Zbrush Hard Surface Sculpting Beginner to Advance | Sean Fowler | Skillshare
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Zbrush Hard Surface Sculpting Beginner to Advance

teacher avatar Sean Fowler, 3D Instructor

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction To the Course

      2:14

    • 2.

      What To Expect Here

      8:47

    • 3.

      User Interface Introduction

      11:03

    • 4.

      How Knife Curve Brush Works

      7:23

    • 5.

      How to Pan Curve Brushes

      4:52

    • 6.

      Introduction to Selection Tools

      11:30

    • 7.

      Learn ZRemesher and Polygroups

      12:24

    • 8.

      What is Gizmo Deformer

      9:38

    • 9.

      Importing Practice Base Mesh

      10:59

    • 10.

      Creating Shoulder Base Mesh

      10:36

    • 11.

      Detailing Arm Base Mesh

      12:41

    • 12.

      Sculpting Base Mesh Fin

      10:00

    • 13.

      Constructing Mid Forarm

      18:14

    • 14.

      Finalizing Forearm

      13:56

    • 15.

      Detailing Base Mesh Shoulders

      13:16

    • 16.

      Learning Array Meshes

      22:48

    • 17.

      Going Over Wire Creation

      21:44

    • 18.

      Creating Finger Base Mesh

      23:19

    • 19.

      Establishing Finger Placement

      16:32

    • 20.

      Finalizing Finger Placements

      18:43

    • 21.

      Foot Creation

      27:22

    • 22.

      Creating Shin Base Mesh

      11:57

    • 23.

      Blocking Out Center Shins

      27:24

    • 24.

      Detailing the Shins

      19:52

    • 25.

      Finalizing the Shins

      13:50

    • 26.

      Creating Leg Greeble

      21:44

    • 27.

      Decimating and Mirroring Meshes

      10:48

    • 28.

      Creating Chest Piece Base

      15:09

    • 29.

      Sculpting Secondary Chest Piece

      26:19

    • 30.

      Chest Pad Placement

      15:28

    • 31.

      Chest Greeble Construction

      18:03

    • 32.

      Establishing Shell Piece Sculpt

      21:23

    • 33.

      Adding Shell Sculpts to Turtle

      21:45

    • 34.

      Adding and Detailing Eyes

      12:44

    • 35.

      Making Cloth Hood

      21:32

    • 36.

      Creating Helmet and Rendering

      15:56

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About This Class

Hello and Welcome to Zbrush Hard Surface Sculpting Beginner to Advance,  A course designed to all levels for anyone interested in learning developing  Hard Surface Sculpting Techniques in Zbrush

A course designed to all levels for anyone interested in learning developing NEW Hard Surface Sculpting Techniques and approaches

This course will take you through a rundown of the basic tools and techniques needed for you to establish a foundation in your sculpting arsenal for crafting your hard surface subject The SPACE TURTLE!

To that end we will supply you a base mesh where you will learn and practice all of our unique quick sculpting techniques and tricks to reveal not only how easy it is to create hard surface sculpts but to also demonstrate how modularly efficient it is to re use pieces to expedite your workflow.

What we teach:

  • Well start you off will a beginner section to develop a solid foundation into mastering Zremesher, Polygroups and their relationship together with other Zbrush functions
  • Learn the Primary and Secondary Functions Knife Curve Brush
  • Understanding of the Gizmos Transform Deformers and how important of a combination it is with the Knife Curve Brush
  • Problem solving Zremesher through Dynamic thickness
  • Going over functions of zbrush such as Hard Surface Modeling tool Zmodeler, and Live Booleans
  • Have Some fun Carving out a facial expression of our turtle and going over glass transparency rendering settings within Zbrush

By the end of this course you’ll have gained the necessary knowledge in understanding just how fast you can flush out complex shapes through zbrush in just a short amount of time as well as have a fully complete Brave and Courageous Space Turtle.

With that said let's START SCULPTING!!!

Meet Your Teacher

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Sean Fowler

3D Instructor

Teacher


Hi there my Name is Sean Fowler and I have been a Professional 3D  Freelance Artist for over 10 years. I'm new here to Skillshare but nevertheless I hold currently 4 years of experience with online 3D instruction and looking to expand to a new platform to be of service to you.

Little about myself, I graduated from Full Sail University with a Bachelors of Science in Game Art at 2011, which pretty much means I am specialized to work in games, be it prop modeling and textures, character modeling and, straight up to animation cycles in maya.  You could say I do enjoy a lot of the disciplines in the game production workflow.  I am very passionate about what I do, and I’m very committed in learning new things everyday.  I ... See full profile

Level: All Levels

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Transcripts

1. Introduction To the Course: Hi there. My name is Sean Fowler and I've been a 3D freelance artists for ten years and a ZBrush artist for almost 13 years. And I'm here to give you an in-depth tutorial in ZBrush 2021, hard surface sculpting beginner to advance a course designed to all levels for anyone interested in learning or developing hard surface sculpting techniques. Here, we'll take you through a basic rundown in the tools needed for you to establish a foundation in your sculpting arsenal in order for you to craft your hard surface subject piece, the brave space turtle. Now to that end, we'll supply you with a base mesh where you will learn and practice all of our unique quit sculpting techniques and tricks to reveal not only how easy it is to create hard surface sculpts, but to also demonstrate how modularly efficient it is to reuse pieces to expedite your workflow. Now, some of the things we'll cover are as follows. We'll start you off with a beginner section to develop a solid foundation in mastering in 0 measure poly groups and their relationship together with other ZBrush functions. We'll go over learning the primary and secondary functions of the new knife curb brush. And then from there we'll cover an understanding of the gizmo transformed to formers and how important of a combination it is with the knife curve brush. Now, additionally, we'll have other things such as how to problem-solve 0 measure through dynamic thickness. And finally, we'll cover some of the other functions of ZBrush, such as hard surface modeling tool Z modeler, along with a breakdown to live Booleans. Now, by the end of this course, you'll have gained a necessary knowledge and understanding just how fast you can flush out a complex shapes through seed brush in just a short amount of time, as well as half a fully complete, brave and courageous space turtle. Now with that said, let's go ahead and start sculpting. 2. What To Expect Here: Okay, so let's get started. In this video, we're going to outline our curriculum to help identify what to expect. So you have a little bit of context as you progress throughout this course. And we're also going to assign some guidelines to help you out in terms of getting the most out of this course. I in, I think to that end, we might just start with those three top guidelines to help you out here. Now the first guideline is this. Please, please, please re-watch the video. Now, that's an important one to grasp because of this. And that is that this is a video online course. So that means that you're looking at the biggest advantage about it is, is that what you're learning can be set at your pace. What you're learning can be stopped, rewound. And as a result, if you stop and rewind, you nine times out of ten will pick up something new that you missed from the first time he saw it. And I can't even begin to stress how often that happens. If there's anything that feels confusing to you about the video or anything like that, please, please please consider re-watching the video again. It really, really does help. The next, the guidelines that we want to give you is that we want to talk to you about the Quick Keys. Now the quick keys in ZBrush are a process that helps understanding the quick keys in ZBrush are process that help expedite your workflow and helps get you your results quicker. It makes sculpting, quite frankly, a lot more fun as well. So as a consequence, you're going to hear me constantly call out that narration of the quick keys very often throughout. And that's just something that I don't mean to annoy anybody, but I just want to make sure that as I do repetitions of calling out the quick keys, that it gets really ingrained into your head. So please forgive me if I try to ignore you, but I'm always gonna be calling out my quick keys out loud as I go throughout the video of each course. With that said, we're gonna be left with our final guideline and that is surpass the concept. Now, surpassing the concept is a very big one because this is one that allows you to grow the most as far as learning hard surface sculpting in this course. So let me go ahead and give you an example. What I mean when I say surpass the concept. Basically in a nutshell, it means whatever I've made in the video, challenging be advanced users. It doesn't necessarily have to be the beginner or the intermediate. But if you're an advanced user, I am challenging you to surpass what I have because I want you to grow beyond it. So a good example of that is in a earlier video, we'll go over something regarding live Booleans and how we use live Booleans to cut into the base mesh of an arm. But as we progress further down the video, we'll go into how we create a hard surface sculpt of a one of the chest pads on our turtle. But you'll notice there are no live Booleans on there. But that doesn't mean you don't have to put live Booleans on there. You can take what you've learned in the past and reapply it, or reapply the concept of what you learned and maybe use a cube to do bevels and certain angles. We just want you to get creative and grow beyond what it is we teach you because that's a very important part in developing your hard surface sculpting skills. With that said, I'm going to now go ahead and outline to you real briefly on all what to expect throughout this course. Now to begin with, we have a section one introduction. This is mainly for the beginner user who has an ever really opened up ZBrush. And it's just to help them identify all the mate, the three main sculpting features that we're going to be using in ZBrush. And we're gonna talk about them. If you are long-time user or an intermediate user, or even a beginner user that's opened up ZBrush. You can, I would still recommend beginner users go through section one, but if you want, you can skip section one. The only thing I ask is that you take a look at lecture four, which is painting brushes with accuracy. Because we're gonna be working with the ZBrush 2021 feature knife curved brush very often. That's a new feature in ZBrush. That's kind of a game changer for hard surface sculpting and being able to know the spacebar trick of panning curves. That's gonna be a very important one to go over. So with that said, let's go ahead and move into section two where we officially begin our creation of our turtle character. This is where we bring in a base mesh and we use as sort of like our subject piece to begin, all are hard surface sculpting and. That are practicing of combinations of different techniques. And we'll go over things like the knife curve brush the detailing, how to create things like array meshes will even find ourselves creating a spare parts folder that we will be reusing constantly. And also using to flush out even new shapes upon new shapes with that one's gonna be a pretty fun one to sort of get your feet wet on. Moving forward. We're gonna move into leg Construction, LLC construction is sort of an eye-opener regarding how to teach modularity with what you've made already and how to recycle it to make a completely different shapes. That's gonna be a very fun one because that by the end of that, you're going to learn how you can get away with expediting your workflow and cutting your time in half. Pretty fun one, and of course we'll end at that one with how to do decimation and mirroring over. Now, lastly, we're going to start turning the difficulty up with you by doing the chest creation. Now this one is going to have a difficulty rating for you because what we're going to do is we're going to challenge you more and more, where we're going to make an example of a chest pad. And then we're going to apply that pass the concept aspect to you on. And we're going to try to get you to create a similar piece and give you the designated shape that we'd like you to make out of it. And then afterwards, we're gonna compare notes between your chest pad piece in mind. With that said, moving forward in section five, we're just going to take a little break and have a little fun with doing creating shells and how we can duplicate mesh materials and be a little bit modular. By decimating that down, we're going to kind of build off of our knife curved quite often in this one, in its secondary feature. And how we can a lot of fun with plainer cut brush with that one. Now, finally, at this point we're coming towards the end of Section six. This is where we're detailing the head and helmet. And this is the fun one where we can just have a little bit of fun with the character. Put on some eyebrows, eyelids, and just have some fun with a facial expression. Go over some Polly painting techniques, and then of course, finish off with some micro mesh for the cloth. And maybe do some quick transparency demonstrations for you to help show you a render setting for that. So with that said, that's the outline of the course. And again, one thing we just keep saying this over and over again is we are strongly adamant about you surpassing us and experimenting beyond the video and combining concepts of what you've learned in previous videos to apply overlain onto what we're making currently because we really want you to have fun with experimentation here. So with that said, let's start sculpting. 3. User Interface Introduction: Okay, So let's begin this video. We're gonna go over ZBrush is user interface and how to bring a mission and go over things like subdivisions and some of the other tool palettes that we can actually commonly used in ZBrush. Now, this is mainly for that person who may never have opened up ZBrush ever at all. So if you've already know about this, then you might want to skip this video. But for that very, very first-time user, this will be a helpful little guide for you. Now to begin with, when you open up ZBrush, you're going to probably be met with this little tab shelf here. And what this is here is the lightbox. And now the lightbox is sort of like a feature built-in with ZBrush that compiles a system of folders that are like resources that assist you in helping you create your sculpt no matter what it might be. And it has a lot of varieties from project folders. You can start off with demo heads or even past brushes from earlier versions of ZBrush that you can go through. We even have alphas that you can cycle through. So it's a pretty nice little spice rack to help you figure out where everything is. Now. For now, let's just go ahead and make that disappear so we can see our full view port here. Now, to do that, we'll just either left-click on lightbox or we hit the Comma key. And Lightbox, we'll just go ahead and disappear. You can hit the Comma key to bring it back and so forth. Now let's go ahead and just talk to you a little bit about bringing in a mesh. Now to do this first, let's go to the tool setting and hit left-click and drag. Now you may think in your mind that you can rotate around this tool by left-click dragging into empty space. But if we do that, you'll notice that another primitive comes up. That's just because this piece is existing currently in 2.5 d mode. And that's sort of like a Canvas pilot mode where you can kind of do all sorts of repeatable texture patterns. But that's not really what we're gonna be doing in this course. So to clear this, we can hit Control N or Command N. Well, let's go ahead and try that again. Left-click drag. And to make it a mesh, we can rotate around into 3D mode. Let's just hit the T key. Once you hit the T key, you may think you're ready to sculpt, but ZBrush has this funny way of having two conformations. And that is first you have to hit the T key, and second you have to hit make poly mesh 3D. If you do not hit make poly mesh 3D, you're just gonna get a pop-up here that kind of shows you what you can and cannot do and reminds you. Go over here, left-click on that. So this is kind of how we make a mesh ready and able for us the skull. Now, if you left-click drag you notice you'll be able to manipulate the mesh as you can see, but as you can see, we have a very low resolution here. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to hit Undo on this by hitting Control Z. And I'm going to give it a couple of subdivisions by hitting Control D. Now when we try to sculpt it, you'll see a much finer resolution. And when you hit left Alt, you'll be able to sculpt inward or if you want left option button. Don't forget if you want to undo anything, just click on that orange bar and left-click drag all the way to the beginning. In addition, you can hit Command Z or Control Z one at a time to undo exactly what you want. With that said, that's sort of just the basics of basics that we could go over to. Last thing on divisions that we'll talk about is is that we can also go through if I hit Shift F, We can go into wire-frame. And from there we can hit Shift D to go to lower subdivisions of which we originally had, and just regular d to go to higher subdivisions of what we had. So if you're a beginner, just practice on this stuff. Just practice on getting to know this stuff very well. Now, once you are comfortable with this, feel free to come up to here and where it says brush and left-click drag. And you will see a whole array of different brushes that you can do. And what these do is basically displaces the geometry very differently. To change the size of the brush, you can go up to draw size like so. Or you can hold the space bar down and make that draw size bigger there. Because holding spacebar will give us a nice little. A quick access to our draw size. In addition, there will be a intensity slider here as well. And the higher it goes, the more displacement the geometry. We'll go. Be careful though. You'll see a little bit of little bit of tearing. That's what happens when you exaggerate it. But that's okay because once you hit the Shift key, which is smooth, it will relax all that geometry back down like that. That's a very important part when it comes to things like organic sculpting. Where you sculpt in a groove and then kinda make it seamlessly blend into its outer surface. I'm going to hit Shift F to go out now. Or I could just simply drag the slider back to a certain area. Now, we would say we're gonna go over the user interface plights, pallets. So what we're gonna do here is we're gonna kinda go take it over to here. The two areas that we're going to cover the most are going to be sub tool and geometry. Now, sub tool, if we left-click drag will have a drop-down. And what this is is it's like a way of arranging and organizing of all the different separate meshes into their own unique editable state. For example, here we just have one sub tool because we have one cylinder. If we go through and duplicate this sub tool and I'm going to hit W key to access my gizmo to translate this sub tool across. You will see I made two sub tools and there are now two cylinders. In addition, I can make edits like turning this sub tool on or off. Or I can turn this sub tool on and off. Keep in mind when you turn this off. If you're still on it, it will stay active until you leave it. Now, the last thing we'll say is that it's important to understand a quick key which is left Alt or left option. And you can switch between the different sub tools, which is a lot easier than having to go through all the long list of sub tools to find which one you're wanting to go with. So keep that in mind. Now, there's gonna be a lot more that we go over regarding sub tools like merge. Boolean functions are gonna be another one that we talked about. But this is a kind of introducing you into it, easing you into a byte, getting just the basics down. With that said that's the sub tool. Let's go over to the geometry and finish there. Now the geometry pertains to the editing state of the mesh itself. For example, we have a display of our subdivisions here. And if we want just as we hit Shift D to cycle through the subdivisions and D to go all the way up. We can also drag our subdivisions up and down. One thing I'm gonna have you take note is there is a delete lower button. And what that is is it's a button that record that deletes the lower subdivisions below it. So if this is your highest subdivision and you hit Delete lower, well, that's probably going to make all the subdivisions before you're not gonna be able to. If you hit Shift D, you're not gonna be able to do very much. You can always hit Control D and create new subdivisions, but add wouldn't really make much of a difference. This is very important though, because Delete lower requires, there's a lot of ZBrush features that require delete lower to be accessed. So it's gonna be important that you remember this button. Now with that said, we also have some other Pete, other pieces of the geometry components such as edge loop, creases, which have concepts like bevels that we can do. And we have a very common one right here that we're gonna be accessing very often, which is going to be the Z remeasure function in ZBrush. Now this is a very important hard surface feature because it reads 0 machine allows us to tap into things like CSI modeler or clean topology, etc. So that's down the road again, like many other things, all we wanted to do though, is just give you a heads up to two things that a sub tool, geometry are going to be. The two tabs you're going to be accessing the most throughout this course with poly groups probably coming in at third place because you're gonna find yourself assigning a lot of groups. And then fourth place will be deformation. In there. You're probably only going to be using mirroring because that's the only reason we would use it is just a mirror, things like our hard surface arm, hard surface legs, so forth. Now, again, we go over that as the course progresses. This is just easing you in very calmly into all this. All I recommend you do for now is just get on an intimate understanding in sculpting things. Maybe by pressing the B key, hitting one of the brushes here and just experimenting down and seeing their effects. Holding down the Shift key to see how you can relax them. Holding left Alt key may be giving more geometry, just giving yourself a sense of practicing all of these things. So with that said, we're going to cover our very first hard surface ZBrush function, which is going to be the knife per brush. With that said stick around. 4. How Knife Curve Brush Works: Okay, welcome back. In this video we're going to go over our first major hard surface sculpting feature, the knife curve brush. And again, this is a 2021 feature here that we're going over. The knife curved brush has a primary mode and a secondary mode in which we're both gonna go over. So with that said, building off of what we learned in the last video for our beginners, we're going to just repeat again so that you can be caught up. Now first off, I'm going to clear my lightbox by hitting the comma key. I'm going to left-click drag on that cylinder and left-click drag into our viewport. I'm going to hit the T key to make it a 3D object and make poly mesh 3D to be a sculptural object. From this point on, Let's access our knife curve brush. First things first, I'll hold Shift Control. And if you look up here, when I hold down shift control, you're going to see it's the switch from brush to select rectangle. Let's click on that and ridge us that to access our knife, a brush. Now, knife curve brush has a activation state. Now if you can see it's in standard, so it seems like nothing's changed. But if you hold down Shift Control, you'll see then the knife curved brush is there. So if I hold down Shift Control and drag out, you can kind of see it kind of works like clip, curve, brush if you're ever familiar with that, with one difference. And that is, is it cuts off the geometry and fills in a poly group right there. Now, there is another brush in ZBrush that does something similar. It's the trim curve brush. However, at this one's a lot cleaner because it gives us a cleaner topology in an handles angularly better. In addition, it also has symmetry mode as well. So knife curved brushes, a very, very, very big step of an improvement for ZBrush. So with that said, if we go ahead and hit the X key, will notice that when we draw it out, it does work in symmetry mode. But if we go into the other side, it's symmetry mode will be deactivated. And in addition to that, if we divide it a couple of times and try to divide, you'll notice that it will not go through. That is because again, if you remember on the last video, what button to remember under geometry, it's that delete lower. Now again, there's a lot of functions in ZBrush that require you to delete the lower subdivisions in order for it to work. So this is where one of those functions, Let's hit it. And as you can see, we have our ninth curve brush. Now, in addition, if should go without saying if you hold Shift Control down and we see that curve right there, anything that's on the shaded side gets subtracted and everything that's on the unshaded side does is let the same. But if we do it again, hold down Alt, It's, we can get an inverse effect of that. With that said, let's go ahead and move on into our secondary mode. Now the secondary mode can be activated by holding Shift Control and spacebar down and a pop-up menu will come up. This is where you access and turn on B radius. And once that's done, knife curve brushes now in its secondary functioning mode, you may wonder what that is. So at would be just best to just this show you holding Shift Control and drag out. Except this time you're going to see a different behavior. And that's sort of like a slat where everything is. Now, it may be a little bit weird and a little bit wonky to look at. But the way this works is that the width of this slat, which is carved out in defined through wherever the line is, is basically based off of the draw size. So in other words, a smaller draw size, if I hold down spacebar and adjust my drawer size down smaller and do it again. We're going to have a thinner slat. I'll undo. And if we hold space bar down and make a wider draw size, which can be here by holding spacebar down or going up to here to draw size and then do shift control. You'll see a wider slat. It should also go without noticing that if you hit the X key, for some reason this is a feat. This might change down the road with later versions of ZBrush, but in its secondary state, symmetry doesn't work very well at all. So symmetry only works in a knife curve, brushes primary state. Now the last thing we're going to go over is we are going to go over the inverse effect of the secondary mode. In other words, what happens when we press the Alt button down? So probably just best to show you hold Shift Control, draw out this time hold left option or left Alt. As you can see, that it basically gave us the inverse effect where everything was. Now using this principle. We can also go ahead and hold spacebar down to make the draw size smaller. And as a result, we can cut even smaller sweats in using this principle, it's actually very advantageous for us because a lot of features in ZBrush automated features rely on the assigning of poly groups and wind poly groups are automatically generated for us like it is here, we can come up with some interesting combinations for some ZBrush sculpting down the road. And we're gonna show you those techniques and how they work down the road of this course. So with that said, this has been a demonstration in intro into the knife curved brush. What we're gonna do next in the next video is we're going to be practicing curved technique. Now, I know a lot of people maybe a little bit confused on what that is. And what we mean by curb technique is that we're going to show you how to create curves and also create angular curves of 90 degrees or more or less that are hard. And we're going to show you probably the most important lesson of all videos, which is the Space bar trick. In other words, where you draw out a curve and then you can pan the curve. All these things are very much essential for knife to work out and handle knife curved brush affectively. So think of the next lesson as a way to mass as your way of learning how to master accuracy with the knife curve brush. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 5. How to Pan Curve Brushes: Okay, welcome back. In this video we're going to go over how to pan a curve of our knife curved brush, as well as manipulate the curve itself in various angles. So with that said, let's get started to give you an idea. I'm going to show you right now. So far we've been doing straight cuts, but if I hold Shift Control down, you'll just see straight lines there. And as a result you get that. But if I want to do a more of a curvature, how do we make that happen? Well, first I'm gonna hold shift control down, left-click drag a curve out, like so. But now I can release Shift Control. And as long as I'm holding left-click down, I can move this around anywhere as I want. I can keep the curve alive. Now. I can, since I released Shift and Control, I can now just tap left Alt or left option to get sort of a Bezier result out of this. Now, if you're looking for something with a little bit more of a different angle may be a tighter angle. First we'll do the same thing. Shift controlled drought the curve. Release Shift Control. Now you can just type option or left Alt twice. So again, left option or left Alt twice. And as a result, you now have a more acute angle that you can work with. As a consequence to all of this, we can kind of see the possibilities again about everything that we cannot make on here. Now, using this concept, there is one final important ability that we have to go over. And this ability is this key button configuration has everything to do with mastering accuracy with your curb cuts. And that is the spacebar trick. And what the space bar trick is, is basically, it's a nickname to say that how we pan the curve around ZBrush because so far all you've been doing is just kind of starting from this point and then making all your curves occur from this point that we see right here AT. And it limits us. We almost have two trajectories and project an idea of where everything is supposed to look just from this point. But if we hold Shift Control down, we can change that point. Which is actually very, very advantageous. To do that. Hold Shift Control, left-click drag out, and release Shift Control with your left hand. And notice I'm keeping it alive with my right hand by still holding left-click down. This time I'm using my left hand to hold spacebar down in. Now as I move with my right hand, I can drag this around. This one takes a little bit of practice to do to manipulate panning, because there's a little bit of button configuration and you gotta be able to be willing to do the work in order to make all of this work like so. So kind of take a moment to practice all of that because being able to use the space bar trick to pan is a very important component for things like accuracy with your knife curved brush. If I hold Shift Control down, you'll notice there's a selection radical. The spacebar brush works also with this if you want to do more accurate selections, like so, if I hold Control down and marquee select, maybe there's some accuracy I want with this, again, the spacebar brush works with the painting there. I mean, having that accuracy is a very, very important concept. And now it's very important to be able to master manipulation through the space bar trick and through the Bezier is by holding left option, left Alt or double tapping left, option, left, all for a harder angle. So with that said, please take a moment to practice all of these. And in the next video, we're gonna talk to you a little bit more about what we just did here with masks, isolate selections, and finally poly groups. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 6. Introduction to Selection Tools: Okay, welcome back. Now in this video we're gonna go over three functions in ZBrush that are going to help us to understand our second major hard surface sculpting feature, our second primary hard surface sculpting feature in this video where you got to learn a few different things to help us get there. This video is sort of like a preparation into that. And those three functions in ZBrush are going to be the masking of ZBrush. It's masking tool system, It's isolates selection system. And finally it's poly grouping. Three things, masking, isolate selection and poly groupings. So with that said, let's just get started now. To begin with, let's go over masking. Now to do a mask. If you hold down Control right off the bat urine Mask Mode in its default state, it's, if you open it up, it's on freehand. And if we hold, if we have a bigger brush here and hold down control, you will see that the mesh turns to a different color. This mean, this means that a portion of the mesh has been masked. And what does it mean to be masked? It's pretty a symbol if you try sculpting now that which is masked does not get effected. The wild that which is unmasked is affected. Now. Alternatively, you can hold down control and left-click into open space and invert the mask selection, which will be a very important part to remember. And like before, that which is masked, gets unaffected, that which is unmasked, gets effected. So you can kind of see how this works in plays out. And of course, if you give it a couple of subdivisions and try it again, the same thing works. Masking does work with a whole bunch of divisions. It's one of the few things that seems these days that doesn't get affected by subdivisions. So that's masking. Alternatively, you can hold down control and drag out a mask marquee selection tool to make something more sharper and you can use your space bar trick to kind of give yourself similar areas. Finally, there are two more things to remember. Masking in. One is if you hold down Control, you can create a mask, but if you hold Control, left option, Alt, just like with the knife curve, you get an inverse effect where you can paint away a mask. Same thing goes when you create a mask and open space. If you hold down control, maybe use the space bar trick. You can also hold left option and you'll see that marquee select turn into a white mask and you can subtract away. Some of this is basic knowledge. Some of this is easy, but we all want to make sure we're on the same page. Of course finally, you can change the stroke to something like curve and maybe do like, for example, certain kinds of masks or create certain kinds of patterns in the world is your oyster in that regard. So you can have some fun with all of that. Now, having said that, we're going to now build into another feature, we're going to kind of explore another feature and that's going to be the next feature down, or I'm sorry, the next function down in ZBrush, which is going to be the isolates selection. The isolated selection is always set as your default Shift Control button. If you hold Shift Control down, you will see select rectangle. And it's pretty simple. You left-click, you will see it right there next to the knife lasso. And if you hold Shift Control and you can draw out a green square. Now, whatever goes inside this green square once it intercepts into the mesh is all that gets seen. So sometimes this helps if you want to, if you have a very dense mesh and you can just work on just sculpting just a portion of it. It's kinda nice. But if we can take that a little bit further, if we hold Shift Control, kind of like with mask, if you go into empty space and do a drag rectangle, you can invert the selection. Now, additionally, if you wanted to all come back hold Shift Control and simply left-click do not drag. And you will bring the mask back. Now if you hold Shift Control and then release Shift Control and then hold down left option, the mask will turn red and that will be it's subtractive state. Now this means we get, we hide the geometry essentially. Hidden geometry is geometry that we can't see. We can always bring it back the same way where we either inverted or we just shift Control left-click. But while it's hidden, it's important to know you can delete that hidden geometry. Under Geometry, modify Topology, Delete Hidden, which we will be doing quite often throughout the course. So it'll get more examples of that down the road. So the question comes, why are we learning these two functions? Well, the answer is pretty simple because they chain into what's coming next. And that is poly groups. Poly groups. The last feature in which word or I'm sorry, the last function in ZBrush that we're going to learn before going into our second major sculpting tool form, feature or function. And so what poly groups are, are basically ZBrush is way of organizing the mesh in two groups of color that allow it to perform automated processes. Sounds a little complicated, but let me give you an example. Let's first create a poly group by starting, holding Control down and maybe changing our stroke vector freehand. Now, right now it's a mask. But to create this and turn this into a poly group, we're going to take this mask, make it a poly group by holding Control W. Now it will have disappeared. But if we hit Shift F, we can still see that poly group. Now, if we hold Shift Control with our rectangle, we can isolate, select that very poly group. So that means shift. Isolate selection also works with poly groups as well. Again, that's going to be a very important part down the road. Now, as I said before, what is the purpose of poly groups? Will they create, again function? They create, they help ZBrush in identifying the directions of functions in which it's supposed to go. Zbrush has a whole bunch of automated functions that can be used and applied upon a mesh. And poly groups are used to help give it directions in which it's supposed to go. Let me give you an example, one such function. For example, in edge loop under Geometry, they have a function called group loops, which allows us to put a smooth edge flow between this poly group and this poly group. Now, let me go ahead and see if I can risk a little bit more of a contrast color to help us see it easier. If we notice a jaggedy edge that's going on here. Group loops can help us to kind of smooth that out. But again, group loops relies on poly groups to exist in order for them to work. So again, if I hit Group loops right now, it will say multiple functions. So let's dilute lower. I'm gonna go ahead and hit it. You can kind of see how a new edge flow was designated based on the poly groups that we're giving it like stage directions in how to perform it's automated function. And now if we shift select, we have a much cleaner line that goes around. And that's the point that I would like to get that ZBrush has a lot of automated functions, different kinds of automated functions. And they rely often, quite often on having poly groups give them the directions or roadmap or dictate the behavior on which they act. Group loops, for example, put Group loop edge flow between one poly group to another. So there's a lot of different examples of this working. Another one is going to be the main ZBrush function that is going to be coming up next. Then May our main hard surface sculpting function. It's our second one that we're going to learn. That one's coming up in the next video. But first, let's just go ahead and recap on how to assign poly groups. Again, first off, you can do so through holding control and maybe drawing a piece on. Or you can just go ahead and designate, marquee select, and then you can just turn those pieces 11 to poly groups by simply hitting Control W. In addition, if you remember our knife curve brush, we dragged out a piece and a poly group was already created for us. So we can create poly groups that way. If we wanted to. Let's go through sub tool. Let's go ahead and do something different. Let's bring in a 3D primitive to add to our existing sub tool by hitting the button append. And we have a little bit of selection in which we can choose. I'm going to choose a cube. I'm going to turn that off and select this cube. If we look at this group, we can make poly groups by just dragging a marquee select and making a poly group that way. Or we can do another way which can be going under the Poly Groups tab and hitting the button group by normals that we use the meshes normals to assign different poly groups. So using this concept, we're going to segue into our next major hard surface sculpting feature, which is going to be 0 meshes. So with that said, sick around and stay tuned. 7. Learn ZRemesher and Polygroups: Welcome back. In this video we're going to go over our second major ZBrush sculpting feature, and that's going to be 0 measure. Now, 0 measure is a big one because of, it's probably more of an important one because of knife curve brush because knife curve has kind of opened a doorway that allows 0 mature to once again iterate through a lot of interesting shapes and then come out with a lot of clean topology with it. So it's going to be important to grasp the concept of 0 measure in conjunction with what was learned in the last video regarding poly groups. Now, to give you an idea how 0 Mesha works, first of all, we're going to take the current mesh that we have. And I'm just going to first of all show you what it looks like and what it does. But without any poly groups, I think I should probably start by explaining what 0 measure is. First of all, because I've just said all these things about it, but I never explained what it actually does. So let's just start there. 0 measure is a function in ZBrush that takes an existing mesh and aligns, reconstructs the edge flow of its topology to a cleaner outcome. So for example, you see this mesh, well, it's a default shape right now and it has a very clean topology as it is. But maybe we don't like this area of here. So if we go through geometry and then we go through 0 measure and simply hit 0 measure. You'll see the entire edge flow completely changes. In addition, you're also going to see it turn into one singular poly group. You can kind of see how it made it all uniformed and everything like that. But this is what we really want to focus on regarding 0 measure. That is, if you look at all these corners here, you might want to take notice that it kind of scrunched in a bunch of topology that's not really necessary to go back into it. Maybe we want something that's a little bit more efficient and a little more uniform. Well, within 0 measure, under Geometry, 0 measure we have a whole bunch of different features that we can kind of go under. And what we're gonna do in this video is go over the preset settings you should be operating on as a base starter for all of this. So with that said, those presets are, you're going to just simply hit, keep groups on adaptive size 0 and smooth groups 0. And that's it just for a starter. Now, with that, go ahead and hit 0, measure one more time. Maybe I'd like to actually get rid of this scrunched in little two-star junction edge flow and make something that's a little more cleaner. Now as you can see, it just behaved in a way that is a lot more uniform, in a lot more easier to recognize. That's, and you also noticed that the poly groups that we had, and I'm using isolates selection to shift Control, left-click to go through each of them. Each one is a very easy and sculpted mesh that we can work with. Why is this important? Why? What's the potential with this? Well, if you remember, there was an opportunity like let's say let's scrunch the sin. If we remember and go back to our knife curved brush, we can maybe work with something like, for example, this. And notice that there's poly groups here and there's poly groups here. And if you're, hopefully you're seeing the potential and the possibilities of where I'm getting at with this, we can hit 0 measure and just get a nice clean outcome. And if one thing I will say is this. So let's just take a moment to think about this for a second. Sometimes, and this is a pitfall. Sometimes 0 measure doesn't give us a clean out outcome. And that's because this is again, an automated procedure. So if you're trying to do what I just did in the video in your result came out differently. First thing I would do, change the poly count, then try to go again, and then try to change the poly count again. And then in the existing same state, if it's a little bit better, change it again. Because a lot of times we like to hit 0 measure of few times under the same settings so that it works out It's algorithm to be cleaner. Now, if that still does not work and you are still having issues in your 0 measure is tearing all over and it's not working even though you have keep groups on, smooth off, all smooth groups off adaptive size 0, but adaptive on, well, if it's still not working, Here's something else you can do. Shift Control, left-click on here. Now we've isolated and hidden knowledge Geometry, modify Topology, Delete Hidden. Now go through dynamic subdivision. We haven't talked about this yet. We haven't done any of this yet. But first we're going to turn on dynamic subdivision smooth groups on and go to adjusting thickness. Now, why is this an important concept? Because if we turn dynamic subdivision off, we deleted all. You can do a pretty Z remeasure should basically have a much easier time of giving you a cleaner mesh if it doesn't have any corners is what I'm trying to say. And then when you turn on dynamic subdivision, you can rebuild your thickness out this way. Once you're done with that. Remember this is just a projection. It's not actual geometry. But then you can just go ahead and click Apply. Don't forget though, the thickness is all one poly groups. So you may need to go through and kind of reconstruct your poly groups once more. That is just sort of a breakdown to 0 measure. And how that works again, it's just a very nice little clean form of topology with it, with this clean now, you may ask yourself, why do we need clean form topology? Well, there again, that goes back to there are functions like CSI model or which is z brushes built-in modeling program which you can just access by hitting the quick keys, the zm. And if you wanted to, you could go through and do like a bevel function all around here using 0 measure. You can, because this has such clean edge flow topology, you can actually go through and Bevel like that because we also kept our topology the same poly groups. We could crease the poly groups and then do some divisions. There's a lot of things that can kind of go through with all of this when you have 0 mesure on your corner and you're working it like this. A very useful thing. So what I'm going to ask for you to do is if you're a beginner, just try to take a couple of practices in trying to cut up a piece of our cube up. And then going through the settings that we went through with and making sure every plane has a poly group on it. Making sure 0 mesure has keep groups on smooth groups 0, adaptive size 0, and just go through and problem-solve and rebuild meshes to clean edge flow. Just keep going through and practice rebuilding edges to clean edge flow in, again, you have trouble with 0 measure giving you a clean result. Just and it's on these settings and every plane has a poly group, but it's still tearing and for whatever reason, just again, isolates, do what we did. We isolate selected, we went through modify Topology, Delete Hidden. We went through 0 measure, and then you go through and 0 mesh this piece as a flat plane. Very easy. Then we go through dynamic subdivision, turn that on, go through smooth subdivision level 0. And then we're going to go ahead and adjust the thickness and conclude with apply. That's a lot of steps. I know. I know that's a lot of steps like, but it's probably why I say repetition is everything. You may not have to go through that. If 00 measure may actually work just fine. And quite frankly it will work just fine. You don't need to do all those steps to rebuild the geometry through dynamic thickness. You could just rebuild the steps through technically, if I did delete hidden and you just simply went through and deleted hidden in hit 0 measure like so you could technically, technically, you could just simply do a Q mesh and then set it to all polygons and then extrude it like that. You could do that as well. It's not your only option. But rebuilding pieces of geometry because we were at this point. And I'm going to use the undo slide, slider. Show you we were at this point here. Sorry. Let me find where it was that we scrunched it. Maybe we didn't get to that. We went from this point to this point right here. This point to this point. We just constant. It was just basically rebuilding an entire mesh using everything that we learned in the previous videos. So I want you to please take your time. Just practice on just trying to do something similar to this where you cut into a cube. You maybe scale the Cuban and then you hit by hitting the R key and accessing the gizmo. And then you make sure every angle has appropriate poly groups. Make sure 0 measure has the settings that we have right here. And again, if you fall into any issues, just the poly count size, just keep practicing and then hit 0 measure. And then if you have to clean the edge, blow up it's 0 measure again, keep going and keep going. And if you can't just isolate, select the piece and go over the steps of creating a dynamic thickness out of it instead. And again, the video of this shows you already what to do if you want to rewind this, I strongly recommend you do because this one is very important to practice. We very much would like you to get a good foundation on this one before advancing forward into the next major hard surface sculpting feature which builds on this piece. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 8. What is Gizmo Deformer : Okay, welcome back. In this video, we're going to conclude the beginner level section video tutorial by introducing you to the last of the three primary hard surface sculpting features we go over in this course. And that's the gizmo deformer or the gizmo transform types. Now, this is to explain what this is, is it's basically a feature built into ZBrush that allows us to deform the mesh in a variety of different ways that and as a consequence, we can flush a lot of interesting iterative results of hard surface pieces that we can once again reuse and modularly. And that's a very important part of this final step. We can even go through and get creative and circle around and after deforming the mesh and so many fun ways like we can then turn and go to the knife curve brush and add more additional detailing by cutting in certain angles. It really can never end once you add this into it. So it's probably best if I give you a demonstration and show you first let's hold Shift F down. I'm going to change my material to Matt so you can see it a little bit easier. Now, in this particular case, I'm going to go ahead and hit the W key. And I'm going to turn off x for symmetry. And when we hit the W key, we bring up our transformer or gizmo transformer. Now, it has a whole bunch of different menu options on here. But for starters, when we want to take this pivot point and center it, we click on this little upside-down tear trough. If we hold left Alt or left option button and drag, we can recenter the we can adjust the rotational pivot point or the translation pivot point. And again, if we want to recenter it upside-down teardrop. And you see with this little circle rosette mesh orientation arrow hold, left option to unlock it, and then reset the orientation. So that's sort of a breakdown of that course. You have the toggles where you can move it around, scale it like so, and scale it bigger or smaller. But where we're really going to look at is this Customize button, which is symbolized by the COG on the left menu. If I left-click up, you're gonna see a whole bunch of options for you. And one of the first ones we try, we can do a whole bunch of these. So I really do, I really do want you to experiment with all of them. But bend arc is going to be one of the easiest to grasp. Ben dark again is just something that bends the mesh to your will. And we primarily use the green cones to make this happen. You can kind of see like so. And as a result, we get a clean mesh. If you double-tap are, you can bring it back into here and you can kind of see how the meshes deforming. And if you feel that it's a little bit low res geometry, we can always divide it, but remember, we have to make sure to have our holding edges all the same. So we may need to do something like crease poly groups. So let's go through geometry, increase and increase pg for crease poly groups. One thing we will notice is that the end corners here did not get crisps. So I'll just go ahead and with my SI model or brush, I'm just gonna go ahead and just hold spacebar down. Look for crease and bring a crease on every angle here. So you don't have to do this. This is just my thing. So now when we divide this up, there will, it won't collapse on the bevel edges there. Now when we go back, let's get back here now. Let's do a bend arc. And we'll notice again, oh, subdivision levels are canceled. Once again, this is one of those features where we got to remember at the very first video, we have to hit Delete lower. We got to remember that button. Let's click back into Ben dark. And again it's the green cone. And you kind of see a much smoother result from all of this. Then if I double-tap are kind of scale the sin. So that is how one example of a bend deformer is. And when you're happy with it, go ahead and hit Accept. And we can go ahead and do another deformer. And one I like to try is extender, extend or doesn't have any green cones. So you're gonna have to experiment with the orange cones. Now that doesn't really make any changes. But if we want to extrude, That's where the magic of standard kind of works. Just don't extrude to foreign. We can kind of see already some interesting and fun results out of this. And yet again, another deform or can be taper. You can kind of see already how we're crafting this hard surface piece already. This can be something that might be very interesting for you. So like for example, we're going outside of the beginner level stuff to do some late stuff that we do down the road. We can draw in a couple of pieces like this. This is just showing you the potential, how we combine it with other pieces. Here are other functions that we have yet to go over, one of them being booleans. So this is sort of a demonstration. Preview. Williams are basically meshes that to subtract in the lower. They are very fun to use. Kind of see how I'm playing around with it. Let's see. I'll just try and trim curve. Sorry. Mask them. Kind of see already how we're having a little bit of fun with just simply having some experimentation out of all of this. It's just sort of that on and on approach that we can just keep going and going and going and going. We can create something pretty fun down the road as we are going through all this. So that is an example of how we manipulated the bend deformer like. So. Take a look at this image here and I'll see you can kind of see how it looks. And we went from this all the way to just flat plane right here. You can kind of see how bend if our transform, the gizmo transform to formers just made it look like a completely different hard surface peace with a combination of techniques from boolean to extender, to taper, and to bend arc. It's that ability to identify the combinations that we have to practice and learn. And that's what this course is going to now go into. It's about practicing the combinations. With that said, this is kind of like your graduation out of the beginner section. In the next video, you're going to officially start working on your turtle to practice all your different combinations. And then from there, you should have a much stronger understanding, too hard surface techniques and hopefully a better Arsenal. You are equipped with in all the zebras sculpting that you can accomplish. So that said, let's get started on that turtle. 9. Importing Practice Base Mesh: So let's officially get started. In this video, we're going to begin our hard surface sculpting with our turtle character, a space astronaut turtle that we're gonna be working on. To get started, we're going to need to be able to bring in a base mesh of a turtle. And then we're gonna be doing some additional base mesh hard surface pieces that we're going to be sculpting that will go onto the arm of the base mesh. To get started with that, we'll go onto the arm of the turtle. I should say that we'll start off with, it's gonna make a little bit more sense once you see it. The first thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to hit the Comma key and I'm going to bring in an import. And you want to look to the right for that Resources folder for less than one turtle base OBJ. So don't forget to download that. And I'll just left-click and drag and I'm gonna hit the T key to bring that in. And if you hold left-click and hold Shift, you can kind of snap that right in front of you. Now that we have this, what we're gonna do is use this character here as a template to fit all our secondary base mesh pieces that we carve out with. And that's going to start with using a combination of gizmo deformers, knife curve brushes, and a whole bunch of fun with 0 measure. So let's just go ahead and get started. Now to begin with, all change out my Mac cap here to a basic material. I'm going to go through sub tool here. And to begin, I'm just going to bring in a primitive. Go under sub tool, hit a pen go cube, and we have ourselves a cute. Now from here I'm just going to hit the W key and we can toggle and translate that. As you can see, I'll begin by just trying to get a fairly rectangular shape. I might even turn off my, the visibility of my turtle just temporarily so I can just kind of focus on this. Now from here, I'm going to want to give it a couple of subdivisions and then delete those subdivisions. Now the reason for that is because knife curved brush is going to be the first thing we work with on here. And it doesn't really function too well with a bunch of subdivisions, so we got to take care of that. So to begin with, I can go through and just go through turn off SMT, maybe divide this a few times, three or four times. Then afterwards we're going to hit Delete lower. And again, this is all under Geometry. Don't forget to turn us emptied back on. Usually that just smooths it, but I don't really need to do that. Now, the next thing we're gonna do is hold Shift Control and go up here and choose our knife curved brush. Now this is one of the most common features that we're gonna be using through the course. We're gonna be identifying a lot of opportunities to flush out fun pieces through this. So to begin with, I'm just going to go ahead and show you a little bit of this. We just hold down Shift control and left-click and I'm going to drag a straight line and you can kind of see that poly group there. Let's do the same thing again. I'm going to hold Shift Control and I'm going to drag a left-click down and then I'm gonna release Shift Control and then hold the space bar down. And I'm still holding left-click down as well. And you can see me pan around this as well. If you want to make any adjustments with the curve. But I'm just going to keep it right there. And now I'm going to release Spacebar and double-tap Option key and go that will give us a nice angular cut line instead of a, the Bezier line. And we're just going to release. As you can see, we've got ourselves a pretty clean surface here. Now, at this point, we can have a whole bunch of fun. But first things first, I'm gonna just kinda clean up a little bit more. Let me see if I can hold Shift Control. And this time I'm just going to pan this around. Just tap left Alt or left option once. Because we don't need a hard line. We can just have sort of like a Bezier curve. And we can have a little piece just like that. Now, I can just sort of make my adjustments on here. Anything you want. So if you can get to a shape like this, that's fine. This is a good stopping point to go into 0 measure. Now we're going to do 0 measure for a specific reason. And the reason is, is because you remember when we divide it earlier on, if we tried to divide this and you can kind of look at some of those little tapers that we get on here when we try to divide. And that's because you can see that when we knew, when we do do the knife cut brush, it gives us a lot of tie-ups. Now. That's a little bit of a pitfall for this clean topology. But the real advantage about this is, is when you're using knife cut brush, it is a very clean cut. Unlike trim curve, which just has a very malfunctioning algorithm, or clip curve, which does a lot of non manifold mashing of geometry in there that causes errors for us. This curates a very clean edge flow topology of poly groups that 0 measure it can actually work with to compute and remeshing a cleaner edge flow for this whole piece. So what we're gonna do is we're going to mesh this and we're gonna give you a good start off preset for 0 measure. Now again, this is what you want to start off with, but you don't want to over rely on it. You might need to do some tweaking. And if you still get issues, you can go through polychaete, target poly count and do different iterations and so forth. But we're going to do keep groups and we're going to do adaptive size to 0 and smooth group 0. Now if we do it like that and we do a little bit of a 0 measure. This will be the result. Sort of clean little result, but you kind of see it kind of tour into here. And that's because this is one poly groups. So it didn't give it, we didn't give any information here for these two to be separate poly groups. So let's turn these into two different poly groups. So 0 meshwork and once again have an easier time. Again, let's just go through poly groups and start with just something simple group by normal. And you can see already we're getting some nice and clean. Now. Let's go through geometry and let's go through 0 measure again. And as you can see, we get something that's a little bit cleaner because now that line just gave us a nice clean little spot. Now if you see a little waviness right here, just go ahead and hit C refresher one more time. And it will just kind of give you something that's clean and that's what I always like to do. I like to hit 0 measure a couple of times. To get something like that. We're halfway through this base mesh. Let's go ahead and just finish this off with some deformers. Again, this is how we find an iterations of our shape and have a little bit of fun here. So to begin with, I'm going to hit the W key to access to formers. You're going to want to go up to this cog here. And our first two former we're going to work with is that bend arc deformer. Again, with the bend deformer, the most common. You see all these cones here. Well, the most common one is going to be the green cone that you see right here. So keep that in mind as you're going through. Also, if you went once, you can also make that a little bit thinner and then do a quick little z Ramesh. That way when you do the bend deformer again, might be a little bit easier. Something like that. Now, once you have something like that, just click right back on that cog, hit it, hit Accept. Then from here, let's work with a second to former. And for that we'll work with taper. Now, taper is just pretty simple one. There is no green cones for this, but we will be working with these orange cones. In this case, I'll be working with this cone. And I'm going to work with this cone right here. Go ahead and see if you can try to get to this point right here. This is actually a pretty good stopping spot. I may do one more little piece right here, One more bend arc, and I might just try to do it on this angle. That way we have ourselves a good clean base mesh arm to work off of. And you know what I might even do. I think I might even have a little bit of fun with this. I think I might just go ahead and hold Shift knife cut and just simply go through and make my own little piece right there. I wanted to, I could even 0 mesh that. Do it a couple of times to clean it up. So again, that is sort of the basic start off. So what we have here is a good start off in base mesh for you to work with. I want you to just take your time on this one because this is gonna be a good foundation for you to prelude into your next video. And we're going to be building off of a whole bunch of applications and practicing these combinations back and forth. And we're going to explore deeper even to our ninth curve brush by working with the secondary features that cut slats into any piece of geometry. That's going to be very fun too. With that said, stick around and stay tuned. 10. Creating Shoulder Base Mesh: Let's continue. We made our first base mesh using the knife curve brush in combination with the gizmo deformers. Now we're gonna go ahead and show you another combination of a technique to make some base meshes. Because again, what we're gonna do is we're gonna take these very blank detail, this low detailed meshes and we're going to reassemble them all the way over to the arm and we may even reuse these pieces. That's why I had a folder made, which I did at the end of the last lesson and put those pieces there because we're going to store them and duplicate them and take them out. So let's just go ahead and keep going. What we're gonna do is very simple one. It's going to be just sort of like a simple short shoulder plate mesh that we're going to be reusing. And this time we're going to show you how to combine it Gizmo to farmer with a blight Boolean. So let's go ahead and just get started. I'll turn the visibility off and we'll do like we did before, and we'll append that primitive cube. This is all just repetition and learning through repetition. We go through sub tool, a pen, and choose cube. I'll turn the visibility off of the folder with the spare parts and left-click onto my cube. And now for this one, I'm just going to hit the R key and we're just going to a scale that in like so. Nothing too crazy on this 1. First off, I'll go ahead and rematch this guy. So beginning with going through and adding some poly groups to each angle because remeshing something like this, poly groups helped to tell ZBrush which area, where all the borders are so we can have clean edge flow. Let me give you an example. Like for example, if we want a poly group here, a poly group here, a poly group here, here, basically every side. Let's go through, That's what we have to do. Let's go through poly group and we're gonna go through by normals. And again, we're just going to hit it. And you can kind of see there is a new poly gurus that is represented by every piece. And in case you're wondering, I'm holding Shift Control left-click to isolate, select to kind of show that. Now that we have that, we've given Z brush a way of identifying in which we can rematch this. So let's go through if you remember the last lesson, we had our settings act keep group. We add adaptive size down to 0, smoothing groups down to 0, and we simply just hit C Romesh. And because of that, the poly groups on ZBrush, we're told this is how we want to define our borders all nice and clean like this. So with that said, let's continue on. Hit the W key. And like before we click on that COG, we're going to really exercise into that Ben dark primitive again, repetition and learning. The Bandar primitive we're going to be using again, if you remember, it's the green cones. And then we're going to use the green cones like so. Kind of see how it works there. Now, one thing that I can say is if you want to divide this, take a look at if I hit Control D, you can kind of see it kind of gives us this round little piece that's because it's kind of smoothing out and collapsing. Control Z and undo. If you want to keep those edges hard. Let's go into crease and then crease poly group borders. And when I hit Shift F to show you, you can kind of see a crease just appeared out of here. If you need to rewind and see that. Now if I divide it few times, you'll see that it holds its border. Since we're gonna be using Booleans, going to go ahead and delete the lower subdivision. Now that we have that taken care of, Let's go ahead and give you your first applicable approach to life Booleans. Once you have everything that you want, for example, if you want to reconstruct the subdivisions or you want to go into Move brush, hit the X key and hit symmetry. And you want to make this like a little bit more rounder. Feel free to if you want to use the Trim curves to cut something that is different, by all means go for it. But once you are at a comfortable spot and you have the highest subdivision, click lower, we're going to now use a light Boolean to cut a sphere into this. So to do that, let's go into sub tool. We're going to hit a pen, unlike before when it was the cube, It's the sphere this time. And we're going to left-click on that sphere. And as you can see, it's just a normal mash right now as it stands, nothing special about it. But in order to bore, you need to make this a Boolean. And what this Boolean is is it's going to cut into this piece using its mass. It will make more sense when we show you. But before we can do any of that, I'm going to give it a couple of subdivisions. And I'm going to go up here where it says Live Boolean because we have to enable Live Boolean mode, then we have to go into render. If you don't have any of that, you can kind of see where it is right there. Finally, let's go ahead and click and turn this sub tool into the desired size Boolean piece that we want. Now, one thing to note that if you're not in wireframe or Shift F and you go into Boolean mode, it's going to disappear. Just hit Shift F and if you'll be able to see it again, hit the W key and you should be able to see it intersect into this piece like so. Now feel free to mess with the Boolean or the gizmo to give us sort of, how shall I say it? A kind of unique shape. If you want to call it. You can kind of see, I'm just going to go with something very simple. Might left Alt, left-click. Bring it in like this. Another thing you can do is if you delete the subdivisions of the geometry, you can start combo showing up things that you've learned from the last lesson. That's what we're doing where you can go into knife, curb brush, hit x symmetry. And if you want, you can do things like this. There is nothing wrong with that as that is an option. But for now, I'm going to keep it like this. Because by keeping it like this, I kind of give myself the option of changing anything further. Now, we're going to try one more example of a Boolean with a different shape. And that's going to be the sub tool for acute. For that, we're going to just simply do as we did before at the original going to sub tool. It depends. Choose a cube, select the sub tool of that cube. And then we're just going to turn that cube first of all into a Boolean. As expected, It's going to disappear. But if he had shifted up, you'll see it. Also makes sure you're very keen to understanding the order here because booleans only affect the sub tools that are above it. If there's anything below a Boolean sub tool, it will not get subtracted or affected. So kinda keep that in mind. If I bring that in like so. You'll see something like this. Now, you can mess around, scale it. Or if you don't like the width, you can mess around with that. You can give it a couple of subdivisions if you want. You can just keep it like that if you want. Now a cool little trick about duplicating meshes is that we've been doing so far duplications through sub tools. But another way we can duplicate the geometry without duplicating the sub tool is simply by hitting Control and hitting toggling the transpose button around. And if we do that, we duplicate this mash and we have a second mesh. Notice that the original mesh stays in place and it's masked, which is gonna be pretty important. That's kind of give ourselves that extra little finite detail. And you can marquee, select and control off to clear the mask and clear the whole thing if you want. Now, if you want, you can go ahead and duplicate this sub tool. Turn that duplicated sub tool into a Boolean and hold Shift left-click and you can kind of snap that's around like so. And as you can see, we have our first real little mesh piece. So from here, we can do all sorts of fun things. If you're ready to turn this into an actual applicable mesh, you can, because you've got to remember what you're looking at right now is a projection. It is not the actual finished piece, it is not an actual piece. We could turn these Booleans off and it wouldn't mean anything. We got to convert this now into actual geometry. That's pretty easy to do because all we do is just go through sub tool down to where it's Boolean. And we can go ahead and hit make Lynn mesh when you're ready, which I'm gonna go ahead and do right now. It doesn't show up in your sub tools where typically shows up is going to be right up here. So to get this into your sub tools, hit append and select the desired piece. Then from there you can disable all the pieces because it's going to show up at the very bottom of your piece. So this is R. This concludes our sub tool for this piece. It's going to be a reusable piece that we can use. 11. Detailing Arm Base Mesh: Okay, so let's continue. In this video, we're going to begin to start detailing out some of our base mesh that we've created. And also we're going to do that by bringing in a 3D reference to help, aid us in giving us an idea on what something's supposed to look like. And more importantly, we're going to be learning a secondary feature in the knife curve brush to aid us in creating and detailing that forearm. So let's go on ahead and get started. Now before I do anything, I'm going to first of all go into sub tool here and I'm going to go ahead and start to clean up what I've made because I have a few Booleans and base meshes leftover. And of course my finished product, which I've yet to put that in my spare parts. So I'm just going to kind of first drag and drop that in and go through and delete all these excess pieces because we want to keep this as thin as possible. Then I'm going to go ahead and click off into cylinder because I want to bring in a new piece. And if I kinda important OBJ file over this, it's going to replace it. So let's click off into that cylinder and just click Import. And you're going to look into the right side of that resources folder and look for a download per lesson arm reference OBJ. We're going to bring that in. You can kinda see a little bit of a different looking our forearm that's different from our base mesh. And that's because I went on ahead and detailed this one out. Now, we're going to use this as a visual reference, but do not think in your mind that you have to get tunnel vision into what you're seeing here. You don't have to get the exact proportions or anything like that on here. It's just important that you learn the techniques. So with that said, let's click back into our turtle base and bring that OBJ over. To do that, just go ahead and go through sub tools and hit a pen and find your imported file up here in the Quick Pix. You can kind of see the placing them or that all that is, usually it's on the bottom of the sub tool. Now if you hit W, Let's go ahead and center that in there. Kind of gets started here. I'm just going to kind of move this guy off to the side. Let's go into spare parts now and bring in our first base mesh. I'll duplicate this guy and then I'm gonna hold shift left-click on this down and over button so that it kind of goes to the bottom because now that's going to bring us to the bottom order of the sub tool. And let's close out our spare parts and get started. Like I said, as you can see, one thing that is very noticeable is that this piece, base mesh shape is different from the silhouette based mesh shape of this piece. It's a little bit longer, a little bit flatter or a little bit rounder. And I just wanted to kind of get you to understand that you can still continue to make some adjustments interests to help find the piece its rightful place. So I'm gonna do a little bit of adjustments, but I want everyone to know it is not a prerequisite to mirror this or make this look exactly the same. So first thing I'll do is I'm just going to line it up like so and shrink it down. Like that. We're just kind of going through getting sort of idea where all this is going to go through. Then I'm just going to mess with the deformers to help me out here. Let's see here, I'm probably going to hit the W key. Let's click on that cog. And we can start with a Bandar to make this kind of round out a little bit more like that. It's already looking a little bit the same. Let's right-click on that clog and click on for taper. Now let's take some things out. Like so. If you wanted to move some things in or out, you can do that as well. Feel free to kind of do some of your own experimenting, to see some own shapes if you want. We, we've usually been working with the side, but it's not like a sin to actually go through and find some interesting pieces. Once you have that, just go ahead and click that CAG again and hit Accept. Let's go ahead and just make some final adjustments with the Move brush here. For that, I'll just bring this in. Just hit V for the move brush. Make your drawer size big. If you want, you can just kind of Bring in a couple of spaces and you can kinda see how it's kind of lining up a little bit similar. Again, this piece, how it is grouped in here has done a little bit differently. If you want to, you can make some adjustments with that. For example, you can go through Z model or an extrude out a little bit more lengthened 0 mesh everything back. You can do those things if you want. There's no rule or anything like that. Just remind yourself that this isn't a game about mirroring what you're seeing. But understanding technique and the tools that we are demonstrating, that is probably the most important thing that we want you to understand. Now, when you get to a nice comfortable spot, the next thing we're gonna have you do is we're gonna have you divide it a couple of times and then go through geometry. Go in and delete the lower. Hit Shift Control, and go up to the left and select your knife curve brush. Now we can get ready to get started on cutting this up using a secondary feature in knife curve. Now this is an important first applicable step. So let's take a look. Now, if I lower my brush size down and I hit Shift Control, you'll see that whatever is beyond the shadow line up here, it gets subtracted. We know that. But what we don't know is that if you hold Shift Control and Spacebar, little bit of a finger twister and click, left-click on that be radius. And we do the same thing again. We're going to find that we have a new behavior where only the lot, the line basically excludes everything outside of the radius of the brush. Like that. This is a pretty useful feature because you can actually start finding ways to look for duplicating sub tools, finding booleans here, and then going to the original sub tool and using that Boolean that you made to kind of cut in perfectly. There's opportunities of all sorts when you take this approach. But what we don't know is also that in addition to doing it this way, if we hold Shift Control and then release and then hold left Alt or left option, we can cut into it now again, we can change the width of this by going to smaller sizes, like so. You'll see a smaller width. That's how we got these slants here and so forth. So using this concept, let's just go ahead and do a small demonstration with making a slant line here and then a slant line here. And again, don't get tunnel vision and into perfectly copying the reference. Honestly, I would just rather you have this because you're going to rack your brain if it's a first-time, that sort of a slam like that. And again, take practice swings if you have to be in the mode of just do your first slant and then that's all you need. Feel free to go through. You can kind of see there's some new patterns that you can emerge. And if you want, you can just practice them only want or you can make the smallest draw size. So you can make a thinner line here. You can just see all the opportunities that you can kind of go through this. Again, this is also why spacebar is a very important part to learn in all of this. The space bar trick where you're holding Shift Control, dragging out a line, holding down left-click, but you're releasing Shift Control and then holding down spacebar and moving the mouse to pan this around. That's like a complicated thing to do for a beginner because they don't really go over it a lot. But that little trick, it's so very important to learn. It really is an important one to learn to get accurate curves. I'm just going to kind of I'm sorry to constantly reiterate it, but it is a very, very, very, very essential tool to learn here. With that said, once you feel comfortable with a line pattern that you want and you'll remember, I'm just doing a whole bunch of different line patterns to kind of show you like all the potential opportunities that you can get through this. But once you feel comfortable with what you want and once you have a pattern that you want and are comfortable with its shape, just go ahead and just bring it in. We're going to do next then is we're going to go through and we're going to do a Z modeler arms, a split two parts function. I'll just go ahead and just make my piece now. Something like that. Just a nice simple line. Now that we have these three pieces, these are basically become three separate parts. Then we go into sub tool and then we go to Split two parts because again, these are three separate parts because of the secondary feature of knife curve. And what's going to happen is we see three sub tools arranged. Now we can work on these pieces individually, rematch these pieces individually, and do separate work on each piece without having to worry about it construed other piece. One area is going to be doing the slang curve in conjunction with Booleans. The other one's going to be doing sullen current in conjunction with bevels, Z modeler, Booleans, and the chisel brush. And then of course, the last one is going to work with showing us some dynamic thickness as a fun little feature. And so that's kind of how the roadmap is going to work on this one. So with that said, stick around and stay tip. 12. Sculpting Base Mesh Fin: Okay, so let's continue now that we've given ourselves an opportunity to look further and set ourselves up in detailing our arm. We're going to start with the thin piece here first, since that's going to be the easiest piece, it's expanding on what you learned in the last one with some more practice. Then the next one is gonna be about Booleans and how we combine what we have there with the planar cup brush. And then the next piece down is going to be sort of like an advanced version of how we can bring in and cut up even further more pieces in learn Dynamics, subdivision thickness. So let's first things first, let's just start with this fin. I'm going to left or left option. Click to click on this fin sub tool. And what I'm gonna do is is I notice that there's a hollow cavity in-between here. I'm going to use the night cut brush to create almost all of this. So you can kind of see a knife cut brushes here. A thin knife cut brush width is here, and even a thin knife cut brush was used here. What I'll do first of all is I'll go through sub tool. I'm going to turn off the visibility of everything so I have a little more concentration. And so my main finch be the only thing. I'll even move that down to the very bottom. I'm going to make two versions of this. I'm going to duplicate this sub tool. We go and I'll turn one of them off. The first thing I'll do is I'll create this little thickness that we see here. Now if we do it the original way, you'll notice it's in its secondary mode. So let's undo that, hit Shift Control and hold down spacebar. Again, that's how we access between our primary and secondary modes of knife cut, curve brush. Let's turn that off. Now let's go ahead and try that again. We wouldn't. All we're gonna do is again, practice a little bit on some things. Here. See that's the desired result, but feel free to do something like taking practice swings on identifying where you should be tapping left Alt. Because again, this does require a little bit of practice. The whole spectrum of everything. Let's see. Something like that. It's probably going to work just fine for me. If you want. You can also 0 mesh it. Probably not, but I am going to do one thing. Go into my solo mode, or you can click solo mode here. Let's go into our secondary mode. Just to kind of create a little bit of a slant there. Let's get out of secondary mode by hitting solo, which is right there. Now let's get back into what we have. Now. That was our first piece. Let's go into our second piece here. Turn the visibility off on the original piece that we just did. And now make sure again you're in secondary mode, so that's Shift Control and Spacebar be radius is turned on. What we'll do here is we're going to cut some slants in. To do that. We're going to go on ahead and just adjust the draw size radius to a practice swing to see if that's the right size radius you want. Yeah, that's all right. We're going to hold Shift Control. Then tap left Alt, and then hold down left Alt. We should have something like that. You can turn on your piece right here, your secondary piece, and you can click on it. Hit the RW or IQ and center that in and scale it in a little bit so it can kind of show a little bit of thickness for you. Slept Alt left-click onto this piece. We can switch into it. Try that again. And again. It's just holding down shift. We're in secondary mode. We're holding down Shift Control. Tapping left Alt, left-click and releasing. Then if we want, we can pan by holding spacebar to measure the space. Then we can hold down left Alt to do subtractive inverse state. Now, something like that might work like a lot of buttons. And when you say them out loud, when, like when I'm doing, it sounds fair. It sounds very complicated, doesn't it? It's one of those things. It's almost like a video game. If you've ever tried to narrate what all the buttons you're pressing of a video game. A video game will come off very complicated. But if you develop the muscle memory of all the buttons, then it's going to be a lot easier to remember. Because your thought moves a lot faster than your voice. Let's left Alt, left-click. Go into Move, brush, B&B, bigger draws size. Let's go ahead and bring that in. Like so. Left outlet. Or I can just kind of cut in here and its primary mode. So hold Shift Control Spacebar, turn the radius off. Let's do transparency to help me see a little easier. Go, something like that. If you want. Transparency off. That's basically what we did right there. You can turn on the other pieces and see how they function. If you look around, you can also, and see if you need something thinner, feel free to go into transparency mode and just carve out something thinner. It's not wrong concept. It's not like a it can only be done a certain way. There's no such thing as the right answer at all in any of this. So once you have that taken care of, You can also do secondary thinner lines, but that means going back into b Radius holding, Shift Control, Spacebar, toggling be radius on, make a very small drop size. Kind of see me go all the way straight down to one. Like I said, the most important thing about this is not mimicking the original piece. It's about learning the technique because quite frankly, it's going to come to you a lot quicker if you grasp the concept. People like to spend their minds getting racked on how to make this look exactly perfectly a certain way. I don't want perfection of trying to copy something to take away from somebody trying to understand the important tools in the process. So we have ourselves, our secondary pieces. Now, this is going to go ahead and conclude the first part of this. If you want to make any more adjustments, feel free. You know, it's not wrong answer or right answer. In any of this. The kind of the how shall I say? It's the getting the tool down in getting your fingering and memory. Pretty much in sync with the controls of the keyboard are probably the most important thing to grasp in here, developing the muscle memory. This is the most important concept. As you can see, I did more so like for example, I did more slants than this one. Here. You could do more, you could do less. You can do just one. There's no such thing as the right or wrong. It because like I said, if I did that, if I went through and took a long, long amount of time, then I my videos would probably be tripled the amount that they are now. So I'm probably going to leave it at that. Now that we have what we got here, we're gonna move into the center section where we're going to work with Booleans in conjunction with the Z modeler and see if we can show you a little bit on how we do some fun stuff with the plainer cut brush. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 13. Constructing Mid Forarm: Okay, welcome back. In this video, we're gonna continue into the middle section. One thing I forgot to mention is this green stuff that you see here. We're gonna be doing that down the road when we do the shoulder section because that's sort of like a reusable asset that we want to illustrate example in demonstrations of modularity and reusing things kick bashing purposes. So one thing that we're going to do now is we're gonna work on this center section that you see here. And for that, we're going to have an opportunity to kind of look into Booleans being used to create some of these pieces here. And how we can rematch these and add some bubbles, it as well and finish off with some plainer cut. With that said, let's go ahead and get started. Now that we have that first piece created, let's go ahead and first off, I'm just going to hit Shift F. I don't really need to remember that anymore, so I'll just make that one poly group that way if anything happens, I can do a split two groups section. And I'll just go ahead and merge these two pieces down. Merged down like so. And there we're gonna create a new folder for that, and we're just going to call that folder arm. That way we have a place to put all of these things in. Now, let's just go on ahead and move to this piece. Let's turn off the third piece. Now, what we need to do is first put some Booleans in here. So first thing we're going to do is I'm going to hit the B key. And I'm going to look for an insert mesh brush. Particularly insert mesh primitives makes sure you're not choosing primitives. H go for just regular primitives. Once that happens, you're going to have a whole selection of meshes that you can insert in here. In particularly this mesh right here, the cylinder is what we're going to go with for having us having to go. And what we're gonna do is we're just going to left-click drag right in the middle there, cylinder. And as you can see, everything is masked. And that's a good thing because that gives us an opportunity to, because what we want to do is we want to make this cylinder its own sub tool. So since it's already masked, we can go to Split, split on mask because this piece is unmasked. And let's go into this a cylinder. Now this piece like the original shoulder piece that we did, base mesh is going to be subtractive. It's going to be used for Boolean like we did with the sphere on the shoulder piece. I'm going to simply first of all enabled like Boolean mode, which can again be done in render. Render Booleans Live Boolean. And now we have to make a choice on what it is we want to have for this Boolean in turned into, and since it's this sub tool, return this sub tool into Boolean mode. Now, if you, depending on whether you have shift f or not, it's going to disappear. But if you just kind of push it in like so you can kinda see already the results. Don't feel free. Feel free to give it a couple of divides to kind of smooth that area out a little bit about three. Now take your time. Just go ahead and hit R. And if it crunches in a little bit, just kind of push it in a little bit more. Now you can go ahead and do whatever you want. With this. One thing I like to do is just hold left Alt or left option while adjusting the rotational value. I'm going to just bring this along here like that. And if you remember, we can duplicate the Mesh, not the sub tool, but the mesh by simply holding down Control and toggling the translate button of the gizmo. Now, that's not going to work if you have division, so make sure you delete the divisions and then do that. Kind of see the result. One more time. Feel free to check your spacing and if you need to do a split departs to edit all of these, feel free to go ahead. There is no such thing as the right thing. But you'll notice as when you do that, that the rest of these get masked. So if you want them all to scale is one, just drag off and cold Control and drag off in an empty space. Here. Kind of see the results. This one feels a little bit too far. I might just bring that in a little bit more. Now, this is something I'm going to show you is not necessary. But if you feel like you want to do some extra work on this with a trim curve or a knife curve to kind of manipulate shapes. You can do that. These Booleans, as long as the divisions are cut, you can kinda cut through here, or cut through here. Cut through here, through here. You can do things like this, AP want. There's no right or wrong thing. But I'm going to actually advise against that because we're gonna be doing a bevel and having these pieces intersect is going to kind of get in the way of a clean Z Romesh process. Even if you do things like this, where you just bring out the piece like that. Like I said, all of that stuff that I'm showing you, That's just a little taste of what's down the line for the chest section when we get there. So now that you have all this, the only thing left to do is just simply make this a Boolean. So let's go up to sub tool. Let's go into Boolean and do a make Boolean mesh. And it should give us too much trouble. And then let's append that new piece. You can cut up. One thing I forgot. Oh God. You need to have everything turned off else when you do a make Boolean mesh, the new boolean bash will include any visible geometry. So my bad on that. Let's turn that piece off and do a make Boolean mesh again. It looks like it did it. So let's append and bring that in. Like so usually goes all the way to the bottom. Let's turn off our pieces. Click and take a look at her new piece here. You can kind of see poly groups are already laid out for us, which is good. It looks like there's a little bit of weirdness going on here. Hope, hoping that happen. But if you need to feel free to kind of bring that in like a weird little piece right there. And it looks like there's a little bit of a glitch going on. Not gonna be too much of a hassle. Now that we have all of this taken care of, one thing that we can do is if you run into issues like this and you try to do a 0 measure and get some really ugly. One thing, I'll show you some fixing so we can do, let's make sure we get this right and keep groups. Turn it up. Let's do Smoothing Groups off. I expect everything except this to be fixed. So this looks like a very anomaly looking thing right here. Let's see. We go straightening out a little bit, getting better. Now that we have a little bit of that taken care of. Let's go ahead and I'm just going to try that one more time now. I'm Laura, I'm trying to do is I'm trying to do a 0 measure. Sometimes won't we get is a little bit of ugliness because of the Thai offset happened here. And when that happens, sometimes we just need to change our polygon count to help us. If you start off with a too low of polygon count, you're gonna see some tearing like you saw up there. So I'm just going to try to do some a little bit cleaner. And it looks like it's getting a little bit clean. Once you get something that's a little bit clean, you can then ensure way down again, like I'm doing as you see, and then do a couple of 0 measures with that division. And then maybe inch away down a little bit more just to see if you can get something. Because you should never rely on that. Then what we're gonna do is once we have a nice clean spot, Let's go ahead and put some bubbles on here. First thing I'll do is I'm going to hit B, z, m, access our Z modeler. And remember it has three selective components that C model or brush. So let's make our draws size super small. And like for example, the face will give us one set of menus. The edge will give us another set, then a point. We'll have another set of menus. So we want to go with the edge with the set of menus. Let's choose Bevel and Bevel complete. We can kind of see. If we can find ourselves drawing in a little bit of a nice little clean bubble in all of this. So now if we divide it again, you're going to have that problem. So let's just go ahead and increase the poly groups here. Honestly, I'm not too worried about it. I could just simply trim curve that off, but it's not gonna be my problem. I think I found an anomaly through crease poly groups. Now if you try dividing that out, those bubbles should hold just fine. Now if you have any issues with anything, just go ahead and just remind yourself you can always just cut it off with a knife curve. We got ourselves a little bit of a bubble. Remember there's more than one way to bevel anything. Even the crease has its bevel width, which is contingent. I've not having any geometries and you can kind of go that route if you really wanted to. And that's also a possibility. Go ahead and show you what that looks like. See you can kind of see how it kind of has something like that as well. Never really tried it this way. So I'm kind of experimenting right now just to kinda see what that does. That wouldn't do too good. In any event. One thing that you have to remember about the bevel width is, is that you have to hold down control in order for it to work. And even though it gives you a nice clean edge loops, you still got to do the next. He's still got to do a crease poly group on there to get what you want. Alright, so we are almost done with this. We just need to now just simply add, do a plainer cut into our p.sit. So let's go into sub tool in turn on our reference. Help us out. Just a little bit of a slant there and nothing really too special. And let's just bring that in. Something like that. If we announced the plainer cut brush is a brush that is used in that is accessed through Lightbox. If you go up here to lightbox or hit the Comma key, you will bring that up. This is sort of like our shelf are cooking rack of ingredients that ZBrush stores for us that it can't cram into its fast, quick fix brushes, pop-up brushes. So let's first of all click on brush up here. Click on planar, double-click on that and we're gonna choose plainer cut thin. This is a fun brush because it gives us some fun opportunities to kind of test the waters of what we want to see. A pretty nice little brush. Quite frankly, I found in here, you can access it all you want. Two, it gives you sort of a different pattern based off of what location you draw off of. So unlike right here on this piece. And you can kind of see, I can kind of create sort of a fun little piece there. Maybe I want to actually do something like this. I can do something like that. I pretty much have full rein to just experiment. All I want just to kind of, it's just fun to look for like a fun little spot for any of this. Like there, That's a good spot. Now that we have that one last thing we'll do is we'll just go over quickly as the chisel brush. And that's just hitting the B key. And we're going to go ahead and select chisel right there. We'll choose something like brush tip. And we'll just go ahead and just lower this down and do a couple of practice strokes. And if it looks like it kind of just go ahead and if it's too deep or it looks to jaggedy, kind of lower the intensity down. And you can kind of just sort of see how it works a little bit. It's kind of a fun brush, but it takes a little bit of time to get used to. The big problem about this brush is that it has this deal where you do require a bit of geometry to make it work. It's not a brush that works very well without a crap load of geometry. And it's definitely not an easy brush to work with the mouse, which is what I'm doing right now. It's kind of a friendly shall I call it, say say whack them tablet friendly brush. Best way I could probably put it for you. That kind of concludes our little bit of our air, our demonstration here on the midsection. Now as I said, you can have fun with this as much as you want. You can take as many practice swings as you want on things like the plainer cut brush. Re-establishing your pattern as many times as you want. Just make sure you're hitting Control Z and you should find everything that you need on there. Like I said, I like to just constantly just look for all sorts of fun places. It's a very cool discovery and catch lightning in a bottle brush. It's pretty neat. I like that one and more evenly interests here. So now when I do a chisel brush and might have some little bit more evenly spread. Go ahead and work that out in the next one. With that said, we're pretty much done with this piece. The next one we're going to do is going to be finishing up by showing you dynamic thickness and how it relates to knife cut brush on this third piece. And we'll be done with this. And then we're going to be moving into creating some extra little more advanced abstract stuff that we can use for both the midsection here, as well as how it will go to the shoulder. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 14. Finalizing Forearm: Okay, welcome back. So now we're on the last part of all of this, which is going to be the third section. On this section, you're going to notice that if we look on the reference here, you see that there's a different thickness than there is here. And we're gonna work with dynamic thickness and also give you a little bit more of a feel for the bevel width feature under Geometry crease. With that said, let's go ahead and just get started. Now. Again, one of the first things we'll do is, is that you can see I redrew my chisel brushes and just hold down Shift to draw out a chisel line like so, just kind of straight around. So now we're gonna go ahead and left Alt, left-click. We're gonna take our midsection piece that we made and we're going to put that in the arms folder. Let's go ahead and turn that off. Actually, what I think I'm going to do is maybe turn that on because I'd like to see some, I'd get some ideas of where this might work best at. My planer cup brush is intersecting right there. So I might just go ahead and just give it a little bit more of a womb. Like we did in the original piece. We cut some slant lines in here. So we'll start off by doing the same thing. We'll cut some slant lines in here of varying degrees. So first things first hit Ship control, select your night curve brush, go into its secondary mode by holding down Shift Control Spacebar. Now, let's take a couple of practice swings. I'll try to start off where this area needs. So it kinda makes sense. Now let's just show where that looks and that's about, that's fine by me right there. Of course, make the draws size a little bit more pronounced, a little too much. We'll just go all the way here. Then we're going to hold down left Alt. And that should give us something like that. Now what we're gonna do is we're gonna take that piece. I'm gonna hold shift control to bring it to the very bottom. And now we're going to do a split apart. So now this piece is separate and this piece is separate and that's how I want it. Now, using this idea, we're going to now go back to the original piece. And we're gonna do different widths here. For that, I'm going to bring a, since this is a bigger width than this, I'm gonna make my drawings size a little bit bigger. Like so. You get something like that, which is kinda keep trying just keep redrawing. I noticed that there's an extra piece here, but my piece cuts off. So one thing I can do is I can just do a little bit of a piece like this, like that. Make sure it's in the same lining angle. We can just do something like that if we want. Because we did sculpt this little bit differently. Just go ahead and make it look a little bit like that. Once we have that all taken care of, Let's go ahead and go through the whole process of maybe doing just a quick little 0 measure on all of this to kinda help clean all these pieces up. Because next what we're going to do is try to delete the top. So here's what we're gonna do. This piece right here that you're seeing. That's pretty thin compared to this piece, but this is very thick. So what I'll first do is I'm going to select the sub tool for that left Alt, left-click, hold Shift Control, left-click to isolate, select that poly group. And now that it's been isolated, selected in all the other poly groups are invisible. Let's go through modify, delete hidden. Next up, let's go through 0 measure. We're going to just clean this up. See if we can get something fairly clean. And click on 0 measure just a couple of times to work out all the tears and the tangles and things like that. Once you are comfortable with something, let's go ahead and I think what I'm going to do is I'm just going to experiment with some lower resolution. Something like that will work for me. Now. I'm going to add, create a new thickness a mountain. Now we can do this in a couple of ways. One way is that we can just extrude this out through the modeler, but I'd like to do this through dynamic subdivisions. So let's go up here to geometry. Dynamic subdivisions. First thing we do is activate dynamic. And what that does is it gives us like a projected view of what it looks like as if it were divided. But it's not actually divided. Let's go through smooth subdivisions and turn that down to 0 so its silhouette doesn't really change. And now we see thickness slider. This becomes available when dynamic is turned on. Let's go ahead and add. Once we kind of slide that through, we create a very clean thickness line there. And that's what we want to learn for this one. You go ahead and you just pick your piece. If you have to 0 mesh this, if there's anything that doesn't look pretty, feel, feel free to kind of go through the whole thing as many times as you need to until you're comfortable and confident with the 0 measure, then go into dynamics, subdivisions, turn on dynamic, turn your thickness up. It's up to you how you want it to be. And then just go ahead and hit apply. And what that apply does is it turns that projected mesh into actual sculptural low-res geometry. So now we have a separate piece. Let's go into our solo mode when you kind of see all the separate pieces there. Now if we divide this up, it's going to collapse. So we need to get a poly group here and a poly group here. So we can tell it to put creases here to hold some holding edges like we did before. We go to Poly Group, group by normals. Let's just try it like that. It looks like it got most of them right there. Let's go ahead then and go back up and do geometry, crease, crease poly groups. And it looks like we got what we want. Get out of solo mode. Go ahead and go back to my lowest subdivision. And I'm just going to go ahead and just simply look at the bubble width which is under crease. Now remember you're holding down control for that. I'm not going to really give it a too terrible of a bevel can be enough right there. Let's crease those poly groups. Just going to go ahead and hold it out like that. Now we got ourselves a little bit of what we did over here onto here. There's anything that you don't like, just go through ninth curve brush if you don't like the spacing or one a little bit more spacing. There's nothing wrong with that. Do something a little bit, even a little bit. Make sure you're going through geometry and deleting the lower subdivisions is ever set in stone with any of this. Then let's hit the W key frame out so we can see our gizmo and bring that in a little bit closer. Maybe even use the Move brush. Adjust over here. Then we can do the same thing over here. So that's how we do that. If there's any questions about how we can do that, we've now know how the bevel width works increase. So if we want to make some adjustments between here and the bottom piece, we can, and we can go back here. If we want to, we can make a matching pebble pea size. No, I want to go too thick obviously because of that. We're going to have to. Eyeball it or do something like this where we kind of match the bevel width and then left all left-click work with a different type of move brush, which is moved topology, not move brush but move topology. That is a different brush right there. What that does is that just simply moves the individual pieces around without affecting and joining pieces. It's like a move to parts pieces. Now we've got ourselves a little bit more detailing. Started with here. If you want to go back to this piece and do less slants if you want, you can definitely do that. You can recreate that piece as many times as you want. One thing I always like to do is sometimes I like to keep backups for all of these pieces. But now that we have our first starting piece, what we're going to do is we're gonna work on our shoulder. And then we're gonna do secondary sculpting pieces of that underneath here, which is going to be gribble like wire pieces, which will then be placed underneath here and underneath here. As sort of the fill-ins. We'll finish up with the backside of this arm and then we'll finish up with a little bit of a bicep to fill in all the pieces right there. Once you're done though, just go ahead and put all the pieces in the arm. And remember one thing if you want to, this is broken up in a whole bunch of pieces if you want, because they're all in one folder, you can hit transpose set. And what that does is that makes the whole, first you click on the folder, click on the cog, hit transpose set, everything will turn gray. And then you just hit center point and you can chess move everything. Let's go ahead and see if we got, if we go. One thing that might be masked in all of this, going to have to actually be a little bit careful. We go, It's probably that. In other way we can do a transpose said is simply by hitting the W key and do transpose all selected tools. But I prefer going through and doing the folder to transpose set because now you can just adjust things. Hold left Alt, maybe adjust the, the gizmo. So this is a little bit more like that. Or remember, Ben dark? It doesn't really work if you have multiple subdivisions. A, you know, it's just one of those things that you can just toggle with on and on infinitely with. So with that said that's kind of the rough breakdown on how you can do it. This was one interpretation, but don't be constrained with getting it to look exactly the same as the original concept piece. I am so much more focused on you just learning the tools and getting the practice with your curved techniques like panning them through the spacebar trick, etc. So with that said again, I'll finish by saying next up is the shoulders and the greebles. Stick around and stay tuned. 15. Detailing Base Mesh Shoulders: Okay, welcome back. Now in this video, we're going to go ahead and start working on the shoulders and some green label here. And this is gonna be a very simple video. It's going to build off of the last video with dynamic thickness to help us recent meant what we've learned and it's also going to give us some opportunities. Start practicing transposing multiple sets as we go along. So with that said, let's just go ahead and get started. Now, before we begin, let's clean up our sub tools here that we haven't used. For example, we have some face meshes, still, some booleans. Let's go ahead and delete them off as we don't need them anymore. So let's just hit delete the d. Now let's take out that second base mesh that we had. That was that big guy right there. And it seems to be double transpose. So I'm just going to click this little spot right here where the checkmarks are, gizmo. And let's just bring them up like that. This is gonna be our piece that we use multiple times as shoulder piece. First thing we're going to go ahead and do is we're going to just simply duplicate this piece, like so. And then we're going to go Shift down. Take it out. Now, this is where I keep re-frame, rephrasing with people about getting creative. We did the forearm piece for so you could get a little bit intimate with understanding the secondary features of the knife cut brush. Now it's your turn to decorate this in your way because we really are hell-bent on getting you to go outside of what you've learned from a video to what you want to make for your own design. For example, your own slants or your own cuts that you've had practice with the forearm, you do here now. You can do anything you want. And now it's, it's pretty much yours. So if you want here, if you want to work with secondary features, I will say this. There's one thing I should say is secondary features don't work well on symmetry. Only the primary features of knife curve brushwork. If you want to fix that. The one thing you can do is just go ahead and do your cuts that you want and then go through Geometry, modify Topology, and do a mirror and weld and you'll get everything you want symmetrically placed on the other one. And then from there you can go from 0 measure beveled this area, but don't bevel that area. It's all the world is your oyster as far as where you want to take it. And now it's all up to you. You can do something like that. Just make your own pattern and have fun with it. It's really that simple. So having said that, the after you've finished doing your own unique pattern, which I'm doing the same here. I'm just making my own little unique pattern. I did do that again except I'm going to turn symmetry off and bring it across like so. There we go. You get your pattern down and what you like. Go ahead and feel free to do a deal where you go through sub tool, duplicate that pattern, sub tool, turn one of them off. Then ship control. Just like we did in the last one. Now it's just builds off of what we did before. We do a delete hidden. Now we can go through and we can do an extrude or a, a project. On here. I will say this trying to 0 mesh, this may not give you some accurate results to be fair because you have no poly groups to separate everything you want. So kind of bear that one in mind. If you want. You can always try dynamic subdivisions, but don't go too deep because you'll start seeing some tears. Just kinda keep that in mind. Like for example, let's go through dynamic subdivision, turn on dynamic, makes sure the smooth sub-divided or is low. And you can give yourself a little bit of a thickness. Just to have some fun. If it gets a little too wonky, just do a quick little BPR render to make sure it comes off smooth. That's all right. It's a little bit, little bit messy, but I'm okay with it. The thing we can do is ECM. I'm just experimenting right now. We do down extrude Poly Group own. Extrude those. The only way we can fix that and the reason that is is because all the tie off, since we have to do a 0 measure, that's definitely make us lose our pieces a little bit. Not as much as I thought. It's actually relatively clean. Dynamics. So Division, try that again. Go with their thickness and our thickness. B that. Now let's just go ahead and bring it in. Hit Apply what we can do poly groups all. But I don't think we're going to be, Let's do poly groups because we may want to divide this and it's going to collapse in like that. So let's just go ahead and do poly groups, group by normal. Let's take a look and see if that gave us everything poly group and every corner. Good. Because now when we try to do divide, we first go through geometry. And you can see we're repeating all the same places, but we're going a little bit faster now. Increase PG. Now we've got a nice clean little piece here. So that's kind of how we do that. We got a nice little clean piece. It's kind of building off of this principle by adding one more thing. And that is that we did in isolate select, we did a 0 measure, and then we did different poly groups by assigning different poly groups on there so that when we did a crease Poly Group function, when we divided, the corners would still be held. Now let's go ahead and turn on our original piece. Let's go ahead and just bring this up like so. And you can just do this deal where you can either bring it in like that. Then if you want, you can kind of go through undo and just sort of have this guy kinda have its own little pattern. Like so. Now it's a little bit different, It's a little bit unique. Maybe you want to do something here where you want a 0 mesh this, well, that's okay too. You can do that. Again. Maybe we want to do a bevel on here because that's the most common reason we do when we do 0 measures, we'd like to bevel. Again, all very possible geometry. 0 measure. Let's start off with keep groups and turn adaptive down and smooth groups down. And let's just see, it looks like little leery about it and it's going to probably be a fun one. That's what I thought I'd try this though, since our goal is actually to do poly groups. Let's try to just simply do a poly groups through crease. Do pebble with don't want the center to be poly groups. So we're gonna have to kind of mask everything out. Except for the end In. This might be easier. Isolate, select mask, isolate select Mask. We're going all around isolate select Mask. And I'm again, it's all holding Shift Control, left-click mask, invert the mask, then go through bevel. Looks like punches it out in front. So let's just kind of bring it back. So now we've got something that's a little bit cooler, a little bit more of a unique, distinctive edge to it. That keeps us from dealing with the headache of the 0 meshing tear because trying to Z Ramesh this so you can get a bevel. You can, there's a different, a dramatic difference in topology here that it's going to make a massive nightmare for 0 measure to figure out, I mean, like I said, it's an automated program automatic remeshing system, so it's not going to, you don't have complete control. You only have the power to manipulate the control. Now that we have that, let's just bring that out a little bit more. Like what I see. Since I'm done with this. I'm done with that. I'm going to turn this into one single poly group. That way I can isolate the whole thing out from this because I want to combine these two. And I'm going to turn this into one poly group while maintaining all the poly groups here because there might be something I want to do extra. I'm just gonna go ahead and merge these pieces down. And now they're one sub tool. And maybe if I've decided this is too far away, so isolate select because it's all one Poly Group Mask. Now let's bring it in a little bit more. You can do these things. Alright, so now we've got a piece. Let's bring it in. Like so. And maybe I feel like the curvature is not enough. That's okay because again, there's nothing that says we can't go in here and do something about that. Curvature is a little bit too shallow here. Let's go into solo mode if you want to see it, or you can turn off all the visibilities, go with Ben dark and make it a little bit more Ben dark easier here. Then let's hit Accept solo mode. Actually, I kinda like that more than my original piece book. Ones counting. Maybe we can do it like this and then hold down control and bring down and go for a smaller piece. And maybe shrink it in a little bit more so that way we can have some and we'll put some gravel in between here to kind of help us out. But this was all just to help us along the way, establish our pieces. And I'm going to go ahead and do a split mask on this guy. We have two sub tools. Kind of see, it's kind of coming together. Now what we've got to do is we got to start functioning normally, put some gravel in-between here, here, here, and here to kind of fill out the volume because this doesn't really sell unless it has the secondary details of wires and underneath a smaller things in there. So with that said, let the next lesson we're gonna work on creating sort of like agreeable strip that can be moderately you modularly reuse. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 16. Learning Array Meshes: Okay, welcome back. In this video, we're going to create sort of like a field of array meshes and gravel in here so that we can kind of fill in some of these gaps that are in here and here to help us out in identifying all these pieces like we did before at the very beginning, we're gonna need to start off with a base mesh just as before. And we're going to use the sculpting, brought the knife curve brush to help us establish all the shapes that we need. And then from there, we're going to go ahead and show you a little something about arrays. So let's go ahead and get started. First thing I'll do is I'll go ahead and just turn off everything that I want so that we can get started. And then I'm just like before going to go into my sub tool, I'm going to append a cube. And now I'm going to click on that cube From this point on, like I said, make sure everything's turned off. Make sure you also have knife curve brush established. And then just maybe just divide this about three or four times and go through geometry and just hit Delete lower and let's get started. One of the first things we'll go with is that I'm just going to kind of hit W key and scale this around. And that's because we have a little bit, we have a little bit of more mass. This is sort of a lengthy piece, so that's probably why we're going to do this this way. So I'll go ahead and start now, I'm going to hold Shift Control. Drag a line across here and it's on the shaded side. So maybe that's the wrong side. Hold start from the left. I'll go ahead and drag a line that's right across there and do the same thing again. Except this time I'm going to stop probably halfway there. And then double-tap left Alt or Option key to make a little hard cut. And then once again, maybe something like that double-tap left. Then we'll just kind of go across like cell. So we kind of see what we're getting. Now that we have that, let's just go ahead and make a thin barrier across like so. Again, it's the same thing as before. Double-tap left Alt. Like before double-tap left Alt. And just see if you can get it to evenly spaced. Then we'll start cutting off some pieces here that we have something that looks completely square. From here, let's hit the R key and maybe scale that in just a little bit like so. Maybe give it a little bit of width so we can do a little breathing room on here. Now that we have all this taken care of, Let's go ahead and add some modifications. So like, let's make this area a little asymmetrical from the top, a little bit here. Like for example, you don't have to get tunnel vision. I keep saying this over and over again. Don't get constrained by what you're seeing in the video. You can do your own thing and I encourage you to do your own thing. It's just kinda go all the way down. Maybe. Something like this. Perhaps just to kind of experiment with what we got here. Maybe I'll do it like this and just kinda bring it through. Go something like that. Maybe. Let's see here. I'll just make my adjustments. Kinda see what I'm doing. Ourselves. Little bit of a case. We can always just keep on going if we like what we see. You can just simply likes. So you can kind of see I'm just making my own shape again, it's not mandatory if you want to do something completely different. It's absolutely fine. And it's absolutely encouraged. Just makes sure that when you do this, that you are getting to know the tool. Essentially. You cannot make your own unique little shape right there. Now, we need to do in case you've guessed it is the do some Z remeasure. So like we've done before, we got to make sure every angle has a nice, clean, hard surface cut. This one isn't completely angles, so we'll make a poly group right there. We've got to make sure every angle has not only a hard surface cup and a poly group to go with it. I'm not using poly groups by normals on this one. I'm just doing some manual work on this. Just holding Control down and doing a what is it? Control W to take what is masked and turn it into a poly group. Alright, so let's go through 0 measure and reshape this piece. And again, remember our presets, all we do is just simply hit Keep group turn adapted to 0, smooth groups down to 0. And let's just go ahead and just see what our default gives us. It gives us something fair. Not too bad, not too insane, little bit wonky here. So maybe we should add a poly group there to see if I can. It's not really to mandatory. It's more like nitpicking this point ahead and just hold down Control marquee select over and then hit Control W to turn that into a poly group. And try this one more time. Little bit cleaner. That's pretty much all that we need to do there. It's not really all that complicated. Again, if you want, you can go through crease and bevel it if you would like. Just to kind of give yourself something a little bit cleaner. I'm not really sure if I want to do the bevel in this whole process because it's not that big a deal for me as of this moment. But what we're going to do now is that we're going to make sure that when we're going to first increase the poly groups and or geometry increase. That way. We can sort of have ourselves a little bit of a cleaner edge. If you don't like this round thing here, we can always just kind of go through and just isolate, select this piece here, this poly group here. And then we can just sort of go through whole control, make poly group out of that. We'll control make poly group out of that. And that way, when we 0 mesh, again like we did before, we can go through and get a little bit of an area right here that will have clean topology that we can increase with. Now if we go through increase poly groups, increasing will happen there. And when we divide, we'll have a little bit more of a crease section there. With that said, that's going to be a simple little piece right there for us. And this is, like I said, it's a piece that you are going to be experimenting quite often with, especially on the deformers. I could give you an idea. Let's first of all go through sub tool and duplicate this in turn, one of them off and recenter the pivot point. Click on a cob and look at what you can do with taper. Don't forget to delete the lowers, the lower geometry history. One thing that you can actually do is I like to experiment a little bit on this, is just kind of working with trying to have a little fun in seeing where you can take it. Like, for example, this is one way you can take it. Hit Accept, then make it a little bit longer. That way we can do another curve like so or vice versa. Then go through. And I wanted to just show you how we can flush out shapes by thinking like this. Except kind of see where I'm going with it. Again, that's just like for example, another shape we can do. Then we can restrict this out like so. Then maybe if you want, you can do a bend arc. Bottom line that I'm trying to make here for everyone to look at is, is that I am not committing myself to anything. I'm not I'm basically just flushing out shapes, essentially. Going through an iterative process to look for shapes. Like here's one shape right here that I can work with. Maybe I find this to shorten. I'd like it to be thinner. Up here. Again, a process that we can do is just look at, see how this all looks. Don't commit or get tunnel vision. I'm just simply having fun looking for an interesting shape. And once I'm done, I'll just go ahead and just hit Z remeasure, see if I can get some of this back. Well, that's gonna be ugly to try and get on the first draft. Some a little bit clean, little bit off here on the wonky Venus. Let's see if we can first of all, fix that by changing the target polygon count, that might help a little bit. Did you can kind of see because we have all these different places we can work with something. Again. Once you have something that's clean, then you can work your way down a little bit more and work your way down a little bit more. But quite frankly, I kinda like it like this. My best draft result. Now remember, just like we learned before, if you want, you can go through and isolate, select all of these into one group by going through and first of all, hit Control, left-click. Just isolate, select, invert the selection, bam, bam, invert selection again, hold Control, Command W. There you go. Then from here you can just go through and do geometry and delete hidden, which is under modified topology. Then you can go from there into dynamic subdivisions in case you forgot. And then we can just go ahead and work with the thickness again. Then have the thickness be our way that we control everything. That too is an option for you. So I'm just reminding you of your choices. If you have something that's too thick, you can problem-solve it. With that said, we're going to now move on into, now that we have a little bit of a cleaner piece here. Might go through and do a little bit more editing, like right here. Maybe. I might even do some right along here. It's kind of a nicer, simpler look. Once you have what you want, remember that you can then go back in. And this is kind of like an abstract piece. But once you have what you want, go into bend arc and you've had some fun with it. And you've constantly explored every piece that you want. You're going to use this abstract piece to create array meshes. Now this is the last part of the lesson, so I'm just going to show you the what array meshes are and what they are is basically they duplicate the geometry in a line. And they turn that instance looked, looking duplicated geometry into actual geometry probably doesn't make sense when I say it. But so let me allow me to actually do a demonstration that said measure one more time. That way we have a clean line here. First thing we'll do is under Geometry, we're going to see a ray meshes and to activate it first we're going to do array mesh by clicking on it. Now this is a new feature. We didn't do this yet. So what we're going to do then is first thing we need to do is we need to offset one piece off from the other. And you can see there is a XYZ amount. But what we want is to toggle the z or I'm sorry, the z amount. Now, once you have that done, you have it looking like this. You're going to want to go through and you're going to want to toggle with the repeat process. And the repeat process kind of gives you an interesting look. As you can see. It's kind of a fun one and you can again, just kinda mess around with that. You can, I encourage people actually to do this as this trips work with the scale to kind of see how it affects things. I would say it's probably the most important thing to do is to just practice by doing just by pressing buttons a little bit. And once you are at a comfortable angle, like I am, you're going to then duplicate this into a make an actual array mesh out of itself. That said, I'm just going to do one last bend arc on all of this. Then. Keep it like that. I think I'd like to try as skewed former just to see because kinda want that to reach out a little bit more. Once you're happy with that. Let's just work with array. You can kind of see how that works a little bit more. Feel free to rotate it around, both on the X and the Z. Probably the y is the most prevalent. Let's go ahead and go back to offset and probably bring it down to about this. And I'm just messing around them, just not I'm not committing to anything and I don't want you to get to lined Intuit either. Just mess around and look for a little bit of an easy shape. That's like in very good shape right there that can work pretty good. Do your best and not try to intersect with anything. Let's just do a few more things. One of them is going to be just seen what this looks like with less repeating. And I think I like what I'm seeing here a little bit more. I think I like that frequency in that pattern. So what I'm gonna do is is I like this one the most, but at the same time, I'm also seeing that it's little too short for me. Probably going to then offset to make this a little bit longer and then go into repeat to fill in what I've offset ID. We go something like that. Now, let's turn a ray mesh off real quick. If there's anything you want to do with this piece more, makes sure you do it now. Because we're going to get ready to convert this piece and we don't want to be without any hiccups when we do so. Like for example, if you want to go through and divide this to give it some divisions before go. And so let's go through geometry. It creates crease poly groups and divide it a couple of times. Want to delete the lower if you want to add any bevels to it through the crease like with the bevel width, just to see what it looks like. You're welcome to do that as well. Just like so. And that's certainly not a problem either. If there's anything else that you want to put on it, this would be the time to do so. With that said, let's just go ahead and then go back to our array mesh. Turn that back on one last time after we've checked everything, one final Go and make sure everything is sort of in its place. Let's go ahead and do make mesh at the very bottom. And what that's gonna do is that's going to turn these all into actual pieces of geometry. And now that kind of concludes our array Mesh Builder. So now what we can do is we can go the center point, hold left Alt. We can scale these down a little bit more and we can go through and maybe push them in. And these can all now be used as wires to help us out in creating are under gribble areas. And remember, it doesn't have to just stay like this. You can do all sorts of things like marquee select line. I've put a little bit of a groove in the center here. And you can do all sorts of things on it if you want. You can also work with some other deformers just to see if you can have fun. Anything from taper, for example, is an option. Or if you want to really just get Iranian experimental, you can also work with the extender. And that's actually kind of an interesting tool as well. Although I would say that the extender is a tool that is meant for practicing. It's got probably the most, the most pieces on here all put together. Some of them you can get some interesting results from, and some of them you just got to kinda take your time and learn like this piece right here. You can kind of have some fun with that eye. Really not going to work with the extender because of the fact that I want to keep a default setting on all of this. Like so. That's just gonna be the last setting piece that I want to go with. I mean, I can always do something like this and have some fun with that. And that can be like a fun little piece that we can add in there. But what we're gonna do is now add some wiring underneath here. And this is going to serve as sort of like a gribble piece that is gonna go in the under shoulder and within some of our detailed base Gulp. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 17. Going Over Wire Creation: In this video, we're going to continue on and draw in some new wires to our newly created array mesh that you see here. To begin with, we're going to go ahead and hit the B key to bring up our brush. And we're going to look at some 2021 features that were added in earlier versions, which is the extrude profile and extrude profile to now extrude profile to kind of if I select that you're going to notice a whole array of meshes here. And I can just choose right now circle for example. And if you see there's gonna be basically a circle created there. If I want to change the width of that, I can always just change my drawer size and right-click on the curve and the width will just be reapplied. Now, as said before, there are two brushes, extrude profile and Stroop profile to just to give you that idea, this is extrude profile to it doesn't really hug air taper onto the piece. It just flatly is parallelly drawn end-to-end Without no taper. So that's just a quick breakdown of all of that. Now, since there are not as many profiles as there are in the first extrude brush. We're going to go ahead and resort to the original one because I like to work with this random square brush. What I'm gonna do first is I'm going to choose this random square brush and extrude profile brush one. And then I'm just going to bring this down like so and have something like that. Now nothing to and say nothing too crazy. And I can probably be satisfied with that. I'll hit our key and recenter this all and bring this in to about here. Now you'll still see your curves. So if you want, you can make that disappear by clicking off onto a mesh. Now what we're going to do is a couple of things. We're going to use the Move topology brush to kind of rearrange all these pieces. But before we do that, let's go ahead and get rid of this little taper here. And I can just do that simply by holding Shift control, making sure sit select rectangle is their biggest going to drag off and then hold left Alt button to turn it red to make that disappear. And then we'll go into Geometry, modify Topology, and delete that hidden. Now from this point on, I'm going to try to make this look a little bit like wires. First thing I'll do is I'm going to select my move topology brush or if you want to nickname it, the move parts brush, which is BMT. Remember we're not selecting the Move brush, just the topology brush. And I might also, if I want, I can hold Shift to make this collapse or better yet. I can. Well, let me see here. I can just go through all of this and what I'm seeing, I'd like to go through and remove this sub tool so that these frame here and the wires are two different sub tools. That way when I divide, it's going to actually smooth out a little bit more. Let's go two sub tool, go to Split, unmask. It looks like we have a partially hidden I must have undone undid too many times. Do that again. Now we have two sub tools broken down. So now if I divide, it's gonna kinda now let's go to kind of break out into a little bit of a smoother area like so. I'll hold Shift to smooth out a little bit more. And then I'm gonna hit Delete lower. So now we can begin. I'm just going to use the Move topology brush at this point to kind of bring in some, make the wires basically. How shall I say I'm gonna, I'm gonna make them kind of essentially, I'm just moving them around. You can kind of see how that works and you kinda get a feel for it. And if you want, you can bring them in here. Move them around in different angles which are trying to do is to get them from looking uniformly straight or perfectly aligned. I want these to look tangled. Basically. If you feel someone this is too small or too big, one thing we can do is we can hit our center this in, scale it down so the wires are a little bit more like this. We can reapply, once again. What we have. Then go back to kinda tapering out all these pieces like so. It's just sort of a process where you just kind of have a little bit of fun trying to make it look like very disabled looking piece. Now, another thing that we're going to go through showing you is that we would like to add maybe just a little bit of variety in these pieces. By first of all, adding a secondary wire into all of this. So first things first, I'm gonna go ahead and place this a little bit closer to home. Then. Just bring it in like that. Bring hit the B key and take a look at this piece right here. The inserts cylinder and extension. It's very similar to the last brush we did, except it's just a single cylinder. And you can kind of see how it works like that. And the reason it's all wiggly like that is because it's kind of the curve is set to snap. You can always change that by the way, by going up to stroke a curve and turning off snap. And it won't give you as much of a pull. And you can kind of just kind of work your way to a little piece here. So what I'll do now is I will incorporate this inserts cylinder into it to help break up and create some different pieces as well. So first things first, I'll just bring it out like so. If I want to change the width a lower my draw size and then click on the curve to readjust. Like that one. I'll go with that. Let's make that curve disappear by just clicking into the mesh. And we'll just bring this piece in. Like so. What we're doing is we're just adding some variation to these wires. Essentially. We're just kind of giving some flavor, if you will, will give one more of wire, just the same here. Except this time we'll make it a bit smaller than that one for the sake of variation. Let's see. Maybe mess around with the curve a little bit here. Do a combination, perhaps do a little bit of a curve, and the Move brush, Let's click off the curve. Let's click the curve out. Bring this guy in a little bit more. We're just working on just having some fun here, just doing some randomness. That's all it is. Once you get to a kind of a comfortable spot of gribble that you feel good with. Now, like I said, this is going to help cover up some areas. Go ahead and then just take all of this because these are a bunch of poly groups. And if we left Alt click, we can see these are a bunch of polychromy. I'd like to combine these into one sub tool, but I'd like to be able to mask and independently control them in one sub tool. So the way I'm gonna do that is I'm gonna take, I'm gonna take let's see. I'll go with this. I'll go with the frame pieces, hold control over it and drag a mask over it and hit Control W. So it's all one single piece. That way. When I want to do some isolating select moves, I can select one that frame and invert the mask to make any more adjustments. Now let's go to our wire. It remember if you want to add more, there's nothing wrong with that. Again, you could always do the same thing you did before. I don't have a whole lot of polygon count here. You can just hold down Control. And if you wanted, you can kind of manipulate it by rotating it around. Maybe you want to do something like that. You can there's no real law that says you absolutely cannot do that. It's certainly up to you. What you want to do. There's no real law that says what you can or cannot do. But you can kind of see, we have a little bit agreeable. They're in the process. So once you get to a comfortable spot with your piece, take a moment to kind of process which you need to make any more adjustments. Like maybe you want to put something like this on here. You can always do that. But once we're done, let's just go ahead and combine the sub tools together. Now. I'm going to hit Merge Down. Let's turn everything back on again. So our turtle base mesh, our arms and our shoulders. Let's go back into our table. Let's center the pivot point and rotate it. Now that we have this arm piece, Let's scale it down. And now I'm just going to duplicate it. And I'm going to put one of these pieces into the spare part folder because again, I might find myself we're using this and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. Now at this point I'm going to left, I'll click. I'm gonna make one of these guys disappear. Like that. Oops. There we go. We're just gonna do a split mast to take that piece off. And then I'm just gonna go ahead and just delete that guy now, I don't really need him anymore. He's just served his purpose. Goodbye arm? No, no. Just hit. Okay. Now let's just go ahead and go back down to our original Greek world peace. And we'll start filling in some of the gaps here and make some adjustments. Now, let's just go ahead and bring this in and bring this guy in. Like so. One thing you can decide which way you want to have it. You want to have it like this, or do you want to have it like this? There's no such thing as a wrong way. I'm kind of partial doing it. Like I said, I'm kind of partial to doing it like where I can move the pieces a little bit inside so we get kind of like a spoke little bit. Maybe I don't want to mess around with this a little bit more and just have some fun. This is again, this is sort of the experimental phase and there's no really wrong way or a right way to do this. In all of this, this is just sort of a sort of you having fun with it is the best way to describe it. Mu, you can just enter it in this way if you want. Or you can enter it in the other way. Little bit on the fruits ON either way. So I think I might actually go with maybe something like that. Just for now. We don't have to commit to anything. I'm going to go through with a transformer by clicking on the cob. Make sure that the transformer is aligned to the same alignment as wherever it's facing before you go into the transformer cog and click your bend curve. And again, we can just mess around with this and kind of give ourselves a little bit more of a adjustment, if you will. If you need more curves, just click on that orange cog and you'll put one curve between everything. Like so. Just keep that in mind. I'm thinking of bringing it more and get a better idea. Like it a little bit like that. You've got to remember this area is going to be played it off. So we're going to have this taken care of. I need to and I have to put something between here I will. But again, I'll just kind of startup here maybe. And again, this is all just finagle. This is just just You taking your time and figuring out what works best on here. Maybe you want to do a little bit of a taper. You can do that. Maybe a taper in combined with curve. You can do that. There is no right or wrong way, but I will say this, there is a reason why we wanted to do this on here. Why we wanted to duplicate a lot of all this. I'll just go ahead and bring this in. Maybe pull on here to rotate the value here. Bring this down just below. Kind of see how we're kind of having fun, just kinda bringing this in and having this kind of come in. Don't worry. Again, we're going to take that out, play that into something very different down the road. Kind of continue. We never really talked about the rotational value of anything here. When you click on any dots, you're gonna get an extra orange dot on top of this dot up here. Cool. Pulling on that will have a rotational twist value as a result of it. So just food for thought. To help you align. You can kind of see how I'm having fun with this. Again, this is a practice for the deformers. That's all this is. And it's a practice on how we can flush out interesting shapes in the process. Let's add another just to see what things look like. So let's just do a test with that and hit Accept. Then I'm going to hit Q and just bring things. And now we're getting until a little bit closer to home base. Looks a little bit better. I think what I'll do is I'm going to have the chess piece intersect in underneath here. For now. I'm gonna go ahead and be satisfied with that. There is one thing you can do, like I say, you can always feel free to change anything out that you feel. If you wanted to. For example, you cannot add like for a Boolean like we did with an insert cylinder here, you could do an insert cube and do a Boolean that actually goes across here. Like I said, we want you to be in this mindset of a, how should we say it? Having fun experimenting is what we want you to do. Like right now, I'm going outside the realm of this as we speak just to have fun to experiment with what I'm doing. Just doing something that's just out of rank, just edge, kind of show you off the bar just like how much fun we can have. If you want to add like a little bit of a little too much. I wanted to add something like that. You can certainly do that, but I would rather just do probably if I had to go through this, I could split a mast and then go through and do more cuts. But I'm not going to do that. I think I'd like to actually leave it like that. Let's see. You can kind of see already why I go through and advocate to the idea of having this, having the outer braces be sort of like one poly group here because I can do independent control here. We're kind of taken ourselves a little bit closer. We're getting a little bit closer into hard surface here. So now what we're gonna do is we're going to apply what we did and now just fill in some blanks here. We're going to fill in some blanks here and then do a couple of more base mesh sculpting creations for the hand and the bicep here, and then move on into the light. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 18. Creating Finger Base Mesh: Okay, welcome back. In this video, we're going to continue to move on, work on our hands and a little bit more of filling out some of these pieces here. So to do that, we're going to create yet again another base mesh to start off with. As you can see, I made some adjustments to my piece a little bit more just to kind of experiment out what I like and don't like, just to have some fun with it. But like I said, it's just one of those things where you got to feel pretty comfortable in just experimenting as best the way I could say putting it, just constantly, move pieces around, see how they look and how all those fun things you gotta be able to have that fun. So I encourage you to continue to look for fun, looking positions and shapes to help you out with making this. If you want to do some detailing like around here, you can maybe like a strip line. You now have enough knowledge with the knife curve brush secondary mode of subtracting to put a line divot in there as you see fit if you would like. And I may do that myself down the road. So with that said, let's go ahead and just take a moment to figure out what we're going to put next on here. Now, the one thing I'm thinking that I'm going to do is I'm going to probably go with a hand that's gonna go around here. And to do that, I'm probably June of first of all, work a little bit of positioning of all the pieces that they're not too long out. I'm readjusting and making sure that everything is where I want it to be. Just kind of in conjunction with everything. It just want to make sure everything is just kind of just right as far as like seeing the right position and so forth. Once you are at that satisfy point, let's go ahead and turn off all that. And let's just go ahead and do is we do before and hit append and bring in a cube like so. First thing I'll do is turn everything off. In this cube is going to act like a reusable piece for many things, from a finger to maybe a foot tip, a whole bunch of things I'm going to use this for. So let's just go ahead and have some fun with it. Let's see. I can probably go with want to turn off the visibility of everything. Go with guns. Just kind of making it fairly block-like, like so give it a couple of subdivisions. Then let's go ahead and go to the geometry and do our delete lower because that's what's required in knife cut brush and hold Shift Control. Let's go to knife curve. Let's start flattening about all these pieces so they're nice and clean cut. Like so poly group on every end. Now I'm just going to go through geometry, keep groups adaptive size to 0 and smoothing. And let's see if we can get something that's fairly, fairly uniform. We go nice and clean. With that said, let's go ahead and just sort of, you know, this is just sort of a default state. I kinda liked this block. So if I want to kind of duplicate it and delete the lowers, I can do that. But let's just go ahead and get started. Now. We never did symmetry on this. I'm just going to hit X. Maybe do a couple of practice swings on here. I think I'll try it from the top. Like I said, don't watch the whole tutorial. Don't just be in the mindset of this copy as you go along the video, watch the whole tutorial from the end. I like that one a little bit more. You can never see a cut go through. It's because it's partially ending in the middle. In order for that to be fixed, you kind of have to kind of be outside in an area like that kind of works. It's something we can work with here. Let's combine these two poly groups. Like so. I'm just holding Shift Control left-click to isolate, select these poly groups, masking them and then hitting Control W. Now let's go through our 0 measure and see what we can get. We can get some a little bit cleaner, a little bit messy, but we can maybe work out the pieces. The sides claim, the sides claim. And this is kind of like you're seeing these jaggedy edges and this is the downfall about what 0 measure has to offer is that you got to be able to problem-solve when you start seeing things like this. Where you see the jaggedy edges show up and to problem-solve, one thing we do is we change out some of the settings in order for it to work. Like. For example, one way to change out the settings is to try it with different target polygon counts. Sometimes you'll get a completely at different edge flow algorithm as a result. Another way to do it is to simply turn symmetry off. Sometimes that kind of helps. When it comes to things like this though. That is something that is a little nuisance saying. So let's just go ahead and cut it off. We can turn to think why that will be that way. Here we go. Let's try it again. We've got some a little bit cleaner. Now let's hit x symmetry and try it again. Now that we've got some a little bit cleaner through. Good enough for me. Let's just keep going. Maybe got a little bit shorter. That works. Now that it's starting to come along, we can do certain things. We can bevel it we can go through and do certain levels just on top if we want. I might do the crease beveling process with bevel width. Since this is all very, very clean, we can just kind of deal with it that way. Don't forget to go through poly group and do a crease. Normals. Now again, like 0 measure poly group is an automated feature so you might not get the perfect example of sets you want like right here to right here. And that's just the name of the beast right there. Let's see if we can change it out. There we go. So I did a full solid circle, changed that out, go ahead and then use that to our advantage. By doing a geometry. Go through increased poly groups, kind of see them, may consult them right here. It's starting to look a little bit closer to the peak. And now if you want, you cannot change this any way you see fit. But now that we have that, let's put some Booleans in here, or let me think on how I want to do. Let's work with the bevel. First of all, let's, let's work with the farmers and see what we can get because we're, we got to shape now we've got an interesting shape, but we still got to flush it out. So let's delete the lower subdivisions. Let's go ahead and hit W and hit X to turn off symmetry so we can center the pivot point in there. And let's do bend arc for our starter just to see what we can get. Liked that look a little bit more. I think I'd like to top taper that. So let's accept that bend arc. Now let's taper the top a little bit more. Probably going to be all right with that. Kind of like it a little bit like that too, might be able to get an interesting shape out of that. Let's just keep pushing it a little bit more just to have some fun here. Start skewing in. Doing is I'm just looking for some fun interesting shapes here. This could be an interesting shape right here. This is a nice little skew. Let's go ahead then and hit Accept. And again, this is just getting you into an iterative thought process to experiment with shapes here and how we combine them with things like Booleans, knife cuts, 0 meshes, bevels, etc. Hit the B key. I don't know. Like I said, I have no idea what I'm going to make until I make it. So I'm just going to drag in a cube. Then I'm gonna hit sub tool. Then I'm going to go ahead and go through split unmasked. You can kind of see I'm using the same techniques we go over, over and over again. So now we're going to turn this cube into a Boolean by going like William mode, turning that sub tool, particularly into a Boolean. Let's see how this looks now. Bring it into about yay width. Then duplicate it by hitting Control. Nice, but we all needed to be doing kind of like it a little bit like that, but something like that. Now we have sort of like a start off base mesh. So let's go ahead now and just bring it through. Let's see, we can do a couple of things now with this. Let's just first of all, I'm just getting the feel of what this all looks like right now. It looks acceptable. So I'm just going to temporarily turn that Boolean off and just make sure, and go back to my original piece, makes sure I'm like finalized with all the deformations. Like for example, there's any last minute changes I want to make. I'll make them right here. Kind of like how you see right here. I like that shape even more than I like the other ones. So we can kind of do something there. Then I can go back into my Boolean. And the reason I'm doing this, making these last minute changes before the Boolean, is it because I don't want the deformation of the make Boolean mesh to change that shape basically. So let's bring something like that would work. All right, so we'll do it that way. Then. We'll just go ahead and do Boolean. Make Boolean mesh. Let's append that in because it's up there now, let's append that into R sub tool stock. Like so. We should then turn off everything and we can kind of see our newly constructed Boolean piece. Now we're not going to 0 mesh or anything like that on here. We may do or like a crease poly groups, but honestly I'm pretty content about how this is on here. I mean, if we do anything, I'm probably just going to, first of all, if I need more geometry, I'm going to turn off smooth divide. That way. I don't have any weird collapses here, and we can just do it that way. Now, one last thing we can do, if we wanted to, we can first of all turn this. We can still work around this and continue to do things like Ben dark on here, something like that. Maybe more tapers. We can do something like that. If you didn't like you notice when we did bend arc kind of tore up here. The reason is, is because the density of the Boolean is very different from the density of the mesh. When it fills in the geometry there, it's going to actually be a lot different than the geometry on top. And also the edge flow of it is all pointed off. So I might do different Booleans, I might do different pieces. So I'm going to correct that right here now by deleting that piece, turning my boolean back on, my other piece, back on. This time. Going to go through, I'm going to go through solo and I'm going to rematch this, see if I can get something cleaner. So like for example, poly group, which is going to be right, they're grouped by normals. Let's just see if that works. Every piece has a normal. Good. Let's go through 0 measure now, Geometry. 0 emission. Quick little 0 measure of everything. It looks like everything's good. Let's divide it. First. We go to crease poly groups and divide it. More crazy Probably groups so that it doesn't collapse in. And then we're deleting the lower. Let's bring that baked into our Solo Mode out. And now let's go ahead and do a make Boolean mesh and append that mesh. Let's take a look at it now. You can see there's a different form of geometry right there. Also, if you wanted to 0 mesh this, you could, it's going to be a little bit difficult, a little bit tricky because it's got a little bit more complex surfaces for it to handle. I think I can probably still get away with it, but I'm kind of leery against it. You don't have to, you don't have to see regression if you don't want to. But one thing you'll take and look is when I did that, you notice that tearing in the center is now no longer there. That's because it has more evenly uniform geometry to work with and not that weird edge flow. That is that we got ourselves a nice little start off piece. Again. Feel free to constantly make any more adjustments on here for this piece. Like I said, I probably will be making it a little bit like that if I want. And I might even settle just for this, because this might fit my needs for a base mesh. And it might actually work pretty well actually for what I need to do. But like I said, you, after this point, if you're going to try to 0 meshing, I don't recommend it because again, that center part is pretty complicated for it. In theory it could, but it's gonna be pretty hard with these settings with keep group and adaptive off and theories still could. But let's just try it to see if we can get this to have a clean result. Just see in tests 0 meshes resolve. That's what I thought it would do. That is what I thought it would do. Just something really weird, really wonky. Figure out where it went wrong. But that's why I don't do anything more. With 0 measure is not meant to handle like really complex forms of topology. Don't like overburden it with complex pieces like this. This was probably a good example of why you don't do it like that. Just kind of a learning the strengths and weaknesses of 0 measure learning when to quit while you're ahead. So when you're done with that, you can go into decorating it any way you want. You can go into knife curved brush, and then go into its secondary mode. Maybe put a little divot or something or a line in there. You can work with that a little bit. Kinda like how I do right here. It's a bit of a thin line vote. Do symptom like that. Again, I'm using the space bar trick to kind of hold out. Then if you want, you can kind of do the split two parts thing like we did with the forearm. You can do that with this is if you want, I'm not going to do something too dramatic on this. What I might do is just something as simple as chisel brush. And that's about it quite frankly, I don't really need anything else. I can just simply, for example, divide this couple of times. Well, that's probably all I need. Then maybe make it a little bit bigger chisel. And if you see it's a little jaggedy. One little thing about chisel brushes is that they require a lot of geometry. Because of that, I might be tempted to avoid that 4.6 million cell. Let's go back down to two and then maybe split two parts. Let's see here. I'll do a split two parts. I'm going to hit Okay, let's take a look down here. What we split, we split the centerpiece from the top piece. Turn that off. Let's go ahead and take a look at it. Let's just go ahead and Let's just go through geometry, modified topology and mirror and weld this. And let's bring back our piece so it's kind of above it, like so. Then you can do a deal where you can merge this down. You can do something like this if you want. Now, make sure you have exactly what you want before you sign off. What I want you to do is something like this. I want you to make your own pattern. And if I had to make a suggestion, I would make a pattern thinner than the drawer size of eight, maybe like four. And if you want you can do downward like so. Or if you want, you can do straight across like so. Bottom line is this, I want you to iterate and get creative. And then in the next video, I'm gonna show you my version and you're gonna see your version. All right, don't forget once you're done, you're gonna go through Geometry, modify Topology, mirror weld, so it gets to the other side and then see how it looks. So again, this is that experimenting iterative exercise and I'm gonna be giving you. But that said, stick around and stay tuned. 19. Establishing Finger Placement: Okay, welcome back. In this video, we're gonna go ahead and start placing all the things that we've made. As you can see, I made a little bit of a pattern and that was basically the same thing I did in the last video, except I chose straight lines. And again, I challenged you to go ahead and do your own line design. And from there, There's no right or wrong way. There isn't anything we haven't done that we haven't taught. This was just sort of giving you the opportunity to exercise what you wanted on your own. Definitely surpass the top. What you're looking at here, if you can. If you want, as these were two separate sub tools, you can kind of mess around to with this or change out the shape if you want or make something that's a little bit different like so if you want, this is going to act as whatever you wanted to look like. And you can see already that maybe you want to sort of like a sharp tendon, fingertip piece like this for the turtle, that would be a pretty good piece again, this all comes down to you having fun and you experimenting with what you got. So just bear that in mind. I kind of liked that idea what I was doing, those scaling iterative and I may find myself circling back to it. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to go ahead and make one of these pieces, probably this one here, a single poly group. Because I might find myself wanting to separate these two pieces off. And I can't do that with separate departs because it will separate all these pieces here. But if I isolate, select this whole singular poly group and mask it, I can separate that powered off and start going into scaling again. So I'm just going to make that one poly group for now and then recombine these two tools back together again. Let us just see it merged down it. Okay, now let's just go ahead and hit Duplicate. Bring this duplicated piece all the way into our spare parts because we're gonna circle around and reuse it. Now with that said, let's start filling in some areas here and let's go back to fill in in like we did before. So first things first, we have this new piece that we can work with. And we have a couple of other pieces as well, like the shoulder pieces. We also have a lot of excessive sub tools here. So we're going to have to work with that. Don't forget, we also have agreeable piece. Let's don't forget to put that into the arm section as well as the two shoulder pieces. And as for these three pieces we use to get this piece, Let's just delete those off. Like so. You should have two now here, one that is here, and second duplicate is in the spare parts section. Now let's just go ahead and see if we can add some combinations for some fun. First thing I'll do is I'm going to work with creating sort of like a hand. For that. I can kind of just kinda go through and I feel like it's a little bit Nabi. So maybe I can make it look like that. So it's kind of has a little bit of a tendon, cartoonish claw. Then we can just kind of, if you want, you can scale and adjusts like so. And we'll reuse our shoulder piece to kind of play Legos with our pieces. So let's go into spare parts and duplicate a piece and hold Shift Left Control. Bring that back down like so. Now let's just bring this piece in, combine these two pieces together like so. Let's just bring that in. You know, one thing I look at when I see this as I feel like I want to just do some experimenting. Like for example, I wanted to do an inverse selection of a Boolean to kind of round out the edges here and have an experiment like with a similar shape. To give you an idea. We didn't go through this app ever with you guys, is that you can do inverse Booleans, which is where we append a Boolean or append a sub tool in we choose a sphere, for example. And everything that's on the inside of the sphere basically decides the shape of the matter instead of what's outside of the sphere. Give you an idea here. By doing that, we click on the third topic. And you can see already you get a little bit of a new unique shape. That's kind of a cool looking shape and I kinda like it. That's kind of neat to see how we play around with it. A little bit to have some fun with it and maybe make it a little bit more rounder are down here. And that kind of works to our advantage too. So let's go ahead and the one more Divide. Turn off all the other pieces real quick here. Turn that into a Boolean, but going to do one more thing just to have some fun here, I'm gonna actually selected my plainer cut brush from my lightbox. And I'm just kind of, well, I'm just experimenting and looking for fun pieces here. Or better yet. You can do a line cut brush, which probably is going to be something that we'd go across here like so. I'll go ahead and just try it. First of all, like this. Let's go ahead and do a Boolean. Then make William mesh real quick. Let's append that new Boolean in there. And this is kind of going off the script because we just loved to experiment and iterate. And if you want, you can go ahead and then go into your knife cut brush, turn your drawer size down, like so. And you can kind of see how fast I'm going through all this. I'm just having some fun looking into new ways to innovate, experiment with kind of like catching lightning in a bottle, sort of to speak. Something like that. Maybe that can be used as a piece we can use. Let's go ahead and bring back everything. Turn on our character and our arm. Let's bring back this piece. Now what can we do with this piece? This piece is gonna be like the nugget knob that holds the fingertip in. Let's bring this guy in personal its center, the pivot point because it's Boolean and resets itself at the point. Let's go ahead and just what this is all going to be now matter of placement. Maybe you want to do an adjustment like a bend arc at this point, I'm hoping to ****, that you guys are getting very comfortable experimenting with the potential possibilities that this has because that's what this is all about. It's kind of just experimenting and finding your comfortable finding iterative shapes through the deformer. Here. One thing I liked about this, you remember how we did that poly group thing at the beginning or we could just do this. Marquee select, do this, and now we're going to do something similar to that. Maybe bring it a little bit more in here. Like so. This is going to serve a little bit like a kinda like a diaphragm sort of thinking maybe something like that. Can fit in a little bit easier. Something a little bit like this. And scale it in around one more time. This is just sort of a patient game we're playing right now with ourselves. We're just bringing in a Boolean, then scaling it in like so. Let's go ahead and just make a folder for this so that we can transpose this a couple of times. So for example, let's go ahead and just simply click on one of these pieces. Hit New Folder. I'm going to call this hand. We're going to bring that nugget in there like so. Now way when we hit the W key gene much transpose this particular set. Now we can scale this to these two together. Like that. And in addition, since they're one piece, we can work with the bend arc. This piece. Kind of see now how I'm just kind of fluctuating between all the different things from deformer onto transpose, set back to the individual piece, having that synergy to go back and forth in all those areas, very important to grasp and get down. That's why I say learning the keystrokes is everything as far as maximizing your speed in a flushing out of shape can standard good, a little bit smaller. Now I'm going to do is split to unmask, just to keep these guys segregated. We'll do one more time. Count, angle and out a little bit more. Men remain a little bit. Then a little bit. You can kind of see how this is. This is all like I said, just the process of kind of working and constantly adjusting to mix a little bit of sun. So you got to be a little bit patient with it. Just keep moving it until it begins to make sense. Spacing on that is everything. So now that we get that, Let's just go ahead and do just one more piece here. That's going to be I think what we'll do is I'll have him we're going to move him over just a little bit more. We have an empty negative space here. So what is going to have to happen is, is that we are going to need to fill the gap in with that, with something. Maybe it might be a good opportunity to work with practicing the gizmo to former I'm sorry, the extender deformer. Like this. I like the pacing placing of these two. So I might emerge these temporarily so that we can keep it as one. Let's bring it over just a little bit more. What we're doing is we're just trying to make a little bit of room here for our third finger. Duplicate that one round, bring it in. The reason why I wanted to kind of make it one sub tool, holding left Alt and left-click to rearrange the orientation of all of this as well. Now that we have all of that taken care of, what we have left to do is something for here. We also have a little bit more work to do for filling in the pieces, but we're almost done with our arm. That's the good news. With that said in the next lesson, we're going to talk to you a little bit about how we make little bit of a extender piece and how we can reuse our gribble to fill in all the gaps here. That said it's the ground and stay tuned. 20. Finalizing Finger Placements: Okay, so let's go ahead and continue on. We're going to go ahead and see if we can fill in the gap here using a new type of deformer, we didn't go over too much on, and that's gonna be the gizmo deformer. So let's go ahead and get started. For this one, we're going to kind of take a little bit better break. We have our hand done and we have all the fingers that are placed in the hand. Let's go ahead and just bring that up like so, and disable the visibility just temporarily until we can find what we want. Now what we're gonna do is we're gonna bring in a cube just like we did before. And that's under the tool and append. That's going to be right there. Let's take a look at doing, getting things started. Let's first of all, let's just go ahead and just want to hit the R key and just frame it up. Probably something like that. And then let's go ahead and just quickly go through and get a clean Z Ramesh out of it. Let's just go through geometry. See remeasure. Make sure to keep groups, adaptive size, and smooth groups. It's an unclean. We do. Let's go ahead and just get started with this. We cannot do this many different ways, but one of the simplest ways is first off, I'm going to go with a taper curve to kind of taper in a little bit of the piece. Actually, you know what, I'm looking at this and I got an idea, like to go ahead and start with something simpler. Let's do a knife cut brush on its primary function, where we can work with a little bit of symmetry. Let's take a moment to kind of give ourselves an opportunity to something like that. Then for you to do one more 0 measure, see if we can get something fairly clean. Then let's just cruises poly groups actually increase all we have a little bit of a wonky notice here, right up there. Let's just kinda cut that out. Try again. There we got something cleaner. And that usually happens again because of symmetry. So now that we have that, let's just go ahead and increase those poly groups, divide them up a couple of times and then delete the lower. With this said, let's hit the W key and do a taper now. And again, all I'm doing is just flushing out and looking for pieces out of this, just looking for interesting shapes that I can do from this all. Let's turn into a then dark. And you can kind of see now I'm combining all the deformers to get something that I want. Like. So once we like what we see, let's accept now let's talk about the extended to former. We haven't done that one yet, so let's just have a little bit of a quick tutorial on that. If we go into our transform types under the cog in our gizmo deformer. We're going to go ahead and see extender. Now extender is a pretty easy one. If we hit Shift F, the main cogs that you're going to work with on here are the orange COGS as they are extending basically. So from any direction you can kind of see all of these things happening. And in addition to that, to the adjacent orange COGS is a white cog and that gives us kind of a cool little bevel to work with as well. Using this concept, we can also do other things like in the top corner, we have a white cone which actually helps us with the extender here. And that kind of serves as an extrude or as it's labeled in an inflate. And you can kind of work with going in and out. You don't want to press this 2D because in certain, in situations like you see right here, you're going to get some, well, how shall I say at some wonky Venus. Now that we have that and you can kind of see how a hard surface pieces being flushed out and all of this. You can try, I wouldn't try to 0 mesh something in extend or mode because it does create artifacts like right here. I kind of liked them because they kind of add to the the hard surface piece, but I kinda like to keep it just pretty simple for now. Now. Once you feel like you're a little bit more comfortable with this, you pardon me. You can go ahead and just simply hit Accept and you can do whatever you want with this piece. Like if we go back to our sub tool and bring up all our pieces, the arms, the hands, etc. First thing I'll do is I'll duplicate this piece and put it into the spare parts folder. Then we'll work with this piece. Here is our piece. Let's just go ahead and scale this down like so. Let's bring this in like so. And I want you to think about how in everything that you learn new, always think about how you can combine it with the things you already learned in what I mean by that is it's like things like the slant of the secondary mode and the knife curved brush and how you can create some cool pieces with extender on that and do group split by parts, or how you can do Booleans and put it into that. It gets to be a point where you have to start thinking beyond and going beyond the script of the, pardon ME, the video. That's the main goal, aim. Alright, so as we can see, we're lining it up like so. Let's just go ahead and just bring it in. Then let's just do some more adjustments with the Ben dark. Maybe do a little bit down this way. Except we can then make further adjustments. Kind of see how it all falls into place. Like right here. We'll go ahead and select my Move brush now DMV. And let's not have it intersect with this. So let's just go ahead and go into transpose. Cut some of that off like so. Actually scratch that. I'm going to first of all do a duplicate. Cut this off, duplicate, undo to the original piece. Then we'll have another piece go for the back side. One more time. Except kind of see how I'm throwing in all the pieces, how we're iteratively getting through all of this. Now this is getting to a point now where we're hitting sort of repetition, placement in everything that we're doing. This is kind of a hidden piece. So that's kind of why I'm not going to go to insane or crazy. But reuse this piece modularly as you want to fill in the gaps underneath here. Like so. Let's see now that we have this, at this point, we have a couple of more things to do and that is just simply add some green into the areas that we have here and then maybe do a little bit of adjustments with what we've done so far. So let's see. We got this piece, Let's duplicate this piece off. And let's bring this to the very bottom. Let's go ahead and maybe go ahead and take a look at how we can fit this in. That's probably why it's not two. It's a little bit far away. That in we're going to have it in a couple of places. One is going to be right here. Then we'll duplicate it, and we'll have another one right here. Will duplicate it and have another one right here. Let's turn off. Go through one at a time. All right, so let's just do this time. Let's do get the excess off with lasso because there's so many separate meshes. Night curb brush doesn't handle that very well. It only cuts off the geometry of one piece at a time if it's separate. But we can go to ship control, Isolate, Select and select rectangle. And just again like before we're holding Shift Control, left-click drag, releasing shift control, but still holding down left-click. And then we're just going into holding left option or left Alt. Then turned transparency off. This stuff in a little bit more. Maybe even scale. It. Got some gribble going on there. Let's go ahead and go through Geometry, modify Topology, and delete that excess so it doesn't need to really be there. Do the same thing for the next piece. That's going to be this piece here. Probably need to make a little bit of an adjustment either with a bend curve or a bend arc. I'm going to choose curve for now. Since it might be a little bit more of a customizable piece, Let's add one more dot curve by pulling on that piece right there. Then let's just go ahead and hit accept and bring it in. Flattened it a little bit like before. Let's get rid of that guy. I'm using the Move topology brush to kind of pull out all these pieces here. Just kinda dragging them out. There we go. And then we can move all these wires as a whole. Then do the same thing in the back here. We could just cut them out, which is a lot easier. We got some more pieces. And last one is going to be right through there, kind of an interesting one that we're going to go with. Decide how you want to make this for me. I'm just going to wing it a little bit. Kind of see how I'm just kind of going through all this. Just enough to bring it in. Just give it a nice little sheen. Look. We got this here. Change this into quick little lasso. Only thing that I feel that we can work with is. I'm just making some adjustments now to the the taper area here. I mean, nothing really too insane. Just simply do either detail little taper, maybe just to kind of experiment to see where something looks like. Because I just think that you always want to have fun playing around with this. You always want to be in a state of mind where you can kind of see where something looks like if you just take the time to view it. Now that we got all that taken care of, we have a little bit of an arm. We're going to have a little bit more work to do as we go through all this. But one thing that I will say is that I really want you to be in the experiment mode of thinking to yourself that this is just about noxious, is just mainly about learning hard surface sculpting techniques. What we're doing right now is we're taking abstract pieces and reassembling them, kind of like Legos in some manner. That's what's happening right now. I was just taken your pieces and just simply reapplying them, seeing what they can bring out for us. That kind of stuff is kind of what's going on here. When you're done with everything that you are comfortable with, what she will do then is this, you'll just go ahead and kind of go through the process of cleaning everything up. Then any excess pieces you're going to add into the folders. Make sure your hand only includes just the claws and the arms include just these pieces here into the arm section. So, but that said, we're going to now move into the next piece, which is going to be into the lake section. We're going to show you how we go through the process of of reusing some of our pieces that are the same pieces here into how we can apply them for pieces that are been made already. In other words, like this piece here will read decorate to be a completely different piece for a big part of the shin, etc. That said sick around and stay tuned. 21. Foot Creation: Okay, welcome back. In this video, we're going to continue on into the leg and working on the foot. Now as you can see, I've made some more adjustments to this arm piece and did some more adjustments to all of the leggings and such. Once you've gotten to a comfortable spot, I've done some rework and just simply finagle with moving things around. But once you get to a comfortable spot, start doing is we've dumped for and reorganize your folder by moving all the pieces into separate areas. Like for example, this is the arm piece and this is the hand section. And now we have it all kind of keeping our sub tools claim. Now once you have that, we're gonna start with making a little bit of a foot. And this time we're gonna kind of show you some ways we can be modular and our asset creation and continue on. From there. To begin with, I'll just go ahead and turn on my spare parts here. And you can kind of see all the different spare parts we made so far. Right now I'm gonna go ahead and go with this piece right here. So I'll just go ahead and duplicate that. And shift left-click in here, which should bring this all the way to the bottom. And that's this piece. Now that we have that again, we're gonna work on the foot and the base mesh of the foot. We reusing pieces that we've already made so that you can get some more practice in on other forms of defender extenders, such as the five. I can get myself jumbled. Other forms of gizmo deformers such as the extender deformer. Mouthful. What we'll do is we'll take a look at this piece that we made here in the previous one and see if we can flush out some new shapes and get some more practice in their. First thing we'll do is I'm gonna hold shift control and left-click and go into knife curve. And like before, remember, if you hold down shift, take a cut piece and you hit X key and enables local symmetry. You can go into work in symmetry mode. Again, anything that you want to make, you can make pretty easily. Another thing you can do is go into your secondary mode, which is what I'm gonna do. But remember, it doesn't work with symmetry mode, so we have to do a mirror and weld operation after we're done. So let's hit X to turn off the X key. And I'm just gonna see if I can carve a line here and here. To begin with, I'll just go a little bit small, take a little practice run and see if that's what we want. Maybe go a slightly wider somewhere around three. Yeah, that works from it. I'll just go from up here and across here. I'm using the space bar trick again. I don't like what I see. You can always undo. We'll go with a double-tap on the left Option key to make a angular cut. We got that. Let's go ahead and do the same thing over here. Double-tap for the angular cut for up here. Now let's do a mirror weld operation. See if we can do something easy there. Let's see. So that's gonna be under Geometry, modified topology, mirror and weld. Got our pieces looking good. So far everything is lining up for us if there are any additional pieces that you wish to do. For example, do you wish to do something like this? Where you're just kinda wanting to do two patterns. You can do that. Sometimes we like to do that just this sort of test the ground and see how something looks a little bit. I like it a little bit, just simple like that for now. Now, again, we mentioned the extender deformer. So one thing we can do on here is we'll just go ahead and hit the W key, choose our cog to go into our transform type. And let's choose extender. And now we've had a little bit of practice with making this piece, so we already know what we're expecting. Now extender is a little bit interesting. Again. Its default state, it doesn't extrude anything. If you wanted to extrude something, then it's this white corner at the end. But you're going to always be operating off of something like this. Now having said that, don't don't forget to do things like experimentations with how we combine everything. For example, what does it look like when we combine this look? With the taper look that we've had so much practice with. It's kind of an interesting look right there that we can kind of flush out. You can do a quick little BPR render to kind of see if you like that. Or you could do the opposite. Just kinda go z back and do an inverse version and then do the taper and see what that looks like. Again, the no such thing as the wrong answer in any of this, I like this look, this might actually serve something uniquely different for me. In the center, the kneecap going up. So I'll keep this particular look in mind. Alright, so go ahead and I can just kinda see the possibilities little bit there. Let's see if we can extend it. Here. Maybe. Let's just go ahead and do an except. Let's go ahead and do some tapering are a little bit more. Now. Can taper the bottom. We can taper the top. Just do a little bit of having some fun exploring some shapes that look a little bit more. Let's see. We can just kinda push something out here. As I'm looking at this, I'm not making any commitments into any shapes. I'm just sort of, what I'm doing is I'm just looking for a shape to inspire me to go to the next shape. So this part right here, just looking at this, this inspires me. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna make a little mental image of what this is. This time I'm just going to hit cog except, and I'm going to cut this piece in half and see if I can get the same piece. Again. To do that, we can do it several ways. If your knife cut brush doesn't give you good justice for whatever reason on here. And then we can just kind of keep in mind. And remember we have other brushes, hold Shift Control. Sometimes knife cut brush doesn't work very well with extender and you have to go back to older tools like trim curve to help you out. Just go ahead and have that, take something off. And of course, even if this doesn't work, we can go with something pretty simple like, let's see, like delete selection tools. Let's try that again now without the B radius. There we go, Much easier. We have that taken care of. Let's go back to what we originally remembered here. So we did a taper. Like so I'll do that. Now I got similar, it looks like like that. So let's do it originally like this. Then hit Accept. Now let's go ahead and divide this off. We have a nice flat piece. If we want, we can keep going. Bend curve here is add a little bit of curvature. Long doing is just sort of flushing out a shape here. Not going to recommend any one tried to do a 0 measure when it's gotten, this mesh has gotten this complicated, so just bear that in mind. But if you want to do things like add more to the trim curve, you can take a shot at that. I'm sorry, not the trim per curve, but the night curve in either it's primary or secondary mode. Certainly take a shot at that. Now that we have that taken care of, let us go ahead and do a sub tool, duplicate and go into deformation and mirror this guy. Now let's go ahead and do a sub tool and merge these two down. Now let's hit the W key. First, we'll center it, then we'll hit the X key. Then we should get a even mesh here. So now we got something new. Make sure local symmetries on before anything if you do this approach. Now that we have that we can also scale this to be different. Much further, we can do more tapering. So we can hit X recenter the position, hit the COG. And then let's see if we can flush out more interesting shapes rounder. It's kind of like that a little bit. In all I'm doing is I'm just iterating. I'm just kind of just taking it and looking for interesting spots on this. Once I have what I need, just go ahead then. Let's find some way we can combine the foot into this, the tip. Now, we're gonna go into spare parts. I'm going to take that original piece right here, duplicate it again. That's one of our parts that we're making. And I'm going to now deform this piece. Piece. Kind of see where I'm going now. Maybe few tracking the original piece. Don't forget if you intersect in with this, you're going to have a problem. So be careful you never intersect these two pieces. I'm just kind of play around with this and essentially just looking for a fun and interesting shape. And sometimes it can be an iterative process, but once you understand the curves, it can also be a little bit fun. The uncertain not to the curves but the deformers see. I can kind of see where I'm going already with where I'm going to make this. Don't be afraid to do anything that is an opportunity to explore any. Like take for example, if I had shoot, trim curve brush, don't be afraid to kind of go in here and do something like this or duplicate that. That's kind of a fun shape. We may have just caught lightning and bottle on. So I'm going to just redo this face and then go back to my original sub tool. Kind of see where I'm going with this because it's now seen some potential possibilities here. So I'm just going to go ahead and go with it and take a shot with this. Delete the hidden. Then we're going to recenter it and see if we can have some fun with these two new pieces that their bring it out like so. Then turn transparency off. Let's see if we can see Transformers requires symmetry mode to be off. Forgot about that. I will say though is that we will be covering the back part so that can kind of the, for now excluded. Let's see if we can bring this guy. This is, this is just sort of arriving at the shape from 1 to the next and doing experiments on seeing what something looks like in the whole process. There we go. Now that we have our piece here, Let's go ahead now and see if we can do just a little bit more work with things like just kind of touching up certain areas here. For example, if you, this is all stuff that's going to be covered up. So it's kind of pointless that I'm actually doing it. But if there's anything more that you want to put, you cannot keep going because like I said, this is just all things that you can just constantly, constantly keep on putting on here. So what I'm gonna do now is I'm going to put a foot in here folder for the foot to hold everything here. And then I'm just gonna go ahead and transpose the set of this foot now onto the location of the turtle. Scale it in length so I'll but be careful don't hit to do the scaling and symmetry mode, you're going to run into all sorts of problems. Now the nice thing is, is when you transpose this set, Don't forget to take your time as far as going through and just kind of setting it exactly where you want it to be. And if you want to affect the deformers as a whole, the one thing I'll probably recommend if you want to kind of do some sort of an affection of like tapering everything as a whole. My get my recommendation is take every sub tool, make it a single poly group by holding Control marquee select over the entire sub tool group and hitting Control W and hitting poly groups. So that, that way you can separate them and merge them together as one sub tool seamlessly. Kinda see what I'm doing here. I'm just kind of bringing it in. Toggling in-between. Might even shrink it down just a little bit. Just to have some fun. Like what I was saying before. Go through sub tool. Let's turn off the transpose set. Go into solo mode or better yet, just turn off so you can see it easier. Go into sub tool here. This is all going to be one poly group. This is all one poly group. And this is all one poly group. Then you would go through merged down. Like that. Oops, partially in geometry. All of it is partially. Make sure that before you merge everything that you have gone through and deleted all hidden geometry by going through Geometry, modify Topology, Delete Hidden. Then from here, you can kind of do continue on, for example, doing your taper like so. Or if you want, you can go ahead and switch off into your bend curve. Like so. You can do all those things. This is all coming from just slight doing just this piece here. Don't be afraid to just go into one piece. And then just working with that as well. Like for example, I masked everything out even though these are all one sub tool. So now it can be just this piece that I can affect if I want to, in any way from normal scale down to just a normal taper or reversing the taper if I see fit. Just for this area. That's again why we do the poly group. We can actually create like an interesting little silhouette. Going on here. Let's go ahead and turn or twist on scale this guy back up. I'm just going to cut some of this geometry off so we can see what we got here a little bit better. Maybe even go into a Move brush with my editing, the B and V tool. All we're doing is x2 now you just trying to get ourselves are established foot. Like I said before, this is all iterative. This is all just a process where you just take your time. Just like with the arm. When we were doing the placements, it's just a iterative process. We're going to leave it there. This was a little bit more of a longer one because we wanted to show you the possibilities and the potentials you could take with it. If there are any. Like I said, I want you to feel free to enjoy or experiment with different places, different shapes. I want you to really just kinda see what I'm doing right here. For example, I'm just constantly moving the pieces around so that I could continue to have some fun here. Like so. I'm just constantly just enjoying looking at that. Probably do them on a little bit more. But on the next one after this, we're going to work on the knee and then we're going to work on the back area and I'm sorry, not the knee but sort of like a area of like gravel basically. Then from there, we're going to just have a good time just trying to figure out the, the chest and how we can go over some new techniques in the process. So that said, stick around and stay tuned. 22. Creating Shin Base Mesh: Okay, welcome back. In this video we're going to go ahead and continue on with our leg and reuse some of our base meshes to demonstrate some more modular opportunities to reuse the same base mesh and get more practicing making different, different sort of designs using the knife curved brush. So let's go ahead and get started. So if you remember, this is the base mesh that we use for this piece. So we're gonna reuse it again for a lake piece based mesh that we're going to decorate, but we're gonna try to do a different pattern of things on here so that it looks different. Just so you can have some it just so we can show a little bit more opportunity of the possibilities of what you can accomplish, so forth. So I'll go ahead and go into my spare parts folder. And then I'm just going to duplicate this sub tool and hit Shift left-click, bring that all the way down, and then turn off my spare parts. I'm just going to work with just with this one in this lesson. Let's just go ahead and see if we can now find an interesting place. And like we did with the last lesson, we demonstrated how far we could take things with the deformer and just how far we can keep pushing something. I'm gonna do something that's a little bit similar here. We're just going to be working with the deformer and the scaling to just find that sweet spot of what we want to do here. Let's just go ahead and just see where we want to take it and maybe that might work. Like this area here, what it's showing. But I feel like I needed it needs to wrap around a little bit more. So let's bring it up a little bit further. Let's go into our Solo Mode, which is right there. Or I can do my quick key, do a quick little bend our current around. This angle. Kind of wraps around like so. We'll taper that top off. Maybe this around. So you're free to just mess around and continue to work with this further and further, if you want to see something else, definitely take a moment to look, looking at this right now and then dark to kinda go this way. Then maybe we get in like that. For now. Let's bring it back in. And I'm gonna go ahead and use this piece in, kind of duplicated twice and then mirror one side to be on the other end. Will do something like that. Let's go ahead and shrink this guy in. Like I said, this is all just like placement and funneling right now. Left-click to just do a little bit of reorientation. Hear. Fact. Might do some sort of a deal where I kind of just might just make this whole piece just for now and just disappear either through the trim curve or through what is it called? The Night curb or isolate select curve just to kinda get it too. Because I feel like it's kind of getting in my way of opportunities where I want to take this long doing is just shown a little patience and working the mesh. Like I said, all this is is just kind of just kind of working with adjustments. Don't get too tunnel vision. In some there's a couple of things. First off, don't get too tunnel vision with how this is all supposed to like play out in terms of how it's connected. Remember you have grateful that you can create to assist in that juncture. Also, don't be afraid to go into brute the Move brush if you wish to help you out with anything that you might see. See, maybe a taper up there is what we need. Then followed by a bend arc to get a little bit more curvature. And then see how that works out. Kind of see how I'm just kind of working through the shape, finding my iterations. Just going to take a moment to just sign a, see how that looks on the other side when it's mirrored. So I'm just going to duplicate sub tool, mirror it and bring it onto the other side. That's where I know over here. So just sort of bring this guy little bit forward like so. Say this part right in the center. We're going to go ahead and just fill in with some of our array meshes to help us out there. Want to bend the arc a little bit here to actually keep it like that. Maybe It's getting slowly, slowly working its way in, which is good. We'll have some more base meshes going underneath there. But right now I just kinda one to take my time on this one. Let's see. Again, this is all just me working in shape in and just experimenting with the deformers, constantly looking for a refinement. And remember if there's anything I don't like, I can just simply take it and Z back. Essentially. Kind of like that a little bit, little bit nicer than the other side. So see if I can go through to sub tool, which is turn that operate now. I'm going to duplicate that and then bring that over to the side and see how that looks in the mirrored interpretation of that one looks like me to make some adjustments. Further. That's the case. That's alright. Again, I'm rearranging this by changing the rotational pivot point by holding left option and left Alt. That just simply changes things a little bit more. Could do something like that. That can kind of work. That's a little bit of the starters point of the base mesh. Looking right now at the placement and the practice placement. And I just want to have something that's fairly even. I'm gonna have to read duplicate this over when the time comes, but right now I'm pretty okay with that being the case. Just sort of like getting that blank canvas started and in its place. So that helps a little bit more. With that said, we'll go ahead and put a pause on that and we're going to work on just filling in the center here and put in some gravel underneath it. And then after that, we'll move into decorating the sides here. And then work on the back. That said stick around and stay tuned. 23. Blocking Out Center Shins: It's continue. In this video, we're going to go ahead and work on filling in some of the center part here, the center green part, and just kinda give ourselves a headstart into this. And we're going to once again reuse some of our spare parts to help us out and see if we can reform it to look like some different areas. So with that said, let's go ahead and get started. Now let's just go ahead and turn on our folder, spare parts. And I kind of liked this little area right here. So I'm going to just see if I can duplicate this and maybe flush out another shaped through it. Like so. So what can I do out of this? I'm looking, just duplicated it, shift left-click and re-center piece. I'm just going to go ahead and duplicate this sub tool one more time. Just in case I need to circle back. Looking at this, I can probably say right now, I just want to focus on just the spine areas here. You don't necessarily need to have wires. I'm just as we did when we made this, we made the wires all one poly group and then I just isolate, select, draw a mask over it, go into split, and then split unmasked. Now we have two sub tools. And now we can do some experimentation. So we cannot do a couple of things. We can do something, for example, like split parts, or we can go to an individual piece and then modify that piece and create a new system of race. This. Or we can do something similar to that and then work with the farmers in conjunction with race. I want you to in that mindset of understanding the options and the choices and all the different directions you can go when you're making something new again. So let's just start off with one BMT. Let's just go with a single piece. So I took move topology and I'm just going to go ahead and draw a mask over this one piece. And then I'm gonna go ahead and hit Split mass piece. Then I'm going to go through a little bit more. The forgot that when I did that. Try that one more time. Just going to go through and split masked point. Now we can just bring this in, maybe on do this all the way back. Lots of interesting little glitch. Here. We're seeing the work like that. Try one more time, Split Mask piece, take that one piece. Now let's work with this singular PC. If we can now draw something more out of it. Let's see here now let's just go ahead and scale it up a little bit. Work with the tapered to experiment with some shapes. Maybe we can find something more out of it. Kind of like the Batman look a little bit on here. And I see a potential for a heel piece a little bit on it. Let's go ahead and check the other side. See if we can taper. Now I'm starting to see my potential piece. It accept. All I'm doing is just working with new pieces, new extenders, new fun looking areas, just having some fun flushing out shapes. That's what all this is. It's just practice to flushing out shapes. So you can keep enjoying just kind of the potential that you have possibilities on this. Let's go ahead and take this, see what this looks like. So let's do that again. You can kind of see the process and going through them, just going through quick iterations. Now that we'd like that, Let's bring it back in. I'm gonna see if I can cut this a little bit short now. More time up here. Perfect. Now let's go ahead and duplicate this and do a deformation to the mirror side. And we're gonna go ahead and build off what we did in the last tutorial video where we mirrored the two pieces and then see how they looked in conjunction with one another. I kind of liked that one a little bit more. Now that I see that, let's go ahead and turn the visibility off there. You can kind of see how I'm just constantly experiencing the bar, just going through and just redefining all the pieces and the opportunities that we can make out of this duplicate again, Deformation Mirror. It's probably on the other side. You can kind of see just how we are kind of going through all of this. Just kind of how we get to a different shapes so quickly. Let's go ahead and combine these tools and start looking for some more shapes out of it. We're gonna take these two sub tools, merge them down now. So I'm gonna hit the W key, make sure local symmetry is on. Hit the X key and recenter these guys back in. So now we can work with something. Remember, you intersect like this, you get this. So it's kind of a cool concept, but I'd rather have a separate piece of geometry that were the case. Let's see if we can. Little bit, I'll have separate geometry for it. Alright, so now we've got something that's a little bit more closer to home. Let's go ahead now and take this and bring it in a little bit closer. Turn off symmetry mode, go into center point. And now let's keep the ballroom rolling here. Now. What else can we do here? We can take this piece and maybe we can go into bend. We can flatten this out a little bit more and then just see if we can go with the bend deformer. I'm sorry, I bend arc two former, something like that. Just go ahead and just keep making all the adjustments that you want. Now if you want to also do anything extra, for example, maybe you want to go with adding more pieces to the box. You can pull something further from spare parts. Maybe one of these pieces can do something for you. If you remember this piece right here, you can actually use this as a nice little centerpiece. It's just all about combining all these areas again and again, like so. But I'm kind of on the fritz to just simply go on here and just simply do an insert mesh piece, like a separate little piece. Want to over rely too much on my spare parts. So bringing the sin x, let's separate this lake. So now if we hit the B key, remember we bring, brought in Booleans to kind of put in. We can do an insert multimedia primitive. Make sure you don't choose the H1. And we can just do a cube right here. Let's go ahead and rotate this cube fairly to make sure that guy, if you want, Let's make sure we can get a good clean mesh out of this because you're gonna see, so if we bend this around, you're gonna see some weird wonky tech geometry. Geometry. Duct poly groups, poly groups by normal. And then let's go through our geometry 0 measure and then keep poly groups. Our settings are all there at this point, you should know your settings on the measure for this whole course. Let's see. Oops, we've got one thing. We need to keep this guy separate from the sub tools else we're gonna match everything. That is way too complicated to get down. So split, unmasked. Try that one more time again. Geometry. Now we've got something a little cleaner. Let's see what we can do with this guy. I'm going to go into solo mode. Remember, solo mode is right below the ghosts. I have it on my quick keys right here. Let's make sure that it's perfectly level like So. Hit X key makes sure local symmetries on. You can go ahead and have some fun with this. And just sort of invent your own little piece. And keep a 0 meshing it out so you can get some clean. If you don't get any clean measures, turn off x symmetry and try again. Sometimes that helps, but you won't have even topology in the process. So bear that in mind. So I just keep going, not going to stop. It's going to creases. Do a little bit of a bevel. Though it looks like without the bubble. Or better yet, let's just see what this looks like without any geometry. Then let's control the thickness. Here. Dynamic subdivision turned on smooth subdivisions, go into our thickness and see if we can find something a little bit thinner than convert that into geometry by hitting apply. Keep in mind, that's going to make the poly groups the same all over. So if you need to do any 0 machine are reassigning of the poly groups or if you foresee any future Z remeshing. I'll just go ahead and do a quick little poly group by normal. I think we'll be fine. Symptoms wonder if just the simplest of shapes and easiest to grasp. Let's just mess with, this, might have something easier here. Let's just go ahead. Mess again with the taper, turn-off x symmetry. Go ahead and go into centering this just flush out shapes. You can kind of see where we're going. We're just constantly just looking for that shape and having some fun experimenting and doing iterative processes. All this is about practicing, finding all the limitations of what you can accomplish with a, these tools in conjunction with everything. It's really like a quest to explore. That means mandatorily. If you really want to learn all this, you got to, got to take the time and be willing to go outside the norm. Let's see, we'll hit Accept. Let's have some fun, just some final fun with this. Maybe we want to put a quick little two former on here. You can do that. Split unmasked. And this May 1 not work to our advantage, but we'll have some fun just to see, just to have some fun and see what something looks like. Let's go out of solo mode so we can see everything. Will put some Booleans in here. But if we're gonna put Booleans into here, remember the rules, It's all about remembering the rules here. Everything has to be disabled, all visibilities have to be disabled so that you can make everything work correctly. So let's go ahead and go back here. We're going to now see if we can work some Booleans in here. To do booleans, you've got to remember the rules, Live Boolean. And just going in and turning that sub tool with the cylinders into a Boolean. Let's see. Remember I have x symmetry on and local symmetry so I can manipulate the scale individually. Like so. Hold Control, left-click, hold Control and click. This is just simply, there's no plan. That's just simply having some fun. Looking for the pieces. 11 for all the opportunities. Exploring everything here. Point this a little bit weird. Anything I could probably elaborate, it's how fast I'm arriving at these shapes. So quickly. The selection seek, we can do something here. Figured. This is local symmetry. So let's go ahead and turn local symmetry off. We can move this as one piece. The pivot point. We might be dealing with turning X off that my work. And we do that, we got to return back to kind of see sort of the fun that we're happened. Again. I have some fun with that. So let's go ahead and do a Boolean and do a make Boolean mesh out of that pen that in like so. Sweet get that made. And then let's disable the sub tools of everything and checkout what we got here. Which is alright, I'm not going to do too much more on there. Now let's go back into our piece and then see if we can fit this back in. We can do all sorts of things. We can make it up this way. You can make it upside down. You can scale it, which isn't a bad idea. We can do a couple of more things on here as I'm looking at work here. Once we have all that taken care of, what we'll do is I'm gonna to Holly group on this. I always like to add a poly group and just turn it into one poly group. That way I can sort of kind of turn this all into if I need to separate everything or mask a certain section, it's just easy with isolates sled poly group. Now you remember that sub tool, we combine these two on, Let's hold Shift left-click to bring it all the way down to make it easier when we hit Merge Down and hit Okay. Now we got this tool, sort of like our next tool. Let's go ahead and center the pivot point here and feel free again. Take it any direction you want. Maybe this is the direction you want. That's fine too. Now that we have this, you can keep going. Like I'm doing. Or you remember when I did that poly group wanted to get a good example, holds left shift click Shift Control, left-click to isolate select whole control into empty space to marquee select, and then hold Control into empty space to invert the selection. That way, we can just control this guy right here. Like so. And maybe you feel this is too much of a bend arc and you just want to manipulate just this. You can do that as well. Now that we have that, I did say I was gonna do this on an array. I'm still not sure if I want to do it that way because array meshes are notoriously difficult sometimes to get it. If you have two options, we're going to duplicate this down into a strip. And we can do that either by manually one piece at a time or with an array. Sometimes a little bit difficult to do things with an array because you got to get it right. And sometimes I just like to do this manually one piece at a time. Might go with something a little bit. Something just a little bit more simple, I should say. Let's go ahead and do this on the left side as this might be easier. Geometry, Mirror weld. We know that we know all these rules. Let's go ahead and go through sub tools and turn everything that we have back on. Bam, bam, foot, leg guy. All right, so let's just go ahead and take this cool little piece that we made here. This guy is right here, can be either upside-down, right-side up. I like it a little bit like that. And we're going to do is we can just bring it in a little bit more like this. Bring it in like so we can eat. I'm going to say we can either hold Control left-click and duplicate it out like that. I'm a little bit hesitant to do that because you might want to have the option to separate this off. And having sub tools might be easier for you on that. Let's experiment to see what this looks like. An upside down. Kind of like that. Once you have what you need and kind of bring it in a little bit more. Just take your time with the placement here. I might get rid of the thickness of these pieces. When we begin to callin, all of this will be taken our time there. But again, as I say, this is the most reoccurring thing about it is as you look at how I kept going as far as pieces go, I'm going to duplicate this sub tool. That way. Bring it here. Let me get pretty small. This is probably why it was not a good idea to do this with an array. Because if you try doing this with an array, trying to get this lineup might be a nightmare for you. Trying to get a single strip that is also having that kind of control just to simply do one piece at a time is advantageous. Then duplicate this one more time and have this guy come up like so. You can kind of see how it's going and it's an iterative process. We do things again where we're going to be adding more to it. As in other words, adding stuff underneath it. As we've done before. Again, we might circle back, rechange the thickness. We already did a demonstration that with dynamic thickness, width under dynamics subdivision. So we can keep going with that. We have our first start off, we got our first plates, started off. In the next lesson, we're going to go ahead and start working around this center piece by tailoring these two base meshes, the sort of detailing them out so that they fit in coincide with the centerpiece a little bit more. With that, we're hoping you can get again more practice, more exercise into all these different areas. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 24. Detailing the Shins: Welcome back. In this video, we're gonna go ahead and tackle into the base meshes and start carbon some detail in here. And we're going to show some different patterns in here just to kind of give you an idea of just all the different ways we can make one the same base Mish look completely different in different scenarios. So with that said, let's go ahead and get started. I'll go ahead and use this piece and then we'll just read duplicated over once we're done here. Let's go ahead and go into the C. Let's go for now into solo modes. We can take a look at it without having to get our hands dirty here. We add Shift F. We can kind of see all the anatomy of this in the poly groups that are out. For now. I'm thinking what I'll do is I will keep the thickness the same just for now, divided a couple of times. And then we'll just go ahead and need be smooth some of this stuff out. Then if you haven't guessed it by now we're going to just cut into this whole area using this secondary features like we did before with the knife curve brush. Let's hold Shift Control and select our knife curve. Like before. We'll just cut into doing a slant right about here. But don't forget to enable, make sure you have b Radius turned on by hitting Shift Control Spacebar and adjusting this should do. Let's just go ahead and take a couple of cuts in here. Then of course uses Space bar trick to realign this if you want. This aright, but a little bit hard to do this when you're working with Beziers because you just don't know exactly where. Spot my work. Where to do a Shift. Tap. Left Alt on a good place right here. So feel free to do a couple of practice swings on it. Let's see if we can do one little bit over here. Just take a couple of go do one right there. Like what I see so far. Go ahead and just kind of look at all the pieces that we have. So far that might work just fine. So now let's go into sub tool. Make sure this is on our bottom sub tool and shift left-click. That way we can navigate onto the boat. When we split this off, it will be the bottom three pieces and we won't have to go through all these different sub tools, figuring out which one it was. We'll do our clean up on this a little bit later. I'm just looking at this right now, seeing where I would like to take this. Let's go ahead and do a split two parts and hit. Okay. Let's go ahead and just do something like that, maybe. Something like that. Just go ahead and mess around, have a little fun just making something out of this. So once you have that, let's go ahead and cut some slants into here. I might even thing where I might just make these little wider and try again. Like all I'm doing right now is just sort of experimenting with what I got here. Still a little bit, little bit too big. Let's just go ahead and let's turn on all the other pieces and soup that kinda looks like in retrospect, might need to turn everything off so we can get a better idea here. So what I'm gonna do is just disable the visibility of everything so we can see things a little bit better because we need these other, we need to see how this looks with the other pieces. And so far it's we're getting there. We're slowly, slowly getting there. Just got to keep at it. Now that we have that, what we need, Let's go back into solo mode. From here, let's go into our primary function. Just take a moment to look at what we have. We might get some issues with cerumen shown here, so I might have to do some editing, but that's okay. Now, let's go ahead and just do a quick little 0 measure on all this and see if we can get something clean out of it. Gonna be a little bit messy here, but we'll see what we can work with, because this is all about problem-solving. We'll do a 0 measure. I figured we'd get some weirdness like that. We tried to do a 0 measure again. Just remember a couple of things. If we get weirdness, just go all the way to the back. We get any kind of weirdness. One thing we can always do is to remind yourself that this is part of the problem-solving 0 measure is an automated program. Sometimes you just need to change to the polygon count to see if you can get it to land on something easier. Even if you have to just tweak it or move it just a little bit, give it a couple of tries. See, this is the cleanest one. We got a little weird artifact here. But if you ever see like collapses in here and you might just want to undo and just keep kind of trying to find get 0 measure to behave in a proper way. If you can't get it to do, if it still keeps fighting with you, then the next thing I would do is do a Shift Control left-click. And then with that, we can just go ahead and do a Geometry. Modify Topology, Delete Hidden of that stuff. And now try to 0 mesh. Now that it has less to work with here. Like we have right here, something a little bit cleaner. Redo it again, give it a little bit more uniform. Now let's take that polygon count size down to half. See if we can get something again a little bit cleaner. And you can kind of see the cleanness of this. This is, this is because it has less corners. It doesn't have any corners to deal with. So it's making the automated process a little bit easier in calculating what we need, which is a good thing. So maybe just a couple more hits. Go, It's getting cleaner there. And then once we have what we need, we go to dynamic subdivision in, we rebuild our thickness out up with this. Now remember hitting dynamic subdivision means that we're going to get a little bit of collapsing. So we got to turn that smooth subdivision levels down a little. It looks like that. Then let's go through thickness. Thickness is only giving us a projection. We're getting something that's pretty good so far and a little bit decent. Let's go ahead and let's hit Apply on this. Now that we have this, we need to start applying poly groups so that when we divide, because remember when we divide a kind of collapses, we need to have poly groups on these corners to hold the edges. Let's start off with, because when we'd go to crease poly groups, those holding edges and those corners will hold. We might have to work with see modeler in some of these areas because groupby normals may not be too friendly and certain areas actually not that bad here Let's see what we get. It may have just looked out crease poly groups and see the damage. Just kind of going back and forth looking for where I see collapses. A little bit cleft see here, but not that bad. And I think that was intended when I divide it a couple of times, bam, just as I want. Now let's go ahead and bring out a solo mode and see how this is conjunction. And kind of see the place where it is. So we're going to repeat the same thing now by holding lip, left, Alt and left-click. And we're going to rebuild this piece now, the same way we did the other piece. Let's go into solo mode. And we can do the same thing, even we can trust try to do 0 measure. Might be a little bit easier with this one. Maybe. Let me see here. I'm assuming that's poly group. Good. Let me again, just keep going through. Don't resort to just going through and just deleting all of this. Do a couple of tweaks to the target polygon count because again, this all comes down to problem-solving skills. Alright, that's good. Actually getting clean. Once you got to clean, go ahead and go for a lower subdivision. Not too bad. Work with that. Little bit clean. Something here. What do we have here? Something that happened much better. You can kind of see 0 measure doesn't get it right perfectly every single time you got to work with it. A little bit, like this is one example right here. Kind of see how it plays around with you. Messes with your mind. I can actually make this work. Maybe not. Since I'm fighting this incredibly a lot, I'm just going to go ahead and just I've taken my best shot at it. I'm going to have to do is I did before. Just rebuild it from the very top. Because again, 0 measure has a much easier time with less corners to deal with. Just looking for something that's good. Easy. Target polygon count, a good clean topology for dealing with. There we go. We got something that's working a little bit easier now, you can kind of see how I'm going through all this. We've got something that's clean. Now, let's go through edge loop. Or I'm sorry, not edge loop. Let's go through and do dynamic subdivisions. Turn that back on. Remember the rules we need to go through and turning subdivisions off. Let's turn in mess around with that thickness. This is going to be a little bit off because again, the thickness is going to go, is going to be elevated and raise. So we're gonna have to bear that in mind. All right, and we'll hit apply. And we're going to have to do some rearranging now because it's raised up a little bit. I'll show you what I mean. You can kind of see. Actually I like it a little bit like that. It helps a little bit to my advantage. Let's just add some poly groups to this like we did before, so that when we divide this up, the holding edges will stay the same under a crease Poly Group function. So you can kind of see the pattern here. This is all about repetition because there's a lot of steps in trying to figure all this out. So we got to keep repeating and reinforce the same thing until it's solids on poly groups. See what the default groupby normal is. We got a good state here. Now that we have that, let's take a moment to just have a little bit of fun with this. I'm thinking doubling. Lets go z model or brush. I can choose the traditional way, but I'm thinking I'm just going to take a moment to go and do it differently. Hold my brush over the space bar and hold space bar down and choose a bevel. Then let's just kinda see what that looks like. Little bit like that. A little bit like that. And it's kinda just taken my moment here to look at what I like. I think I'll light up to an outside bubble for here. I could bevel everything but then maybe I might just bubble everything here. Got to remember to crease these two areas. I'll just go ahead and do a manual crease and that's a Z modular feature. We'll do one right here. Hold down spacebar to crease edge 12. For the same on the bottom here. We probably These areas just creasing the areas that the poly groups by normals didn't catch. I forgot. Here. We don't really need that and we're gonna do a crease poly group there. Alright, so now that we have that, we're just gonna do a couple more things on this baby. Hold down Shift F, and hold spacebar. Let's just put a couple of insert edge loops on here and then go through and bring a couple of these in. Then let's extrude just that section. It's just gonna be poly group all. Now, Holly loop. I'll just go through because they like it a little bit like that, but that means I'm gonna have to do a little bit of crease poly groups geometry after that, let's just go with sub tool. Not so tool but geometry, crease, increase pg for poly groups. Let's just divide that now and see if we caught that. Looks like we did. Let's just go ahead and hit the W key. Looks like my rotational values off. Let's just bring this guy out like so. Now that we have that taken care of, the last step will be to work on this secondary state here. If there's anything more you want to put on here, you can, if you want to have a little bit of fun and add more to it by combining or maybe you want to do slants on here with the knife curb brush with some simple stuff like here, here, here, here, and here. You can do that. Just feel free to just take it wherever you want to go. Because again, this is all about, it's not about trying to mimic the exact work that you have here. It's about just giving yourself opportunities to practice, how everything works here. So with that said, We're gonna go then to finishing up this side and the fin here. And then after that we'll just go ahead and just kind of move on into the backside of the green ball underneath that said stick around and stay tuned. 25. Finalizing the Shins: Welcome back. In this video, we're going to go ahead and continue on just finishing up a little bit of detailing using the plainer cut brush and a couple of slants to help accentuated. And then once that's done, we'll merge all this backup again in reduplicated off to the other side and move on. Now with that said, we have our pieces here. If we divide this up, it should come out pretty fairly clean like selves. So we, right now I'm on move topology brush and I'm just holding the space bar and just kind of ensuring that there's some fairly even space in everything here so that it looks roughly proportionate. How this all kind of measures up. It's just a game of phenylalanine and kind of tweaking and just moving stuff around. Once you get to a comfortable spot. Let's go back to dividing this a couple of times, maybe three times. And then I'm just going to go ahead and they'd go through geometry and delete lower. From there, I'm going to hit comma and I'm going to go into our brush. There. We're going to go in and mess around with our planar folder and choose our favorite brush, the plainer cut brush. Now, this is the one where we have to start at different spots in the whole area just to kind of get what we want. So just bear that in mind like right here. If you've I'm thinking that when I do this, I'd like just this piece effected. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna make sure this is on the very bottom. And I'm going to do a split two parts once more so that I can just affect this area. I could do that with poly groups, but I got to like all sorts of poly groups all over. I'm just going to hit Split departs. Now, when I mess around with this, I can affect that one. And also when I divide this, it's just this piece being divided. So I'm just messing around looking for a fun little angle to get this to kind of fall in line too. Interesting. Look. That's kind of interesting as well. This is what I like about this brush is that you can really have a lot of fun with it and just experiment with it. Look for different areas. To get this to fall. In line with. The downfall of this brush is that you don't normally get a choice too much in terms of where you start and also the what is it? The diameter, radius has a big deal in where you go as well. It right here. Sometimes you got to compromise a little bit with it. Because it kinda like this look, but let's just keep going because what I'm gonna do is I'm just going to go ahead and keep looking for that fund spot here. Let me see something In else here. Let me just start off here just to kind of, you know, what I'm thinking also is that this particular piece might be just too thin. So I'm gonna go ahead and delete that one. Couple of geometry delete. Then let's just go ahead and reapply the thickness to this to be a little bit thicker so that when we do this, it won't collapse. Let us see here. Just to make it a little bit thicker. Course, because this is an indifferent location. Find our little guy here. See, this is again part of that problem-solving. We've got to kind of keep them in mind, width. Now let's mess around and see if we don't and shouldn't get as much tearing and collapsing in, That's better. Back to the road again. I'm holding left Alt to get this pattern here. Let's see here. Go with trim curve. Turn off the radius. Real line. Just to kind of have a little bit of fun. Then we'll go from here. Dynamic on this. That way we can get a little bit smaller. Lines. Dynamic will sometimes do that too. Yeah, that'll kinda mess around with you. Now let's click on the fin, give it a couple of subdivisions. And I hit the B key and go in your plainer cut. We can just mess around here. Now. There we go. Probably not going to work when you, if you never see that plainer cut work too well, it's probably because of the fact that something is usually mast. You have subdivisions on your dish. Here we go. Interesting. Kind of thinking actually because I'm have to fight with doing this on the other side. Maybe I'll just go with chisel brush. Couple of practice strokes. Take about half of the intensity down. Trying to do this with a mouse and not a Wacom tablet, by the way, is very, very difficult. That's good enough for me because this is going to get covered up. Now that we finished that, let's just go ahead and just return on everything again. That's why I didn't do too much emphasis because I knew that was going to get covered up. Let's go ahead now and Rio, align our pieces. Let's go ahead and merge all these back into one sub tool again. Now that we have that piece, Let's go ahead and duplicate that piece. Deformation. Go to mirror, bring it over to the other side. Recenter that pivot point when you hit W key and click on that upside-down teardrop. Now we're just gonna go ahead and rearrange this. I know what I did there. I have something now masked out, so let's just try that again. We're gonna go ahead and take that upside-down teardrop piece and just replace it back in there to our original piece. If you need to, you can use your original base mesh to help you out in where you're putting that. Just to kinda help you get to your bearings and just simply just taking your time doing the placements. We go we need now we're gonna fill in all this stuff with some grateful. We'll fill in now the center part of here with the little bit agreeable. And what we'll finish off as having a piece like this kind of fill in for the back side here. And then now we'll have some additional areas which will fill in using one of our other pieces to just flush out some more of the former shapes. So with that said, we got the outer side taken care of. Now that's all that's left is filling in the back and the inside. So that said sick around and stay tuned. 26. Creating Leg Greeble: Okay, welcome back. In this video, we're going to see if we can fill out the back side here. And we're going to go ahead and go with something very simple like one of our modular pieces right here, and see if we can get some more practice on a deformer and even if we can maybe fill in some of the wires here. So let's go and get started. Now. Again, like before we're going to duplicate and choose this pieces or backside, and then hit Shift left-click to bring it down. Then after that, we're gonna go ahead and just bring this guy in, turn off our spare parts here and work with this piece. So let's just go ahead and deformer it up and maybe do a taper on here. We're just going to kind of work our way out on this one. Just kind of work this like everything else in iteration. Overall, it's not a really too complicated piece here. This is pretty simple to former stuff compared to what we were doing before. Just hit Accept, bring that in like so. Just taper. Then we'll just do a bend arc. Then we can just go ahead and just after we do that, we can just simply hit Accept and maybe placed this. That might actually be something that we can work with here. This is might be a acceptable piece to go with Ben dark here. Bring this back in. Maybe taper this just a little bit more wider towards the end here. Now we got a little bit more to work with here. Let's see if we can just bring this now in. Just have this fill in the back part of the mesh here. Remember we were using the deformers to cultivate our beginning aspect, but we don't have to normally settled just for that. We can go ahead and use that move brush. If we want to sort of give ourselves a little bit of an easier time. If we want. We want to just mess around with the extenders. Just give ourselves a little bit of a fun little momentum piece here. Do that. Said don't just settle for the, the deformers on face value. Work with everything from Ben curve. Just learning to combine because everything here is just thematic to one thing and that is practicing combining things. Taper n. Alright, so now that we have this taken care of, let's just go ahead and fill in the inside here with some green label so we can finish out this piece here. This is going to be pretty easy. If you recall, we did something all the way back up here with one of our pieces. It looks like it got a little bit to hammered, so we'll just go ahead and take this piece and go to the very bottom. We're gonna do is we're going to just sort of like before duplicate this and just simply see if we can mess around with it a bit. Kind of looking at it right now. Gonna be a little bit similar to what we did with the centerpieces here. And let's go ahead and just get these wires taken off. Then let's get back into our original pieces here. Then I'm just going to kind of work with. First off, I'm not going to go with knife cut. I'd like to get rid of these just to try but knife cut with a whole bunch of separate meshes doesn't work as well. So let's try trim curve to see if we can get rid of that. It doesn't really do too much, doesn't. That's okay. The reason right there. Yep. Alright, so let's try that again. Let's go ahead and delete all this stuff because I really don't care for it. Don't feel like I can get anything good out of it. Go old school. And we're just going to bring in a cube and then we're gonna move a little quicker here. Bringing into this cube highlights select, Let's go into poly groups here. Groupby normal. And now let's go through our geometry. 0 measure. Keep the groups, turn the adaptive size to 0. Smooth groups is 0. Remeshing, awesome. It's just kind of going through here again, just breaking it in back into our net curve. Let's see if we can just kind of doing something very similar to what we did here. See where I'm going with this. I'm just trying to once again, kinda greatest similar design as we did before. Don't need to go any further. Mesh. Will probably be all we need. Just real quick maneuver on an extender, maybe further too far on the extrude. Something me see, something simple taper. And all I'm doing is just sort of coming up with something pretty easy, pretty quick and simple. This point, I'm gonna do a quick Save. Then I'm just going to, I always like to do a quick Save before I go into array meshes. So once again, when we activate a raid meshes to do that, we just go ahead and hit array meshes. And then we're just going to offset this somewhere on the y to about right around there. Then let's go ahead and go through and toggle our repeat. Maybe something like that. Maybe toggle. Like so. Might be a little too dense. So again, I'm okay with that. And we may even have this piece, so be another extra piece that we put into here. Just sizing everything up really, I'm just making like I said, we can go ahead and just read change the order of this. You can just mess around with these things. I think maybe that's something 13. And then once you like what you want, go ahead and make it into a mesh. We have ourselves a piece here. I'm going to do a couple of things. So I'm just going to center the points here and merge this in. Emerge these two pieces in. Make sure one of them is an entirely singular Poly Group way you can make additional edits in one sub tool and when they're on top of each other, Let's go ahead and merge these two down, like so. And now I'm going to duplicate this piece here because it kinda like what do we want? And let's see if we can put it to use. Maybe we can put this in with the spare parts. One thing that we can do with it, as it's in the spare parts is this. This is, we can align this with other pieces, other array meshes, so it has a little bit of a change in the table. So let's go ahead and bring this in here like so. Now it's just one of those things were those small little details count for everything. You can use this to kind of fill in the gap. Here. It's not really that heavy on the polygon counts. Fortunately, we can not do some things with it. Maybe you want to do like a little bit of green here and duplicate the piece out and just kinda go through duplicate more pieces in. You can always do that. And then of course you can do things also like maybe scale it, bring out a little bit more of the pieces when it comes to the side just to make it look a little bit different. You can do that as well. Just as you are mindful to make sure that, you know, you're going to obviously need to cut out all this geometry, trim it out. This extruding geometry. Let's go ahead and do that. Now. I'm going to hold Shift Control and do the drag rectangle process. So again, that is pretty easy. Just kinda shift control and then go through Geometry, modify Topology, and delete hidden transparency again. Let's poke some of that back into there. You can always combine it up with the combined what we have with the other spare parts. Maybe you want to have just this piece agreeable as well in here. Oh, just to kind of see what it looks like, you can do that too. Just to experiment, if you will. Maybe you want to put this stuff in here underneath just to kind of fill in any kind of volume on here. You can do that. Just want to fill in all sorts of mechanical parts. Maybe just to kinda have some fun with it. Hold Shift Control. Do the same over here, since it's buried out a little bit. Just kind of fill in in the volume here. We're just going to find in some shortcuts and showing you some modular use. Here. Let's go into transpose and then once again, let's just delete some of this stuff that's holding down Shift control and left-click drag an open space, it's going to turn green and then hold left option to make it all disappear again. Kind of see and just kinda cutting away at it here. Then we'll just delete the hidden. Looks. Got a little bit of a render issue. Usually that happens when I'm kind of in a process of taking up memory. I'll need to reset that, but it looks all right to me, just doing a quick BPR render inside. Once that is taken care of what we're gonna do now is we're going to move into the next section here, which is going to be the body section. Now this is going to be a little bit more challenging for you because one thing that we do on the body is that we, well, we kind of do this deal where we're going to give you an example of something. And then we're going to go ahead and have you follow the example and do it yourself. So we're gonna make a piece like around here. And then we're gonna have you do the next piece to see if you can retain it. So with that said, we're also going to be doing a little bit more of a demonstration of customized Booleans to help you out with this. We haven't really typed into that. But at this point, you want to go ahead and take the time to kind of round out your guy a little bit more to your specifications and makes sure that heat kind of looks just basically just want to kind of do some adjustments and things like that. That said, that's our second half are completed tutorial for the leg and the foot. But now that we've kind of done all of that, we're going to also talk to you a little bit more about micro mesh a little bit. And how we can drive that out in conjunction with everything we've learned. Because right now this has been mostly about getting you to learn the knife curve brush and the deformers to a T. So that when we start going into more advanced stuff, we can now reapply it here. So with that said, what we'll have you do next before moving on is this we want you to kind of go through here and clean out your, your sub tools here. So I would say go ahead and be very careful and do a quick save in case you delete something. First, go ahead and just kinda go through and delete all the pieces that are invisible that you never ended up using. Anything that you thought like, Here's a piece, maybe you want to save that piece. Well then you just bring it into that spare parts section. But then just keep going through and deleting all the things that you're not going to use. Then of course all the things that you do have kind of just go through and bring it all out. Don't forget to load all your completed work that you have here into your foot section so that we can keep everything nice and neat, kind of fairly clean. Like when we clear off of that, we can make our adjustments. And then once we finish doing the foot or I'm sorry, once we've finished doing the chest, will circle around and start cleaning up our file size a little bit more. That way. When we do all this, a true, It's going to be able to duplicate this across to the other side because we still have everything on one side still. Unfortunately. That said stick around and stay tuned. 27. Decimating and Mirroring Meshes : Welcome back. In this video now we're going to move on into the chest. But before we do that, we got to get these arms that we've made and bring them over to the other side and duplicate them. Now, before we do that, there's one thing I have to go through with you and that is that you've got to make sure at this point that you are at a clean stage of where you are completely resolved with where all the poses are in everything. Because what we're gonna do is decimate the meshes before we duplicate them over. And that's going to help with keeping our polygon count low, so it's not being overused, if anything. I'm gonna do some demonstrations of that by duplicating the mesh out and then mirroring it over. And then after I do, for example, I'm gonna do this for the arm. And after we do that, and we're going to go ahead and go through the process of having you do the same exact thing I did as I took you through the arm of decimating it, mirroring it over to this side. For this arm, you're gonna do the same thing now on your own for the legs. So that said let's just go ahead and get started here. First thing I'll do is I'll select into my arm folder here and I got all the sub tools I got to work with. And what I have to do is I have to go through each of these sub tools. And I'm going to have to go through and decimate them. Now to decimate them, what that means is we're taking the polygon count in significantly reducing it while maintaining its sculpted, sculpted state. It's like optimizing it, but keep in mind once you do that, you can't deform the mesh. You can't sculpt on the mesh. It's no longer sculpted will, unless you do something like DynaMesh, fuzzy Ramesh in project or something like that. But that's not what we're doing. To begin with, let's go up to Z plugins. And let's dock this over here and you'll see a tab called decimation master. And for now we can do either preprocess all or pre-process current and preprocess currents. Just going to go ahead and pre-process a piece before you can go ahead and hit decimate current. Because the way we do this is when we decimate a mesh first we hit preprocess current for it to kind of go through a process of commutating all the areas. And then we hit decimate current to go after and reduce the count. So it can kind of look right up here. This is our target poly count. We preprocess current and then hit decimate current. You can kind of see it just goes down like that. So we're gonna go through all of these. Some of these will take longer than others depending on how much geometry you have. Keep in mind another very important fact and that is this. You got to make sure you go through Geometry, modify Topology, and delete hidden on all these sub tools before we go through pre-processing. That way everything is kept clean. I'm just kind of going down the sub tools here. Just making sure we have everything kind of reduced down. There we go. Let's go through this one. This is a pretty small ones. It's not really I'll tell you anything that's 0.5 million to a million, definitely over a million. You want to go ahead and decimate once you're finished. But truth be told, I don't normally go below 0.5 million for preprocess, but just gonna be thorough for the video here. Now, you can kind of see why I'm having you do the arm or the leg on your own because this is basically the exact same repetitive state. Over and over again. We're just going through the sub tools, hitting preprocess current. I can do preprocess all but the thing about that is that sometimes you get a little bit of an issue. Some errors. Every ZBrush version has its fixes. Ipad errors like this happened before, but just going to play it safe for this video. I want to really doesn't need to be decimated nor neither one button bringing over. And then we're gonna hit destiny current. Alright, so we've decimated all of this down. And so what we're gonna do is we're gonna take this folder and we're going to go ahead and click on the cog of this folder. And then we're just going to go ahead and hit Duplicate. And it's going to give you a little warning sign you just want to hit. Okay, Let's turn off one of these folders. And what we're gonna do is this time around, we're just going to go through and mirror all these pieces across. So let's go through like we did before, one sub tool at a time, Deformation Mirror. And this time I'll just hold left Alt, left-click and just hidden mirror function cannot be applied because the mesh has multiple subdivisions. So that means we are going to have to delete the lower and higher. Let's go ahead and go through Deformation Mirror. Here. Just holding left Alt, left-click mirror. All these pieces, they've already been decimated. My job on all of this is done. Just go and left-click here. Mirror. Then the course will go down. We haven't touched into the hands or we haven't decimated the hands yet. Believe that is another folder. So now if we turn on the arm again, it looks like this piece right here wasn't put into a place. We didn't decimate that. Let's just go ahead and duplicate that Deformation Mirror and assign these pieces in the correct folder. So that's this fee. So we bring it in here and then we bring the other one in that piece. Now the only thing that's left for this is just going through here now and I'm just going through the sub tools and going through a pre-process current. And we're going to decimate all these pieces back down because the handle is a separate folder, not part of the arm. I'll just go ahead. Do the same thing again. We're just going through this time, the hand folder. Just a couple more terms. Then we're going to go through this current one less time. It's just a repeat again. So now we're just going to go ahead and after we finished decimating that piece, Let's go into that **** like before we duplicate that folder, it okay. Now we have two folder hands. Let's turn one of them off. And let's just go ahead and left Alt, left-click on each piece in mirrored over. So deformation backup again, hit mirror, Deformation, Mirror information, mirror sub tool, bring it back up again. There was one piece that I forgot to get out of there. That's okay. Sure. Why I kept the visibility on that one out. We'll just go over here. All right, so now that we have all that taken care of, Let's just check through our sub tools. Everything's looking good so far. So now that we have done that, what I'm gonna have you do is, is we have all of these pieces in our folder once did now it's your turn to learn. It's your turn to take what you've gotten out of this and reapply and don't forget to go through and don't forget, I should say, is to delete this guy off. Like so. That means split massed point. Instead of base mesh kind of stand in that we just used to give us an idea where our mass is going to be. I'm just going to delete that off. Now that we have that, our next piece is going to be the chest after you've done on your own this time duplication of the arm, the leg, and the foot. Over to the other side just like before. Again, you're going through one piece at a time with preprocess current to decimate current, every sub tool within the folder, that is foot. And then after you're done with that, you're going to duplicate that foot folder and then turn the visibility of one of the folders off and then left Alt, left-click each piece and go through deformation and hit mirror and bring it on over. Pretty simple, lots of steps. Once you get enough practice in, it becomes easier and easier, I promise you. That said or going to move on into the chest area here. And that is coming up. And it's going to be a little bit more challenging because we're gonna put more on you. As we go through. That said stick around and stay tuned. 28. Creating Chest Piece Base: Welcome back. In this video, we're going to continue on into the chest section. Now as you can see, I've already duplicated and did the legs and mirrored them over. So as I said before, you should have been able to do the same thing as I did in the arm. And I hope hopefully you were able to accomplish the same things. Now we're gonna use that same concept where I do an example of something simple like that and then leave you to make the follow through with repeating the steps to the legs. We're gonna have you do something similar to that with the chest where we create the pads of the chest, then then you will be doing something similar, a similar techniques shown to make a secondary pads. So that'll make more sense once we move along here. To get started here, I'm going to show you what to expect. Now in the chest section, what we got is it's going to be comprised of eleven-sixteenths padded hard surface pieces. So it's going to be like a piece that's kind of be like this. A piece that's gonna be kinda like this. And of course it's gonna be a piece, it's kinda like this and we're gonna fill in some gravel and fill in the cavities around here like so. What we'll do then is I'm gonna go ahead and do an example of one pad. And then we're gonna have you do in a, follow those steps to do the second pad, which will be the center piece right here. And you'll be doing a shape similar to this shape right here. So we'll show you how this works. And then like an activity, we're gonna have you turn it over to you and show you how you do it. And then on the next lesson, we can kind of compare notes that kinda see where we land. So let's get started. So first thing we're gonna do, like we've done nothing different. We're just reiterating and repeating process, getting everything down. I'm going to append and bring in a cube. And then I'm just going to square that cube in Gleick. So scale it down. It's gonna be kinda like a strip like so. For now I'm just going to keep it centered in there and I'm looking at it and all. I'm gonna hold shift control, make sure my knife curve brush up here is selected. And I'm going to then go through geometry. Maybe turn off SMT and just give it a couple of divides. Turn SMT on, and then we're going to delete the lower. Now I'm just going to go ahead and just hold Shift Control. And we're just going to go ahead and make some pieces. Again. Take your time on this secondary mode. So make sure you're in the first mode. Kind of see him just to kinda working out the piece, working out the mesh. Looking for some iterations. Something like that, to start off with. Something like that perhaps. Then. All right, so as you can see, I just made myself a little bit of a piece right here. It's got poly groups on every angle, so it should be fairly easy to 0 mesh. We shouldn't have any too much problems. I'll just go through 0 measure, turn my key groups on, turn my non my poly account download probably, probably keep that this similar to the same. Smooth groups and adaptive size are gonna be turned off. And let's see if we can get a 0 mesh out of that. If you run into this again, again, 0 measures and automated features. So that means that you're not, you don't have a lot of control over where it takes you. If it takes you into weird wonky little areas like this, you can keep hitting Nazi Ramesh receiving, get something clean. Or you can just sort of maybe cut down and give it another go at it if you want or if you want, you can kind of, um. Adjust the target poly count to see if you can look for something cleaner in there and give that a couple of tweaks. And if you're still running into any trouble, you can always just hold Shift left-click control, hold Control, and then marquee select, Shift, left-click and empty space, then hold Control and tap left-click to invert selection. Then I'm going to center point. I'm just going to kind of bring this in like so. Then from there, anything else I can look at it just kinda looking at all the opportunities. So the pieces we got a little bit of weirdness all over. Let's see if we can go through deformation and we can also do things like polished by groups. That also has a way of kind of cleaning up pieces. Go ahead and see if we can kind of get a little bit more out of this. I'm just gonna, I'm just gonna kinda keep working in this piece until I can get something fairly clean. And if I have any problems and I'm not I'm still not able to make anything work. I can just simply reapply and resubmit the whole thing. And you can just see I'm just constantly trying, I'm just constantly add it. Don't forget, you can also isolate, select, delete the hidden 0 mesh just with this, and then go into dynamic subdivisions and then give yourself a little bit of thickness and then reassign the poly groups of all the ends. You can do things like that. So don't forget all your options here. So let's just go ahead and now that we have some little bit cleaner here. Established clean mesh, we can then change the target polygon count. And finally, we would need to divide it. But if we do that and it's going to collapse in like that. So let's go through crease, increase poly groups and now we divide. We should get some fairly smooth delete the lower on those. Now what I'm going to do, you know what I'm gonna do? I'm actually going to take this piece. I'm going to undo that. Go to my lowest subdivision. And I'm going to go ahead and now just shrink it out. I'm going to use the Move brush to kind of help me find something out of this. Because I kinda like this top side will be a little bit more even, something like that. Because again, this is all going to be sort of like the bottom piece that we're going to be working with. Now. Let's divide it. Delete lower. Let's go through sub tool now and duplicate that. Now from here, we're going to duplicated this into two sub tools. That's because one of them is going to be become a Boolean. So go up to here with Live Boolean and just kind of move this guy out a little bit. This is the bottom sub tool we're on. Make sure you're using the bottom sub tool, convert that into a Boolean. You can hit Shift Up to look at it again and then just bring it back in. Of course, you're not gonna see very much so scale that end so we can get a little bit of thickness going on here. Then from here, let's just go ahead and mess around with our final piece. So from this point on, what we're going to do is a couple of things. We're going to first of all, we're going to let me bring it in and then see if we can make it like this. I'm going to first make it like this. I'm also going to take the original piece, that's this piece that's not being affected by the Boolean. I'm gonna duplicate that. Now we have three sub tools. It's gonna be very important that you do that because we're going to use this piece again. I'm going to turn the visibility of that original sub tool off. And then I'm gonna go back to my boolean. And I'm going to hold Shift Control. And I'm going to go into the secondary, probably the secondary function of NYC curve, brush. That way I can do something like that. And the reason we're able to get that kind of look is because we're affecting the Boolean in its secondary mode. When it's not subtracting, it's basically filling in all the pieces of its default state. So let's go ahead and use that to our advantage. Have some fun. You can carve out all sorts of pieces here. Take your time, feel it around, get a good spacing out of all of this. That one's a little bit getting, not just a good spacing, but also Barely good amount of angling. Then once you have what you want, we need to turn this into a solid mesh for the Boolean. So lets, the rules are for making a Boolean mesh. We got to turn off the visibility of everything. Like so. Now it's just this piece. Let's go ahead and go down to Boolean and hit make Boolean mesh. And now that should, an extra tool should appear above. Once we hit Append, we have now a new piece. So you remember that extra piece we made. Let's go ahead and turn that guy on and turn the other two pieces off. Now, this extra piece here, we're just going to go ahead and isolate, select the top poly group, and then go through geometry, Modified Topology, Delete Hidden. We can reconstruct the subdivisions a little bit here, or do a 0 measure to make something of a little bit lower polygon based off of this account. Like to go with some pretty low. The reason why we're doing this is because this little piece here is gonna be like a little bit of a micro mesh on Dynamics subdivision. And that's what we're gonna be working on upcoming in the next video. So you can see we did a couple of steps here. I'm just going to kind of put that underneath here, like so. And even scale this. And so it's a little bit like that. We kind of see what we have here. Not too bad. Now that we have all this, you can, you can attempt to 0 mesh this in case you're looking to bevel it. I wouldn't try doing any bevels on the inside, but you can go ahead and just have fun and challenge yourself with a 0 measure. Remember 0 measures automated and therefore, it's going to be something you don't have any control over. You can only manipulate the best possible result. It, you can get out of it. But you're never gonna have complete control. So the results are the best that you can make it. And it looks like we got some fairly clean out of this. Also allows us because it's so clean we can work with bevel width a little bit if you want. Maybe just make something small. If you want. You can also like we have a little bit of an issue where our centerpiece guy messed up there. We can also kind of play this a little bit centered. You can do that too. You can take a shot at 0 measure. But having bubbles on here is not like a prerequisite. It's sort of like extra credit if you can do that. At this point, try to get to this point. And then in the next video we're going to show you some micro meshing and how we can create some plainer cut overalls that kinda go over this and some plainer cut pieces that go under it. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 29. Sculpting Secondary Chest Piece : Welcome back. In this video now we're going to finish up our piece in this video, we're gonna go through our new feature in ZBrush to help fill in this area. And that's going to be the micro poly feature in ZBrush. So to get started with, we're going to cover this like a crash course. It's a little bit similar to dynamic thickness. Therefore, it's going to be resided under Geometry, dynamic subdivision. And like dynamic thickness, we're just going to first turn on dynamic. And then instead of thickness, we're going to hold down micro poly. And as you can see, we get a whole bunch of little programs, alphas that can give us a pattern to what we're looking for here. You can click on the up arrow to kind of see all the sort of different unique patterns that we can go through, which is kind of interesting and fun just to kind of see what something can look like. If you do anything like click a line, you can also alter out the features a little bit, which is a little bit more fun too. So like we said, just kinda go through and find a pattern you like. I'm just going to try to find something that kinda makes sense to a hard surface piece, maybe like a film or of some kind to seek out That's a little similar to what I want. But once I'm with circles, maybe I'm just going to keep going through here because it's a little interesting to see how all this works. As you're going through. Vortex is close. Thinking. Like to go with maybe a little bit closer, if not what we want to ninth just kinda going through here. Claim probably doesn't work very well on. Let's take a look at what we have. X plane. It might be something that works well with what we want. So just take a moment to kind of look at everything. See if you have everything that you want now. You can do if you adjust the scale, you're not gonna see anything. If you want to adjust the scale of everything you're seeing, you can kind of go through and adjust it like that. Probably going to check it out a little bit like that might work for what I want. Let me some a little bit like that just to make it a little bit bigger. Kind of taken a look at what this would look like at a distance, might just go a little bit bigger. Now probably will work. All right, so once you have what you want to get the proper scaling to it, just go ahead and hit Apply just like you do with the thickness. And then we can just cut everything off either through something like trim curve or like just kinda going through ray cutting out all the pieces that you want. Or you can just go through and do it through selection tool and just bring out sort of like a cut in everything. Kind of see how we're doing and then maybe finish up with trim curve on here. You could do knife curve, but I-V curves a little finicky when it comes to things like this. For example, do the delete hidden knife curves a little bit finicky when it comes to separate it meshes. Usually it just only separates one single mesh and that's about it. After you get that taken care of, Let's go ahead and go through sub tool. And you remember that third piece that we had. Let's go ahead and duplicate that piece or I'm sorry, not duplicate, but let's just go back to that piece in hit Shift left-click. And this piece is gonna kinda go underneath here. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna work on trying to carve out a little bit of a pattern with the plainer cut brush. And then from there, we're going to, while we're gonna see if we can have a little bit of fun with creating some slants to kinda go around it. Like it's a little bit off slow. Go. Now to do that, let's go ahead and hit that light box. You can go into our brushes. And let's look into the planar folder and find our planar cut brush now, because it's flat, you're not going to get a lot of interesting pieces on here. It's a little bit hard to get something interesting on here. Flat. I like to just maybe give it a, a couple of subdivisions. Before I do that. I can do that, Give it a couple of subdivisions. And then just afterwards, go through geometry to leave lower end. I'd like to bend arc it because that will help me find some interesting shapes through the planer cup brush. See if we could find something interesting. This Here's an interesting shape. Let's see if we can do something like that and it's a little bit inverted. I'm just taking my time. You need more realist straight to get over here. So I'm going to go ahead and do some improvising. Let's turn on that body mesh and bring this guy in a little bit more so I can have a little bit of volume to work with here. Right there. Now. Let's get back into it. You can kind of see, I'm just fishing for my piece. Looking for an interesting shape to kind of flush into little bit more, better piece right there. Then let's go ahead and trim curve that did that. So let's get back into night curve. Here. Try something here. Now that I got my pattern, Let's get back to this guy back here and serve its purpose. Now let's take a look here and now I'm just going to kind of, alright, so what I'll do here now is I'm going to go through and isolate, select this group. Geometry, modify Topology and delete hidden. Then let's just see what we can get out of this. Dynamics subdivisions. Turn on. Turn that to 0. Let's see how we can get something clean out of that little bit cleaner. Now, we're trying to get a little bit of a clean room because our mesh kind of tore it up a little bit. Let's hit Apply. Now let's go ahead and hit some slants in here. So the radius, Let's turn Dynamic off so we can get some smaller lines. Just do a couple of practice siblings here. Kind of see what I'm doing here. Get off of there. Right now I'm just practicing. I'm just looking for a fun looking shape here. Manchus go here. Do some Anything you want, pretty much. There's no right or wrong on this, but it's sort of like you just invent your own pattern if you want. Like right now, all I'm doing is sort of experimenting with some fun shapes, some fun shot shadowing patterns here. So you can do anything that you want on this. And then maybe if you want to do some small subtlety details to, you can do that. So like for example, let's put some insert permanent meshes in here by just dragging a cube in, going through and split in that off under split unmasked. Bringing this in and going up to Live Boolean to enable the mode and then making that sub tool a Live Boolean. Just bring this in like so. You can do things like maybe you want to carve a very interesting pattern with Booleans on here. I'm not really doing any of that. What I'm doing is it's just simply bringing in a piece and just having a little bit of fun with just adding just a little bit of a hex detail. Nothing really too crazy on it. Maybe do a couple of them. Stuff lay nothin wrong with that. But this is sort of the idea that I want to kind of get you into is that even the small details matter in crafting some of this stuff. Once you do have that, just go ahead and make Boolean mesh out of that with the Boolean under sub tool, make Boolean mesh. Once that's okay, go ahead and hit a pen and see your new tool right there and bring that in. Let's turn off everything except the three pieces that you created. We should have now three pieces. And we're gonna have now a fourth piece made. That fourth piece is going to be a duplicated piece. So what that means is that once you have this all kind of accentuated out, maybe you want to flatten it a little bit more. Want you to take this piece right here, the frame piece, and go ahead and duplicate that sub tool and bring it just a little bit behind. Maybe just bring it out a little bit and flatten it out just a little bit more. And just scale it in a little bit more. With that one piece. I want you to carbon some slants. So it's gonna be holding Control, Shift and slants like this basically, but let's make them a little bit wider so that they can fairly spaced. Just want you to kind of bring in some slants here. All this is, is, this is practice. This is like finding practice in how to utilize the pieces further and further. And also how to get fast button configurations. Oops, that's not right. So now we've got something like that. What you're gonna do next is make sure that these are all now singular poly groups, but you can just merge all of these down. Once you do a merge, just hit Okay. You've got your first piece. Just remember you can go ahead and separate any of these pieces. Like here's one piece. It was all know, it's not single poly group isn't. We can always go through and do a split parts. In fact, one thing I'm going to say right now is that when you go through all these pieces, if you do a split two parts, make sure everything is split here. Like for these three pieces here, everything that's here. I'd say go ahead and go through the process of what is it? Trying to make this one poly group, that was what my mistake was. Merging these three pieces down would probably be a good idea. Then making sure that they are all one poly group. Because you're going to want to do like adjustments in such as for all these pieces here, these are all separate pieces made by the mesh that was made. Let's bet sudden we got everything that we needed. Probably this piece right here. Once we have everything, Let's go ahead and bring this guy in. Let's go back into this guy. Quick save. Because I don't want to lose my spot. Just going to bring this in a little bit closer. Like it to line up. And that's part of why I wanted this to be one poly group. Because you may find yourself doing things like making adjustments so that this fits in a little bit easier, like right here. Or you might want to do alignments with everything. One thing I will say is that if you do do any of that, you might need to go trim curve because should say Move brush. Because this is a little bit easier to process everything. There. She is. Wondering what went wrong. There was on the wrong piece. Like right here. Either one do trim curve or an I-V curve. Just kind of helps you to line up everything. Looks like because this is a Boolean, just a heads up on this. Got to be careful because you lose your center pivot point and you gotta kinda bring it back. Let's bring that in. Bring that in. Kind of see, it's just a kind of a work-in-progress all of this. But this is also kind of what your task is pretty much for. Doing all this stuff is, is that you got to this time around, you're gonna have to go through and make your own unique piece. Now, we've outlined this piece for you here. This is a padded piece that you're gonna be working with like agreeable paddled padded piece. What we'll do here is I'm going to go through the process of re-emerging all this stuff down, which is going to be a nice long, little kind of fun to look at. Like a fast forwarding stop-motion. Once you have all of these pieces taken care of, what we're going to have you do is, is that you're going to be doing the next piece on your own using the exact same technique. What that means is that this piece right here, this piece is going to be going right here on the lower bottom segment. Okay. Now, using the same techniques that we did where you carved out the frame, you're going to be doing the same thing in here, except the shape is going to look a little bit more like this. It's just going to probably give you more resolution. Let me go ahead and outline the look. A little bit more harder shaped. Also, we want to see you get it fairly close to about the center here. Let's got to look something like this. Now, once you do that, once we so like I said, I'm going to repeat this because it's very important. We want you to now your exercise, your assignment. This is your kind of your graduation to everything you've learned is to recreate this piece, which we've already done and shown you. That's where we go through. We use a Boolean, a carve-out in the center. We carve through the Boolean to carve out slats in between here and do a make Boolean operation. We go through and duplicate this and put it underneath hearing create slats underneath all of this. We take a duplicated piece of the original base mesh that we carved out. And we use planar cut to go along here. We use knife curved, go along here. And then we use Boolean. It kind of cut some small little details of gravel into. We use poly mesh two with a flat plane where we go into geometry, dynamic subdivision and turning on micro Pali and we find a piece of pattern we like of holes, scale it appropriately through a combination of dynamic subdivision in the scale. And then going ahead and applying it and converting it into a mesh. We're just reviewing all this stuff. Then we go through and apply by reshaping the little piece of the little plate, the outer plate with in some trim curves that move around. You can see. And then finally we merge them. But I will say this though, when you're merging everything makes sure this is a single poly group before merging everything because you want to be able to have that flexibility of being able to readjust this for different segments. Like I said. Now that you know how to do this, go ahead and try to make this piece. The final area on this is going to be a bend arc, which will just show you real quick. Just a very subtle little bend arc on both ends. Then we just bring this in to the centerpiece here into the body. Now, like I said, we want you to do this exact same thing. Your assignment is to do this exact same concept, but with this shape instead. So with that said, I'm probably going to then on the next video coming up, you're gonna see my version of this, this shape right here, imported in. And you're going to then compare notes on how we differ and probably come to the one conclusion that is that there's no such thing as the wrong piece. There's no such thing as the wrong kind of geometry as long as you've got something similar than good job, you did it right? So with that said, good luck on trying to create this pattern using the techniques we use to create this. And we'll see how you do on the next video. 30. Chest Pad Placement: Welcome back. In this video, if you did what I instructed correctly, you should have had something similar to this kind of a shape using the same principle of techniques that we did before, like on this piece here, you'll notice it's just simply a different shape, a different variation, but the same concept. So that was sort of like your assignment to do. You can compare notes with this one. I'm gonna go ahead and export this one piece out so you can have a little bit of comparing of notes to this piece, to the next as we go through. So this is what you should've been able to come up with. And now, if we go out and solo mode, we should have two pieces here for you ready to go. With that said, we're gonna go ahead and move on to our next pieces. What that's going to be as is we're gonna do a Boolean now. Now a Boolean is we need to kind of carve out some cavities here. We can give a little more real estate for our pads before we can reuse them, duplicate them, replace them in different areas and all that. So What we're gonna do is going to use a customized Boolean and get you introduced to that. If you go through to your resources folder and click off to the left for an empty space and click on Import on there. You should be able to find a OBJ titled sci-fi Boolean and just go ahead and import that in. And it should look a little bit like this now this is like a customized Boolean, so to help give you some grievous surfacing detailed. So it's a little bit different than what we did before. But what the way this works is we're gonna kinda stamp this into the chest. We're going to turn this into a Boolean and stamp it into the chest like so. So let's first of all go back to our main character here. Let's just go ahead and hit a pen and click on that sci-fi Boolean. And let's just go ahead and then bring this Boolean or the sub tool. It's not a Boolean yet, but let's go ahead and turn on light Boolean. And now we hit Shift F, can't really see it. Looks like it might be inside the mesh there. There she is. Let's center up the pivot point. And now we're just going to turn this into a Boolean. Now we kind of hit Shift app, we can see it. But notice that when we do this, kind of covers up everything. So let's go ahead and look for our chest piece here. I'm just going to put the chest piece at the very bottom here because I think the folders might be getting in the way. Make sure it's on top. Beautiful. Just put when you get the Boolean on here, make sure the Boolean is on the very bottom. And then just go through and make the sub tool hit Shift left-click and then put it just above the sci-fi Boolean here. Now, we have a little bit more wiggle room here, but we don't want the Boolean to affect our pads. So what we're going to do is we're going to move the pads below the sci-fi Boolean. And now it won't. Anything that is below a Boolean is not going to get affected. Everything that is above a boolean is going to get infected. So with that said, let's just do some quick little deformers on here so we don't have to punch in so deeply. We'll start with this one. Maybe a little bit more rounded. I'm just going to leave it like that. So it's a little bit more curvature. That looks like a little bit of a mechanical machine. In some ways. We're just kind of right now just punching it in, make it a little bit bigger for my own purposes. Now that we have that, let's just go ahead and carve it out just like we did before we did Booleans, we carved out Booleans in the last video. We're going to do it with a customized Boolean. So hit Shift Control and hit the knife, lasso brush, turn on local symmetry, hit X and just kind of do your own thing. And you can kind of see the carvings kinda go throughout. There isn't a right or wrong way on how to do this. But I would say just take your time in all of it. Let me see something. I think right now what I might do is minimize my carvings. Be just something like that. Something like that. And like I said, all of this is going to get covered up anyways, but I just want to have little bit of wiggle room space. Now that we have all of this taken care of, Let's take a look at some of this little bit of an artifact here. Must be from a mesh, from a base mesh on another sub tool. Not too worried about it right now. That's going to get covered up. But for now, let's just go ahead and just keep going. You can go ahead and take your time and kind of carve out everything that you want. If you also would like to go through and do like a mirror weld and just do one side if you're having trouble and it keeps going on one side, you can always just simply turn symmetry off and just kind of carbon to it this way. Errors, no rule against that. So with that said, what we're gonna do now is we're going to kind of just simply take our pieces in, re-scale them around. Like so. If I have to, I'm just going to basically be reworking everything just like slowly one piece at a time, which is kind of nudging everything. And so that has a little bit more room to grow. Now we can move this guy a little bit down. Bring him across a little bit more like a game. I'm just nudging. Nudging. Because I'm just thinking about how I'm gonna make room for that top part there. To make that top part, I'm just going to be modular here and duplicate that piece above. But don't move it. And let's see. We're going to have to mirror the symmetry. Go through geometry, deformation. Let's just go ahead and hit Mirror, its center point and rotate this around. Now it's on the outside here and a curving in. And I'm thinking that I might deciding should I go under or over the seven trapeze? That's sort of a design choice by you. You can just sort of fill it out and see for yourself which you like the most. It's a little bit protrusive and just got to decide. Do you want that to go over? Because if you do, you're going to have to push some of this stuff in. You're having trouble switching to that and you can just turn off your Boolean. Go ahead and see back. Try to go underneath. And I gotta be honest, I kinda like it a little bit over. We'll see how it goes. Maybe try to do the best of both worlds. Scale it in. This is just sort of placement. My work, something out like that. Let's just bring it in. See how it's all just one piece at a time. It's just one piece at a time. One after the other, one after the other. And that is a twilight zone reference. If you can guess the episode it's from, I will give you ten points and acknowledge you. Go ahead and move this a little bit more. Let's just kind of a bit more like that. I know it's been bothering everybody covered up. So you can probably guess now we're going to be going with this. And that is that we're going to take this piece now and bring it to its duplicated state by mirroring it over. So that's pretty easy. So we're just going to go ahead and start with this one. It's duplicate. And then we're gonna go through and do deformation. And we're going to do mirror. And then we're gonna do the same thing, duplicate. And then Deformation. Mirror. Looks like one of the pieces was turned off. But that's okay. Do something about that. I didn't I just didn't duplicate it. Let's try that again. Then Deformation. Mirror. Once more. Now that we have it like this, Let's organize the two pieces together. So I want these two pieces to be a sub tool, these two pieces to be a sub tool, these two pieces to be the sub tool, that's where that helps me to rearrange everything both in scale symmetrically. So let's go ahead and start with left Alt, left-click. Put this to the very bottom, left or left Alt left-click on this piece, It's Shift left-click to put this in the, on the bottom. And now we're just going to hit Merge Down on these two pieces. Do the same thing for the center, left Alt, left-click shift, left-click, left Alt, left-click shift, left-click. And then we're just going to merge down these two pieces. One last time. This time I won't be calling it out. We can just merge them. I'm doing it this way, that way. So I can have turn X key on your local symmetries on at the center. And now we can just sort of scale, make adjustments further on here. Remember if it goes to the center like that, it means that your, your piece is what its pieces. It doesn't have symmetry turned on if it goes to the center. Last but not least. Now keep in mind another thing that we didn't do is we didn't make this into a converted Boolean mesh. What we have left to do now that all this is taken care of is we can just simply fill in the back area with some gravel. And then we'll just go on ahead and turn this piece into a Boolean mesh along with it. And then we'll be finishing up into the shell. So with that sets the ground and stay tuned. 31. Chest Greeble Construction: Okay, welcome back. In this video, we're going to continue on adding in some detail within the cavity of this chest to finish off. Now, if you haven't already went through and change my basic material to basic material to just have a little fun and change it up. But first thing I'm gonna do is is I still have an active live Boolean here. What I'm going to probably do is turn off everything and I'm going to go ahead and rearrange everything so that it's just the chest piece in the Boolean that our own visible. So I can do a make Boolean operation. But before I do that, let's go ahead and go through and create a chest folder for these pieces to hold into. So I'll click on one of my pad folders and hit new folder type in chest. I'm just going to drag everything in here, like so. And then I'm gonna take off the visibility of that. Then I'm just gonna kinda go through and delete any excess unneeded sub tools and then turn off everything else. Like so. Now we'll just got this piece. Let's just do a quick little Boolean operation on this guy. Then it's just gonna be, uh, make Boolean mesh. A little high poly count. Well, I'll hit Append, bring that in. Now I can go ahead and just delete both the Boolean in the original mesh. Now, we have our new piece, so we bring in our chest again and we should have something back to what we originally had. Now that we have that taken care of. Let's go ahead and fill in that center area here. Now, there's a lot of ways we can do this. We can start off like kind of similar what we did in the piece with where we put just a bunch of green wires, for example, I'll give you some opportunities to kind of show you what I mean on Here. We go through our spare parts. You remember our second gribble wire? We can work with that one, maybe in, duplicate that guy shift left-click, maybe go through and bring this all out to the center like so. And just kind of habit lay in and overlay out like so. Scale it, give it some depth. Now, you can also scale this one out a little bit and just work with a little bit of green will work here and just work something like that. And just simply having fun, just kind of going through. Another thing we can do is B&B. Give ourselves a little bit more cavity. I might push this back a little. Just a little. Then we can just work with something like this. This is a pretty low poly council. I can do some fun stuff with this. Maybe you want to do a deal where you can bring it through and then bring it through like so. Then clear the mask and once again reset the orientation. Bring it through like so. You can do something like that. Even. You can now work with some of the other Greenville pieces that we have. We have that good old fashion one that has a little more volume to it. We can do Shift left-click, center of the pivot point back over here. We can just bring this guy in Q1. Just see if you can experiment with it and just really modulate your pieces out of here. Do a deal where, which is kind of meshes in a little bit more. This one has a little bit more density of wires. So it might be an interesting little grumbling piece that you can work with. Let's see here. Let me soon. Definitely going to need to read our rematch. This guy, I'm sorry, decimate this guy out. If it gets a little overly noisy as it is. Here. One thing we can do is we can always try to break up the Gradle. To do that. We can just start by, I'm just doing some quick little examples here. One thing we can do is first off, I'm going to clear off some of this stuff. To do that I'm going to choose my Isolate Select and then just delete some of this excess geometry, transparency, excess geometry. Then we're just going to go through modify Topology, our Geometry modify Topology, Delete Hidden. I don't really need to do it. I just have it on a nice little pad here. One thing we can do is as though to kind of break up the pieces a little bit more. If this gets a little too excessive or it gets a little too noisy in any way. You can always do a deal where you can just put some stuff over it to break it up. For example, like how we did this pad, you can kind of do like a simple little rudimentary shape piece if you wish. Like a square. Trying to think of a good example of something like something like this. If you wanted, you could always do that. Just something that helps break up the pad just a little bit more. Like so. Just kind of helps suck, kind of give it its little. Allies, say, Principles of Design probably could call it takes away noise is the best way to probably do something like this. Now, remember how we cut this out. We cut this out by doing a series of of trinkets. But you can do a different pattern. What we did before, everything here was just an exercise to that. You can kind of see the hard surface kind of meshing in a little bit more now that you have a little bit more of a idea how this works. But you know, this whole class or this whole course here. It really is not just about modularity, it's not really about cheating. It's about also getting you to be more experiments. Now, take this piece right here, for example, maybe you don't like that piece. Maybe you want to experiment with a different kind of piece on here. What kind of piece do you think could fit closer to an intersection like you have here that has less greebles detail, but it has a little bit more playing. You could take something and go through sub tool. And like I said, I keep saying this, you got to practice by doing, you can take something and bring another cube in here, go into cube. Let's see, we can go into solo. And if this is going between four pads here and now, you can go through, and once again, just go through the whole process of first hitting local symmetry. First going up to Transforms, maybe you want to go with y symmetry as well as local symmetry like this. And then see how we can work with the knife curve in this manner. You can keep going and going and going. I don't want you to think in your mind that this is not something that is not possible. You have to just sort of, what I would say is you would have to just sort of experiment and break your boundaries. Take this for example, we learn knife curve doesn't work very well. For, you know, even though symmetry is on, it will only handle left and right symmetry, but not up and down symmetry. So two forms of symmetry at the same time. Yet again, we taught you what mirror and welded. So that's a problem-solving feature. And in order for mirror and at weld work, you'll first find that it really only works across x. Why did it do that? Because x was only turned on. So I'll undo and this time I'll also turn the y-axis. And now we have something like this. Now, using this concept, I can kind of go through and just sort of pretty much go through and do the same thing I've done before. 0 mesh geometry. And this is all what I'm doing right now is just simply just trying to give you again more ideas of where you can take that centerpiece. You don't have to reuse another piece. You can just sort of just keep going and going and going and design your own area. And this is the most important part because you cannot learn just by copying the video. That's, that's been sort of like my mistake as well. So if you can please please please, please try your best to get like a back to trying to talk and also speed and same terms like simply put the most difficult thing on the planet. But it's just trying to simply say that copying what you do on here is not, is no longer good enough. It is simply not good enough. You cannot just simply copy on here. You got to explore and experiment beyond the course, go beyond the lessons of the course. Like we've everything I'm doing right now. I'm not doing any new features. It's just nothing we haven't done that we've done already. You might want something like this, for example. Something like that. Maybe you want to go ahead and just make the knife curve. First off. Just like so. Just see, once again, what do we do from here? Whatever we want to do, we want to do extender, go for extender. Want to go with extender with some extrusion, go for it. One to go ahead and do a symmetry transform with slats go you know what to do. It's primary mode. It's measured by the diameter of your brush size. And you can take a couple of practice swings. And again, if you are reminded, you've learned that secondary mode symmetry doesn't work. So what does that mean? It means that you go through modified topology and you go through mirror weld again. It's just sort of that same concept. If you want to experiment further with it and you can just keep on going. You can kind of bring in more tapers to it. For example, you can just keep going. It's the same concept as we always been doing nothing new. You want to, you can go ahead and do the bend dark. Then just simply hit Accept. Going solo. You can just make yet again another piece right here. Maybe this piece can be then done through arrays. Maybe you want to do like a string of arrays, and then you want to run wires on each side. You can do that. What does that look like? Do you think I want you to take this experiment? I don't want you to wait for me to do it on. Here. I want you to actually kinda show me what that looks like. See if I can bring this. I'll just go ahead and bring these guys back just so I can kind of ring hand forward a little bit more. Kind of see yet again, it's just another Boolean piece. Of course, quite frankly, while that would look cool wires on both sides, it might also construed a little over noisy with all degree bill. You might not see. In other words, very well with all the gravel that is behind it, it won't contrast out very well. So that's probably one. Do you want to it but that doesn't mean you have to do it. You can still haven't yet, again, an extra part for you to place On to use for other wires in other locations. Kind of bear that all in mind. The possibilities are truly endless on what you can and cannot do just because I'm using this one piece doesn't mean that can't use other pieces. That said that's kind of going to finish up our chest. So what we'll do next is we'll go into the backside here. And again, that's just going to be like as before, a where we create one piece and then we're gonna read duplicate the piece. The chest is going to be a little bit easier and a little less steps than you might think. It's gonna be a fun little tutorial trip. And then from there we're going to move on into the head and have some fun making some coolness out of that. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 32. Establishing Shell Piece Sculpt: Hey, welcome back. In this video we're going to tackle into that last major section of the hard surface body and that's gonna be our shell. Now the shell is going to be a little bit easier than the pad, but we have been thinking hard about this and we want now to give you less and less holding your hand. What we're gonna do is we're gonna get an acceptably cool looking pattern where we're just going to create a single pad and we're gonna place it along here. But we're really wanting to reinforce this to you that if you want to add more beyond what we're doing, you should be at a point where you can do that, where you can sculpt additional patterns. We also very much would like to see any screenshots are pictures that we can kind of look at critique because we really want some main reactive engagement on all of this, because this is about where we start to graduate you to your own creativity going beyond the course's concept. So let's go ahead and get started with the shell. So to begin with, I'm going to go ahead and go through and first off, make sure all my sub tools are arranged appropriately. So we've got a chest folder. Let's bring in any excess gribble in here. That way. That's all taken care of. And it looks like we have a little bit of a stray of disproportion in our geometry. I'm just going to fix that with the quick mirror weld. Like I said, this is nothing more than a base mesh, so it's not like the absolute crux of essential things here. Now that we have that, let's just go ahead and go through sub tool and we do it so many times we append a primitive. How many times now it's like our first tool that we ever use. With that said, we can choose any kind we want. So I'm going to go with, as always, my cue. I'll select that cube. I'll just scale this guy down. Maybe scale them in. I could 0 mesh at this point. But thinking I'm gonna hold off just for now. Hold Shift control and left-click up on top of here and get our knife curved brush. And I'm just gonna give a couple of divisions here. Turn SMT off, back on and then delete the lower subdivisions. Now that we have that, let's go ahead and take a look at what we can do with this. I'm just looking at all the opportunities, just going to finagle and it have some fun with just kind of looking for fun shapes in all of this. That's actually not too bad, but I think I prefer that way a little bit more. That's a little bit more turtle like we'll just go ahead and turn off X and realign this again. Then I'll reset the orientation by holding left option, left Alt and click on that little circular square. Now, you can just go ahead and if you want, you can add in just a little bit more to just kind of bring it out a little good. Now at this point, you can do a 0 measure. Just remember when you 0 mesh, if you get tearing or anything like that, not a big deal. We can just go ahead and delete everything except the top surface and do a dynamic subdivision off of it and just do it that way. So let's just go ahead and hit Shift F. Let's go through 0 measure. We know our settings at this point, keep group. And we're going to do adaptive size 0, smooth down to 0. We can kind of see the looks that we get. Looks like this area right here is one poly group. That's why kind of collapsed then. So let's go ahead and see if we can do something about that one. Now, let's go through poly groups and group by normals. That should do just fine. Let's do 0 mesh one more time. It's a little bit cleaner, a little bit easier, a little bit uneven there. Let's see if we can go ahead and give a couple more 0 measures on this. And one thing that I always, always find, that might be why it's that way. Let's go back. Little tricky one, right there. Looks like we missed something here. Isn't this fun, something so simple. Now, fix that. Let's try this. Let's go ahead and go to the bottom. Culprit been found. Looks like the group by normals didn't do much. I should have gone to a lower setting. You can do that though. We can go through poly groups, group by normals to 27, see if we can get everything we need. Looks like that, did it? Yep. Poly group on each end. Make sure there's one there. Yep. Alright, let's play again three times the charm. Again. If you get something that is a little bit off-putting, either try to, then the best thing to do, and it's just simply hit Delete Hidden. Then go through and get a nice clean mesh. Even go through and see if I can flatten this out with clip. One. I normally do curves sort of my take my time on this one. Let's go on and off. We'll go through now dynamic subdivision, turn that on. Rules are that it's 0. And let's do some thickness. Let's see if we can get something that's clean. We do have something that's clean. So let's hit Apply, get some group poly groups on there. And now what should have taken a longer time, had to go through a whole process in. But it's good because this actually tells us in 0 measure is never going to have work a 100% for us. We have to have backups to help us out and getting everything that we need. Are dealing with a fun day to day. One. I am wondering sometimes if I have people that are watching this having similar problems, we go, I'll poly group to separate everything. Beautiful. So now we got our shape. Let's just go ahead and do some creasing on these little fellows here. And let's just go ahead and do that. Crease poly groups. We divide this a couple of times. It should hold its edge, which is what we want. Now that we have all of that taken care of, we can do some testing here. Let's go through sub tool and duplicate this, will turn this off. For now, I'm going to disable the visibility of everything that we have. Now. If you haven't done this already and you have to read, download your sci-fi Boolean. Go on ahead and do so. But what I'm gonna do now is I'm going to make this into two parts. One is going to have the sci-fi boolean on the bottom and then we're gonna have a different plate on the top. This is a little bit different than what we did before where it was micro poly mesh. So I'll append and bring in a sci-fi Boolean. And bring that in. We remember how to do our sci-fi Boolean. We go to Live Boolean and we enabled the sub tool to be a Boolean by clicking in that center and we can hit Shift Up to see it. And let's just scale this out. Like so. We have ourselves a little green piece. Make Boolean, like so. Then append that new piece on. Right there. Let's turn off the two existing pieces. Don't forget you duplicated that twice now. Now we're going to center the piece. Let's go back to our original piece. I'm thinking I'll make this piece thinner. Maybe. Go as much to sail bevel it, which requires me to delete my Subdivisions a little bit, then give it a couple of divisions. Let's keep it like this for now. Do our bevel, this kind of looking at this right now and just finding sort of like a little happy spot. Don't forget you're holding control and you're doing the bubble. Sometimes a lot of people get stuck with them. Now that we have that taken care of, we just have a couple of more things to do and just simple things like going through our knife curve, going into its secondary function and turning that brush size down. Do a couple of practice swings. Work. We'll do maybe a slant like that, and then do a modified topology mirror weld. I think we did it on the other side though. So let's that's because we're facing backwards here. Now I just have to decide whether or not I want this on the top of the bottom. I think I'm gonna have it like that. Then. Last but not least, let's go to a bend arc. I'm just going to bend this guy out. Just simple. This one's simple, using similar concepts. And then finally go through and do a plainer cut. So that's comma and brush. Planar. Planar cuts are hardest brush to practice with, but it's our funniest one to practice with. Those for me. Kind of see, we kind of got a little bit of that size of this down and try again. Beautiful. Now that that's taken care of, we can do whatever we want. Now, if you want to add any extra pieces and you can, we can also scale it in like so. You can do that. Not to be a rocket scientist science on this one. Just going to be you just having fun with your piece. I'm going to go ahead and bend arc this hip, except don't be afraid to do anything you want to do on here. If you are wanting to do something like something similar to this, maybe you want to do an extender on here just to have some fun again and explore some shapes. Definitely go for it we're reaching now the point where you should feel very, very comfortable at this point with whatever you want to do. Including just kinda going through do something like that even now, right now I'm kind of going outside of this and this is sort of the I wasn't planning on doing this part, but I can just do this to help give you some ideas for you if you want to. Like, let us see that. This is just nothing more than examples of things that we want you to kind of get practiced with. Want you to get acquainted with the the mirror weld. The idea of practicing with 9th curve. Even in the smallest of areas like right here. That was kind of when you get that invert like that. It's probably because you're holding down left Alt, which is an easy habit to get into when you're in secondary mode. So try not to do that. This mirror weld this again. Man, I keep doing that. It's a habit. I'm just doing this simply to kind of once again, experiment to show like these are the things you can do to experiment with your geometry. Don't worry about it being symmetrical because again, symmetry sometimes when symmetry does this kind of deal where we're intersecting to the other side? The knife cut doesn't work very well. Kind of keep that in mind. Again, on and on. I want you to just feel free to break out of this in any way. You want to start really start hitting into practicing techniques, practicing patterns. Practice understanding that we do mirror and weld on this particular scenario because secondary mode doesn't work very well. We didn't mirror on weld because when we did the primary mode, because of the fact that when you do knife curve brush intersecting into the other side, it has some wonky results. So we have rules that we have to oblige into. Kinda keep that in mind. If you want. Also don't constrain yourself just to the knife curve, get in there, have some fun with the other brushes. Maybe you want to do something with this piece and start to forming it along here. It's now getting to a point where we do less and less and it becomes more about you and what you want to do for this whole turtle. Because it's very, very essential that you practice and grow beyond the concepts that I teach you. Because that's the only way you can learn, is if you're growing. That said, just going to go ahead and just do a couple more fun things on here. Then I'm going to turn it over to you. Now once you have your flat panel piece. We'll have the next lesson. We're gonna go ahead and do a sort of how shall I say it? Like a placement is what I wanted to go with. Just sort of like we're going to go ahead and duplicate these pieces across. And just simply go through and do one piece at a time and place it throughout the shell that we can have a little fun. Then again, this is all stuff from using one. This is just, for example, an example of what I mean also like just having a little fun, just doing your own thing. Maybe you want to make it a little bit thinner or make it go in there, you can do that. No. Nothing wrong with that is just it's all about you. You can take what we did in the first arm. You remember the split split two parts idea that you had where we did where sorry that I had that when we did the arm, we did all these split cut tools. While if you split apart, you're going to have a sub tool for here. In a sub tool for here, you can 0 match that and then do some beveling right here. Or you can go with z model or edge loops and do some extruding. The possibilities are constantly endless and that's what we have to get through to you. Is that the possibilities keep on getting endless. With that said, once you're done with everything, go ahead and merge all this into one sub tool and we'll see you in the next video. 33. Adding Shell Sculpts to Turtle: Okay, welcome back. In this video now we're going to continue on with making our peace and doing some placement with it and trying to see if we can find some good locations for all of this to be a little bit easier for the shell. Now, a little heads up here that if you have something that's a very high poly count and you're gonna be duplicating that. You may want to either a, go through the process of making sure you have this deformed exactly as you want and go through and decimate this down as we did when we copy the arm all the way over to the other side, you might want to do something like that. Another thing that you can do is is that you can just leave it as is. And then when the time comes for you to go through and combine it all into one mesh. You can kind of merge it all down into one singular piece. You can always do that. Just kind of be a little bit on the wear of all these things. We have to be modular in trying to keep this clean. So I'm just going to go ahead and I think for now I'm just going to keep as is. And then I'll go through and merge these because they got a feeling that as I'm going through all this, I'm going to probably run into a lot of scenarios where I'm going to need to move this around. And if you have a decimated, it's just going to kind of fight against you. So I don't want to really have to deal with that. I will just for now hold on, hold off on decimation and maybe just do decimating all this mesh down as it goes through. But that is what I'm gonna do. So let's go through and I'm going to duplicate the sub tool. Bring it up here. Just repeat the whole process like that. Maybe find not afraid to go through and maybe just rotated around just to kind of see. There's anything interesting to look for here. Little bit. I'll just keep it like this. Then just bring it in like so. Do it a little bit more like that. I'm going to hit B Empty Moved topology and see if we can mess around with moving the topology of just the underlining pieces that are underneath. That way it kind of sinks in a little bit more. Then I'll just go ahead and scale this guy up a little bit more. Actually, one thing I might do is just bring him forward and then bring this guy forward. So do that. Just see, I'm just taking my time and this is also a little bit off different from the original concept. That's okay. Let's duplicate them again. This is going to, like I said, this is going to drive up your poly count. So be ready to go through decimation master under z plugins and go ahead and decimate this down once you have everything placed. If it gets a little too choppy, turn the visuals off on everything. That way. You can kind of work through. Just one thing here. Get some frame rate of this down. I'll even scale this up. We'll do that one more time. Duplicate. Bring the guy. Maybe since this is the bottom piece, I can get a little creative and maybe do something where I can just kind of go through and maybe do a taper at the bottom so it kind of pinches off a little bit. Again. Nothing wrong with that. Now we got something that looks a little bit more of the mesh that we originally started with. Now that that's the case, we cannot go through and just sort of repeat, rinse and repeat this by duplicating it to the other side. Now, of course, this piece here can probably just wrap around right here. Not sure for wanna do move topology. I'd just might want to do the basic move because I'm just moving that individual part. Like to move everything as a whole. Duplicate this guy. Just sort of Pete the pattern. This is just sort of a, it's just you taking your time, making sure it all lines up. It's a good practice for practicing your Gizmo, deformers. The move, rotate and translate, or the Scale. Gizmo. I'm just holding left Alt, left-click switching back and forth between different, various sub tools. Just do that maybe couple more times or maybe keep them like that. We can just sort of see how the pattern goes and we don't have to replace this and go through the whole process. Again. We can just simply, once we get one side, we can just simply mirror it over to the other side. So once said that this has to be too hard. I might even do some tapering for the bottom and that's probably another reason why we don't want to decimate before doing all this is because decimation is going to put us into a situation where we're reducing the geometry. So because it's reducing the geometry, we're going to see essentially tears in like resolution tears everywhere on the mesh. It's kind of hard to describe. You'd have to decimate a mesh to know exactly what I'm saying. Decimate a mesh and then sculpt on it to know exactly what it is in referring to. Now we're getting closer towards the end here. We can just go to bring this in. And this can also be like another cool looking pad as well. It's kinda neat. Like it's look. Gonna go over we're above. More importantly, it's a good moment to quit save here. Like that extruding now. So let's just go ahead and bring that guy and a little bit more depth to that. Like that. Let's go ahead and keep going. Duplicate that. This is a good place to once again antiquated yourself into bend arc in case anything gets out of place here. Let's go ahead and turn on the arm so we can kind of see in retrospect where everything is because I don't want to be duplicating things that we're not going to see. Go ahead just a little bit more. We're almost done with this. Looking to terrible looking. Remember, this is just one piece. If you feel that you want to do something more, or if you feel like you would like to, like right here it's a little bit odd silhouettes so we can just kind of break that out. If you feel you want to make variations. For example. Like a good example would be taking the centerpiece here and making another centerpiece and not making that strip there and just making that strip either exclusive just to these three areas. You can definitely do something like that. Sexually, something I may push for doing down the road here. See, it's just a working progress. It's just something we got to be a little bit sensitive to. And of course you can always just be empty move topology and see what just kind of go through and see just what something looks like when you kind of go about Moving of meshes out like that and just give yourself an idea of what something looks like here. Because again, moved apology moves different parts. Now, at this point, just go ahead and go to your Move brush, that's BMG and left Alt, left-click and just sort of go throughout all of these to kind of like look for areas here and maybe just kinda give it a little bit of a peek and look for areas here. Like this area right here is an intersecting area. So I'm going to have to actually rework a little bit of this around it to either be above the shoulder piece or below it so that it deforms in some way. Another thing that we can do is like we haven't done this one yet. We can do a twist to former, where we can just kind of make it twist like that. And then see if we can get that to work its way around the shoulder mesh. Twisting is a little bit more how I would say complicated and a little bit more challenging to get. B. Be careful with it, take your time and have patients with it. That's pretty much how that looks like. It's straight though. Just thinking. Not that bad, just like that though. I think I might just leave it like that. But another thing you can do is. This would definitely be a nice little hard surface piece. Go into solo. Nice little hard surface piece that we can actually save if you would like to save and then add more. So let's just put that in my part section. You can see potential like I'm recruiting. Now. Some of you that are more experienced, My come to the conclusion that this is similar to kick bashing and it is actually, but we're kind of doing a little bit of a beginner's basic because we don't want to, we want you to kind of, um, while it can be used as kip bashing if they're your first pieces, I don't really recommend you actually save them permanently. I recommend you get more and more practice. This is all about practicing techniques in ZBrush. So now that you have everything taken care of, what you're going to do is you're going to duplicate this piece, deformation and hit mirror. And you're going to mirror just about everything that you've done onto the other side. Again, duplicate that's Control Shift D if you want, as it says right there. But I kind of prefer having the visual cues. And again, you're gonna see the polygon count definitely goes up. So once you are done with all of this, go through and we'll do one together. Go through each shell and duplicate our go through Z plugins, preprocess current, and then decimate current on each sub tool that of these shelves. Just go ahead and do that one. So I think that's just about it. Now that we have that, I'll give you an example. If I left Alt, left-click on here, I'll hold Shift left-click. Bring this to the very bottom. We're gonna go through. And you got to, like I said, make sure you're done with everything. As far as this goes. You're gonna go through Z plugin, decimation, master preprocess current. Let it analyze the mesh and it'll give you a quick little turnout. Then we go through and hit decimate current and you'll see that sign go down. And then after that I'd call it a new folder shell. Then we're gonna go through and then just to repeat the whole process with all of these. That said, that's our shell piece. Not too bad. It's pretty much a enjoyable thing. Like I said, I don't want you to be too hung up on design of one spectrum area. Like for example, this is the only as far as I took it. But if I was wanting to, I could take this ten times farther. If i1 like, for example, I could make a different pattern here, or maybe I can make overarches of plates that kind of go segmented like three horizontal arch segments that go across each place I can keep going and going and going and going. Because that's just what we want you to realize is that you can keep going and going and going and going. And as you do that, you're gonna learn more and more and more and get better and better and better through it. So these deformers, these Trim cut techniques of the primary, secondary functions, the Boolean features, how we combine all those three width 0 measure to get clean babbling techniques or Z model or techniques. All of that is used to drive out shapes and explore different shapes so that they can be stored in your mind. So when you do it again next time, it just comes to you like that. With that said, we're going to now move on into the next piece, which is going to be the head section and have some fun with that. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. Here's a little BPR render. 34. Adding and Detailing Eyes: Hey, welcome back. Now that we've finished everything that we were going to do in our character for hard surface sculpting, we thought we'd have a little bit of fun with the head, just give it a little bit of character to it by showing a little bit of poly painting. Now again, very important. This course is a hard surface sculpting course. And that the base mesh you were given was kind of like a prelude to help establish and practice are hard surface sculpting techniques to. So again, this course is about hard surface sculpting techniques. This is all basically extra fun stuff that we're doing. It's not like a character course or character ZBrush character creation course. I have another course specifically for that. This is all about getting you to learn hard surface sculpting. So we're just going to have a little bit of fun with this guy and just give them a little bit of personality so that we can just kind of give you a nice little send off. So I'm just going to keep things simple for the beginner. Our first off, I'm just going to simply append a sphere. And we're gonna go to the bottom of that guy. And I'm just going to divide that until it looks completely smooth and go through geometry and delete it. I'll move this up a little bit more. And like we always done hold Shift control, we're gonna do knife curve. And I'm just going to cut all the way across like so. Just as we've always done, let's go ahead and 0 mesh that with our typical Z remeasure start off settings. Again, this is all just, just having fun basically, that's all this is. It's just something that we want to do as a fun little send off for you. Just to have a little bit of fun to give it a little extra pop and personality as well. That let's take a look. Yeah, that's two poly groups, they look similar, but now I'm going to divide that a few times and I'll delete the lower. These guys are going to serve a little bit as a fun little group for our eyelids. First things first I'm going to go through sub tool and I'm going to duplicate this guy just in case because I always like duplicating new meshes. Let's just bring this in like so. And bring them in, scale them down because this is going to be like a lower eyelid that we're gonna have a little bit of fun with here. Just going to, now all I'd say is that just have some fun with the move tool and craft your own unique interpretation of a fine here. C, have a fairly clean curvature on it. Again, we might just circle around this. Like so. Then we'll duplicate this, go through Deformation Mirror that went across. Maybe a little bit. Maybe do some asymmetry on here. One is bigger than the other. Just having a little bit of fun. Next. One in feel free again to pause this anytime you want just to kind of do your own interpretation. Now after we do that, let's go all the way back here. They like to just have so much fun. Once we do that, if we shift left-click onto our head, I want you to go ahead and go through sub tool and go split two parts. And it's going to divide up our mouth, eyes, and head into three sub tools typically. And so go ahead and start with finding the eyes. Now, once you're on that sub tool, let's go ahead and color those in by first signing a material to it. Let's click on our material and let's look for toy plastic. We're going to look for toy plus YC. Where would that be at? Let's find our cylinder smart materials, toy plastic. Now to assign that to it, everything changes to that. But to assign it to a, two things have to happen. First, you have to make sure you hit M or M. Rgb probably would be the better choice. And then go through color and hit Fill object. Now that you have that, let's just go ahead and go back. Let's just go ahead and switch this to RGB. And let's just switch this the black, like so. Just turn all z. Go through quite a few settings for them. Now that you have all of that taken care of, Let's go ahead and talk about the color here. Now I first off would start off by going through and finding your brush, standard brush or hit BST. I changed the stroke to free. And then I change the setting to RGB, which means you're just affecting the color channel. Finally, I would turn off Ziad and make sure you don't have any alphas enabled. And when you do that, you should finally end with selecting your color. Now, notice that everything turns to that color. If you do that. Again, two, That's because all these other pieces don't have any assignment to them. So for example, let's go ahead and go back up. We shift left-click to this. This doesn't have like a color signs, so we can just go ahead and just hit RGB and just hit color fill object or I'm sorry, Let's go ahead and go through mapped. Then M RGB. Now we're assigning the material and we're assigning the color to it. So now when we switch it around, it's not going to change. So let's do that real quick. Let's go through the eyelids. Do the same thing. Color, fill object, do it one more time. Color, fill object. Now, once we've done that, I don't know why my visibility on my eyelids. You can kind of see that everything has now changed to be the same except the eyes. That's because again, the other ones we assigned a mat two. And with the, while we continued to stay on key with this piece. So we assign the basic material to Matt with M RGB, and we also assign the color white. We assign the basic material to Matt and the color white, again, doing all of that with fill object as we did originally with this, which was toy plastic and white with M RGB and color hit White. Like I said, just take a moment. It takes a little practice. But the nice thing is now, once we go through, things will obviously stay the same. Well, let's just go ahead and go through color, the logic one more time. Get back into our eye. Now we can add some color to this. Now the reason it looks like this is because we have M RGB because we're assigning a mat material of basic and I don't want to do that. I just want to assign the color. Now. We have that nice little sheen. All I wanted to do. Just want to just kind of making little tiny circles here. Have a deer in the headlights look, or you can have your own looking. I, I think quite frankly, the shape of the eyelid is probably the most important part in all of this. Let's go. Maybe break turquoise. Go, something like that. Maybe just Polly painting handled a little bit of fun with this. And that's all. Mean, very gentle and very subtle. And I've been holding left-click down on this whole time. Then just go ahead and maybe go with something like this, like that. But I'm curious to see what full black would do. We want to have a little bit of a deer in the headlights look like? I'm not really sure about any of this. Not too sure if this is a good idea to come up here. Now. So take your time, have a little fun with the shape. Again. The one thing I will say with character design of cartoon characters is that the shape of the eyelid probably constitutes as the most influential shape of all. Sorry, the influential piece of expression for cartoon characters. And also like a little bit higher might look like crazy, a little bit swollen, may look like he's been beaten. There's a lot that can be done with a shape. Again, the eyebrows are probably also saying, saying you can take your time just moving this around. Like so. Let me be even angle the shape a little bit more like this. We might even want to have some fun with the mouth. It's just kinda want you to find a little bit of an experiment out of all of this. Just have some fun. That's all I can tell you is have some fun. Kind of like the default like that. Now that we have that till taken care of, the next thing we're gonna do is we're gonna work on maybe putting a little bit of cloth around the guys instead so that he has a little bit of an astronaut looking at helmet on. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 35. Making Cloth Hood: Welcome back. In this video, we're going to continue on where we left off and we're going to finish off our head by making some cloth around him in a helmet to go around him. For our courageous space astronaut turtle, This will be pretty easy to do. It's just the step-by-step. So what we're gonna do first is, is in this video, it's gonna be about the cloth that kind of goes around the hedge, sort of like a partial cloth belt. The customize this turtle so that he can sort of three the little bit. So to do this, let's just go ahead and first off, just go through and go into solo mode to get this section. I'm gonna hold down control and select circle for masking options. And then I'm just going to kind of mask a piece off and just see how that looks for now. I'm just going to be taken a couple of practice swings with it. Maybe something like that. Just got to kind of look at that and just kinda see how much real estate of the cloth I want to see on here. Maybe something I can risk, Something like that. I'm not afraid to go through and do this a couple of times. Maybe I want the band appear to be visibly seen a bit more. I could see that. What I'll do is, is then I'll hit Control W to turn that into a poly group. And as we see, we have multiple, multiple poly groups. But one thing I want you to do is don't ship down because that's going to ruin the nice little clean line that you have. Keep it always on the top resolution the moment you have a poly group made and then just go through Geometry, modify Topology and delete, hit R, I'm sorry, geometry delete lower. And now that we have two poly groups, Let's go under edge loops. And I'm going to isolate, select one edge loop and kind of invert this. I'm going to put some group loops on there. Now that we have some group loops on there and we have a little bit of a cleaner divide, if you will, just to make this a little bit easier for us. Now if we see we have a little bit more of a cleaner line. Let's get this now to kind of look and expand a little bit more out. And we can do this several ways. But I'm just going to kind of do my own little interpretation where I'm holding Control left-click to soften it, Control Alt to really sharpen it. So it's sort of like that. Then I'll go down through to deformation. I'm just going to just experiment to see if we can do something with inflating. As you can see, it kind of gives us a little bit of a bump and that's okay. I'm just going to now hold shift and take a couple of strokes and kinda smooth it out like so afterwards. So I'm just going to go ahead and go and hit B&B. Bring this. Well, I'm thinking I'll bring this in a little bit. Actually bring this forward. So I'm going to want to do something like that. We want to bring it in a little bit more and then I'm gonna hold shift again to round that out. Then hold left doll to, of, taper this out. Then I'm gonna hold shift to constantly move that out like so. And then maybe inflate just a little bit more. Just to kind of get something going and get the ball rolling for us. Just left Alt and just making my piece. Like so. We have something that is fairly like, like a little bit like a thick cloth a little bit. Then maybe if you want to do the bottom in the same way, you can certainly do that as well. I kind of was against the idea of doing it that way because I liked the idea of not having a mask on there. I could do it that way because again, the mouth is a separate mesh cell. I'm just going to repeat the same steps. Go through, make a mask on there. There are two masks, so the geometry. And then I'll go through group loops, multiple subs. Try that again. Group loops, mask that piece out. Now let's go to cleaner mesh. Hold controlled, soften the mask, sharpen, do it the other direction. There we go. Now we're just going to inflate this through deformation. Start with. In flight. Then move it up a little bit. Give it a little bit more of a punch. Hold Shift to smooth it out. A little pinch, won't flake that a bit more like so. So now we've got something a little bit more like that. So we're almost done. All we need to do now is we need to get this into its own sub tool because we want to do a little bit of a micro mesh on here. So this is a poly group. Let's hold Shift Control left-click to isolate select. Let's just drag a mask over all of this, like so. Then hold Shift Control in empty space is left-click to bring everything back. Let's go through split. And we're going to go Split Mask now that pieces its own piece. Now that we have that, one thing we can do is is I'm going to use micro mesh. And I like using micro mesh with a lower poly count. And I can't reconstruct my subdivisions since I put edge loops on there. So we're just going to simply go through 0 measure. And maybe just, I'll start off with something default with the symmetry on. I didn't turn any poly groups on because there isn't any Something like that. Something clean is okay with me. Let's do a couple more. Let's kind of didn't lose our silhouette to launch delay. Alright, so now that we have that, let's go ahead and go through dynamic subdivision and turn that on. And let's turn on poly micro mesh. Now, don't forget subdivision division is 0. And I'm kind of looking through all these thinking. I'm a little prone to just simply do like just kind of a cycle through kind of shop for what piece I want to mean I can do thick cloth. I would say the best bet is to kind of go through and just simply just simply go through and just look for what works best for you. There's definitely if there's one thing I can say no right or wrong answer, It's just what kind of fits for a good synthetic piece. One kind of works a little bit, but it does bring up a pretty good point about one thing and that is that kind of see a little bit of debiting in all of this. I might turn micro mesh little bit off. Just do it like that. I'm just going to go ahead and just say screw it and not just shop around for what I want. Let's see, let's see a good piece. Let's find a good piece. That's kind of a cool looking piece. Well, if we needed a night, this would definitely line up just right for us. Certainly isn't enough looking chain mail pieces out here. I kind of link that kind of like that look a little bit, but I think we can do a little bit better. That looks fairly synthetic. And I'm just going through one also looks here. The closest we've got. I think so clop one is one that I might keep a ion killed took I think I like bumps. Most of all. Probably bumped three. That's probably the one. Okay. So let's just go ahead and change the scaling down on this one. And then maybe turn that off just a little bit so we can give it a subdivision and try them one more time. Alright. That's probably going to be my mesh, my cloth space cloth looking mesh. So I'll just go ahead and hit Apply. Good time to hit quick safe. And if you want, then it's just a matter of reapplying the same concept as you did for where we're holding Shift left-click, holding down mask over and then going to split masked sub tool that you have this piece here. And you have this piece here. Now you can just go through geometry. Think I want to solve one piece now. Geometry, we can do a cloth. First off we go, we need clean edge flow topology for our micro mesh to work fairly well. Let's see, that's fairly clean. Now I'll just bring it down a little bit lower. Now, same thing as before. Let's go through and give it one subdivision. And then we're just going to go through Dynamics, subdivision rinse and repeat with smooth subdivision, turned off, micro poly turned on. And then we're looking for something to match similar to what we had before. I believe it was the bump piece. Look like it actually shows here. Are those three. There we go. We've got something that's a little bit more there. All right, Then we'll just hit Apply. All right, So that concludes getting the cloth section of this done. If there's anything more you want to do before you go on to the helmet, you can, for example, this is bonus extra credit ideas. It's not just about following the course, It's about having the ideas and the concept done. Maybe you want to go through spare parts and take this piece right here and maybe just duplicate it and go Shift left-click down and have this function as some sort of a prelude to an earpiece. You remember how we did some of the earlier stuff down here, and we went through our iterations. We had fun with finding something with the taper or the extender. Where are we kind of went with a deal like let's see, deal like here. Then going from here to taper. You can go, are going from here to something similar to what you did before. You can definitely have some fun with that. Maybe you want to just like make a little earpiece and then Habit reach around. I can give a good idea. Go with here. We can do something that's either taper where we then just kinda go through, makes some sort of It's a littl