here and we're going to switch back to our shaded view, which is the solid circle icon up here. We can select that. Now let's zoom in a little bit. We're going to hit tab to enter our edit mode. And then 310 to our face mode. Now hover over any one of these faces here for just the cap, we don't want to hover over one of the spots are the stem. We just want to hover over the cap and we're going to hit L on our keyboard to select linked. So it's going to select every single face that's linked to that face. In this case, it's just going to select the entire cap. Now we're going to go over here on the right side. We're going to click this little button here, the material properties tab. Then with our cap and material selected up at the top, you just click on that. Then we're going to click Assign. It's now we've assigned this cap material just to the selected faces here, which is in this case just the cap. We can now hit tab to exit our edit mode. Go back up here and two are rendered view, which is the top rate bubble. And now we are free to change the color of this gap material and we should only see it visible now on the cap of the Mushroom. Let's move up to the top here. We're going to click the base color for the hue. Set this to 0.995, the saturation to 0.99. Then we're going to leave the value at 0.8. Now that we can see the red on our cap, Let's adjust one last color. In this case, we can see that that we have a redcap. However, it's kind of washed out and that's actually because of the subsurface. So down here we can see the subsurface colors. So this is the color that the subsurface scattering is causing with inside our object. In this case it's white. It's making our red kind of washed out. So let's change this to a red, pinky color so that we can add a little bit more saturation to the cap of our Mushroom. We can do that by going up here, switching the hue 2.95, it enter. Then we're going to change the saturation to 0.99 and then hit Enter. We can see right away the color for our Mushroom is much more saturated now. It's this kind of nice red, pinky color. In most cases when you're using subsurface scattering, you want the subsurface color to be pretty similar to the base color that the object actually is. We don't want to have green inside of our red Mushroom bouncing around. It's going to actually affect the overall color of it. In this case, in the previous case, we saw that the white was making the red really kind of washed out. So now we've added this red pinky color and we're getting a nice red pinky hue to the edges of this Mushroom with the cap material done, we're now done with both of our mushrooms. As I mentioned in previous lessons, the reason that both of these mushrooms were textured together is because we used Alt and D when copying them to make them instances of each other So they share all of this data. So we made our job really easy by texturing just a single Mushroom. And then the other one automatically updates using the exact same materials and placements of those materials. Now let's move on to making the grass material. So let's select any one of these grass. It doesn't matter because in the case of the mushrooms, all of these Grass should also be instance because we use Alt and D to make duplicates of them. So I'm just going to select this big one on the back here That's easy to select. With our Grass selected, we can now go down here. And instead of making a new material, instead we're going to choose this drop-down here. And we're going to choose the cap material as a base for this. So all of our Grass is going to turn red right away. But we know that we can branch this now by clicking this little too. I've clicked that. And now we can adjust the colors of this material to make it look more like Grass. Before we get too far though, let's make sure we rename this to Grass. We note its four. Then we can go down here to its base color. We're going to change this to a green color. So we're going to set 2.3 and then hit Enter. We can turn the saturation all the way up to one. Then we're going to make the value good bit darker by setting this to 0.25 and then hit Enter. Now was a quick note on this color slider here. We've been mostly just typing in values here, because for this tutorial, I know exactly what colors I'd like to use. But if you were just trying to figure out a color and you didn't really have an exact value that you had in mind. You can also click this little white dot up here. And just move this exactly where you will like. And all those numbers down at the bottom will update. To make the color either darker or lighter. You just slide this slider up or down. So in this case, I'm gonna go back to the values that I had originally for my grass. But if you were just looking for a specific color or if you if you didn't have a specific color in mind, rather, you just wanted to have this set to some kind of arbitrary color where you just kinda feeling it out. You can just use those little dots to adjust the color freehand. So now I have my colors setback to what it was. And now we can adjust the subsurface color. I'm going to click on the subsurface color box down here. Then I'm going to set the hue 2.19. Turn the saturation up to 100%, are set to one rather. Then I'm gonna make the value set to 0.38 and then hit Enter. So if I click off here, you can see we have the base color is a nice rich Grass green. And then the subsurface color, I wanted it to be a little bit lighter so that the light bouncing around inside the grass is a little bit lighter, illuminates the Grass almost. And I made that a more yellowy green. Later on. We'll also be playing the same grass material to the base of our terrarium, at least just on the inside. But for now, let's move on to the Frog and apply these materials. Now let's zoom in down on her Frog. Now let's select the frog and then choose from the drop-down menu here. And we're going to choose grass. So we're going to use the grass as a base. So after choosing grass, make sure you branch it by clicking this little too. Again, this won't always be a two. This is just specifically too because it's showing the amount of instances that this shows up. One, in this case, grass is being used twice within the scene. So when I click this, now it's essentially showing one. It just doesn't exist because you don't need to know that it's only on one single object. Now that we've branched this, let's call this frog instead. It entered. Then we're going to change this base color here to be a bit darker. We're going to set the value here, 2.06. Then we're going to set the value here to be a little bit darker by setting it to 0.068 and then hit Enter. So with that done, the green material for the Frog is done. However, we still have to other materials we need to make for them. We need to make the eye, as well as the pupil. To do that, we're gonna go down here to where it says slot one. Then we're going to click this Plus button two times because we need two more additional slots for this frog. So let's select a slot t2. It's just by clicking on this empty space here. And now we can click the New button. We're going to call this eyes. So EY ES, eyes will go down to the subsurface in set this to point to. So it's a little bit less subsurface than the other materials we've been making. You just want to make sure that both of these colors here are set to pure white. So I'm just going to turn this all the way up to one for the value and then zero for both of these. Then same thing for the subsurface. Set these both to white. Then before we apply this white material, let's first go to slot three. So we're going to click on this drop-down. Choose slot three, click New. We're going to name this pupil Pup, IL. Hit Enter. And we're going to set the base color for this, all the way down to black. So you can either just select this little dot here and pull it down to black, or you can just slide the value slider down here all the way to the left, so it's at zero. In this case, we won't be adding any subsurface to this because we don't want the light to pass through these black pupils. Now on the top view port, we're gonna go up to our shaded view, which is this little solid circle here. With our Frog selected, we'll hit Tab to go into our edit mode. If you have any faces selected on your Frog, simply just click off to the side of it that it deselects everything. Now I'm going to hover over the left eyeball it L to select linked. I'm gonna go over here to my material properties tab, which should still be open. But if it's not, it's this little red checkered circle down here. Select your eyes material, then click Assign. So it's assigned the eyes material just to the selected faces. Now we can click off to deselect. We'll hover over our right eyeball, it L to select this. So it's going to select all the linked faces. Make sure you have the eyes materials still selected on the right sign. Click Assign. We can click off of it to deselect. And then we're going to do both the pupils now. So hover over one of the pupils. Hit L, makes you switch to your pupil material on the right side. Now, click Assign, click off to deselect. Then hover over the remaining pupil, it L to select it. She's still have people selected and then hit Assign. Now we can hit tab to exit our edit mode. And then we can switch back to our rendered viewport, which is the top rate button. Now we can see that our Frog is nice and textured. So both the eyes are wait, both pupils are black, and then our Frog itself is green. With our Frog done. Now let's move on to the base of our terrarium. We can zoom out here. We're going to select the base of the Terrarium. This is actually going to be a two-part process. So first, we're going to make the entire base gold. And then once we've made the gold material, we're going to select just the interfaces and apply the grass material just to the inside so that the inside of our terrarium looks like it's sitting in grass. And then the outside has a nice gold rim on it. With the base of the Terrarium selected. We can now hit New down here to make a new material. We can rename this gold GLD. Hit Enter. Then go down to your base color. Click on this and we're gonna make this kind of a muted gold color. For the hue. We'll set it to 0.08 and hit Enter. The saturation can be 0.82 and then hit Enter, then the value 0.53, and then hit Enter. Now we have the general color of gold, but it doesn't actually look like a metallic material. It just looks like we've painted this kind of a BAG gold color. The way we can change that is by going down here to where it says metallic and just turning this all the way up. So we can see soon as we've done that, now, made this material metallic, exactly like the name says. To add to this metallic effect, we're going to change a parameter called anisotropic. This is going to stretch our reflections into longer oval shapes. This is a common effect on real-world metal. So to change this, we're just going to go down here on the list. It's directly below the roughness anisotropic. And we can set this to 0.7 in the hit Enter. We'll notice up here that are all reflections now stretch all the way around this base now. So it's kind of pulled these reflections and made them less round and made them more oval and stretched out and linear. Like I said, this is something that you see commonly on metal in real life. Now that we have our gold setup, let's remove the gold from the inside of the Terrarium and make it grass instead. Now we need to go down here to where it says slot one. Twirl that open. We're going to add a new slot. With our new slot selected. We can now choose our dropdown. In this case, we're going to choose grass. And we're actually not going to branch this because we want this material to be identical to the material that we have on these grass blades. So there's no need to branch this. We want the exact copy material. Let's hit Tab, tend to our edit mode. Then we're going to go back into our shaded view. The reason we're going into the shaded view is because it's easier to see our selections. I don't know if I mentioned that before. But basically it's just, it's nice and easy to see what you have selected and what you don't when the model is basically just gray and orange. So that's why we've been switching into our shaded view. Hit three on your keyboard to make sure that you're in face mode. And we're going to select this very top face. We can zoom in here. We have our top face selected Then we're actually going to be expanding this selection so that it goes down all the way over the edge to the, down to this, basically where this corner is at. The way we're going to expand the selection is by going up here where it says Select. Then we're gonna go down here where it says select more or less. We want to choose more. If you have a numpad, which I don't have in this case, I'm actually going to have to do this manual each time. You can just hit Control and then NUM pad plus, and it'll add to your selection each time. Or you can hold down control and numpad minus and it will detract from your selection. In this case, I have just a single polygon selected, so I'm going to choose more. And that'll select out. Now it's a pretty subtle change here, but it's actually moved the selection out, it's added to it and selected this one extra little cut that we had here that we added when we were smoothing this out. Now I'm going to go back up here again, select more or less, more. It will expand it out one more time. And then I want to go one more time because I remember that we added one more cut down here. So in this case we're going to need to do this. Select more, three times total. So select more or less, and then one last time, more. And I can see it's selected that one last little polygon down here at the bottom. Now if we go over here into our material properties tab, we can select the grass material. Then choose, Assign. It's now will be assigned this Grass material just to the selected faces. We can hit tab to exit edit mode and then switch back into our rendered mode up here at the top-right. Now if we zoom out, we can see that the inside of our terrarium is nice and green like the grass, and then the outside is remains the gold. At this point we have just two more things left the texture. Let's move on to the Log button. So again, select your Log. And then from the drop-down here, we're going to choose the cap material. So select cap. Now we need to branch it. So we're going to branch it out into its own unique material by clicking the two here. Then we can call this log l-o-g and then hit Enter. Let's go down here and change our base color to a dark brown color. We'll set the hue to 0.037. It entered saturation to 0.69. Hit Enter. Then our value is gonna be pretty dark, 0.06 and then hit Enter. We now have this kind of dark brown, most chocolate color. And then we'll be changing the subsurface color to a warm yellow color. So we'll select this. Set our hue to 0.04. Hit Enter. We can set our saturation all the way up to one. So we're just going to make that Max down. Then our value, We'll set this to 0.64 and then hit Enter. Now we can see on our Log here that we have a nice dark brown outside. Then the areas where the light is catching it, it almost makes it look like it's made of plastic or something. So it's kind of adds to that stylistic effect. It's scattering this nice warm color inside of this log here so we can get some highlights coming through it. It's also casting light onto the top of the frog because the amount of light that's being cast through the Log is also kind of illuminating the top of the Frog as well. Now this Log material will be the first material where we're going to be adding some additional nodes to the system. We're going to do this to add a little bit of bumpiness to the logs that it looks a little bit more like bark. So let's go down here to the bottom viewport. We can zoom out. We're gonna be working down here near the bottom. So the first thing we need to do is hit Shift and a to add a new node. And then in the search bar here, we're going to type in. So be UMP. And then we can choose the bump node here, and we're just going to drop it right next to this. We can now connect the socket from the bump node one to the original principal be SDF node. By clicking this little, little purple dot, we're just going to drag it from where it says normal over to the normal socket. On this side. We can see right away it doesn't really do anything. And that's because we're missing some more information. Now we can hit shift and a. Then the search, we're going to type in noise. So NOI S. And we can see here it's filtered out some results and we want to choose noise texture and we don't want and white noise, that's a different, different parameter. So we'll choose noise texture. Place that here. Now we're going to drag this factor. So this little gray dot, drag this one down into the height on the bump node We can see right away soon as we plug that in, we now have this black and white noise texture. So essentially that's what this is doing. This is pumping out black and white noise. So it's an image into this bump node. And then the bump node is converting that black and white information into height information. For this model, we can see that it's kind of just made it look like a bumpy Log bark material. Now we're not done adjusting parameters here. But you can see immediately the difference that we have from when we didn't have this attached. So this really smooth kind of just featureless Log to when we attach this. Now we have this pretty convincing bumpy Log bark texture. Let's zoom in here down on the bottom to the noise texture, and let's adjust some of these parameters. The main Walmart I'm really going to change here is the scale. So we're going to set the scale to 2.6 and hit Enter. And that's going to actually make this a little bit larger. So the smaller the number here, the larger the, the noise texture is going to be, the larger that image is being projected onto the Log. If we made this number higher, it would make our bark much, much smaller. And also, it'll probably look a little bit more bumpy and noisy. So in our case, we just went kind of large bumps on this log to make it look more like bark. So overall, I'd say the barks looking pretty good except I think it's probably a little bit too strong, so I think it's a little bit too bumpy. And we can change the strength of the bump over here on the bump node. We can just have this number. So if we type in 0.5 and hit Enter, it's actually going to make the bump half as strong on the Log. So it's a little bit more subtle now, which matches the rest of our scene, which is overall relatively smooth. With the Log done, the only thing left to do is add a little bit of color to our background. Now we can zoom out. I'm just going to click on the background here to select the background plane. We can click New to add a new material. I'm going to name this one background. Then hit Enter. Now we can zoom out here to find where it dropped the nude. Then the only thing we're going to change here is just changing the color. We're not going to adjust any of these other parameters. We can zoom in here. And then we're going to change the color from white. I'm going to make mine a pink color here, free to change yours to whatever you'd like. But in my case, I think pink works well with this color or with this color palette rather. I'm going to type in 0.99 for my hue. Point, five-ninths for the saturation. And then I'm going to leave the value at 0.8. I can click off. Then we can see here that this pink is kinda complementing some of the greens. And then, as well as the more vibrant sort of darker pink, pink, red that we have on top of the mushrooms. With the last material applied. We finished our scene. The next lesson, we'll be setting Up Our File for rendering, as well as creating our final image. I'll see you there. 10. Rendering the Terrarium: In this lesson, we'll be setting Up Our File for rendering as well as creating our final image. Let's begin. Start by making sure that you've switched over to your layout tab, which is the default tab that we've been working in for most of this class. We're gonna be working in this tab again for this lesson. Again, the layout tab is right up here, so you just click that and that'll switch you back to this view. We're going to start by adding some depth of field towards scene to help accentuate the miniature look that we're going for. So in our left viewport here, we want to switch back to the shaded view. So we're just going to click this little solid circle here. Again, if you don't see these buttons here, use your middle mouse button to pan left and right on this bar, and that'll slide it over so you can see this button. And we'll make sure that you're still inside your cameras. So you want to still make sure you have this camera button selected so that we're seeing through what the camera is seeing. Now go up here to your overlays button, which looks like two circles overlapping, and we can click that. And that will hide all overlays within our scene. That includes things like are the cage that we see around our class, as well as the light that's actually now disappeared since we've uncheck that. This will also hide anytime that you select something. So if I select this Mushroom here, we can see that it no longer is highlighted like it is on the right for the moment. That'll just give us a much clearer view when we're setting up our depth of field will eventually be turning this back on. Not go up here to the top next to where our viewport shadings taps where we're going to click this little drop-down. Then we're gonna go down here to the bottom and we're going to check on depth of field. This will allow us to visualize the depth of field from our camera within the viewport. So by default, when we adjust our camera parameters, we adjust the depth of field and we won't actually be able to see that interview port unless we enable this setting. So make sure that you've clicked this little drop-down and then turn on depth of field. Now go up to your list on the top right, and then select your camera within the render scene collection. With your cameras selected, now go down to the object data properties. So in this case it's a little green symbol for a camera. And now we can check on depth of field. So this one now I'll enable our camera to actually use step the field. I'm going to scroll down here so I can see these settings. Then the first thing we're going to change is the f-stop. So let's set our f-stop to a really low number. So when I set this to point to and then hit Enter, we can see right away now on our left view port here that a lot of our scene now is kinda blurry. And then we were going to adjust what is blurry and what is in focus is by adjusting our distance. The f-stop value that we just changed is essentially how shallow our focus plane is. We want our depth of field to be pretty dramatic. So we're going to use a really, really small number before we start adjusting the distance. Go over to your left viewport. We're going to zoom in here. And I want you to zoom in onto one of the spots on the front of your large Mushroom. So if something roughly in this position, obviously your spots will be in different positions than mine. But just find the spot that seems to be the closest, probably the one that's over top of where the stem is at and zoom in roughly to that. In my case here I can tell there's some spots here, even though they're blurry. Now what I want to do is go to my distance slider here. And we're going to drag this distance slider until eventually those spots become in-focus. So the smaller in this case, I make my number, which is moving the distance, the actual focal point on my camera, the more in focus the spots get. So as I start getting closer and closer to the focal distance that I need, we can zoom in here. So I can see here that the top of this spot, a little bit more in focus than the bottom. I want to make sure that the bottom side of one of these spots here is in focus. I'm going to keep making my value a little bit smaller. And you can see here right about there, it starts becoming in focus. If you find that this slider is moving a little bit too fast, just hold down Shift as you drag it. And it'll move the slider even slower so you can move it really precisely. So just drag this until the bottom side of one of these front most spots is in focus. In my case, my distance should be set to 7.4 m, but yours might vary slightly. Now as I zoom out, I can see that these spots here are nice and focus. As it goes further back in the scene, the spots in the background start getting blurrier. That's the effect that I was looking for here. I want to have the center of my Terrarium be the focal point, so it's nice and sharp. And then things in the foreground, such as these blades of grass or even my Frog, are gonna be kinda blurry as well as things in the background. This is helping accentuate that miniature effect that we're making here. So we're, we're sort of giving it a tilt shift style effect. In other words, done Adjusting the depth of field, we can turn back one, the overlays. So I'm gonna click this little overlay button here. Then I'm gonna switch back to my rendered view, which is this little button here on the right Now let's zoom out so we can see our whole camera. And the depth of field here. We're not really going to notice it because it's so noisy based on the fact that it's having to render to all of these colors and lighting and all the reflections. On top of this, we're not really going to notice the depth of field, but we will notice it once we get to the final render. With that final setting done, we're ready to render our final image. You can now go up here to the top center. We want to switch to the rendering work-space. We can click Rendering. And now we're just going to render our image. We can zoom out here so we can see the entire canvas. Then we're gonna go up here to render and then render image. Alternatively, you can just hit F12 on your keyboard if you prefer that. Soon as we click this button here are image is going to start rendering. Now in our case, this image is probably going to take anywhere between maybe a few minutes, like maybe 2 min, only up to maybe 10 min depending on how strong your computer is, then depending on the settings you have, the hardware that you have. So I'm gonna click render image here and then we'll see you. My image starts to render. We get all the statistics up here, and it's going to render all 500 samples that we originally set up in one of the first lessons. We can see here it's counting up through the samples and then once it hits 500 samples, it'll stop rendering. It'll be done at that point. And then it'll run the de-noise. And then at that point, we can now save the image. I'll see you in just a moment after my images finished rendering or render is done. And I think it looks great. But there are few simple things we can add to make it look even better. Let's go up to our compositing workspace here at the top, it's next to the Rendering tab. We can now drag this bottom bar down here to make the dope sheet at the bottom smaller. We won't need that. Now let's hit N to hide this side menu. We won't need that either. And then up at the top, we're going to drag out a new viewport. We're just going to click and drag here. Once our mouse turns into a little plus sign, we can drag that here too, about the middle. When this new right viewport, we can click this little drop-down here. And we're going to switch this to the image editor. Then up here at the top where it says New, we're going to click this little drop-down here and we're going to switch this to the viewer node. Now I can zoom in here a bit so that it fills the whole canvas. Now let's start working here on the left viewport. So to start with, we're going to choose news nodes. So this little checkbox up here and click that. You can drag this over here to the left. And again, we're going to see this familiar node system. This works just like it did in the last one where it's passing attributes from the left node to the right node. Click this composite node. We're going to drag this over here a little bit to make some room between these. Now let's hit Shift and a go to search. The search here and we're going to type in viewer. So V, E. And we could see viewer pops up, click that, place this down here. And then we're going to drag this image note or the image socket rather on this left node. We're just going to click on this and then we're going to plug that into the image socket here on this viewer node. Now we can see right away that we now see our render here twice. So the first thing we need to do is to uncheck the backdrop button up here at the top. So we're just going to click that and that'll hide it here on the left. So normally if you were working with us and you wanted to use the normal default workflow, you would actually be using these nodes directly on top of the image you are editing. I find that a little bit hard to see what I'm working on. So I prefer this method over here where I've actually made a brand new kind of dedicated space to see these. I'm going to zoom out here so I can see the whole image. Now I can see that this is displaying what this viewer node is seeing. The first thing we're going to add is something called glare. So we'll hit shift into a to make a new node here. In the search bar here we're going to type in glare, GL, AR, see glare, click that, and then we can place this node. So by default, when you place it on top of one of these wires, it'll turn white and then when you place it, it'll automatically connect whatever that wire was that turned white. Now in this case, we actually need to connect this for both. So we're going to take this image node here, and we're going to drag this up into the composite at the top. It's now we have this, this first left node, which is our actual render being put through the glare node, and then it's outputting it directly into the composite as well as the viewer node. Now let's zoom in here on the glare to see what settings we can adjust. Well, notice here on the right side that we've actually added some glare to our image. And because of the type of glare, in this case streaks, we're actually seeing little stars all over our image. So if this is a look you like, streaks as a way to do that using the glare node. However, we're actually going to switch this to a different one We're going to switch this to the fog glow. So there's other options here. I'll quickly show you those. So there's ghosts, which I personally have never used. It's very cool looking, but it's also very specific and use I'm sure. And then there's also simple star which looks pretty similar to streaks. But again, we'll be using fog glow. I'm going to select a fault glow from the top here. Now we can see that it's just added a nice subtle soft glow around the bright spots. And this is mimicking an effect called Bloom that we have in real life. When something is really bright, we'll see a halo, a soft glow emitting from it, showing basically how bright this reflection or this object is. We won't be changing a whole lot of the settings here because there really isn't many to change. The first thing we're going to change is we're going to switch it for a medium to high. So this is just going to make it a high-quality bloom. So it's just gonna be a little bit more accurate here. It's going to do a little bit better job of picking where to put this bloom on our image. And then we're also going to make the size a little bit bigger. We're going to turn this up to nine. So by default, this slider is kind of odd. I think, I think it starts out as six is the lowest. So me, just as an example here. So six is the smallest you can make a, which is a really weird size to start at. And then nine is the largest you can make it. So in our case we're going to set it to nine. But again, this slider for some reason only goes 6-9. Now if we look at our image over here and we zoom in, we can see some of these reflections and the, some of these really bright highlights now have this kind of soft kind of foggy glow around them, which I think looks nice. It adds to the softness of this image. There is one more effect we can add though, though, add a little bit of distortion around the edges of our frame and a little bit of rainbow fringing on the edges of things. So to add this, we're going to go over here to the left side. I'm going to drag select over both of these right nodes and move them over to make more room for this next node. At deselect those, I can hit shift and a to add a new node in the search box, I'm going to type in the word lens L E N, S, lens distortion. So go over here. I'm just going to drag it over top of the bottom one so that it automatically links that one. Then again, on this lens distortion node, just click the image socket here on the right side, and then plug that into the composite so that it pumps this directly into the composite as well as the viewer. Now the only setting will be changing on lens distortion is just the dispersion down here at the bottom. We're going to set this to a really low value because this is a very heavy effect. So Very little bit of this effect goes along way. So I'm gonna set this up to something really tie first. So just so you can see how crazy it can get, I'll set this to one which is I believe the maximum. Then on our right side here. See it's processing that. As I zoom out, you can see it's actually warped my render into this kind of bubble shape here. And it's made this really kind of blurry, almost motion blur looking effect that also has rainbow within it. So we don't want that effect to be nearly that strong, but we do want to have some of these elements here. We're going to set this down to just 0.1 instead of one. So 0.1 and then hit Enter. And then we'll see over here it starts processing that effect. It's also much faster in this case because there was a smaller number. And now we're getting just a little bit of this kind of nice rainbow effect that we're getting around the edges here. And it's also kind of stretching this and making it a little bit blurry, a little bit motion blurry. It's just adding a little bit of style to the edges of this, this render here. It's really not doing a whole lot of anything to the middle, but it does add a nice rainbow effect around the edges. You can see it here on the shadow pretty nicely. If you're not a fan of what this effect is doing. Again, this is optional. If you don't like it, you can just move this down here. You don't even need to delete it. You can just move it off to the side. Then instead take these and just plug them directly into the composite and the viewer. And in this case it'll bypass this because it's not being connected to anything and it'll go back to how it was. For my case, I think the effect looks pretty cool. So I'm going to leave it plugged in. Okay, so now it will process that affect quickly. And then we go. Now our final image is ready with all of our effects done on this image. Now the only thing left to do is save it. So within the compositing tab here, we're gonna go over to our right view port. And then we go to Image. Then we're going to choose Save As. And then that'll bring up an option box where you can choose the location as well as the name for this image. So again, click Save As. Then within your option box, you can use your folders on the left side or the address bar at the top to navigate to where you'd like to save your image. Before we do anything and save it, we need to give it a name first. So I'm just going to call this Mushroom Terrarium underscore 01. Now in case I want to say about a second angle of this, or maybe a different color. I can just call it O2 or O3. And then I don't have to delete the original ones, I just have a series of them that connect. I can save out then. Then over here on the right side, you want to make sure you change your file format. So in this case, we're going to be using the PNG file format, which I believe is the default. If not, you'll just want to click this drop-down, go to PNG. And then for our image here, we can either choose black and white, RGB or RGB with Alpha. In our case, our image doesn't have any Alpha, so we really don't need the alpha included. So I'm just going to choose RGB, which will just give us a nice colored image. We can leave the color depth that eight. And then we can leave the compression at 15% with these settings done or location chosen and our name given making now hit Save As image. Now that our final image is saved, we can share it with all of our friends and family on social media. In our next and final lesson, we'll be discussing our Class Project. I'll see you there. 11. Our Class Project!: You made it to the end of the class. Congratulations. Now that you've learned how to make a cute Mushroom Terrarium with me, I'd like you to create a new one of your own and share it with the class. To make your terrarium unique, you could try things like Adjusting the colors and the placements of the objects. Modeling brand new objects, like a new animal, a small flower, or a fallen leaf. If you'd rather not attempt to brand new terrarium, try using the existing pieces of this terrarium to tell a story about the frog. From my class project, I made this new scene. I created it utilizing all of the same techniques we learned during this class, including the little fox. After you've finished your unique terrarium, post the render to the project gallery to share it with me and all of the other students. I'll personally review each project posted to the gallery and that you know what I love about your project, as well as anything that could use a little bit of adjustment. I can't wait to see what you all come up with. Thank you all so much for taking my class. I really appreciate it. If you enjoyed this class and want to know when I release a new one, please click the Follow button here on Skillshare. Please consider leaving an honest review for this class so you can let other students know if it's worth their valuable time. If you liked this class, please check out my teacher profile. You might find another class of mine that interests you, such as my cute Gnome modeling tutorial. Thanks again. I hope to see you in another class soon.