Kickstart your Creativity with Procreate: 20 Fun Drawings for Beginners and Beyond | Lisa Bardot | Skillshare
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Kickstart your Creativity with Procreate: 20 Fun Drawings for Beginners and Beyond

teacher avatar Lisa Bardot, Happy Art-Making!

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Intro

      3:12

    • 2.

      Class Project

      2:17

    • 3.

      Tools & Resources

      1:31

    • 4.

      Creating a Canvas Template

      2:19

    • 5.

      Procreate Interface Tour

      7:04

    • 6.

      How to Export your Artwork

      0:58

    • 7.

      Using the Progress Tracker

      3:33

    • 8.

      Intro to Week One: Food

      1:31

    • 9.

      No.1 - Orange

      12:36

    • 10.

      No.2 - Pear

      15:31

    • 11.

      No.3 - Egg

      13:54

    • 12.

      No.4 - Pizza

      16:32

    • 13.

      No.5 - Donut

      14:39

    • 14.

      Week One - Reflect & Share

      1:33

    • 15.

      What's coming in Week Two

      0:27

    • 16.

      Intro to Week Two: Plants

      3:17

    • 17.

      No.6 - Monstera Leaf

      19:37

    • 18.

      No.7 - Cactus

      16:41

    • 19.

      No.8 - Poppy

      19:55

    • 20.

      No.9 - Acorn

      15:25

    • 21.

      No.10 - Mushrooms

      18:46

    • 22.

      Week Two - Reflect & Share

      2:03

    • 23.

      What's coming in Week Three

      0:46

    • 24.

      Intro to Week Three: Animals

      2:03

    • 25.

      No.11 - Snake

      22:34

    • 26.

      No.12 - Bird

      14:29

    • 27.

      No.13 - Fish

      18:14

    • 28.

      No.14 - Butterfly

      13:50

    • 29.

      No.15 - Mouse

      17:06

    • 30.

      Week Three - Reflect & Share

      1:40

    • 31.

      What's coming in Week Four

      0:53

    • 32.

      Intro to Week Four: Objects

      3:13

    • 33.

      No.16 - Socks

      15:31

    • 34.

      No.17 - Alarm Clock

      14:57

    • 35.

      No.18 - Camera

      13:47

    • 36.

      No.19 - Ukulele

      17:26

    • 37.

      No.20 - Art Supplies

      29:18

    • 38.

      Week Four: Reflect & Share

      2:33

    • 39.

      Beyond Kickstart your Creativity

      2:34

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About This Class

Do you want to live a more creative life? Do you have a new iPad (or one collecting dust in a drawer) and are curious about how to use it for making art? Are you ready to build a consistent creative practice and tap into your artistic potential? Then it's time to...

We'll start at the very beginning by first introducing you to the popular drawing and painting app, Procreate. I'll guide you through the app's most essential features, then we'll jump into drawing! Over the next four weeks, you'll complete 20 mini-tutorials that focus on different subject matter themes, including food, plants, animals, and objects. Each week, you'll have five short 15-20 minute drawing sessions to complete at your own pace.

In these lessons, I've designed easy and approachable drawings to help you build confidence and keep you motivated as you learn to use Procreate. By the end of the course, you'll have a gallery full of beautiful artwork that you've created, and you'll have gained valuable practice in digital art techniques, improving your drawing skills and training your hands and brain to make art.

This class is perfect for the complete beginner or anyone who wants to rediscover their creativity. Here's just some of what we'll cover:

  • Learning the Procreate interface
  • Essential digital art skills like layers, masks, and blend modes
  • Choosing colors and working with brushes
  • Shortcuts to make finished art faster
  • Making the most of a single brush
  • Shading & lighting
  • Rendering basic textures
  • Creating multiple colorways
  • Making digital collage
  • Playing with patterns
  • Using fun Procreate features like symmetry and liquify
  • And even animation!

I'm Lisa Bardot, and I love helping people find their creativity through drawing on the iPad! I teach millions of people all over the world how to have fun making art in Procreate. This class is based on my experience running Making Art Everyday for the past 5 years. Making Art Everyday is a series of daily drawing prompts, tutorials, and motivation, to help you overcome creative fears and develop your art-making practice. I've learned what it takes to guide beginners in their art-making journey, and I've condensed all the best parts of MAE into the structure of this course.

Kickstart Course Progress Tracker
I know how important it is to see you progress when building a new skill, so I made a handy Progress Tracker for students of this class! It's a .Procreate file so it will be easy for you to add all your illustrations into it. This nifty tracker makes it easy for you to track your drawing progress all in one place. 

I look forward to supporting you as you grow and develop as an artist! So grab your iPad, and Apple Pencil, and let's start creating! 

Share this class with a friend (and gift them 1 month of FREE Skillshare) using this link: https://skl.sh/3jsGQVM

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Lisa Bardot

Happy Art-Making!

Top Teacher

I am an illustration artist, teacher, and all-around creative person based in California, USA. With the iPad and Procreate as my tool of choice, I create industry-leading digital brushes, tutorials, and art-making resources to help beginners and experienced artists alike find joy in creating. My educational videos about drawing and illustration have been viewed millions of times, and I've received high praise for my thorough, concise, and fun teaching style.

I own Bardot Brush where I create Procreate brushes and tools beloved by artists. I also run Making Art Everyday, providing drawing prompts and challenges to help people overcome creative fears and develop an art-making practice, as well as Art Maker's Club, a joy-filled creative community and learning hub for digita... See full profile

Level: Beginner

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Transcripts

1. Intro: Have you always dreamed of being a great artist, but your stick figures just aren't cutting it? Or maybe you just got a new iPad or you have one collecting dust in a drawer and you want to put it to good use. Maybe you crave a creative habit, but your busy schedule and Netflix binges are standing in the way. If any of these scenarios sound familiar, then you might be ready to kick start your creativity with Procreate. I designed this course to help you start making art immediately. You'll get comfortable working in Procreate, learn valuable art skills, find creative inspiration, and build a sustainable creative practice all from the comfort of your couch. This is the perfect course for complete beginners or anyone who wants to rediscover their creativity. Over the next four weeks, you'll complete 20 mini tutorials that focus on different subject matter themes like food, plants, animals, and objects. Each week you'll have five short, 15-20 minute drawing sessions to complete at your own pace. The goal here is to keep things simple and avoid overwhelm as you build up your skills and confidence. By the end of the course, you'll have a collection of 20 unique drawings and the foundation for a consistent creative routine. Hi, I'm Lisa Bardot and I help people find their creativity through drawing on the iPad. You may know me from my YouTube channel where I teach people about drawing, illustration, and all things procreate. I've helped millions of people all over the world learn new art-making skills and discover their inner artist. This course is based on my experience running Making Art Everyday. A series of daily drawing prompts, tutorials, and motivation to help you overcome your creative fears and develop your art-making practice. For the past five years, I've learned what it takes to guide beginners through creating their first artwork and building a sustainable creative habit. One of the key insights that I've gained from running Making Art Everyday is the importance of celebrating small victories in order to maintain momentum. With that in mind, my goal for this course is to help you create drawings that will give you a sense of accomplishment and keep you motivated to continue your artistic journey. I also understand the importance of being able to see your progress as you're building a new skill. As a student of this class, you'll receive a visual progress tracker so you can see all the artwork that you've created in the course and give you a little motivational boost to keep going. For this course, we'll be using the popular drawing and painting app, Procreate. I've been using Procreate for almost a decade and I can say that no other medium I've tried has had such a positive impact on my artistic development. Procreate is intuitive, easy to use, and accessible, but has limitless potential for creativity, and the best part, you can do it all from the comfort of your couch. No need to leave the house or buy expensive art supplies. Just grab your iPad and your Apple pencil, and let's get creative. Are you ready to turn those stick figures into masterpieces and ignite your inner artist? I will be with you every step of the way, providing guidance and support as you kickstart your creativity with Procreate. Let's get started. [MUSIC] 2. Class Project: [MUSIC] Your project for this class is a lot of little projects. You're going to be completing 20 easy drawings over the course the next four weeks. Each week we'll have a different subject matter theme. We've got food, plants, animals, and objects, and there will be five different lessons in each week. Each lesson is about 15-20 minutes long, so I don't want you to get overwhelmed with how much time this might take. If you've got 15-20 minutes, you can get your drawing done for the day. You're more than welcome to complete the lessons at your own pace so if it takes you more than four weeks, that's totally fine too. But I do recommending not letting too much time go in-between your drawing sessions. I find that you tend to lose a little bit of the momentum when you put it away for a while so every couple of days, if you can get your iPad out and do what are the lessons, that's what I encourage and that's what's going to help you establish your art-making practice and make this more of a habit. I encourage you to regularly share the work that you create in this class. At the end of Week 1, you're going to go to the Projects tab on the Skillshare page and create a project. In that project, I want you to share your progress tracker with all your artwork input for the week. I also want you to include your favorite piece from the week. I encourage you to spend some time doing a little bit of reflection on your progress for the week and think about some of the things that you've learned, what was most interesting to you, things that you may be excited to try again, and share a little bit about that in your project. Then when you've completed the second week of this course, I want you to go back to that project and edit it. You can replace your progress tracker with an updated version and share a new piece. Share the piece from that week that you liked the best and share a little bit about what you thought about it or something you learned. At the end of each week, you're going to go in and edit your project, add something new, and by the end, you will have a nice little journal of all your reflections from doing this course. Reflecting, I think, is a really important part of growth and of learning, you really get to spend some time thinking about what you've learned and you get excited about maybe what you want to keep trying in the future. [MUSIC] I highly recommend doing that and I cannot wait to see your projects. 3. Tools & Resources: In order to do this course, you are going to need an iPad and an Apple pencil, and you'll need to make sure that you have the Procreate app installed on your iPad. At the time of this video, the version of procreate that I am using is Version 5.3. If you're using a different version, things might look a little bit different, but it should mostly be the same. You're also not going to need any extra brushes or anything like that, we're going to be doing all of the lessons using the built-in Procreate brushes that already come with Procreate. You are all ready to go as long as you have your iPad, your Apple Pencil, and Procreate installed. The other thing you'll need for this class is the Progress Tracker. I made you this really cool little progress tracker that is a Procreate file. You can open it up in Procreate and you can put all of your artwork in it and really see your progress at a glance. I've got a video that shows you all about how to do that, coming up. But you'll want to download that as well. You'll find a link to download the Progress Tracker on the Projects and Resources tab of the class page. Finally, I want to recommend that when you're watching these videos, that you do it on a screen that is not your iPad, so on a computer, on a TV, on some other device. That way you can work in full-screen on your iPad. Up next, I'm going to show you how to create a Canvas template that we're going to use for the duration of this course, I'm going to give you a tour of the Procreate interface, and I'm also going to show you how you can export your artwork to share or to put into your Progress Tracker. Let's get started. 4. Creating a Canvas Template: [MUSIC] In this video, I'm going to show you how to create a custom canvas template in Procreate. For this class, all the drawings are going to be done on a 3,000 by 3,000 square canvas. We're going to create a template so that way we can just tap it and open it up and we're ready to go. When you open up Procreate, you're going to be in what's called the gallery view and this is where all of your Procreate artwork is going to be stored. You can organize your files, you can rename them, you can share them there's a lot of things that you can do here but for this video, we're focusing on how to create a new canvas in Procreate. More specifically, we'll be creating a Canvas template that you will be using for all the drawings in this class. To create a new canvas, we're going to go up to the little plus sign in the upper right corner, tap that and there's some options here. These are all different Canvas templates. Different sizes that you can work with when you're drawing in Procreate and we're going to create our own custom Canvas template specifically for this class. We're going to tap this little rectangle here with a plus sign, and that's where we can create a new Canvas template. You want to make sure that you are here where it says pixels. You want to make sure that Canvas dimensions are set to pixel and then the canvas size we're going to be using for this class is 3,000 by 3,000 pixels. You just need to type in 3,000 under width and height. Once you've done that, we're going to give this template a name. We'll tap right here where it says Untitled Canvas and we'll call this one Kickstart Course. Once you've done that, you can go ahead and tap "Create" and that's going to pop you into the Procreate Interface which we will be learning about in the next lesson but for now, we're going to tap right here where it says Gallery and that's going to bring us back to the gallery view. Every time you're ready to start a lesson in this class are going to go up to the plus sign here and then in your list of templates, you're going to find the one called Kickstart Course and you're just going to tap that and you'll have a Canvas that's the right size and ready to go up. Up next, we're going to get to another Procreate Interface a little bit. If you have never used Procreate before, this is a good time to get familiar with some of the tools and options that there are in Procreate. 5. Procreate Interface Tour: If you're brand new to Procreate, or if you just need a refresher, you won't want to skip this video. I'm going to give you a tour of the Procreate interface so you can get familiar with it and you'll be ready to follow along with the drawings without being confused about where the different things are. I'll show you the gallery view. I'll show you where the different tools are, how to choose brushes, how to adjust brush size and opacity, and what some of the different menus are. It's just a really quick crash course in Procreate, but I think it's really going to help you as you work on your drawings in the further videos. In those videos, of course, I will be walking you through step-by-step of everything that we're doing, and I won't just gloss over anything so that way you can follow along no matter what. This is, the Procreate interface. Over here on the right-hand side, we have all of our painting tools. I always like to start by introducing this little circle in the upper right, and this is how you select colors in Procreate. You tap this little circle, and as long as you have disc selected here at the bottom, which is what I recommend using to choose colors in Procreate, you'll see a colorful ring with a disc or a circle in the middle. This is how you choose your colors in Procreate, you choose a few, like red, yellow, green, and then you choose, how a light, dark or saturated you want that color to be. But let's just move the circle down here to black just to get started so we don't have to worry about colors from the get-go. You can tap that circle again to close the color picker. Next up, we're going to go through these tools right here. Starting with this paintbrush, this is of course the brushes, so you can tap on this brush icon and you can scroll through your library of brushes. Procreate comes with a lot of brushes built into it, and each one is organized into a set. You can tap through these different brushes and just put some brushstrokes on your Canvas, and just see what they look like, see what they do. Get a feel for what it feels like to actually put something down onto your Canvas. Oftentimes when you're drawing sometimes that's the hardest part is just getting started and putting something down on the Canvas. I often find that just playing with the brushes and seeing what they do is a good way to just get the ball rolling, just spend a little bit of time just going through these brushes, seeing what they look like, and get familiar with some of the different textures and things like that. We're, of course, going to be using all of these or at least some of these brushes to do our pieces. I've got some brushstrokes on my Canvas here. Now let's introduce you to the next tool which is smudge, which is this little finger icon. If you tap on this tool again, you can choose from any brush in your library to smudge with and it just drags the colors around your Canvas. That's what the smudge does. The next tool over here is the eraser, and just like with the brush and the smudge, you can choose any brush to be your eraser. There's a lot of good things about being able to do that. You can match your erase strokes to your brushstrokes so it looks seamless. I also love to use the eraser to actually draw some of my shapes, which we're going to get to do in this course, but that's a really highly useful tool right there. Between the brush and the eraser those are the ones that I use the most. Then the next thing we've got is our layers, and we will get to know layers a lot in this course. Layers are one of the most powerful aspects of doing digital art. They allow you to separate out parts of your artwork from each other and you can manipulate them independently. Don't worry too much about it right now, but layers are awesome. We're going to get to know them a lot in this course, so make sure you tap back over to your brush. The next thing I want to show you are these sliders. This is called the sidebar, and we've got these sliders. The top one is going to be your brush size. You can make your brush big or little. Let me choose a different brush here so we can see it a little bit better. You can make your brush size big, or you can make it small. Then the other slider here is our opacity. I can turn the opacity down and that just makes my strokes a little see-through or a lot see-through depending on how high you have that slider. Next, I'm going to show you a couple of Procreate gestures. Now, Procreate was built to be a platform that runs on touch. Gestures are a really important part of working in Procreate, and you'll get to know a lot of these gestures as we go through the course. But there's a few that I want you to know right off the bat. The first ones are undo and redo. These are super useful. This is the benefit of working in Procreate or digitally for that matter, is that you can actually undo whatever you want. You mess up. Just undo and try again, and it's very freeing [LAUGHTER] You're not just like, oh no, I messed up on my paper now it's ruined. You can just undo. Two fingers and tap, every time you tap it's just going to undo one step of what you had done previously. Or you can tap and hold and then it'll undo multiple, and then to redo, you take three fingers and you tap and you can redo what you had just done. The last thing I want to show you in this lesson are some of the menus over on this side. First of all, we've got our Actions menu and there's a lot of different options here. Again, we're going to get to know, but you can add things to your Canvas. Under the Canvas, there's a lot of different options there. Don't get overwhelmed, don't worry about that for now. There's the sharing options for when you're ready to export your artwork and share it with the world, which I'll show you in the next lesson. Then another fun one is the video. You can actually watch a time-lapse replay of your art. If we tap that, I can see a replay of everything that I just did. There's some preferences and things like that, but don't worry about that for now. The next menu here is the adjustments menu, and these are for making alterations to your artwork. We're going to get to know some of these. There's a lot of really fun adjustments and filters in Procreate that you're going to get to know. Then over here we have our selection tool, and this is for making selections. Then we have our transform tool, which is for moving and manipulating things around the Canvas. We're going to get to know those too. We're not going to explore those too much right now [MUSIC] I hope you enjoyed this little crash course in Procreate. There are a lot of really amazing features that you can use in Procreate, things that you can do with it, and we're going to get to know a lot of them and you're going have so much fun. I'm really, really excited for all the cool stuff that you're going to learn when it comes to Procreate [MUSIC] 6. How to Export your Artwork: In this video, I'm going to teach you how to export your artwork from Procreate, so that you can share it on the web, you can add it to your class project, you can put it into your progress tracker, or you could print it out and put it in your home. Once you finish your drawing and you're ready to share it, you're going to go up to the Actions menu, which is the little wrench right here, and then you're going to go right here where it says Share. Here in the top half of this menu, there are a few different options. The best option for us to share artwork if we're just going to be sharing it on the web or something like that or printing it out, is the PNG. Choose PNG, and then you'll get some options for what you can do with it. You could save it to your camera roll, you can Airdrop it to your phone. There's a lot of things that you can do, but that's where you're going to find the option to actually share your artwork. [MUSIC] 7. Using the Progress Tracker: [MUSIC] One last video before we jump into our drawing lessons. In this video, I want to show you how to use the progress tracker that is supplied to you as a student of this class. This is meant to be a way for you to see at a glance all the progress that you've made, and you can see all your pieces all at once, so you can fill it up as you finish a piece. It's really easy to do. It comes as a Procreate file, so you'll download it, you'll open it up into Procreate, and then I will show you how to put your artwork into it. You can download the progress tracker on the Projects and Resources tab of this Skillshare class page. You're going to want to download the progress tracker either directly to your iPad or transfer it to your iPad from your computer or other device. When you try to open it up, it should import directly into Procreate. I've got my kickstart course progress tracker right here. You can go ahead and tap it to open it up. If I go up here to my layers panel, which is these two little squares, I can tap that and I can see I have two layers. The top layer is the actual tracker, so the overlay with texts and everything. Then down below that is a layer where you can start to place your artwork. Now I'm going to show you how to get your artwork onto this progress tracker. I'm going to exit back out to gallery view by tapping "Gallery," and then I'm going to open up one of my pieces. There's a couple of ways that you can add your artwork to the progress tracker, but I think the easiest way is using Procreate's copy all function. To do that, it's pretty easy. All you have to do is take three fingers and swipe down on your screen, and that's going to invoke the Copy Paste menu. We're going to be choosing Copy All from this menu. Copy All, and that's going to copy my entire artwork. If the three-finger gesture is a little tricky, you can also do the same thing by going up to the Actions menu, which is a little wrench, going to Add, and then choosing Copy Canvas. That's another way to do it. Once you've done copy all or copy canvas, you're going to exit back out to the gallery view, and then you're going to open up your progress tracker. Then you do a three-finger swipe down on your screen again to pull up that Copy Paste menu and you choose Paste. Then you can grab these little blue nodes in the corner of the selection and resize it so that it fits, and you can zoom in, it's a little bit easier. You just want to get the edge of this dotted lines little bounding box to align with the edges of the opening in the frame. It's okay if it's a little bit bigger. Now the other way to get your artwork into your progress tracker is by importing an image from your camera roll. If you had exported your artwork and saved it to your camera roll, this is how you would do it. You'd go up to the Actions menu, the wrench, and then you'd go to Add and then Insert A Photo, and then you can choose any image from your camera roll and it will import it. Then again, you just resize it so that it just fits. Just a teeny bit bigger than that square. Like that. [MUSIC] Every day after you finish a lesson, go ahead and add that day's artwork to the progress tracker and it will be so much fun to see all of your artwork at a glance and see all the progress that you've made, and then of course, don't forget to share your progress tracker in your class project. 8. Intro to Week One: Food: [MUSIC] Welcome to Week one of the kick-start your creativity with Procreate course. This week, we're going to be drawing food. I think food is the perfect subject matter for beginners who are learning to draw. It's universal and instantly recognizable. Food comes in so many different shapes and textures and colors. It can be depicted in a lot of really creative ways. Or you can keep it really simple, which is going to be our approach to drawing food in these first five lessons. This week, you'll get to know Procreate's most useful features and some very essential digital art skills. You'll learn about working with brushes, choosing colors, working with layers. You'll learn about sketching, using clipping masks, and Alpha Lock and so much more. I'm sure at this point you are very excited to get started with your first drawing, but you might also be feeling a little intimidated too. I just wanted to encourage you to let go of any and all expectations that you have about how this course should go. What you create, doesn't have to look exactly like my examples. It doesn't have to be a masterpiece. The point of all these drawings you're about to make is to just go through the process of making them. With every brush stroke you make, you are learning and training your hands and brain. Don't worry about trying to remember every little thing too. The beauty of the fact that we're doing 20 drawings is that you get a lot of repetition and practice at doing these different skills. Without further ado, let's get into our first food drawing. [MUSIC] 9. No.1 - Orange: [MUSIC] Welcome to your first drawing of this course. Today we're drawing an orange. This drawing is going to guide you through a lot of probably stuff that might be new to you when it comes to working in procreate and drawing, but stick with me, I'm going to be explaining every step along the way. I'll be introducing you to some cool features like quick shape and quick line. We're going to be using Alpha Lock to add texture to our orange and even a little bit of shading, and we'll finish it off with a cute little face. Let's go. To begin, we're going to be using our Canvas template that we made in the previous section. We're going to go up here in the upper right to this plus sign, and we're going to find the kick-start course Canvas template that we saved. It was 3,000 by 3,000 pixels, so just going to tap that, and it's going to open up into Procreate. Let's begin by heading into our brushes, so tap the brush icon right here, and we're going to find the Inking set. So find the Inking set, then in the Inking set, we're going to get the studio pen brush. So we're going to find studio pen in the Inking set. The next thing we're going to do is choose a color. Go up here to the color picker circle, and we are drawing an orange, so of course we're going to start with a nice bright orange. Here in the outer ring, we're going to choose orange as our hue, and then we're going to grab this little circle here and we're going to set the saturation and lightness or darkness of that color. I want something really saturated, so I'm just dragging it all the way up that way. The next thing you want to do is set your brush size. We have our brush size slider here. I'm going to set it to about 50 percent. It doesn't have to be exactly the same, but we're going to go ahead and draw a circle. If you are a beginner, drawing a circle can be a little intimidating. They often come out a little bit wonky and there's nothing wrong with that, I think wonkiness adds a lot of personality to illustration, but if you wanted to draw a perfect circle, Procreate has a really great feature to help you with that called quick shape. Let me do a two-finger tap to undo that. This time when you draw your circle, we're going to keep our pencil on the screen once we get to the end. So you can watch me do that here. I'm going to draw this circle, and then when I'm at the end, I'm just going to keep my pencil on the screen and it will snap to this oval shape. If I wanted this to be a perfect circle, I would take one finger and just hold it down on the screen, and it will snap to a perfect circle, and I can make it as big as I want, like that. When I'm happy with it, I can let go. If I wanted to edit this further, I can actually do that by tapping here at the top where it says circle, and I can move it around like that, I can drag the edge and make it bigger or smaller. I'm going to keep it pretty big, but I'm going to leave a little room at the top so I can add a stem and leaves, but I think that looks pretty good. You can just tap on any tool to exit out of that mode. Now, we're going to fill this with color, and you could of course, color it in like that, but that would take forever, and we're digital artists and we have tools that speed things up, so let's undo that. To fill this with color, we're going to use color drop. It's really easy, all you do is take this little circle, you just drag it out and then you drop it here in the middle of your closed shape and it will fill completely with color. Super handy, I use that feature all the time. Next we're going to add a stem and leaf to our illustration. I'm going to go over to my colors and I'm going to choose a nice leafy green, so I'm moving my hue over into the green and then this is like really bright and saturated up here, so I'm just going to actually come a little bit closer to the middle like that, and then I'll tap to get out of there. Now, I could go ahead and start drawing my stem just like that, but I might want to come back and add some texture to my orange, so I'm actually going to put the stem on what's called a separate layer, so I'll go ahead and undo that. Here is our layers, it's these two little squares. You can see I have Layer 1 and this is where my orange is, my big circle, and I'm going to tap this little plus sign here, and that's going to create a new layer. Basically I can draw on this new layer and it's not going to affect what's on the other layer, it's not going to affect anything that's on any other layer. This is great for separating out parts of your artwork so that you can work on them independently without messing other stuff up, so we'll get to see that in practice in just a sec. Let's go ahead and draw. I'm going to draw a straight line for my stem, and we can use that quick shape function to do that again. You can draw a line, but when you get to the end, just hold your pencil down and don't let go, and now you can decide where you want your line to end, so I'm going to put it right there. Now, I'm going to zoom in so I can draw my leaf. To zoom you just take two fingers and you pinch them out like that or spread apart like that, and I'm going to draw a line coming out that way, and then I'm going to add my leaf to this line. I reposition my Canvas a lot when I'm drawing, I like to rotate it and move it around, so I recommend doing that. We'll draw a curved line on one side of this and then another line on the other side, and then we'll fill those in with color drops, so just drag from the color picker circle into those closed shapes. If you're getting these lines, which I am here, there's a white gap, you can adjust your color drop threshold. This is an important little thing to learn, so I'll just undo that really quick. I'm just going to drag it in just like before, but I'm keeping my pencil on the screen, and now I can move my pencil all the way over to the right and it'll fill in all those gaps. I'll fill that one and two. Now we've got a stem, we've got a leaf. Maybe I'll make this stem a little bit thicker, you can, if you want. There we go. If I wanted to zoom back out so I can see my whole Canvas, take two fingers and do a little pinch like that, and it will make the whole thing visible again. Now I want to add a little bit of texture, a little bit of pizzazz to my orange, so I'm going to go over here to my layers, and I'm going tap back over to layer 1 with the orange here. I want to add texture that's just a little bit darker than the color I already have here, so I'm actually going to take a finger and put it down on the screen, and that's going to invoke this eyedropper and you can choose any color that's already on your Canvas, but I'll choose the orange, and then I'll go over to my colors and just choose just a little bit more red, so color it a little bit more red, maybe teeny bit darker like that. Then I'm going to go over to my brushes and I'm going to go to the vintage set, and I'm going to choose the newsprint brush right there. Now, I wanted to fill this entire circle with texture, and if I try to do that, I might get some over the edge like that, so that's not the best solution. We're going to use a really cool feature called Alpha Lock to keep the texture inside the circle. I'll just undo that, I'm going to go over to my layers here. I'm going to tap my selected layer, so it's the one in blue. tap it, and then here in the menu, I'm going to choose Alpha Lock. Then you'll see there's a checkerboard pattern behind this little thumbnail of the orange. Now, if I draw with this brush close to the edge, I can go right over the edge and it's not going to go beyond that shape because what Alpha Lock does is it locks the shape on that layer so you can only draw within that shape. Let's go ahead and finally texturize this orange. I'm actually going to make my brush size all the way big, so put it all the way up, and then I'm just going to lightly go over the orange like that in one continuous stroke. You don't want to do too heavy pressure because that will make the color or the texture really dark, so just one continuous motion. Then right here under the leaf, I'm going to go over that one more time just to make it a little bit darker. This brush has some darkening effects built into it, so if you layer your strokes, it'll get darker and darker like that, and that gives us a nice little shadow for our leaf, and then maybe I'll also add another stroke around like one side of it like that, just to give it a little bit of shape. Now that we have some texture on our orange, our leaf is looking a little flat, so let's add texture to that too. We're going to go up to our layers and we're going to select the leaf layer, and we're going to turn on Alpha Lock, just like we did with the orange. You can either tap it and go to Alpha lock in the menu, or you can use a gesture which I like to do. You take two fingers and you swipe to the right on the layer. Then for the colors, I'm going to select this green using the eyedropper, and then I'm going to choose a color that's a little bit darker, so I'm moving this way on this color disk, so down and to the side a little bit to get something that's darker and also a bit more saturated. Then I'm going to go to my brushes, and in this same set, I'm going to find the [inaudible] brush up towards the top. [LAUGHTER] Then I'm going to zoom into my leaf here, and I'm just going to basically draw over half of the leaf just to give it a little bit more dimension, so just making one-half darker, then I'm going to get an even darker version of that color just a little bit darker, and we switch brushes now. I'm going to go over to my brushes, I'm going to go back to the Inking set, and I'm going to choose studio pen. I'm just going to add some vein details to my leaf, so a line down the middle and then some lines coming out the side like that, and because I have Alpha Lock on, I can just go right over the edge of the leaf and it's just going to stay within that shape. I added some veins and maybe I'll make the brush size a little smaller and add a few more just to give it some variety to the line weight. Now this is a very simple illustration, so I thought it might be fun to add a little personality by giving the orange a little face. In my layers here, if I tap the two little squares here, I could create a new layer to draw the face, or I could use the same layer as the leaf. I just need to turn off Alpha Lock first in order to draw a new shape on that layer, so I can take two fingers and swipe to the right on that layer, now that checkerboard pattern is gone, so I can draw outside of this shape now. I'm going to grab black as my color, so go to the colors and choose black, and I'm just going to draw a cute little face using this same brush. Two little dots far apart, and maybe I'll up my brush size just a little bit [MUSIC] and draw a cute little mouth. With that finishing touch, we are all done. Congratulations, you've just finished your first drawing of the course. You can revisit the lesson on Exporting Your Work if you wanted to share it and post it online or add it to your class project or if you want to add it to your progress tracker. In the next lesson, we're going to be drawing a pair. You're going to be learning how you can use the eraser tool to refine your shapes, you're going to learn how to reorganize your layers, how to add a background color, and how to combine textures in your art. I'll see you in the next lesson. [MUSIC] 10. No.2 - Pear: [MUSIC] Welcome to drawing Number 2. Today we are drawing a pear. In this lesson, we're going to explore some new brushes. I'm going to show you how you can use the eraser tool to refine your shapes. We're going to be combining different textures, we'll be using the select and transform tool to speed up the drawing process. I'll talk to you about using brush pressure and adding a background color. It's going to be a lot of fun. Let's do it. Let's go ahead and create a new Canvas. I'm going to tap the plus sign and choose our Kickstart Course Canvas template. Let's start out by selecting the brush we're going to use to draw the main shapes of our pear. We're going to go into the brushes and find the inking set and we're going to choose the studio pen brush. We're going to be drawing a pear that's sliced open. Let's begin by choosing a color. We're going to go up to the colors and we're going to choose a creamy color for the inside of the pear. For the hue, we're going to be here in the yellowy-orange area. Then we're going to move this other circle into the white but then move it back down this way a little bit to get a creamy color like that. You can always paint a swatch on your Canvas just to see what that looks like and then undo it. Go ahead and draw a pear shape like this. It's okay if it's a little wonky and quirky, I think that adds personality. Then you're going to take your color picker circle and you're going to fill this in with color drops. Just drag that into the middle of your shape and fill it in. I do want to know with color drop you want to make sure you have a completely closed shape or your color might spill out everywhere? Now I want to add the little bumpy part at the bottom of the pear. I'm actually going to use my eraser to refine the shape. I do this a lot. I'll draw a bit more basic shape and then I'll refine it with my eraser to make it a more complex shape. You can set your eraser to be any brush you want. We want it to be the same brush that we're using to draw with so that all of our brushstrokes match and it looks seamless. Procreate has this really cool feature where if you tap and hold the eraser like that, it will select whatever brush you had as your brush as your eraser. Now I have studio pen set to be my eraser. This only works if you have the brush selected and then you tap over to the eraser. Go ahead and choose studio pen as your eraser. Now I can go down here to the bottom and just erase away a little bit to create that pear bottom shape. I can erase the rest of that just like this. I can even come in a little closer if I wanted to round those out just a little bit more. That one's point D. Just refine that shape a little bit more. That's the inside of the pear. Now we're going to create the peel of the pear which is going to be like an outline around it, then we'll see some of the edge. We're actually just going to duplicate this same shape and use it as the outside of our pear. We're going to go up to our layers, which is again the two squares up here and we're going to duplicate this layer. Basically, make a duplicate copy of this shape. To do that, you're going to swipe to the left on that layer and you'll see some options here and we're going to choose Duplicate. Now you see we have two copies of our pear. We want to make this one a pear-green color. Let's go over to our colors, choose a yellowish-green color and then a little bit dark in the middle but over to the side like that. Now we're going to drop this color onto our pear shape. Just drag it and drop it onto your pear shape like that. We need this peel color to be behind the cream color like the inside of the pear. We're going to move this layer below the other layer. To do that, you're going to tap, hold and drag it underneath the other layer. Now because the cream-colored pear is on top, it's the one that's visible. Whatever layer's on top covers up whatever's below it. But that's okay because we're going to actually resize this a little bit so that we can see it. Make sure you have the green pear layer selected and then tap this little arrow icon. This is our transform tool which lets us move things around the Canvas. You can zoom out still, just make sure you're outside of this bounding box if you want to zoom your Canvas. If you're inside it might not work so well. Now make sure you're under the uniform transform mode. This will keep the shape in proportion when we resize it. Then we're just going to drag these little nodes in the corner, the little blue nodes and just make this a little bit bigger on these two opposite corners like that. Here we go. If we switch over to free form, we can transform it out of proportion. If we wanted to make just the side a little wider, we could do that so you can make it big like that but we just need to make it just a little bit bigger. We have a border around the whole pear shape now. Then you can tap the arrow again to exit the transform mode. Now I want this side of the pear to show a little bit more so it looks like you're seeing the side of the pear a little bit. I'm going to go back to my Layers and I'm going to duplicate this green pear layer. Again, to do that, you're going to swipe to the left on that layer and choose Duplicate. Now we have two copies of that work. I'm going to choose the bottom copy. Then we're going to go back to our transform tool. I'm still in the free-form transformation mode and I'm just going to grab one side of this and I'm just going to drag it off to the side just a little bit. It seems like we're seeing the side of the pear. Then I've got a little bumpy area down here at the bottom of the pear where it doesn't quite seem like it's selected so I'm just going to paint over that to connect those areas like that. Now we can see the inside of the pear and also a little bit of the outside. I'm ready to start adding some texture to the outside of my pear but I need these two layers to be together as one layer in order to add texture to that whole green area. We're going to merge these two layers together. There's a couple of ways to do it. The first one is by tapping the top of the two layers that you want to merge. Tap it and you can choose Merge Down here from the menu. The other way is just by pinching the two layers together. You just take two fingers and can be a little tricky with two layers. There we go. Pinch them together and you'll see that they'll be merged together. Whichever way is easier for you. Now we're going to turn on Alpha lock so we can add texture. We want to lock in this shape, and we want to add texture inside of it. You can take two fingers and swipe to the right. Or you can again, tap the layer and choose Alpha lock but make sure that checkerboard pattern is on your layer thumbnail. Now we're going to go over to our colors. We want to choose a brownish color to add some speckles to the pear. I'm just going to go over closer to orange in my hue like that, and then I can get a little bit darker of a color , orangish brownish color. Then for the brushes, we're going to go into the textures set. Down to the bottom, we're going to choose the grunge brush. Then maybe make the brush size a little bit bigger, actually all the way up. Then you're just going to very lightly come in here and add a little bit of this brown around the edges just a little bit here or there, not a lot. If you press too hard, it'll make it really brown, so just very lightly add a little bit of this texture. You zoom in and see how much I've done. Now we're going to add another texture to this, because there's variations in the color on a pear, but there's also little speckles. We're going to go into the spray paint set, and we're going to choose flicks. I'm going to also change the color just a little bit. I think, I'm going to go maybe back towards the yellows. All the colors of a pear are here in the warm greens to orange. I'll choose a more dirty yellow [LAUGHTER] color, and then I'll just add a few strokes of this Flicks brush. You see, maybe I'll get a little darker. There we go. You can mix and match, add different values, which is like how light or dark a color is to create that pear texture. But I think that looks pretty good. Now I'm going to go to the layer with the inside of the pear, so this creamy color, and I'm going to add a little bit of texture to that, not a lot. I'm going to take my two fingers and swipe to the right to turn on Alpha Lock on this inside pear layer. I'm going to select this color using the eyedropper, so this color of the inside of the pear. Let's just choose white actually. We'll choose white, so something way up there. Now for the brush, we're going to go into the material set. I'm going to choose the noise brush. This has a very subtle texture to it, and I think it will work for the texture of the pear. Let's go ahead. Now that my brush size is too small, so I'm actually going to make it all the way big. Then very lightly, I'm going to go over this whole shape. Doesn't have to be a continuous stroke, just to add a little bit of texture to make it less flat. You can see that texture there. Finally, we're going to add some details. We're going to add a little stem, and then seeds and things like that. For the details, I'm going to create one more layer. I'm going to tap the plus sign here, and we have a layer above the other two layers. For my brushes, I'm going to go into the Calligraphy set, so go into Calligraphy. The brush we're going to be using is the shale brush right here, shale. For the colors, I'm going to start with my creamy color. I'm going to choose a color that's darker and more saturated, so I'm going this way in this inner disk here. Just to add, this is going to be the line down the middle of the pear. That's a good color right there, just a bit darker. I'm going to draw a line down the center of the pear like that. Then for those where the seeds are on the pear, we're going to draw a line that comes out almost like an upside down heart, and then again on the other side like that. Then we're going to get a brown color, so get a lot darker, a little bit more saturated. Then maybe go over into the oranges a little bit more, so it's a little bit more reddish orange. Let's zoom in and draw a couple of seeds like that. This brush, if you use heavy pressure, it will be thick. But if you use light pressure, it's nice and thin. You can use that to your advantage if you're trying to draw seeds. Use light pressure at the tip to get that point. You can fill it in like that. There we go. Draw two little seeds there. Then the last thing to do is add a stem. We're just going to draw a curving shape with a little nub on the end, like that. Now this time around, we're going to add a background color to our illustration. To do that, you're going to go up here to the layers. Down here, you'll see it says, "Background color." You could tap that and then choose any color for your background. I'm going to use a color that's in the same vein as my pear, so a yellowish green. You could see as you move this around, you get an instant preview of the color that you're picking. Maybe I'll go a little more yellow, and do this pear color. Just because I think the pear looks a little bit like it's floating in space, I'm just going to add a really subtle shadow underneath. I'm going to go up to my layers and tap the plus sign to create one more layer. Then we're going to move this layer underneath all the others, just like that. This layer is now below all the other layers. I'm going to sample this color that I used for my background, and then I'm going to choose a version that's a little darker and more saturated. Now I'm going to just zoom in here, maybe make my brush size bigger, and just draw just a little bit of a shadow underneath like that, a really sketchy, brushy shape. Then to make this pear fill even more grounded, like it's actually sitting on something, I'm going to go even darker and more saturated with my color, so go pretty dark. If I actually turn my brush to the side, it gets nice and soft like that. You can just add a little bit darker right underneath the pear. [MUSIC] This illustration is all done. Congratulations. In the next lesson, we're going to be drawing a fried egg. We're going to be introducing a little bit of sketching for the first time, and also a little bit of shading. I'll see you in the next lesson. 11. No.3 - Egg: [MUSIC] Welcome to Drawing 3. Today, we're going to be drawing a fried egg. In this lesson, you're going to be introduced to sketching. Sketching is basically a pencil plan of what you want your artwork to look like before you create your finished piece. It's a really, really useful step in the entire process because it's unrealistic to expect yourself to be able to draw something perfectly like right out of the gate, so I use sketching to take me through different iterations to get it to that final place. You can start with really basic shapes and then start adding on complexity to that basic shape, which you'll see as we do this egg. Sketching is really, really important and I'm excited to introduce it to you today. You'll also be picking up some more tips about shading and choosing colors. Let's get into it. Before we get started, we now have two artworks from this class in our Procreate gallery, and they are both called untitled, so let's show you how to give these pieces a name. All you do is tap on the name, so Untitled Artwork, and then you can name it whatever you want. I'm just going to call it orange and then this other one I'm going to call pear. It is useful to name your artwork because if you ever want to back it up or transfer it to computer, it helps keep things organized. I am pretty bad at remembering to name my files, but it is a good thing to do. Let's get started with today's drawing. We're going to go ahead and tap the plus sign to create a new Canvas, and we're going to find our Kickstart Course Canvas template and open that up. We're going to be drawing a fried egg and we're going to begin this illustration with a sketch. A sketch is just a pencil drawing to help you plan out what you want your final drawing to look like. Sketching is especially useful for when you're drawing more complex shapes, starting with more basic simple forms and an adding details to that to create what we actually want our piece to look like. Let's go over to our brushes and we're going to choose one of the sketching brushes. I'm here in the sketching set. My favorite from this set is the 6B pencil, so you can choose 6B pencil from the sketching set, then we're gonna go to our Colors and we're just going to choose a black or dark gray. We're going to be drawing our egg at an angle, so we're going to use an oval to create the shape of the egg. Just draw an oblong oval, something like this, and then for the yolk, we're going to add another oval to plan out where we want that to go. Off to the side, we're going to draw a similar shape oval to the one we just drew. Something like that. Then we're going to give our yolk some volume by drawing like a mount over the top, so something like this. Just an arched line. I like the line to stick out over the edge of the egg, I think it gives it a nice dimension. Now eggs aren't perfectly round like this. There's usually some wavy edges, so we're just going to draw some wavy edges right over the big oval that we drew previously, so something similar to this. We're just going to draw wavy lines over the edge of our egg, just going back and forth like that. The last thing if you want, my egg looks like it's tilting this way, so you can use the transform tool to rotate it if you need to. Just tap the little arrow here, and then you can grab this green node and you can use that to rotate or straighten it out a little bit if you need to. Our sketch is complete, we're ready to move on to color. We're going to be using this sketch as a guide as we draw our finished piece. First of all, let's go up to our Layers and we're going to create a new layer. Tap the plus sign to create a new layer. I like to keep my sketch on top of my final art, so I'm going to move this sketch above the new layer that I just made. We've got the sketch on top and then the new layer on the bottom. Then we're going to reduce the opacity of the sketch, so it's just barely visible and we can use it as a guide to draw our final art. To do that, you're going to tap this little N right here on the sketch layer, and then we have this opacity slider and you can just slide it down to so it's barely visible and you can use that as a guide. Then while we're here in layers, we're going to be making obviously a white egg with a yellow yolk, but drawing white on a white background is really difficult, so let's go ahead and set our background color. To do that, your background color is right here under your layers at the bottom, you can tap where it says Background color, and then you can choose whatever color you want to be your background. I'm going to choose a nice bright blue, I think that'll look really nice with the white and the yellow. Then, of course, we're going to go over to our Colors and we're going to choose white, and it will snap to a pure white value. This works on a few different places around the color disk, but I use it most often for white, so double-tap close to white and it'll snap to white. Then for the brushes, we are going to go back into the inking set and use our favorite studio pen. I use this brush a lot for just general shape, drawing shape making, so studio pen from the inking set. We're ready to go ahead and start drawing the shapes of our final artwork. Basically, we're just going to be tracing over our sketch, starting with the white of the egg. Tracing is a really useful skill, you use it all the time in art, especially when you are going from your sketch to your final art. I'm just tracing over those wavy lines of my egg, and then I'm going to fill it with color-drop. Great. Now I'm going to do the yolk and I'm going to do that on separate layers so I can come back and add texture and shading to the rest of my egg. I'm going to go up to my Layers, I'm going to tap the plus sign to create a new layer. Then for my colors, I'm going to go in the warm yellow and choose a nice yolk yellow color. [LAUGHTER] Then I'm going to trace over the yolk shape just like that. Once you have a fully closed shape, you can fill it with color-drop. At this point we're done with our sketch, we can actually turn it off because we don't need to reference it anymore. To do that, we're going to go up to our layers and then we're going to tap on the layer with the sketch, and this little checkbox right here turns off the visibility of the layer so you can hide a layer just by unchecking that. Now we're ready to add some texture and shading to our egg, and we're going to start with the white of the egg. Tap onto that layer, and just like we've done in the other videos, we're going to use Alpha Lock to add this texture. You're going to take two fingers and swipe to the right on that layer, we have now that checkerboard pattern or you can tap the layer and choose Alpha Lock from the menu. Then for colors, we're just going to choose just a very, very light gray. If it's easier, you can tap to select white and then just move the circle down until you get a little bit lighter of a gray. Then for brushes, we're going to go into the texture set, here it is, textures, and we're going to choose the grunge brush. See my brush size is about 50 percent, I'll see if I need to adjust it but I'm just going to lightly add a little bit of this gray color around the edges of my egg, like that. Just very lightly. Then I can add a few little swatches in the middle of it, and then also right here under the egg yolk, I'm going to add a little bit of that gray. I'm actually going to make the gray go out this way a little bit because I'm imagining there's a light coming from this way and it's casting a shadow on the egg a little bit, so I'm going to make the shadow part go that way. That's looking pretty good. Now we're going to get a little bit darker of a gray and we're going to add that in. Go up to your Colors and then just go get a little bit darker gray, and then we're going to add this darker color along the bottom edge of the egg white here. Then along the bottom edge of the egg yolk and then we'll drag it out to the side a little bit to show that shadow. If you want, you could keep going and get a little bit darker. I would get a little darker and maybe a little warmer, so we can bring the circle in to the middle to saturate the color a little bit more, and just add a few little darker spots here and there. Here we go. Our egg white is looking pretty good, let's go ahead and add some shading to our egg yolk. We're going to go to the layer with the egg yolk, we're going to turn on Alpha Lock with a two-finger swipe to the right, so just like that. Now let's actually get the eyedropper and sample this yellow color to start with. Then we want a darker yellow to add a little bit of shading on one side, but when you're darkening a yellow, you don't just want to go straight into black because that will make it look really muddy. I like to go closer to orange when I'm trying to get a darker yellow. You can get a little bit darker, add a little bit black to it, but mostly we're essentially saturating it more by adding more red. Now I'm just going to add a little bit of shading to one side of it, I'm curving around like this, and then along the bottom a little bit. I'm using really light pressure. If I was using heavy pressure, it would come out really dark, but I'm trying to keep it light and then I can build up strokes until it gets as dark as I want. Now I'm going to get an even darker color. I'm going closer to red and I think I'll just leave that where it is in the middle and then I'm going to add a little bit here on this side just to make it really dark on one side. Then we're going to add a little highlight to make it seem like it's shiny. Again, I'm going to sample the main yellow color of the yolk with my eyedropper, and this time I'm going to get a lighter version of that color. I'm just going to go along the top edge of this circle, closer to white, and I'll zoom in and add a little bit of shine, just like that. That will help it seem shiny. Now it's starting to have a little bit of form, it doesn't look so flat. It actually looks 3D, which is what we're going for but right here, we've got this bottom edge of the yolk and it's looking a little harsh, I feel like the egg would blend in together, the view part of the white on top of the yolk. Let's just soften this line a little bit. We're going to go ahead and choose the eraser tool. If we tap and hold the eraser tool, it's going to choose the same brush we had as our brush as our eraser. I've got the grunge brush as my eraser. I want to make sure that I am on the layer with the egg yolk, which I am. Maybe I'll increase the brush size a little bit, I'm at 40 percent or so. Then I'm basically just going to erase a little bit of this bottom edge. That's going to just soften it and blend the yolk into the egg white just a little bit, so they blend together a little bit. I'm just very lightly erasing a part of that bottom edge. Our egg is looking pretty good, but it does look like it's floating in space, so let's add a little shadow on the bottom to ground this. I'm going to go ahead and make a new layer, so tap the plus sign to make a new layer, and then drag that layer underneath all the other layers. So it's on the bottom. Then I'm going to sample this blue color that I have for my background and then I'm going to get a darker, more saturated version of that blue, so I'm going that way. Right under the bottom edge of the egg, I'm just going to add a little bit of darkness just to make it seem like there's a bit of a shadow grounding this piece to the surface that it's on. Then get an even darker, more saturated version of that same color, a little bit smaller of a brush size and come in really close to the edge and just paint in a little bit of a shadow. I always like to do two values in my drop shadows, makes it look a little bit more realistic. With that, this fried egg is all done. Congratulations on finishing this piece. In our next piece, we're going to be drawing a really cool piece of pizza. We're going to be using sketching some more, including the liquefy tool to alter our sketch, and we're going to be introducing clipping mask and using line details. I'll see you in the next lesson. [MUSIC] 12. No.4 - Pizza: Welcome to Drawing 4. Today we are drawing a droopy piece of pizza. I'm excited about this one. We're going to be doing another sketch today and then I'm going to show you how we're going to use the liquefy tool to alter our sketch and make it a little bit more interesting. We're also going to be introducing clipping mask for the first time, which are an incredibly useful tool in Procreate. Finally, we've got a really fun visual style for this one. It's almost like a comic book. We're going to add some line details on top of our flat color. It's really cool. Let's do it. We're going to go to the plus sign and we're going to open our kickstart course canvas template. We're going to start this off with a sketch. So we're going to go to our brushes into the sketching set and choose the 6B pencil. Then for our colors, we're just going to choose a dark gray or black. We're going to draw a 3D piece of pizza. We'll start off by drawing a triangular shape. Then we'll connect it like that. Then to make it 3D, we're just going to draw a line straight down like that on either end of this bottom line. Then we'll connect those two like that. Then we're going to draw the crust of the pizza. I'm just going to basically do a loop around like that. Then from the most curved part of this loop, we're going to draw a parallel line to this line here. So this is going to be our crust and then connect it with a curved line that's similar to this curved line. Now we have a 3D piece of pizza. So let's also add a wavy line right here to designate where the sauce is, and then a few pieces of pepperoni. I'm going to draw one that goes off the edge like there, one that's here in the middle and then maybe one more on this side. Like that. We've drawn a pretty flat piece of pizza, but I think it would look more interesting if the piece was drooping down, like you pick it up and it's drippy and drooping. Instead of having to draw a drooping piece of pizza, we can actually start with this flat piece of pizza and use the liquefy tool to warp it into the shape we want. Let's do that. We're going to go to the Adjustments menu. This is I think the first time that we've used it. So adjustments menu, which is a little magic wand, and then down here next to the bottom, we've got liquefy. So tap on liquefy. Then you'll want to make sure you have push selected. There's a few different options, but we want to choose push. Let's see the size. I'm going to start at 68 percent and we'll see if we need to adjust that. My pressure is set to 75. My momentum, actually that can go all the way down distortion to be all the way down. All I'm really worried about the size here. Then I'm going to zoom out a little bit. I think I actually will make the brush size a little bit bigger. I'm going to go all the way big with my brush size. Now I'm just going to basically just paint some strokes down, and off towards the bottom is where I'm doing it. Until the pizza looks a little droopy, like this. You can make your brush size a little smaller if you need to fine tune your shape a little bit more. But I think that's looking pretty good. So now I've got a drooping piece of pizza. I'm just going to re-center this. I'm going to go up to the transform tool, which is little arrow, and just put that in the middle of my canvas. Before we move on to color, I just want to add a couple little other things to make it seem even more drippy. I'm going to add some dripping cheese coming down the bottom there. Maybe another little drip right there, and then maybe a smaller one right there. You can have it be as drippy as you want, but just adding those little details and then we'll be ready to color. Let's go up to our layers and we're going to reduce the visibility of our sketch. We're going to tap the little n right here in the layers, and then just slide this opacity slider down so it's just barely visible. Then we're going to create a new layer by tapping the plus sign. Then we're going to move the layer to the bottom so that our sketch layer is on top. Just like that. Now, we're going to be doing this pizza with quite a few layers. You can imagine it's a pizza, so everything is in layers. We've got the crust, we've got our sauce, you've got a cheese, and we've got our toppings. We're going to be creating layers to that degree. To do all that, I'm going to introduce a really useful feature called clipping masks. Let's start with the crust. We're going to go over to our colors. We're going to go into the oranges for the hue, and we're going to choose a nice brown color for the crust. Then over in the brushes, we're going to go to the inking set, and we're going to choose our trusty studio pen. Now we're going to basically just trace over the entire shape of the pizza crust. I like to rotate my canvas a lot as I draw. It just makes it easier for me to draw at certain angles. Just go ahead and trace the entire outline of the pizza crust. Once you have a completely closed shape, you can go ahead and fill that with color drop. Great. Now I want the edge of the pizza to be a lighter color because that's like the inside of the pizza. It's not as cooked like a top would be. Let's go ahead and choose a lighter version of this color. I'm just going to go up here closer to like a light tan color. I want to create basically a shape within this shape. But I actually want to do this on a separate layer. There's some benefits to doing that, which I'll talk about in just a second. So we're going to use what's called a clipping mask. We're going to go up to our layers. We're going to tap the plus sign. Before we do the clipping mask, I just want to show you what it looks like. Just follow along with me. I'm basically going to trace this edge of the pizza right here to create the side of it. I'm going to make a shape that's bigger than what I need. I've traced this line. Then I've made a closed shape that's just bigger than what I need, and I'm going to fill that with color drop. Now I'm going to go to my layers. I'm going to tap this new layer that I made and I'm going to choose clipping mask. Now you can see everything except what was in the shape of the main, like the pizza, has been hidden. So whatever I drew on this layer will only show up if it's within the shape of the layer below. It's just like Alpha lock where you can control the shape and draw within the shape. But this time it's on a separate layer and there's some really good benefits to that. I could go back and add texture to just this color or this color. You can manipulate them independent from each other just like you can when you have separate layers. Clipping masks are super useful. I use them all the time. So let's keep going. Next we're going to draw our cheese. Go ahead and create a new layer. This is going to be above your pizza crusts layers. Then for the colors we can choose a nice bright yellow for our cheese. I'm going to just trace over this edge this time. It doesn't have to perfectly align with the edge because you imagine cheese would be sticking out a little bit more than, wouldn't be perfectly within that shape. Then on this edge you can make it a little wavy and wonky and draw in your drips. Doesn't have to be perfect. That's why we're not going to use a clipping mask for this part. I'm going to do it by hand. Don't forget to draw in all your drips. Then once you have a closed shape, you can fill it with color drop. I can see here I need to just color that spot in. But that's looking pretty good. Now, I'm going to add my toppings and I'm actually going to use a clipping mask on the cheese layer to do my toppings. So I'm going to go up to my layers. I'm going to tap the plus sign to create a new layer. I'm going to tap that layer and choose clipping mask from the menu. We've just set that layer to be clipping mask. Now I'm going to go into reds and choose a nice deep red for my pepperoni. Now I can just trace over my pepperoni shapes and color them in. Now this is clipped to the cheese layer. I'm drawing these shapes within that shape. Here. Here we go. One last thing I need is a little bit of sauce in-between the cheese and the crust. I'm just going to create a layer in-between those two. I'll tap the light part of the crust, that layer, and then tap the Plus sign. You can also just reorder your layers, but we want this new layer to be below the cheese, above the crust. Then I'll choose an orangier color may be a little lighter for my sauce. I'll just come in here and just draw that in like that. Color it in. There we go. We're all done with our sketch. We can go up to our layers and we can uncheck the little box to hide the sketch. For this piece, we could go in and add texture like we have been doing on our other pieces but I thought it would be fun to explore a different visual style. We're going to add all our details using line work, which is basically lines to show the texture and show a little bit of contouring and things like that. We're going to create a layer above all of our other layers. You can tap your topmost artwork layer, tap the plus sign, and that will create a layer right above all the other layers. Then we're going to choose black as our color. Then for the brush, we're going to actually go back to the sketching set and choose that 6B pencil. I think this brush has some nice texture for adding some line work. Now we're ready to add a little bit of texture. I'm going to start on the crest. I'll set my brush size, I'd like 37 percent. I'm just going to add some lines that follow the contours of the crust. It's this curve. I'm just going to repeat those across the crust like that. Do a few more. You can also use heavier pressure and you can get thicker lines if you wanted to mix up how heavy the line weights are. But these lines help give the crust a little bit more dimension and also a little bit of texture. Just like that. You can add some little ones in-between. I think that looks good. Now I'm going to add a little bit of outline. I don't want to outline the whole thing. I'm just going to trace some of the outlines like this. Then I'll stop, zoom in and start again. Then I'll do it on this edge here and then maybe add a little line curve like that to show almost a little shininess, I guess. Can follow this line here, start and stop. Go here, come maybe around this side like that, add another little line. I'll do there. Like that. That's starting to look pretty good. Again, lots of lines that start and stop. You can see I can have these tapered ends to my brushstrokes. I'm doing a light heavy light to get those tapered ends. If I just did heavy pressure the whole time, it'd be this very blunt and so I'm using different pressure to get those tapered ends to my lines. Let's do the bottom edge. We'll do a few lines along the bottom. Then I'll add a little bit of texture. There might be like, there's all those air pockets in the pizza. I'm just going to add a bunch of dots just to show a little bit of texture. We have to fill it in super evenly. Having it be a little less uniform, it's actually a little more ideal. I'm just adding some little groupings of dots. Then over here on this edge of the pizza, I'm not going to outline the whole thing. Maybe just add a couple of lines like that. On the pepperoni, I'm just going to outline the bottom edge of each pepperoni. Almost like it's a shadow, focusing all my lines towards the bottom to make it seem like there's a light sauce a little bit. Then add a few more dots to give this pepperoni some texture, again, focusing my detail towards the bottom of these shapes, like that. Let's do our sauce right here. I'm just going to add a few lines going across like that. Then I'm going to add more lines right above where the cheese and the sauce meets emanating out. These lines will give me, a nice flow. We will add a few more. Make it seem like the sauce has this movement, which is really nice. Just size them curvy lines. You don't have to add too many. But I think looks pretty good. Then all over the surface of the pizza, I want to add a little bit of texture. For that, I'm just going to add these groupings of dashes here and there over the surface of the pizza. This will make it seem like it's not perfectly smooth. Maybe there's some bumps and lumps and these are the shadows of those bumps. That's what I'm trying to do here. This is obviously very different visual style than we've been doing in this class so far. It's very stylized. We're just making choices about how to represent these things, how to represent this texture. We can use little dots to represent the bready texture of the crust and little hash marks to represent the texture on top of the pizza. It's all an artistic choice, but I think it looks pretty cool altogether. It definitely has almost a comic book vibe to it. It looks really cool. The last thing I want to do for this piece is add a background color. Let's go up to our layers. Let's go here to background color. We're going to choose, I don't know, maybe a nice orange color. I think that looks pretty good. This pizza piece is all done. Congratulations on finishing your fourth drawing in this course. I hope you had fun exploring a new visual style with this one. I definitely think it is a really simple style that you can apply to a lot of different subjects. Have fun exploring more with this style after the course, of course. For our last lesson, for our food theme week, we're going to be drawing a donut, so finishing things up with dessert. In this tutorial, I'm going to tell you how you can make the most out of a single brush. I'll see you on the next lesson. 13. No.5 - Donut: [MUSIC] Hello and welcome to Drawing 5, our final drawing of the first week of this course. We are wrapping up our food week as you do with dessert. Today we're drawing a doughnut. In this lesson, I'm going to teach you how you can make the most out of a single brush. We're just going to be using one brush for the entire drawing. Let's do it. Let's go ahead and create a new canvas. We're going to use our Kick-start Course canvas template. We'll start this piece by setting our background color. We're just going to do that right off the bat. You go up to your layers and then go to background color, and the color that we're going to choose is a light warm pink. For the hue, you're going to want to go into, not quite these bright magentas here, but a little more closer to red, and then just a very light pink like that. If you go closer to red, it'll get warmer or it'll get cooler if you go closer to the purple. Just a nice warm pink like that. For this illustration, we're going to be learning how to make the most out of a single brush. We're just going to use one brush for the entire illustration. Let's go over to our brushes, and this brush is in the painting set and it's called Tamar. I'm probably saying that wrong. Tamar. Go ahead and choose that brush. Then we're going to go to the colors and we're going to start by drawing the red part of the doughnut. Let's go into our oranges and we're going to actually start with a really light color and then we're going to build up in darkness by adding darker colors on top. Let's start with just a very pale orange, not quite white, kind of creamy, but kind of orange. For my brush size, I'm going to start around 20 percent, but we're going to be adjusting the brush size a lot and that's one of the ways we can get a lot of mileage out of just a single brush. For a doughnut, we're just going to start by drawing a rounded rectangle shape like this and color it all in. Make it a little bulgy at the top and bottom, curving that, rounding it out a little bit more, but overall it's a rounded rectangle shape. Then just make sure it's completely filled in with color like that. You can use your Transform tool to rotate it, center it if you'd like. Now, we're going to be adding some additional coloration to this doughnut, but first, let's draw our icing. We're going to go to the layers and we're going to make the icing on a new layer. Go ahead and tap the plus sign to create a new layer. Then for the icing color, I'm just going to start by sampling the background color and I'm going to choose a variation on that color and that's going to help the colors overall feel a little bit more cohesive just by starting with that color and making a variation on it. I'm going to go up to my colors and I'm just going to choose a darker, more saturated pink. I think that color is pretty good. You can always paint a swatch to see how all the colors look together. I'll just undo that. Now I'm going to create the shape of the icing. I've been using a pretty big brush size, but now I'm going to go a little smaller. I'm at six percent. I'm going to draw a line of drippy icing, so a wavy line that follows the same curve right here. Let's go ahead and do that. Make some curves big and some small, so something like that. Then I'm going to just draw the rest of the shape of the icing like that. Then for the doughnut hole, before I fill this in with color, I'm going to draw a line that curves like that and that's the opening of the doughnut hole. Then just like I made a curvy line here for the icing, I'm going to make a curvy line there as well, so like that. That's the whole icing shape and now I can color this in. You can make the brush size a little bit bigger to make it go a bit faster, but the bigger your brush size is, the less control you're going to have over your brushstrokes. That's something to keep in mind, but it's okay if this looks a little bit messy. That's the style we're going for, is something loose and messy, so don't worry if it's not perfect. Just keep coloring in until it's completely filled in. You can even go over your original lines if you wanted to make them a little more opaque. We're almost done here. It's still pretty messy, but overall, I think that's pretty well filled in. Now we've got our main shapes created. It's time to add some additional coloring to this piece. We're going to start with the doughnut part. We're going to go down to that first layer with the doughnut. We're going to turn on our wonderful friend, Alpha Lock. Take two fingers and swipe to the right. Make sure you enable Alpha Lock. You can also again tap the layer and choose Alpha Lock from the menu. Then I'm going to sample this base color of the doughnut. Then I'm going to go into my colors and choose a darker, more saturated version. It's pretty orange but with a little bit of black so it's not all the way at the edge of this disc. It's in a little bit like that. I'm going to make the brush size a little bigger. I'm going to try around 18 percent. I'm going to draw basically a line, very lightly, go back and forth across here like that. Then a doughnut has a lighter part in the middle where it's fried [LAUGHTER] when they flip it over. I'm going to leave a little line of white there or that light color there and then just go over this a couple times like that. I can see all this great texture from the brush because if I use really heavy pressure, I'm going to lose a lot of that texture so light pressure so we can see the texture of that brush, but that's overall looking pretty good. Now I want to add some shadows under the icing, so I'm going to get a color that's darker, more saturated, a little redder. Just going a little closer to red. Then I want to make my brush size smaller now because I want a lot of control to make these really small shadows under the icing , like five percent. We'll try that. Just add where they curve up like that. You can add some shadows underneath. Smaller shadows where they dip down, bigger shadows where they curve up like that. It's totally fine to keep it loose and messy. You can use light pressure to show more of that texture, but I think that's looking pretty good like that. Then I'm also going to add a little bit of this darker color at the bottom because if the doughnut is sitting down on a surface, it would be shadowed at the bottom, so go a little bit bigger with my brush size. I'm at 14 percent. Then just add a little of that darker color right along the edge. Now let's work on the icing. Let's go to the layers, we're going to go to the icing layer. Select that layer and turn on Alpha lock so two fingers swiped to the right. Let's start by adding some shadows so we'll start with this pink color here. Go to colors and get just a little bit darker and more saturated. I want to do the side of the doughnut a little bit darker than the top so I'll try 24 percent for my brush size and this side of the doughnut, I'm going to paint in this darker color. If you find that's not dark enough, you can get a little bit darker of a color like that. That way the top of the doughnut is now bit lighter than the bottom. You could also come in and get a lighter color if it's not light enough on top and you could lighten that like that. Now I'm going to get an even darker color, darker and more saturated to paint a little bit of shadows on the underside of the icing to make it look like it has volume. It's a little rounded. Going smaller with my brush size now because I want to have more control over my brush strokes and I'm just going to add some shadows the underside of this here. I'm going to now keep it loose and messy, it doesn't have to be perfect. Here we go. Then also here as well. They should have shadowed the doughnut in the middle of the doughnut hole, but I think I can do that. We've added a bit of shadows, now let's add some highlights. We're going to start with our base doughnut color and then we're going to choose a lighter version of that. We're almost into white. It's a very pale pink. I'm still using a pretty small brush size. I'm just going to lightly paint in a little bit of highlights on one side of these little [LAUGHTER] drips of icing. Then over here on this side, maybe a little bit bigger with my brush size. That's maybe a little bit too big. I'm at seven percent, add some highlights going around the edge there. You could add them here around the doughnut hole either side. These are just the shiny parts of the doughnut so I'm going to paint those in. I can get an even smaller brush size and come in and add some really bright highlights like that. Just using a little bit heavier pressure on just one side of these drips. Looking pretty good. Like I mentioned, I forgot to shadow the inside of the doughnut hole so I'm going to go back to that layer really quick. Sample this very dark version of the color and then just dark in that middle part because that would naturally be a little bit darker. Here we go. That's looking a little bit better. We don't want a super plain doughnut, let's add a little bit of sprinkles to the top of our doughnut. We're going to go ahead and create a layer above the other two layers. Tap the plus sign and we'll create a layer above the other two. Then for the colors, we're going to just choose a bunch of rainbowy colors so you can have fun here and use whatever colors you want. We're going to use a pretty small brush size. I'm at four percent, that's still a bit big so I'm going to go down even more two percent there. I think that's pretty good. Just draw some little lines like that, just all over. Switch to another color and we'll do orange. Just change up the angles. You can also do white and some yellow. I'm just going through all the different colors here and adding a bunch of sprinkles. I'll do some green. Definitely I think we need some blue in here so I'm going to choose a nice bright blue. Then maybe some red, do a little bit of red, maybe a deep pink like that. I think I've got plenty of sprinkles. I am going to add a little bit of shadows right under the sprinkles. So I'm going to go back to my icing layer, I'm going to choose this dark pink that I have on the shadows here and then just add a little shadow on the side of each sprinkle. I'm trying to keep this shadow always on the same side so either on the bottom or over to the left. Again, we're not going for perfection, we're keeping this one loose. But these will help the sprinkles look a little more grounded on top of the doughnut. Some more. Our doughnut is all done. Let's just add a little bit of a shadow underneath. Let's go to the layers, we're going to tap the plus sign to create a new layer and we'll move the shadow to the bottom or the latest new layer to the bottom and of course, we're going to start with our background color. We're going to go up to our colors and choose just a little bit darker, more saturated version of that color and we'll need to up our brush size. I'm at 20 percent and I'm just going to paint in a little bit of a shadow, starting out with a really light color. Then I'll get a little bit of darker and more saturated color. Paint that in, I might go even darker, maybe even smaller with my brush size so I can get in there and add that nice dark shadow right underneath the doughnut. [MUSIC] Here we go. This doughnut is all done and ready to enjoy. We have reached the last lesson for our food week, our first week of the kick-start course. Congratulations on completing all five illustrations. In the next lesson, we're going to wrap up things for the week by doing a little bit of reflection on everything that we've learned and then I'll let you know what's coming up for Week 2. [MUSIC] 14. Week One - Reflect & Share: Congratulations on finishing the first week of this course. I hope you had fun with the five different food drawings that we made this week. I know there's potentially a lot of new information and I hope it wasn't too overwhelming for you. Don't worry if you can't remember everything that you learned this week, that is okay. We're going to be going through that information again and again, especially some of those really useful features we're going to be using them a lot over the course of this course. You will notice that they are features that we use a lot when we're making digital art. Things like Alpha Lock, clipping masks, working with layers, choosing colors, and things like that. At this point, I want you to give yourself a big hug or big high-five for me, and then take a little bit of time to reflect on the work that you did this week. I want you to go through the five pieces you made and pick out your favorite one and do a little reflection on what you liked about that piece. Was it a particular tool that we use or feature, visual style, or was it just fun to do? I want you to go to the Projects and Resources tab of this class and click "Create Project". I want you to share one, your progress tracker all filled out for the week. Then two, I want you to share what that favorite piece was and some insights into what you felt about it or what you learned. I'm so excited to see your artwork and read what you thought about the process. I hope you had fun with these first five drawings and you're excited to do some more. 15. What's coming in Week Two: [MUSIC] I want to let you know what's coming next for the kick-start your creativity course. Our theme for Week 2 is going to be plants. I've got five really fun plant tutorials to continue helping you to build your skills. Congratulations again for finishing this week. I am so proud of you and I will see you in the next lessons. Stay creative. 16. Intro to Week Two: Plants: Hello and welcome to Week 2. This week we're going to be drawing plants. I think plants are such a great subject matter for doing hand-drawn illustrations. They are by nature organic shapes and so they're a little hard to mess up. They're very forgiving. I've got five really fun drawings for you this week. We're going to be covering a range of plants subjects, including leaves, flowers, seeds and fungi. This week I'm going to be introducing you to blend modes, which are a very important tool in digital art. You'll learn about several of Procreate's blend modes and how they can be used to add shadows and highlights, texture and detail and more. You'll also get lots of practice with things like working with layers, clipping mask, using the color fill tool, select and transform, liquefy and more. Before we jump into our drawings this week, I just wanted to talk with you a little bit about the process that you're currently going through in establishing your creative practice or your creative habit. In the first week of this course, you might have been really excited and just blown through the first five lessons in a matter of a couple of days, which is totally fine. There is nothing wrong with that, but I will encourage you, if you can, to pace yourself a little bit and try and show up once every day or every other day and do a lesson. This is really going to help you in establishing a consistent creative routine that isn't going to seem overwhelming. If you spend a lot of time all at once in one day, that's going to be hard to sustain in the days to come. If you finish one of the lessons and you find you want to keep going and keep drawing, here's what I would suggest. Create a new Canvas and try to redraw the thing that you just drew from memory. You could always revisit the course if you need a refresher on some of the skills, but see how much that you can remember or you can try and push yourself and maybe try that same subject in a different artistic style or in some other way. Repeat the drawing, see what you remember and then maybe put your own spin on it. Another tip as you're establishing your habit. This is more about making the time versus finding the time. If you already have the time set aside in your day, you're one step closer to achieving your goal. I would encourage you right now to spend some time thinking about what time of day is going to be the most successful for you in spending some time doing something creative. For me, my most successful time is always after I put the kids in bed, I will sit down on the couch and draw on my iPad. Maybe the daytime works better for you. Think about if you want to do it, maybe right after breakfast, start your day off with a little creativity or if you want to treat it as a break from your daily tasks, you could do it at midday or during your lunch. Designate a time to do your drawing each day, but you don't have to be super rigid with it. Allowing yourself to be flexible is going to give you a greater chance of success when it comes to being consistent. If you miss your window for the day, you miss your designated time, it's okay to do it at a different time and allow yourself to be flexible. In fact, experimenting with your times might lead you to an even better time to practice your creativity. Let's go ahead and get started with our first drawing of this week. 17. No.6 - Monstera Leaf: Welcome to Drawing number 6 and your first drawing of plants week. Today we're going to be drawing a monstera leaf. We're going to be talking a bit more about sketching and how we can start with basic shapes and add onto them to make something more complex. I'm going to be giving you some tips on choosing color and how you can use the eraser tool to draw. In addition to that, I'm excited to introduce you to blend modes, they are a really useful tool in digital art. We're going to learn about the multiply and the screen blend modes and how we can use those to add shadows and highlights to our work. Let's get started. Let's begin by going to the upper right corner and tapping the plus sign so we can use our Kickstart course canvas templates. I'll go ahead and tap that and open it up. We're going to start this drawing out with a sketch. For the sketch, I'm going to go into the sketching set, and I'm going to choose the 6B pencil, that's my favorite brush to sketch with from this set. Then for my colors, I'm just selecting a black or dark gray is great for sketching. As I've talked to you about already a little bit, it's easier to start off with basic simple shapes when you're doing a sketch. We're going to actually do this leaf using a circle to start out. Just go ahead and sketch a loose circle, just like that, doesn't have to be perfect. Then we're going to add some more complex shapes onto this circle. Let's divide the circle in half and this is going to represent the two halves of our leaves. I gave it a little bend here and then I made the lines extend past the circle, that's going to be like the little pointy part of our leaf. Then I'll draw the bottom of the leaf, that pointed spot just by starting here at this line I drew and then drawing a curve line that connects back to my circle, just like this on either side. Then for the top part here, I'm going to zoom in a little bit. I'm going to start at the line and I'm going to draw an S shape that comes out of it. Come out, curve it up, and then curve it back over to connect. Then do the same thing on the other side. Come out, go up, and then curve to connect like that. It should look like a U. If it's easier for you to draw it as a U, that works too, just like that. Now, I'm going to draw some veins for the leaf. Again, starting at the middle, I want to make it pretty symmetrical so I'm going to draw first a s-shaped line like that. Then the same thing on the other side, just curve almost following this line a little bit. Then I'll draw some lines that go down, like I'm starting to curve them down as I go closer to the tip. Then the same thing on the other side. This is it for this sketch. If you remember the transition from sketch to final art, we're going to go up to our layers, we're going to create a new layer, so tap the plus sign to create a new layer. Then you're going to move the sketch layer to the top, so you can tap, hold and drag the layer so that it's on the top so you want your sketch on the top. Then we're going to reduce the opacity of the sketch so it's just barely visible. We do that by tapping the little n on the sketch layer. Tap the "N" and then just slide this opacity slider down until it's just barely visible, just so you can see it. Then just make sure that you have Layer 2 selected, so the bottom-most layer. Let's go ahead and grab a different brush. We're going to go over to our brushes, so tap the brush icon, and we're going to go into the inking set. The brush we're going to be using is studio pen. We've been using this brush a lot and it's really great for making these first initial shapes. Then finally we're going to choose a color. We're going to go over to our colors and of course, we're making a leaf and we're going to have it be green. We're going to move the hue, a little circle for the hue over here. I'm choosing a middle of the line green, not too close to warm, not too close to cold, just right here in the middle. Then for the color, I want something that's not super dark but pretty dark. Now, let's start drawing. We're going to be tracing the shape of our leaves using these lines that we added to the circle to make it more of a leaf shape. I'm going to start here down at the bottom and just trace around, just like this all the way round. If you can do it in one continuous line, you're going to get the cleanest edge all the way around without any bumps from starting and stopping. It might take a little bit of practice, but you can always undo and try again so that you can build up that skill. Once you have a completely closed shape, you can fill it with color drop. We've drawn our leaf shape, now we're going to add the veins of the leaf. We're going to do this on a separate layer. Let's go up to the Layers panel, tap the plus sign, and that will create a layer right above our leaf. Then we're going to set this layer to be a clipping mask, so some of these lines might go over the edge of this shape. We're going to tap it and we're going to choose clipping mask. Now, anything that we draw on this layer, that is the clipping mask, will only show up if it's within the shape of the layer below. Let's go ahead and choose a color for our veins. We want a lighter green for this. We're just going to just move the color picker circle a little higher into these lighter values here. Here's a little tip for when you're working with colors. Whenever you're changing the color to be either lighter or darker value of a base color like this leaf, you also want to change the hue a little bit. If you change the value, you also shift the hue at the same time. For example, when I'm starting with green and I want a lighter green, I'll change the hue to be a little warmer, I'll push it closer to yellow. Then when I'm choosing darker greens, I'll push the hue a little closer to blue, so it's a cooler color. Which makes a lot of sense when you think about it, highlights being light and bright and warm, and shadows being something cold and so they're cool. Just something to keep in mind when you're choosing colors. I'm just going to push over into the yellow or green, so it's a little bit warmer and then I can just do a little swatch on my leaf just to make sure I like the color and then I'll undo that. Let's choose a different brush to do these veins. We're going to go into the brushes and we're actually just going to choose the brush right below studio pen and this one's called dry ink. This brush has a little bit more texture. It's a little bit more interesting than just the studio pen. I want these veins to be lines with nice tapered ends on them. Maybe do a little bit of practice before drawing your final lines. But if you do a flicking motion at the end, do it really fast at the end, you'll get these nice tapered lines at the end. Another way you can get a tapered line is by doing light pressure at the beginning and then working towards heavy pressure. I always recommend practicing with pressure as much as you do anything else because pressure is a really important skill to master when working in digital art. You can try light pressure, heavy pressure, light pressure to really control what lines you get. Once you've done a little bit of practice, you can move on to actually drawing your lines. For this line in the middle, maybe I'll start down at the bottom and I'll do light pressure and have your pressure towards the end up here. It's always useful to rotate your Canvas, you can get the best angle for your arm. That's what I'm doing here to do some of these others. Starting with light pressure here at the tip. I'm not ever getting too heavy with my pressure on this one. Go around and do all of your veins, it's going to trace over the lines that you made in your sketch. If you want to try doing it the other way, you can always start with heavier pressure near the middle and then do like that flicking motion at the end, but I like doing it the other way. Here we go. We've done all of our veins for the leaf. At this point, we're all done with this sketch, so we're going to turn it off. We're going to go up to our layers and we're going to uncheck the visibility checkbox for the sketch layer. Then I'm going to tap back over to the leaf. You might notice it doesn't exactly look like a monstera leaf because monstera leaves are characteristically full of holes. They have all these splits on the end and then there's holes in the middle. We're going to use our eraser tool to make this leaf look more like what we want it to look like. Let's go into our eraser tool and we want to go into the inking set which I'm currently in and make sure you choose the studio pen brush because we want our eraser strokes to match the outline of this shape that we made previously. Choose studio pen as your eraser. Now, you can rotate your canvas. But we're going to draw erase, so we're going to erase away these teardrop shapes into our leaf. They're like curving teardrops like that, then you can erase the middle like that. You can add just a few of these here or there throughout your leaf, so like a long curving teardrop shape. Maybe I'll add a smaller one down here like that. Let's do another one on this side. Maybe one right here. You don't have to do them in every single section, just a few of them. Then another thing that these leaves have are these little holes, so you can come in and just add these little oblong holes in your leaves, wherever you think it looks good. One there, maybe I'll add one right there. I think that looks pretty good. Like I said, you can add as many as you like. We've done the bulk of the drawing for this piece, the next thing that I want to show you is how to add a little bit of shading to it. I'm going to actually introduce you to something we haven't used yet and that is procreates blend modes. Blend modes are a really useful feature, but they're often really confusing, so we're going to be using them a lot this week in our plant drawings, but today, I want to show you how you can add some shadows and highlights to this leaf using blend modes. Previously, when we wanted to add shadows, we just picked a color and then got a darker version and then painted it, but if we did that on this one and maybe I'll just show you, you don't have to follow along, I'll just turn on Alpha Lock really quick. Like I said, you don't have to follow along, but if I just got a darker green and a different brush, I'll just pick a random one. If I shaded one side of this leaf, my veins aren't getting shaded, there's still light right there and they should be getting all dark at the same way because they're all on the leaf. That way, it doesn't work, so instead, we're going to use a blend mode, so let me undo that. I'll just go back to that color for you guys and you can turn off Alpha Lock. We're going to use a blend mode and we're going to use another clipping mask. Let's tap back to our vein layer and create a new layer, and then we're going to tap this new layer and choose clipping mask. Because these clipping masks are in a stack, they're all going to be clipped to this parent layer at the bottom. Now, we're ready to set this layer's blend mode. Just to explain what a blend mode is, it's a setting on a layer that dictates how that layer interacts with everything below it. There's a lot of blend modes and they all do different stuff, and the best way to get to know them is just experiment and see what they do, but we're going to be using them a lot this week, so you'll get to see a lot of them. Let's go ahead and set this layer's blend mode. We're going to tap the n right here and below the opacity slider, we have this list, and these are all the blend modes. Then I'll do something a little bit different, but let's go ahead and scroll to the top of this list until the Multiply blend mode. Like I mentioned, blend modes have an effect on all the layers below them, and this particular one has a darkening effect. They can be a little complicated, but overall, this one has a darkening effect and it's super useful for adding shadows. Let's put it into action so you can see what it does. Let's go ahead and choose a different brush. Let's go to our brushes and we're going to go into the charcoal set. Let's choose the 6B compress brush. This brush is really nice. It has a lot of great texture and it has really soft edges, so it's perfect for shading, so 6B compressed. When you're working with blend modes, the color that you choose does matter. Let's go ahead and choose a really dark color, like almost black, and if I paint with that, it's going to look very black on this layer that we have a blend mode set to. Go ahead and choose a very light color like an almost white, not quite white and paint with that. Now, that has less of a darkening effect. If we were to choose white, that would be pretty much invisible. That's how the multiply blend mode works. The darker your color here in the color picker, the more intense that darkening effect is going to be. If you were to choose a color that wasn't just black or gray, let's choose orange, you would paint with that and the color would also interact with the colors, the layer below. That's something to keep in mind. If you have a really saturated colors, you're going to see all that color when you use this blend mode. It can get a little confusing, but don't worry, we're going to be using this blend mode repeatedly in this course and you'll really get to know it. Let's go ahead and undo all of those little marks that we made and let's go back to our colors. We're going to stick with grays for now, so let's go over into a middle gray, so right here at nine o'clock and then let's go up a little bit, I don't want it too dark, so just go a little up into a lighter value of gray. My brush size, I'm going to go all the way up, so it's at 100 percent, and then let's add a little bit of shadow here on the right side of the leaf. Using very light pressure, I'm just softly going over that edge a little bit and darkening that up and then I'm going to do the same thing on the other side. Just really lightly, if I were to go really heavy with my pressure, I'd lose some of this really nice texture of the brush. I'm sticking to light pressure so that I can see that texture, and then we'll do the same thing right here in the middle of the leaf. Just like that really light pressure. Now, it's pretty subtle, but if you zoom in, you can see that not only is this darkening our leaf, but it's darkening the vein too. Because if we look at our layers, this layer with the blend mode is going to darken everything else below it. That's the beauty of blend modes. I can use this blend mode and I can darken multiple layers at the same time. Let's go ahead and add a little bit of a highlight now to the middle of the leaf. We'll make that a little shinier and give this even more dimension. We can't use this same layer to do that because anything we put on this layer is only going to have a darkening effect, so we need to create another layer for our highlights. Let's go ahead and tap the plus sign and we'll create a new layer. We are also going to have this layer via clipping mask, so tap it and choose Clipping Mask, and then for this layer, we are going to use a blend mode as well to do our highlights, but we're going to choose a different blend mode. Let's tap the "N" here in our list of blend modes, we're going to choose Screen. Screen is almost the opposite of Multiply, it has a lightening effect. Let's experiment with our colors so we can see what it does. Right now, I have that light gray selected and if I were to draw with that, it's going to have a really bright lightening effect because this is such a light color. If I were to choose white, it would look almost completely white, and if I were to choose a darker color, it would have less of a lightening effect. If I choose black, it does almost nothing. We want to choose a fairly dark gray to just add a subtle highlight, so let's undo all that. I'm going to choose a color that is pretty dark, like a really dark gray and then I can test that out. Now, this looks a little washed out, I think for a highlight, so let's put a little color into it. Just like with the Multiply blend mode, if you choose a color like this orange, it's going to both lightened and infuse that color into it. Instead of just a gray for the highlight, maybe we'll do like a warm green. We'll start here going pretty dark, but maybe like a really dark, warm green. Let's try that out and see how that works. That looks really good. It's still a little bright, so maybe a little less saturated like that and play around with the colors until you get something that looks good to you and just lightly go over that little area on each side of the leaf, so right here and right here. Now, this leaf has a lot of dimension to it. It doesn't look flat, it almost looks like it's doing this wave where it goes up and down and that's because of the shading. As we've seen in this piece and with some of the other pieces we've done, adding shading can really help a PC more dimensional and more interesting and just less flat and boring. We can use blend modes to help us add shading to our work. Before we wrap this piece up, I think it'll be great to add a color for our background, so it's not just a boring white background. Let's go up to our layers and go to background Color. I'm going to choose a blue green for my hue, and then I'm just going to go down this way just a little bit to make this nice, dusty aqua color. With that finishing touch, we're all done with this Monstera leaf. Congratulations on finishing your first piece of Week 2. I hope you enjoyed learning about blend modes. If it felt a little overwhelming, don't worry, you're going to really get familiar with them this week and find out all the amazing things that you can do with them. Our next drawing is going to be a cactus. Cacti are one of my favorite subjects to draw and I'm excited for the piece we're going to be doing tomorrow. We're going to be using blend mode some more, you're going to get to know a new blend mode we haven't seen yet. I'm also going to show you how to use the selection tool to draw. I'll see you in the next lesson. 18. No.7 - Cactus: Hello and welcome to drawing number 7 of this course. Today we're going to be drawing one of my favorite subjects, a cactus. Cacti are my go-to subject matter when I don t know what else to draw. I really love the shapes of them and the colors and drawing all those little spikes. I don't know there's something about it I really like. In this lesson, we're going to get to know the select and transform tool. I'm going to show you how you can draw using the selection tool and I'm going to show you how to use blend modes to create this really cool overprint effect. I'm going to teach you about using the color fill tool and I'm going to introduce you to a new blend mode that's going to be perfect for adding texture to your work. Let's get started. Let's create our Canvas for today's drawing. Go up to the plus sign in the upper right and choose our Kickstart Course Canvas template. For this piece, we're actually not going to be drawing anything per se, we're going to be using the selection tool to make all of our shapes. This will create a very fun, playful, angular visual style. Let's go up to the selection tool. It's this little S icon in the row of tools on the left side. The selection tool allows us to make selections of our piece or isolate out parts of our artwork so that we can edit them independently from other parts or move them around and all sorts of things. It's really useful tool today we're using for drawing. You want to make sure that you're in the freehand mode here. I'm going to zoom out just a little bit, so that I can see my whole Canvas. We're going to be drawing a cactus, like a saguaro cactus that the middle stocks and two arms coming out. We'll start off by creating a tall rectangle that's rounded at the top. To do that, all we're going to do is just tap. Start right here. We'll do our first tap. Then you can just tap up, tap to create a tall line like that. Then when you get to the top, you can curve it around like that. Then start tapping your way down. Then when you get to the bottom, you could tap this little gray circle to close your selection. Now you'll see a diagonal line pattern on your screen and that represents everything that's not selected basically. We're going to fill this with color and we're going to do that using Procreate's color fill tool. Down here in your toolbar you'll see a little paint bucket that says Color Fill. If you tap that, it's automatically going to fill your selection with whatever color you have in the color picker. Now we don't want it to be black, so let's go ahead and choose another color. When we do that, it will change the color on the fly right here, which is pretty cool. Let's move our hue into green, maybe a warmer green, so in the yellow-green area. Then we'll move the middle disk. I don't want it to be super saturated like that's really bright neon so I'm going to come into the middle a little bit to make a nice light green like that. Then we can tap the selection tool to exit that mode. We're ready to add the arms of our cactus. We're actually going to be putting these on their own layer, because we're going to be creating this fun overprint effect using the multiply blend mode. To explain the overprint effect, basically in the printing process, when you print two ink colors over each other, they combine with each other to create new colors and that is what we're going to be creating with this piece. Let's go up to the Layers panel. We're going to tap the plus sign to create a new layer. We're going to set this layers blend mode to multiply. To do that, we're going to tap the N. Here in the list of blend modes, we're going to scroll to the top and choose Multiply. Now we're ready to draw the arms of our cactus. Let's go over to the selection tool. Let's draw the right arm of this cacti. I want you to make sure that you draw it overlapping this other shape so we can really see that overprint effect. I'm going to start right here for my first tap and then I'm just going to tap and curve this up. Can make it a little tall, curve it around, tap, then close my shape by tapping that little gray circle. As you can see, it automatically fills with color because we still have the color fill option enabled. Right here where the two shapes overlap, you can see that overprint effect happening where the two colors are combining with each other. But I want to make this arm a different shade of green to make it more interesting. Let's go over to our color picker and I'm going to go a little cooler with my green. A little closer to blue, maybe even a little darker and more saturated as well. I think that looks pretty good. Now I can go ahead and start drawing my other arm as well. I'm going to do it on the same layer and I can just start tapping to do that one. I'm going to start this one a little higher. Start right there and then I'll start drawing this arm. Maybe make it a little taller than the other one. That looks good. I'm going to go ahead and exit out of the selection mode by tapping the selection icon. Let's add a little more color to this piece by adding some fun little flowers to the top of our cacti. We're going to put these flowers on their own layer. Let's go ahead and go to our Layers panel, tap the plus sign to create a new layer and we're going to set this layer's blend mode to multiply as well. Tap the N, and then here in the list, you're going to choose multiply. We're going to make these flowers overlap our cactus a bit so we can see that overprint effect. I'll zoom in a bit so you can see what we're doing. Let's go over to our selection tool and let's do a flower here in the middle. I'm just basically going to, well, tap a half circle like that and then a zigzag shape like that. Let's change the color of this one to be maybe a nice pink, maybe a little bit lighter. You can see the way that the colors interact right there, it's really fun. There we go. I think that's a good color for that one. Then I want my other flowers to be different colors so I'm going to exit out of the selection tool and then tap back into it so that way my color fill can be a different color than this one. Let's do this one next. I'm going to draw a half circle, a U-shape and then a zigzag to make it a spiky flower. Then this one, how about we do that one as yellow? I'll do nice bright yellow for that one. Looks good. Tap out of the selection tool and then tap back in it. We're going to do our last flower on this side. Make our little U-shape, and then our little zigzag. This one will do as orange. I think this flower could be a little bigger, so I'm actually going to use my selection tool to select it and use it to what it's for, I guess, go to the selection tool and now I'm just going to draw a selection around this flower. Tap the little circle to close my selection. All I wanted to do was select it so that I can move it around and it's filling the whole thing with color, which is not what I want, so if this ever happens to you if you make a selection and it just fills with color, you need to turn off the color fill selection. Now we're back in business. I actually have a selection around this flower and I can move it around. I'm going to go to my transform tool, which is the little arrow right here. Now you can see there's a bounding box around this flower. Even though these three flowers are on the same layer, I've only selected this part, so I'm not going to affect those over there, and I can resize it, make a little bit bigger. I can rotate it, and now that I'm looking at my cactus, I wish it was a little more centered. It's like up to the top. Let me show you how you can move multiple layers at once. I'm going to go up to my layers and I'm going to select multiple layers, and the best way to do that is just by swiping to the right on each layer, so swipe to the right on each layer, now they are all in blue that means they're all selected. Now I can go to that transform tool again, a little arrow, and I can move it around so it's a little bit more centered in my Canvas like that. At this point, I think it'd be fun to add a background to this piece, so let's go to our layers, and previously we've always added a background by setting the background color. But if we were to do this and choose this nice bright blue, it's going to look pretty funky because we have all these layers set to be a blend mode. They're also interacting with the background color. We're not going to use that way of making a background this time, so let's go ahead and undo that. We're actually going to create a new layer, so right now I have all these three layers selected, so they say group. I just need to tap so that only one is selected, and now I have my little plus sign again. I've gotten tap the plus sign to create a new layer, and this layer is going to go below all the others. Go ahead and move it down. What we want to do is we want to fill this area with blue except for where our cactus is. We're going to use a selection tool again to make a selection around our cactus. Let's go up to the selection tool, and we're basically just going to draw around the edge of our cactus. It doesn't have to be perfect. In fact, it's better if you have it go over back-and-forth. Not exactly lines. A little bit of white is going to show here and there's gonna be a little overlap with the background where it overlaps, so it does not have to be perfect. In fact, the less perfect it is, the better. Go ahead and just tap all the way around your entire cactus shape. Just make an outline around it. You can even make it less detailed than your original shapes is fine. Just tap, go, we're tapping around. This is going to be a really cool effect once we have it all finished. We're going to tap all the way around and then we are almost done. Right now we have a selection where our cactus is and what we actually want is a selection around where the cactus is, so let's invert this selection. There's an option down here that says invert, you're going to tap that. Now you see that the little diagonal lines have switched, and now we have the area around the cactus selected, and let's just go ahead and fill that with color drop. Let's go to our colors and I'm going to choose a nice bright blue. I think that will look really nice with the other colors. Then I'm just going to fill that area with color drop like that. Now you can see that wherever the cactus overlaps the background, we have this new color here, plus we have a little bit of the white peeking through and it just looks really cool. The only place it's not happening is on this middle layer. Because if we go to our layers, we never set the blend mode of that layer. Let's go ahead and do that now. We're going to tap the n on the center stock layer and we're going to choose multiply. Now you can see we have that multiply overprint effect happening. Now, one little finishing touch on this cactus before we wrap things up, I thought it would be fun to add a little bit of texture to it and to do that, we're going to introduce another blend mode. Let's go up to our layers and we're going to tap, let's start with the center stock, so we'll tap the layer with the center stock. We're going to tap the plus sign to create a new layer, and we're going to set this layer to be a clipping mask. Tap this new layer and choose clipping mask. Now we have a layer clipped to the center stock cactus layer, and we're going to set the blend mode of this new layer. Go ahead and tap the "N", and we're going to scroll down until you find the blend mode called overlay, so we've gotten to know multiply, which has a darkening effect, and we've gotten to know screen which has a lightening effect, and overlay actually does both. It can lighten or darken depending on what color you paint on that layer. Let's put it into practice so you can see, let's go to our brushes and we're going to go into the artistic set, and we're going to choose the leather wood brush. This brush has a lot of fun texture, it's almost like the spotty shapes that it makes, and it'll be really fun to add texture to this cactus. Choose the leather wood brush. Then let's go to our colors. We're going to be working in just shades of gray, so we're not going to worry about color at all. We're just going to be using light and dark gray. Right here in the middle, if we double-tap right here towards the middle, it's going to snap to a 50 percent value. That's like a 50 percent gray. If I draw with this color, nothing happens, and that's expected with the overlay blend mode, you have to either choose a color that's lighter than 50 percent or darker than 50 percent to have an effect, and what effect it has depends on if it's light or dark, so I will undo that. Make sure there's nothing on my layer, and let's choose a little bit darker than 50 percent like that. If I draw with that, now you can see that it has a darkening effect. I'm just going to add like two little stripes of that dark green. Now I'm going to go back to my colors and I'm going to choose a color that is a little bit lighter than 50 percent gray. Just a little bit lighter than middle gray. Then I'm going to draw right down the middle like that, so you can see that darker colors have a darkening effect and lighter colors have a lightening effect. But it's all on the same layer because we're using the overlay blend mode. Let's use overlay to add some texture to these two arms of our cactus, and then we'll be all done. We're going to go to our cactus arms. We're going to create a new layer right above it. Tap the layer and choose clipping mask, and then we're going to go to the little n and set this layer's blend mode to overlay. I've already got my light gray selected in my color picker, so I'll just start there and I'm just going to draw a line that curves around to follow the contours of the arm. I'll do one other one there, and then I'll do the same on the other arm. Now I'll switch over to a color that is darker than 50 percent gray and add some texture that way. The overlay blend mode is super useful. I actually use it all the time to add texture to my artwork, and it's really great for adding light and dark shadows on the same layer, so overly, it's pretty awesome. We are all done with this cactus. I hope you enjoyed this piece today. I think it's a really fun whimsical style. In our next lesson, we're going to be drawing a beautiful puppy, and I'm going to be showing you how you can use the liquefy tool to make basic shapes a little more organic. I'll also be showing you another way that you can use blend mode. I'll see you in the next lesson. 19. No.8 - Poppy: Welcome to Drawing Number 8. Today we are going to be drawing a beautiful poppy. Poppies are my all-time favorite flowers and they come in a lot of really cool varieties. Lots of colors, lots of different shapes and sizes. Today we're going to be drawing a fried egg poppy or a matilija poppy. In this lesson, we're going to be exploring the Liquify tool a little bit more. I'm going to show you how you can use Liquify to make shapes and lines a little more organic, but also get a little bit more practice using blend modes. Let's get started. Let's go ahead and create a new canvas. We're going to tap the plus sign in the upper right and then we're going to choose our Kickstart course canvas template. We're going to start this piece off with a sketch. Let's go into our brushes and we're going to go into the sketching set. I like this 6B pencil for sketching. I'm going to choose 6B pencil. Then for our colors, just choose a dark gray. The variety poppy that we're going to be drawing today is called a fried egg poppy or a matilija poppy. It's a white flower with a bright yellow center. We did a fried egg last week [LAUGHTER] and now we're doing a fried egg poppy this week. Let's start by drawing a big circle to set the overall size of our flower. It doesn't have to be perfect. A flower is an organic shapes, so it's definitely not perfect. Then we'll draw a circle in the middle, and this will be the center of our flower. Our flower is going to have six petals. We're going to start by dividing this up into six sections. First, we'll divide it into thirds, like this. Then we'll divide those in half to create six sections. Now we can use this basic structure to draw some more organic petal shapes. We're going to be using these sections as a guide. I'm just going to go over these lines and create a more organic petal shape like that. Then I'll rotate and do the next one here. Something like that. You're like curving out on the sides and then wavy on the top. Then for the other petals, we just need to draw that wavy edge in like that. Now we've got a sketch for our poppy. Obviously it's not very detailed, but it doesn't really need to be. Let's go ahead and move on to coloring. We're going to go to our layers and we're going to reduce the opacity of our sketch. Tap the little "n" icon, drag the opacity slider down so it's just barely visible. Then we're going to create a new layer and put our sketch layer on top. I move the new layer down, so the sketch layer is on top. The color of this poppy is going to be white. Let's go ahead and set a background color right after that. I'm going to go to my background and I'm going to do a nice warm blush pink. I'm going to move my queue into the reds. Maybe just about right there and then I'm just going to add color until it as dark as I want it. I want it to be pretty light. That's what color I'm going to do for the background. Then I'm going to go over to my brushes and I'm going to switch to the inking set. I'm going to choose our trusty studio pen brush. Then I'm going to go over to my colors and I'm going to choose white. I'm just going to double-tap close to white and it will snap to a pure white value. Let's start drawing some petals. I'm going to start by drawing the top layer of petals. I'm just going to start in the middle here and then draw my petal coming out of it like that. Following my lines on my sketch, I'm going to draw my petal. Make sure I make a closed shape by closing it at the bottom and then I can fill it with color drop. Then I'll do the next petal, which is this one. Make sure it's a closed shape. Then fill it with color drop. Then my last petal on this layer. Then I'll fill that one as well. Now I'm going to do the bottom layer of petals and it's going to be a little hard to see what I'm doing because I'm drawing white on white. I'm going to go up to my layers and I'm actually going to turn off the visibility of this first layer of petals. Then I'm going to create a new layer. We're going to drag that layer underneath the first layer of petals because these are going to be behind those petals. Now we can draw in our other petals. It's going to be these ones here. My sketch doesn't include the edge of that petal, but we can just draw it in. However, it won't show up. Here we go. Let's draw the other three petals in the same way. Just outlining the shape of the petal and then filling it in with color drop. We've just drawn our second set of petals. Before we go back and turn on our other layer of petals, I'm going to show you how we can use the Liquify tool to make these petal shapes just seem a little bit more organic and a little more intricate. Let's go back to our layers and we'll turn off the visibility of the sketch layer so we can just see our petals. Make sure you have the bottom layer of petals selected. Let's go to the adjustments menu, the little magic wand. Then we're going to choose Liquify from this menu. We've already gotten to see the push mode when we did our slice of pizza. Today, we're going to be using the twirl modes. Let's choose twirl right. I have my size set to 64 percent, my pressure set to 75 percent, and my distortion will just put that at 75 percent too. Momentum is all the way down. This is going to be really fun. Let's zoom into this one petal here. I'm going to move my pencil across the edge of my petal. When I do that, it's going to distort everything and make it a little more wavy and more of an organic way. I think that this is probably a little bit too much. I'm actually going to reduce my brush size a little bit and maybe reduce the pressure a little bit so it won't be as intense this effect. Then I'm going to go over that again and just add some little ripples into my petal shape. It's a little more organic looking and not just perfect little waves. Do this one next, and the last one. You can play around with the different sliders and see what different effects that you get. You can also go the other way too to do a little more if you want, just until it looks like you like it. You can do the edges, the sides, a little bit too, just add a little bit more ripples. The faster you go, [NOISE] the less intense this ripple effect will be. But I think that's looking pretty good. Let's exit out. Let's go over to our layers and we're going to do that to the other set of petals. I'm going to turn off this set of petals and then I'm going to turn on the other set of petals. This is now the top layer. I'm going to go back to the Liquify tool in the adjustments menu and we're going to repeat. All the settings should still be the same. Now I can just go over the edges. Just make it more ripply, more interesting. Here we go. We'll do this last one over here. If you find that you didn't like the way that it turns out, you can use this reconstruct, and you can go back over an area and it will reconstruct it. You paint, go back in time, [LAUGHTER] paint back in the way that it used to look, which is cool. But I think that's looking pretty good as it is. Let's go back to my layers and I'm going to turn on the bottom layer. I'm also going to turn my sketch back on because it's a little hard to see these two colors. We're going to be adding some shading so that we can see the distinct layers of petals. But before we do that, let's create a new layer. We're going to draw the middle of our flower. Create a new layer above the two petal layers. Let's go into our colors and we'll choose a nice, warm yellow, so a little closer to orange, then nice and saturated. We're still using our studio pen brush. I'm going to draw the middle of the flower, but I'm actually going to make it a little more bumpy. Just draw some bumpy lines. They don't have to be uniform because we want it to look nice and organic. Draw some bumpy lines all the way around. Then once you have a closed shape, you can fill that with color drop. Now let's have a little bit of shading so that we can see the different layers of petals. Let's go up to our layers, and let's just go ahead and turn on Alpha lock on all these layers. We're going to be adding a bit of texture to all of them. You can do this very quickly by taking two fingers and swiping to the right on all three layers. The other way to turn an Alpha lock, of course, is to tap the layer and choose Alpha lock from the menu. Let's start with our bottom-most layer of petals. I'm going to go up to my colors and I'll start with white. I want a nice creamy gray. I'm going to move it down into the side a little bit so that I have a nice creamy gray color to add a little bit of shading. Then I'm going to go to my brushes and I'm going to switch to the charcoal set. I'm going to choose the 6B compressed brush. 6B compressed. I'm going to just zoom in here and just very lightly around the edges of the other petals. I'm going to just add in a little bit of this darker color. Just like that. Focusing around the sides and then near to the center of the flower. There we go. Now we're starting and just be able to see the two layers of flowers. I'm going to get a little bit darker gray and just come in here right close to the edge of the petals. Go over to your colors and just choose a slightly darker gray, just a tiny bit darker. You can get a little bit smaller of a brush size, about 43 percent. Then just right near the edges and near the edge of the flower center, just add that darker color in. I'm going to go a tiny bit darker. Here we go. There we go. This darker value will really help these petals on top to kind of pop or come away from the layer below it. Great, that's looking pretty good. Let's go and turn our sketch off so we can see how things are looking. I'm going to go up to my Layers and turn off the sketch, and then I'm going to tap over to the top layer of petals and we're just going to add a little bit of shading to that so it doesn't look so flat. I want to use that light gray that we're using when we started shading. Procreate has a really handy feature that allows you to recall your previous color. All you have to do is tap and hold the color picker circle and it will select your previous color. Tap and hold, and now I have that lighter gray color. Then I'm going to go back to 100% for my brush size, and then right here on the tips of the petals, I'm going to add just a little bit of that light gray color there. Just to help them not seem so flat. Then maybe here near the center, I'm just going to swirl that around. Then while we're at it, let's use this brush to add a little bit of texture to the center of our flower, so it's not so flat. I'm going to go to the layer with the flower center, use the eyedropper to sample this color, and then we'll choose maybe just a little bit a little closer to orange, and then just lightly go over that, maybe a tiny bit darker. Just add a little bit of texture. You can focus this darker color around the edges of the flower centers so that the middle is a little bit lighter. There we go. We've finished adding shading, now we're going to add some line detail. Let's start with the petals. We're going to do the top layer of petals first. We're going to tap the top layer of petals and we're going to create a clipping mask to do this. Tap the "Plus sign", tap this "New layer" and then choose "Clipping Mask", we've got a clipping mask on that top layer of petals. I'm also going to set the blend mode of this new layer. Let's tap the little "n" and we're going to choose the "Multiply blend mode". The reason why we're doing this is because we have different variations in color and value on this petal like there's parts that are a little bit darker, a little bit lighter. If we just chose one color to do all our line details, it wouldn't look right with the shading that we've added. Set this layer's blend mode to multiply. Then for the color, I think I'm just going to sample this darker gray that we use previously right off my canvas. Let me grab a brush, this time I'm going to go into the sketching set and I'm just going to choose that 6B Pencil brush to do all my line details. Then let's just see if this color works. I think that looks pretty good. What we're going to do is we're just going to draw some lines, and I'll just do this in a really fast motion in the petal and they're coming out from the center, like fanning out. Just like that. Let's go around and do that on all the petals. Okay, and this one right here, just a lot of little lines. Now we're going to use the Liquify tool to make these straight lines a little more organic and a little more rippled. Let's go up to our "Adjustments Menu", "Liquify", and we want to make sure we're in the twirl mode, so make sure you're on "Twirl". Then I'm just going to just slowly go across my lines that I just drew to make them a little more rippled. The slower you go, the more ripple they'll look. If you were to go really fast, there wouldn't be as much of a ripple. I think this just makes them seem the more appropriate line for this flower. The straight lines aren't quite what we want, we want something a little more organic. Now we have these fine, kind of rippled organic lines. All right, let's do the same thing with our other set of petals. I'm going to go up to my "Layers", tap the bottom-most layer of petals, tap the "Plus sign" to create a new layer, and then we'll set this new layer to be a clipping mask. Then we'll set the blend mode of this layer to multiply. Now we can draw our lines coming out from the center like this. Again doing the nice quick strokes, that helps us get these really like very straight but expressive lines. It's okay if some lines are thicker than others. We'll do our last petal here. All right, so now let's ripple these petals by going to our "Adjustments menu", "Liquify", make sure we're on "Twirl". Then just go across the lines a little bit. There we go. I just wanted to show you, because we use the multiply blend mode on this layer with the lines, they are equally dark here in the shadows as they are in the rest of the flower, and if we hadn't done that, in fact, if I turn off the Blend Mode, you can see like you start to lose the lines down in here because it's darker in here, so it's the same color as the lines. But if we turn on the Blend Mode, now everything is dark because it's interacting with the layers below it. It's a little tricky to wrap your head around, but blend modes are really awesome. Let's go ahead and add some line detail to the center of our flower. Let's go up to that layer with the flower center, tap the "Plus sign". We're not going to create a clipping mask this time we're just going to leave it because we can have some of these lines extending past the shape of the flower center, but we are going to use a blend mode. We're going to go tap the letter "n" and we're going to set this one to "Multiply". For these lines, I'm going to start by sampling the flower color, and then I think actually that works pretty well. You can make it a little darker if you want, actually that's pretty good. I just use this middle color and then I made it a tiny bit darker. Then you're going to just basically draw some flower shape in the middle and then add onto it around the outside of that. Doesn't have to be perfect so keep it very loose and expressive. Then you can see now that I've gotten to the edge here, I'm letting those lines overlap the edge of my flower center shape. Just keep going around and add more of these curved lines anywhere that it needs to be. Cool, I think that looks pretty good. Let me zoom on out. Then I think one last finishing touch would be to make the background just a tiny bit more interesting. I'm going to go to my "Layers" and I am going to create a layer below all the other layers. Just go ahead and tap to create a layer anywhere and then move it to underneath all the other layers, and then I'm going to sample my background color. Then I'm going to choose a color that's just a little bit darker, a little bit more saturated. Then for my brush, I'm going to go into the "Charcoal set", I need to go back to that 6B compressed brush that we used for the shading. Our brush size, it's at 100%. Then I'm just going to lightly go around the edge of my flower in a circular motion, just to add a little bit of this darker color around the edge and make the background a little bit more interesting and help the flower pop. [MUSIC] We're all done with this Poppy. I hope you enjoyed some of the techniques that we learned today. There's a lot of really fun things that you can do using Liquify. But I think this is a really nice way to bring a more organic feel to something like this flower, and you didn't have to get in there and draw all these different little wavy lines and make them all just a little bit different. In our next drawing, we're going to be illustrating an Acorn. This one's going to be a really fun style, we're going to be exploring some of the brushes that have a bit of a dry brush look to them. I'm going to be showing you another way to use the overlay blend mode to create shadows and highlights. I'll see you in the next lesson. 20. No.9 - Acorn: Welcome to Drawing number 9. Today we're going to be drawing an acorn. In this lesson, we're going to be exploring brushes a little bit more to create a different visual style. I'm going to introduce you to dry brush and some different brushes that can help you achieve a dry brush look. I'll teach you about what contour lines are. We're going to be using the overlay blend mode that we used in our cactus lesson to add shadows and highlights to this acorn. Let's go started. Let's start by creating a new canvas. Tap the Plus sign in the upper right, and choose our Kickstart course canvas template. We're not going to be doing a sketch for this one. We're just going to jump right into working with color. Let's start by choosing a brush. We're going to go into our brushes and we're going to go into the drawing set and find the Blackburn brush. A lot of the brushes we're going to be using today have a dry brush texture to them. What that means is when you're painting with physical medium, so like physical paint and the paint on your brush doesn't have a lot of liquid to it. It's just like solid paint or something not a liquid. When you drag it across the page, it'll have this like broken bristly texture. That's what a lot of these brushes have. It'll give this piece of really unique look. Let's go over to our colors and we're going to be drawing the base of the acorn like the actual nut part. Let's go into our oranges and we're going to choose a light brown color. I'm in the middle right here. We'll start by drawing a tilted oval shape for acorn. You can already see that beautiful dry texture along the edges of this brush. Then we're going to draw a little pointed tip on the bottom of the acorn. The bottom of this oval just add a little point like this. Here we go. Make that a acorn shape like that. Now we're going to draw the cap of our acorn. Let's create a new layer to do that, go to the Layers panel and tap the plus sign to make new layer. Then we're going to go into our colors and choose a darker brown and maybe even a little bit redder. We can go closer to red for our hue. Like a nice dark brown like that. Then we're going to draw a line across the middle like this. Then draw the top of the cap. Just curve around like that and color it. If you drew it a little bit too big, you can always erase. A quick way to select the same brush that you're using as your eraser, is make sure you have the brush selected, and then tap and hold the eraser and it will automatically choose that same brush as your eraser. If you wanted to come in here and make this a little smaller, you can easily do that. I'm going to tap back over to my brush now and I'm going to add a little stem. I'll just do a curving line coming out like that. Then I'll make it a little wider towards the top. It's like thinner down here next to the acorn and then it widens the top like that. Next we're going to add our oak leaf. Let's create a new layer for that. Tap the Plus sign to create a new layer. Let's choose a nice green right here for my hue and not super dark, maybe something like that for my color. I'm going to go a little smaller with my brush size, I'm at 12 percent. I'm going to start by drawing a line that comes out this way and that's like the direction and curve of my leaf. Then an oak leaf is a really wavy shapes. We're just going to draw some wavy lines that go along either side of this line, so I'm going to start right here. I'm just going to draw these wavy lines with a curve up at the top of my leaf. Then I'll do the same thing on the other side. Then we'll go ahead and color that in. I don't recommend using color drop to fill in with this brush because it does have that really textured edge. I find that it doesn't quite always fill in all the spaces perfectly. I'll just do it by hand. We've got the main shapes of this illustration done. Now it's time to start adding detail and texture and shading. Let's start by adding some line details to our acorn. Let's go to the layers and we'll just turn on Alpha Lock on all of these layers because we're going to be adding detail within them. Let's go ahead and swipe to the right with two fingers on each layer. That Alpha Lock is on all three layers. Then we're going to go to the bottom-most layer, which is the one with the acorn part, not the cap and the other part, so the bottom-most layer. We're going to switch to a new brush now. Go to your brushes. The brush we're going to choose this time is called sticks. It's still in the drawings that were Blackburn is so choose sticks. Then let's sample this color of the acorn. We're going to choose a version of that. We're going to go a little darker and a little more saturated, so closer this way. Then I'll test it out and see how that looks. That looks pretty good. Let me zoom in here. My brush size is at five percent. I'll start by drawing a line right down the middle like that. I'm going to be using these lines to show the contour of this acorn. Contour lines are lines that you can use to show what the shape of an object is. I make these lines curve around similar to how they would be on the acorn. It'll give the impression that it's 3D and that it's round. I'm going to draw some lines that follow the curve of what this acorn might have. Then I'll do the other side as well. Thanks to these lines, it now seems like this shape has a curve to it. You can add as many lines as you want but I think that looks pretty good. Just like that. Let's work on our acorn cap now. We're going to go over to our layers and select the layer with the acorn cap. We already have Alpha Lock turned on, so we're ready to start adding some details to this. I think I'm going to use this same color that we use down here for this. I think it will work really nicely. You don't have to change our colors, but we are going to change brushes. Go to your brushes and we're going to go into the calligraphy set. The brush we're going to use now is called Kunanyi it's up at the top of the list. We're going to be creating a scale style pattern on this acorn. We're doing a stylized version of an acorn. That just means it's not realistic. This scale pattern will be a nod to the pattern that you see on an acorn. To do that, we're just going to draw some U-shapes all the way across like this. Then at the bottom of each U, you're going to draw another U connecting them together to make this like scale type pattern. Keep repeating all the way across and all the way down until we fill up this entire acorn cap with this scale pattern. Just a couple more rows, I think should do it. Just connecting the bottom of each u-shape together. That's looking pretty good. Now, it's time to add some details to our leaf. Let's go up to our layers and tap the leaf layer. I've already got Alpha Lock turned on. Let's select this green color and then go to our colors and choose a little bit darker version of that color. We'll use this same brush and we'll start by drawing a line down the middle like that and then align into each little section of this leaf. Then we can add some extra lines off of each line like that, just branching out. We've drawn our shapes, we've added some line details. Now, we're going to add a bit of shading to give this even more dimension and form. Previously we've been using the multiply and screen blend modes to add shading. This time we're going to be using the overlay blend mode that we explored when we drew the cactus. We already know that this blend mode can both lighten and darken depending on what color you paint with so we're going to be able to use just one single layer to do both our shadows and highlights. Let's go up to our layers. We'll start with our bottom-most layer, the acorn, and we're going to tap the plus sign to create a new layer. We're going to set this layer to be a clipping mask so tap it and choose clipping mask. Then we're also going to set the blend mode. Tap in, and we're going to set it to the overlay blend mode. Then for the color, we'll start by doing our shadows so we're going to start at 50 percent gray. We can double-tap close to gray and it'll snap to that 50 percent gray. Then we're just going to go a little darker, just a little bit. Now we're also going to be switching brushes so let's go into our brushes and we're going to go into the drawing set and choose the brush called Oberon. This one also has some really good texture to it, but it's a little bit softer so it's going to be a lot better for shading. We just want to make sure we use this brush with really light pressure. Let's go ahead and start by shading our acorn. We're going to imagine our light source is coming from this direction so this side would be the darkest so let's increase our brush size to 100 percent. Then I'm just going to softly shade one side of this acorn. It's pretty subtle right now because we have such not a super dark color so just do one side like that and then also a little bit on the other side. Not quite as much, just like that. Now we can get a little bit darker of a gray, just go down a little bit and we can make this side even darker. Maybe I'll also add some light under the cap like that. Let's go even darker now and just do this side a little bit more so that way this side is the darkest part. We can already start to see the form of this end of the curve of it starting to take shape. Let's also add a little bit of a highlight. All we need to do for that is start at 50 percent gray and go a little lighter. Then very lightly just right here, if our light's hitting right here, it'd be a highlight right here. Got a little bit small to my brush size even. I'm just going to add a bit of a highlight right there. Awesome. Let's do the same thing for the acorn cap. We're going to go ahead and choose the layer with acorn cap, tap the plus sign to create a new layer. We're going to set this layer to be a clipping mask in the menu here and then we're going to set the blend mode of this layer to overlay by tapping the N and choosing overlay from the list. Since we've already got this light gray selected, maybe we just go ahead and add our highlight now so in a similar spot to this one, add a bit of a highlight right there, you can go little bit lighter, even a little bit more of a highlight. Now, let's go dark and do our shadows. We're going to start at 50 percent gray and just go a little darker and we're going to add some shadows on this side, tiny bit on this side so go to my brush size, all the way up to nine percent and I'll add a little bit of shadow right here, a little bit on this side. There we go. Now go a little bit darker and do this edge a little bit more, a little bit darker. There we go. This is starting to have a lot of really good shape due to all these shading that we're adding. Let's do the same thing to add a little bit of dimension to our leaf. We're going to go to our layers. We're going to tap the leaf layer, create a new layer right above it, set this layer to be a clipping mask, and then we're going to set the blend mode to be overlay, so tap the N and choose Overlay from the menu or from the list. I'm going to go to 50 percent gray and then just go a little bit darker. Then I'm going to make this half of the leaf a little bit darker like this. Then just maybe use a light pressure to add a little texture to the other side of the leaf. We'll go teeny bit darker on this side, right in the middle. It looks good. I think we should add a background to this one and make it a little more interesting. Let's go up to our layers and we'll go to background color and maybe we'll go into the yellow green area. Then just play around until you have a green that you like. It's tricky with all these greens, but maybe a little cooler. There we go. I'm going to start with a dark green and just like with the flower we did in the last lesson, I'm going to add a circle in the background. We'll use the same brush that we've been using, Oberon, to add that. I'll sample this green color and I'll create a new layer and place it below all the other layers. I just added a new layer below all the other layers and then maybe get a little bit lighter or maybe a little warmer like that. Now I can very lightly just go in circles around my acorn to show that really nice edge texture. If I was to go really heavy, it'd be very solid like that so light pressure will do it. This acorn is all done. I really loved the visual style of this with all the dry brush texture because of the brushes that we used and then even the shading has some really great texture again, thanks to the brush that we used. I hope you enjoyed getting to see a new way to use the overlay blend mode to create highlights and shadows. In our next lesson, which is the last lesson of plants week, we're going to be drawing a little grouping of mushrooms. I'm going to introduce you to working from a color palette and we're going to be exploring a lot of brushes and playing with patterns and it's going to be a lot of fun. I'll see you in the next lesson. 21. No.10 - Mushrooms: [MUSIC] Welcome to drawing Number 10 and our final drawing of plants week. Today we're going to be drawing a fun group of fungi. We're going to be learning how to use a pre-made color palette to draw this fun little bunch of mushrooms. We'll also be exploring our brushes a little bit more and doing a little pattern and texture play. Let's get started. Let's start a new canvas. Go up to the plus sign in the upper right, and we're going to choose our kickstart course Canvas template. Let's start this drawing off with a sketch. I'm going to go to my brushes, go into the sketching set and choose the 6B pencil brush. Then for my colors, I'm going to choose a dark gray. We're just going to draw some fun little mushroom shapes, not anything super accurate, but a little grouping of them. Let's start maybe down here and do a big wide mushroom like that. Start by drawing the cap. Then for the base we'll do these curving lines like that. Then maybe in this corner we'll do like a tall, skinny one like that. Then another little base, similar to that one. Over here, do another one a little smaller. Then maybe this one will do, since we have some space, we'll do like a nice wide top, something similar to that. We'll make it nice and tall. Then maybe down here in this corner we'll do a little grouping of three mushrooms. I'll draw like three little caps and then the stems. Make these all connect together. At this point, you can rearrange things on your canvas. If you wanted to arrange them a little bit better, you can just go up to the Selection tool, so a little S icon and you can draw a selection around part of your sketch. Then go over to the Transform tool and you can move it around. Rotate. Maybe I'll move this one up a little bit just so you can get a pleasing composition, where everything seems to fit in the space. Move that one up. Once you're happy with the placement of all your mushrooms, we're going to reduce the opacity of our sketch by going up to our layers, tapping the n and reducing the opacity. Then we'll create a new layer and place it below our sketch layer. Next we're going to add color. But for this piece we're actually going to be working from a color palette. Color palettes can be found in the color panel, so we're going to tap the color picker circle. Then over here, there is an option for palettes. I have a pretty big library of color palette saved. You might not have so many. But for this piece, we're actually going to be working with a pre-made color palette. This is a palette that I made that you can download. Let me show you how to download the color palette that we're going to be using in this drawing. I'm going to go ahead and open up my web browser. I'm here on bardotbrush.com. If you go here where it says resources, there is a link to Procreate color palettes. I have a library of free Procreate color palettes that you can download and import into Procreate and use however you want. I also have a pretty good article about how to use a color palette in illustration. But of course you're going to be learning how to do that in this video. The palette we're going to be using today is this one called Rosy Days. You should just be able to tap it, choose Download, and then tap this little arrow to access your downloads. You can tap the file here, and that will open your files app and you should be in your downloads folder. Then just tap the swatch file and it will import into Procreate. Now if you go to your color palettes and probably scroll all the way down to the bottom, I have a lot. [LAUGHTER] You will find this palette that you just imported. You You tap it and choose Set as Default. Now if you go back to disk mode, you'll see the color palette down here. Color palettes allow you to save colors so that you can easily recall them for using in your artwork. Let's begin by setting our background color. I'm going to go into my layers and I'm going to tap background-color. I'm going to choose this first really light pink color for the background. Now I'm going to go over into my color picker and choose a color to start drawing my mushrooms. I'm going to use this yellow color. There's two yellowish colors in this palette, but I'm going to choose the lighter of the two. Then I'm going to go over to my brushes and we're going to go into the Inking set, and we're going to choose the studio pen brush. Now I'm going to start with all the bases of the mushrooms. l'm going to do those all on one layer. Go ahead and just trace over your sketch. Drawing the basis of all the mushrooms. I'm going to do just a couple in this yellow and then I'm going to do different yellow for the others. Make a closed shape and then you can fill that in with color drop. Let's do maybe this one here. Make a closed shape and fill it in. Then maybe we'll switch to the other color in our palette. We have that darker yellow color. I'm going to switch to that color. I'll do some of these other ones here. Then I'll just color these in because they're pretty small. Then I'll do this one right here. Looks like a little vase shape, and one more. Now that I've done all the bases, let's do the mushroom caps. I'm going to go up to my layers. I'm going to tap the plus sign to create a new layer. I'm going to go back over to my colors. Let's start with this nice, beautiful magenta, a deep magenta color. I'll do these mushroom caps down here. I'm going to be drawing them a little longer than I need them because I'm going to be using the eraser to erase away the bottom and I'll show you that in a second. Make them a little longer than they need to be, like this. Then you can fill them in with color drop. This is only three, but if you do have a lot of things to fill in, there's a good little feature in Procreate to do that. You can fill in one of your shapes and then choose continue filling up at the top. Then you can tap into your other shapes and then hit this little checkmark to exit. Now that I've made them bigger than they need to be, I'm going to use the eraser to trim away the bottoms. That's going to give me really nice sharp corners on my mushroom shapes. I'm going to tap and hold the eraser. That's going to choose studio pen as my eraser, or you can just choose it from the library here. Then I'm just going to erase away the part that I don't need. Because of that, I have these nice sharp corners on my mushrooms. Go ahead and erase away what you don't need. Here we go. Let's right one of the other mushrooms. Now I'm going to go back to my brush and I'm going to go to my colors. I'm going to choose this green color. I'll do this mushroom over here. Again, I it a little bigger than I need. Filling it in with color drop, grabbing my eraser and erasing away, part of that down at the bottom. Cool. Let's get a different color now. Maybe we'll try this medium blue. There's like three different blues. Let's try the middle value. I'll do this one here. Maybe for this one, I'll have it be rounded. You don't have to have all of your mushrooms have sharp corners. Maybe you want some to look a little rounded. It's always nice to have a little bit of variety. We'll do that one in blue. Let's do this one next. I'll do it in this medium pink color here. It's the third swatch over. I'll use my eraser for that one. Trim off the bottom. Here we go. One more to do, and that's this guy down here. Let's choose this grayish pink right here. [BACKGROUND] Then I'll get my eraser and trim off the bottom. There we go. We've got all of our shapes drawn. We're done with our sketch, so let's go ahead and turn it off. Go back to your layers. We're going to uncheck the little box for the sketch here. Now we get to have a little bit of fun with our brushes. We're going to give you giving each of these different mushroom caps a different pattern or a different texture. There's some fun things that we can do with the brushes. For this step, you don't have to follow along exactly with what I'm doing. You can play with the brushes and put whatever textures or patterns you want into your mushrooms. But let's go ahead and start by going up to the Layers panel and we're going to create a clipping mask. Let's create a new layer right above our mushroom caps. We're going to tap this new layer and we're going to choose Clipping Mask. Let's start with these mushrooms down here. I'm not going to choose a color from my color palette. I'm actually just going to choose a variation on this color. I'll start by selecting this magenta color for my mushroom caps. I'm going to choose a color that's a little bit lighter than that color, so just go up a little bit. I think that's pretty good. Now I'm going to look for some fun brushes to use. This one, it's called thylacine. If I'm pronouncing it correctly. It's pretty fun. It has a bunch of little lines built into it. I really like this brush for doing diagonal lines like this. Then you can turn it and do diagonal lines the other way and you get this kind of like almost like plaid texture. I'll do that for these mushroom caps. This one over here, like that. Let's check out this one now. I'm going to sample this color and choose a little bit lighter version of that color. Let's check out our materials set. This one has some fun brushes in it. This one called ferno for now, I don't know [LAUGHTER]. Let's choose that brush for now. I'm at like 52 percent for the brush size. I'm just going to paint over this whole shape to add this fun pattern almost like a leopard print or something. Let's do this one over here. Let's go into the Texture set. This one has some really fun pattern brushes. I really like this one called Decimals. Let's choose Decimals. I'm going to choose this color and then get a little bit lighter version of that color and paint over that area and I get these fun dots. Let's do this one here. There's something else I can use in this set. The Grid one we could try that. We choose this color. Since it's such a light color already, I'm going to choose a darker version of that color now, little darker and more saturated. This gives me a cool little grid pattern. For this one, maybe we'll just choose one of these brushes up here. This one's called Tessellated. We'll sample this color and choose a lighter version. Maybe instead of doing the whole thing like that, maybe I'll just do like little dots of this pattern just to make it a little more interesting. I think that looks pretty cool. Pattern brushes can be really fun and they can be a really quick way to add a lot of interests to your artwork. There's a lot of really fun pattern brushes built into procreate, but I've learned to make my own pattern brushes. Actually I have a set of brushes that I sell called imperfect patterns. This is a version of the mushrooms done using some of those pattern brushes. I have these fun scribbles, little sparkles. It's like a cobblestone pattern, little dashes and little swirly lines. It's really fun. Now let's add a little bit of shading to our mushrooms to give them a little more dimension. We'll go up to our layers and we're going to start by adding some shading to the stems of the mushroom. Let's tap on the stems layer, tap the Plus sign to create a new layer. Tap that and we're going to set this one to be a Clipping mask. Then we're going to also set a blend mode. I'm going to introduce you to one more Blend Mode this week. Go ahead and tap the N, and this time we're going to choose Color Burn. Now, Color Burn is similar to multiply. It does have a darkening effect, but in addition to darkening whatever's underneath it, it also add saturation, so both darkens and saturates. I really liked that because when I'm choosing colors that are shadows, I often as you've seen, I choose a darker and more saturated version of that color. I sometimes use color burn to add my shadows for that reason. Go ahead and choose Color Burn. We're going to go over to our colors. Let's just start with a 50 percent gray and see how that looks. We can always adjust. Then we're going to go over to our brushes and we're going to go into the painting set and find Damp brush. I just wanted to jump in and let you know that if you can't find it in your brushes list, damp brush is from a previous version of Procreate. They stopped including this brush in version 4.2. But you can download the old brushes directly from Procreate and I've got a quick link for you. Go-to bit.ly/old-brushes, and you'll find the old brushes there. Damp brush has some nice texture to it, but it's also very soft and blendable. So it's really nice for shading. Let's zoom into this guy here. My brush size is about 33 percent. I'm just going to very lightly lay down some color right here. It's very soft, so I'm layering strokes until it gets dark enough. Maybe I'll go a little smaller with my brush size. You want to make sure you have some shadows right under the mushroom cap and then we'll do that along one side of the stem. Let's go to this one here and do the same thing. Add some shadows right under the mushroom cap and then along the side like this. Again, just like doing very soft strokes, build up in darkness. Then I'm going to go around to all the little mushrooms stems and do the same thing. Right under the cap and then along the side a little bit along the bottom too. I'm curving my shadow around. Then for these, they're pretty small, so I'm just going to go smaller with my brush size. Go right under the cap, and then alongside there. I think that's looking pretty good. Now that I've done all the stems, I'm going to go ahead and do the caps as well, and we're going to do it in the same way. Instead of creating another layer and setting to be clipping masks and setting the blend mode. I'm actually just going to duplicate this layer. The one that we used to do the shadows. To do that, we're going to swipe to the left and choose Duplicate. Then I'm just going to move this layer above my two mushroom cap layers. Then I'm going to tap the Layer and choose Clear. Now I have a layer that's a clipping mask. It's already set to the right blend mode and I'm ready to start adding some shading to my mushroom caps. I'm going to do my shading. I might go a little bigger with my brush size, something like 25 percent. Now I'm going to add shadows along one side and the bottom of all my mushrooms, so alongside layer on strokes to build up in darkness. Over on these small ones, I'm going to go a little smaller with my brush size. You can see how it's like getting darker, but it's also getting more saturated too. I really liked the look of that [MUSIC]. Now our fun little group of mushrooms is all done. I really love mushrooms as a subject. I think they'd come in such unique shapes and sizes. There's a lot you can play with when it comes to how you decorate them, how you color them. They're just like a good base for play, in my opinion. I really hope you enjoyed this drawing is last one of plants week. I'm excited to tell you what's coming up for Week 3. 22. Week Two - Reflect & Share: Congratulations on completing Week 2 of this course. I hope you've been filling up your progress tracker and feeling accomplished about everything that you've drawn and learn so far. We really explored blend modes a lot this week. Blend modes are a super useful digital art tool and I use them in my illustrations all the time. This week we used blend modes to add shadows and highlights to our work, to add texture to create a fund overprint effect and more. There are many more blend modes, but the ones we explored this week are some of the ones that you'll probably use the most as you work in Procreate. You also learned a lot of useful tips about working with color. Whether it was choosing colors in the color picker or working from a Procreate color palette. We also explored a lot of new Procreate brushes this week. By now, you're probably starting to recognize the different qualities of the brushes and what they might be used for. For example, some brushes are softer and might be better for shading, others are great for adding texture and others for drawing shapes. We even got to know the concept of dry brush when we did our acorn. Now it's time for you to do a little reflection on your week. Think about the skills that you learned this week and which ones were maybe the most fun and interesting that you might want to keep exploring after this course. We'll be getting more repeated practice with these skills in the weeks to come. Finally, I want you to take some time and think about what has been helping you to keep the momentum going as we push forward into Weeks 3 and 4. Once you've done a little reflection, it's time to share. I want you to go to the Projects and Resources tab of the Skillshare class page. Click your project and then click Edit Project. You're going to replace your current progress tracker with a new updated version and then share your favorite piece from this week. You can share a favorite tip that you've learned, why the piece you shared was your favorite. You can even share about some of the struggles that you had this week. I am so excited to see your artwork and here about how the course has been going for you so far. 23. What's coming in Week Three: [MUSIC] I am so excited to talk to you about what is coming up next for the Kickstart your creativity course. Week 3 is all about animals. We are going to be doing five different animal drawings that will help you learn about things like altering the color scheme of a piece to produce different colorways, how to do digital collage using photography, using new tools like the smudge and symmetry mode, and how to depict a furry texture, just to name a few. Plus you'll get plenty more practice with all of the essential digital art skills that you have been learning so far. I am so proud of you and all the hard work that you have done so far and I can't wait to draw animals with you next week. Until then, stay creative [MUSIC] 24. Intro to Week Three: Animals: [MUSIC] Hello and welcome to Week 3 of the kick start your creativity, course. This week we're learning to draw animals. Now, drawing animals can be a little intimidating for beginners. They have really complex bodies, they come in a lot of different textures. It might feel a little daunting, but don't worry, we're going to be taking a simple approach to drawing animals by building them out of very simple shapes and forms. This week, you'll get to experiment with color by learning how to alter and adjust colors to produce a piece in multiple color ways. You'll also learn how to incorporate photography into your work to create digital collage. We'll also explore style a little bit by adding some folk art inspired elements to a couple of our animals. You'll get to use new Procreate tools like smudge and the symmetry mode and you'll learn how to depict a furry texture and so much more. As we jump into Week 3, it's very natural that your momentum might be starting to fade a little bit as you settle into the routine of your creative practice. Right now, it's an important time to push through and remain consistent and showing up to draw every couple of days. If you're starting to fall out of the habit, don't put yourself down, but do try to identify what it was that kept you from making art that day. Life will undoubtedly get in the way. It happens to me all the time. I don't always get to show up to do my creative time. But identifying these obstacles is the first step to finding solutions to overcome them. Another tip I have for you this week is to find an accountability buddy. Having someone to share your creative journey with can be motivating and inspiring. This can be a friend or a loved one, or someone from an online art community. Tell one another about your creativity goals and check in with each other to see how everything is going with this course and beyond. My hope is that each of you can be the others motivator, cheerleader and dependable feedback giver. Now that I've given you a few tips to help you work on your creative habit, let's get started with our Week 3 drawings. 25. No.11 - Snake: [MUSIC] Welcome to drawing number 11. In this lesson, we're going to be drawing a fun and decorative slithering snake. With this drawing, you'll learn how to add decorative elements to an otherwise very simple drawing. Then I'm going to teach you how to edit and alter the color scheme of a piece in order to create multiple colorways. Let's get started. Let's begin by making a Canvas. We're going to tap the plus sign in the upper right and then choose our kickstart course Canvas template. Let's start by selecting a brush. Let's go into our brush library and we're going to go into the drawing set and choose the Blackburn brush. We use this brush in our acorn drawing and it has a really nice dry edge to it. Now let's choose a color. We are going to start with a blue, so we're going to do a nice, great cobalt blue snake. You might want to experiment with brush size. Right now, I am at 12 percent and I feel like that's probably pretty good so I'm going to stick with that. We're going to draw a snake and basically, all we're going to do is draw a meandering, curving line that tapers out at the end. Instead of doing a sketch, let's just plan out where we want our snake to go by drawing a thin line and then we can make it thicker to make it look more like a snake. You can do this any way you want but can make it curve however you want. But we just want it to like fill up the area not too close to the edge either. Now I'm going to use heavier pressure to thicken this line a bit. Then when I get to the end, I'm going to loosen up my pressure so that it tapers off. I messed up a little bit right there so I'm just going to use this same brush as my eraser and I can tap and hold the eraser icon and then I'll choose Blackburn as my eraser and then I'll just fix that little mistake there. You can even use this brush to make the tail of your snake a little pointier if you wanted to. Then we're going to zoom in here where the head would be. I'll switch back over to my brush and the head of the snake is going to be a diamond shape that's a little longer on this end. I'm going to draw a diamond that's longer on one side, just like that and then fill that in. I'm going to use the transform tool to just re-center this a little bit. Tapping on the little arrow icon and maybe I'll make it a little bit smaller and center it in my Canvas. We've got a very basic illustration here. There's a lot of ways that you could decorate a basic snake shape like this. Snakes have a lot of really cool patterns and textures and colors and things like that but I thought it would be fun to do almost folk art-inspired decorative element to this snake with some flowers and leaves and things like that. That's what I'm going to do for this. I'm going to go up to my layers and tap the plus sign to create a new layer and then I'm going to go over to my colors and double-tap close to white to choose a pure white value. Then I'm just going to like evenly space some flowers all over the length of the snake and I'm going to be filling in the in-between with some stems with leaves. I'll put the first one about right here. My brush size is pretty big, so I'm going to go ahead and reduce that to like three percent so that way I can draw some more delicate little flowers. I'm just making like a five-petaled flower like that. Really simple, just like your basic run-of-the-mill flower shape. Here we go, I'll do the next one and I'm trying to space them evenly so estimating the distance there, maybe I'll do the next one right here and then maybe the next one right here, it doesn't have to be perfect, just estimate and I'll do the next one there. That little funky, redo. It's the beauty of working digitally is you can just undo it and try again if you didn't like the way that it turned out. Next one maybe right here and maybe right here for the next one or we're getting down to the end. As we get closer to the end and the snake's body starts getting a little more narrow, we can maybe make the flowers a little smaller to echo that. Down here, I can make a really little flower and I think that's probably good, I won't do anymore. Now I'm going to add just a little dot in each flower. I'm going to go up to my colors and choose maybe like a nice yellow for that and then just add a little dot into each flower. When you're doing a lot of the same thing, a lot of flowers like this, it's much easier to batch it out due to assembly lines so like do all of one thing and then do all of the next thing. That way you're not like switching between colors and brushes and things like that. We've got little middles to all of our flowers. Now let's go ahead and add some stems and leaves in between each of the flowers. I'm going to put the stems and leaves on a different layer because I'm going to be showing you guys how we can alter the color of this to create multiple colorways which I'll explain a little bit. Let's go up to our layers, tap the plus sign to create a new layer and then I think I'm just going to do these in black. You can do whatever colors you want for your snake but I'm going to choose black. Then I'm just going to basically draw a line like that. I'm using pretty light pressure, so it's not too thick and then I'm just going to draw a little leaves going up and down like symmetrical. One leaf is on each side and then I'll draw the next line and little leaves. I'm making all the leaves face the same way so they're all facing towards the head. This is like one of those tasks where you can get into a meditative state [LAUGHTER] since you're just like not really having to think too much, you just have to draw a line and then lots of little leaves and just go through the process of doing it and that's one of the things that I love about drawing, is you get in this headspace where you're just focusing on what you're doing, you can shut out everything else. Let's go through and keep making stems with leaves. They don't have to be perfect, they don't have to be precise, they can be loose and messy. Loose and messy is a style too. [LAUGHTER] I think that making things more messy has a more expressive feel to it than trying to get it perfect. This is one of the things I love about Procreate. I used to do a lot of illustration in Adobe Illustrator, which is a vector-based program. You're illustrating with curves and math, and it's very precise and I fell in love with Procreate because it allowed me to do things by hand, but still do it digitally. I love the hand-drawn look and feel. Just has so much more personality and I think you really get to see what's going in an artist's brain when things aren't perfect. [LAUGHTER] One more maybe, one more down here. We're getting a little thin, so maybe I'll make my little leaves a little smaller. There we go and maybe we'll do something really small right here. I'm going to go even smaller with my brush size, like two percent. This brush has tilt capabilities. If you have your brush low, like your angle low, it'll be bigger. A lot of brushes actually have tilt capabilities. In fact, if you play with the pencil brushes, you can both draw write a pencil or you can shade like a pencil too so it's something fun to play around with. If you want to get a nice sharper line or thinner line, just hold your pencil a little more upright and then little leaves here on the end. There you go. That's cute, very delicate. The other thing I want to do is the face. I mean, there's not much to it, just some eyes and a tongue, but I'm going to put that on a separate layer. Go ahead and create a new layer for that and let's see. I should be here on either side of the widest part of the head like that and then we'll draw a little tongue. The next thing I'm going to do is add a little bit of a background element. We've been adding circles behind some of our illustrations just to make it a little bit more interesting than just a plain background. Let's do that here and then we'll add some other little details to it as well. We're going to go ahead and create a new layer, tap the plus sign, and we're going to move this layer down below everything else. Now let's choose a color. I'm going to just sample my blue to start with and just choose a variation of that color so that way this color palette overall will be a little bit more cohesive. I'm going to go over to my color pickers and I'm going to choose a lighter version of that blue. I think that's a little too dark still, let me increase my brush size. I'm going to make it a little bit lighter, maybe even a little warmer, so closer to green. Cool. Looks good. I'm going to draw basically a circle and let the snake overlap the edges a little bit. I'm just going to come around like this and maybe make it a little bit bigger. I'm going to go bigger with my brush size and then around the edges, I'm going to use really light pressure to really bring out some of that dry texture, maybe even bigger with my brush size. If you go really light, you'll see that really nice texture. Let's see, go down a little more. Look at that. Because I use really light pressure over here. I can see that nice texture. That's another technique. Draw the shape with normal pressure and then just go around the edges with light pressure and you get these really nice edges. That's looking pretty good. Now, our little background circles looking great. At this point, we're going to just add a few other decorative elements. I love to add little sparkle stars to my illustrations. I think they just bring this really fun whimsical quality to them. Let's do that here. I'm going to create a new layer for my sparkle stars. For the color I'm just going to choose maybe a little bit darker blue, maybe even a little warmer so closer to blue-green and a little darker maybe. That's pretty good. I'm going to go a lot smaller than my brush size and we're like two percent. That way I have this nice thin line. With very light pressure, I'm going to make these six-pointed stars. A line down and then two lines crisscrossing like that. You can make stars that are different sizes just evenly but randomly fill the space with stars wherever it seems like they need some. We're going to come back in and add some small little stars too along with these so you don't have to fill it completely with these big stars. That's looking pretty good, maybe one over here. Then I'm going to do some little stars that are little plus signs so it's just two lines. Just fill those in elsewhere. Just wherever you think it needs it, you can add some of these little stars. Definitely overhear might add another six-sided star. Looks pretty good maybe over here. We've got a pretty cute background. Now we've got this nice element of the circle with the snake overlapping the edges and then all these fun sparkle stars in there. That is the drawing portion of this lesson. Up next, I'm going to teach you how to alter the colors of this to create a different colorway. If you don't know what a colorway is, it's basically a variation of an illustration or a fabric, or a shirt, or something like that in a different color scheme. One group of colors, and then another version in a different group of colors. But they all go together. That's what we're going to be doing with this illustration. We're going to make a different colorway for this snake. We want to keep one version blue. We're going to actually duplicate this file so that we can work on the copy and change it to another color. Let's go back out to the gallery view, and then we're going to swipe to the left on this snake file and choose duplicate. Now we have two copies. Let's go ahead and open up the second copy. The color scheme of this piece is very cool. It's made up of almost completely cool colors. Cool colors are like beer blues, greens, purples, and warm colors are yellows, oranges, and red. Let's do a warm version of this illustration. Let's start by changing the background color. There's a few ways that you can edit or alter colors within your artwork in procreate and I'm going to show a few of those to you today. Let's start with the background. I'm going to go up to my layers panel, I'm going to select the layer with that background circle and then I'm going to go up to the Adjustments menu, which is the magic one icon, and choose hue saturation brightness. I have these sliders down at the bottom that allow you to change the hue, the saturation, or the brightness of the colors on that layer. Let's start by adjusting the hue. I'm going to choose a warmer color, so somewhere in between pink and orange and I'm also going to make it a little lighter. I'm going to adjust the brightness slider to be a little brighter, maybe even a little warmer than that. That's a really nice warm pink. That's a good start for the background. Just tap any of the tools to get out. Now let's do the snake. We're going to go into our layers panel and we're going to tap the layer with the snake. Because we had separated all these different elements out onto their own layers, we can easily change the color of just one part of that illustration. That's another reason to create separate layers for the different parts of your illustration. Let's use hue saturation brightness one more time to change the color of the snake. Again, go up to the Adjustments menu, the magic one, and then tap "Hue, saturation, brightness". Let's just experiment and see what colors look good. I like this brown, it's almost like an orange but not super saturated. If it was more saturated, it would look like a really bright orange, but I like it desaturated a little bit, although it's a bit dark so I'm going to bring up the brightness a little bit. That looks good. Maybe a little brighter, a little more desaturated. I'm really liking the way that this color is looking with the background. Those are the two colors that I'm comparing to see if they work together. But we definitely need to change the color of our leaves as well because they're really contrasting a lot with this much lighter color. They worked well on the dark blue, but they're a little bit too contrasty with this orange. Let's change those next. Because its color is already black, hue saturation brightness might not be the best way to go because there's no hue to change. Let's do it a different way. Let's go up to the layers and we're going to select the layer with all the leaves and then we're going to turn on Alpha Lock. You can take two fingers and swipe to the right on that layer or tap the layer and choose Alpha Lock. With Alpha Lock on, it's going to be easy for us to just fill the shapes on this layer with color. Let's go up to our color picker, and let's go over here into the warm colors. I'm going to go to a reddish-orange and then maybe choose maybe a little more red, not super dark right there is good. Now that I've selected a color, I'm going to go back over to my layers. I'm going to tap this layer, so it's the layer with the leaves that we just turn Alpha Lock, tap the layer to invoke the options menu, and you're going to choose fill layer. That's going to fill whatever's on that layer with color. If we didn't have Alpha Lock on, it would just make the whole screen this reddish color. But because we have Alpha Lock, it's just filling those locked-in shapes. Now I still think this color is maybe a little too bright. You could do it a couple of different ways, you could go ahead and choose maybe a darker, less saturated version of that color. Go back to layer, tap it and choose fill layer again to change the color. Or you can always go over to hue saturation, brightness, and you could play around with it that way, see what it looks like if it's darker, less saturated, more saturated. Change the hue a little bit, make it a little more red. You can play around and see what looks good to your eye. Being able to recognize what colors look good together is a skill. If you don't feel like you're able to do it right now, the more that you practice with it and play around with colors and decide what colors look pleasing to your eye, the better you'll get out of it. But I think this looks good. Now I think these flowers with a yellow in the middle work pretty good because it's also a warm color. But let's go ahead and change it anyways. Go up to your layers and tap the layer with the flowers. For this, let's use the hue saturation brightness adjustment. Again, go to the magic wand icon, choose hue saturation brightness. Because the flowers are white, if I change the hue, the only thing that's going to change is the actual inner part of the flower, the white's not going to change because there is no hue. Maybe let's choose a warm pinkish color. You can also adjust the saturation a little bit, so maybe I'll desaturate it a little bit. The last thing we need to change is our stars. I'll show you one other way that you can change the colors a little more selectively. If you've got to your layers, let's select the layer with the stars, which is this one right here. Let's turn on Alpha Lock, so two fingers swipe to the right. Let's choose a nice warm yellow for the stars. I think that'll look nice. Then you can come in here and you can paint over them because we have Alpha Lock on. If you just needed to change the color of a part of something like this, you could turn on Alpha Lock and just draw over it like this. Now since I'm going to be changing the color of everything on this layer, it's probably easier just to tap it and choose fill layer. But if you needed to go in and selectively add the colors, you could do it that way. Before we end this lesson, let's go back out to the gallery view by tapping gallery. Let's name these files really quick. I'm going to call this one snake cool and then the other one I'll call it snake warm. I wanted to show you a way to organize your files. When you have variations on a single piece of art, it's helpful to place them into what's called stacks in Procreate. To do that, you would tap this little Select button here and then you would tap to select as many files as you want and then you tap the word Stack. Then just tap little X to get out of that mode. That's going to place those files into a folder. You can tap it and see the multiple files. You can have a lot of files in a single stack if you want. It's just a way to organize your files. You can even rename your stack. If I wanted to call this snake stack [LAUGHTER] or something else, or snake colorways, you can do that too. Then one more quick gallery view thing I want to show you is the quick preview function. Let's open up this stack. Then if you take two fingers and pinch out, it will open up a preview of that file without actually opening it up in Procreate. Then you can tap to the right or the left to cycle between your artworks. This is cool because you get to see the before and after from the two different colorways. [MUSIC] I hope you enjoyed this drawing and had a lot of fun just adding some nice decorative elements to a very otherwise simple illustration and then also learning how you can alter and edit colors in Procreate, and what colorway is, a lot of really fun stuff in this lesson. In our next drawing, we're going to be illustrating a really fun bird. For this piece, we're going to be incorporating some photography elements to create a digital collage. It's going to be a lot of fun. I'll see you in the next lesson. 26. No.12 - Bird: [MUSIC] Welcome to drawing number 12. Today we're going to be drawing a bird. We're going to be building this bird out of very simple shapes and then I'm going to teach you how you can incorporate photography into your digital art to create digital collage. I'm going to be supplying you with some photos that you can use for this lesson and I'll talk to you about how you can find more. Let's get started. Let's go ahead and create a new Canvas. Tap the plus sign in the upper right and choose the kick-start course Canvas template. Today's drawing is made up of pretty simple shapes so we're not going to make a sketch, we're just going to jump right in. Let's go to the brushes and we're going to go to the drawing set and choose the Blackburn brush. We've been using this brush quite a lot lately. I really love the character that it has and then we'll go up to our colors and let's just pick a bright orange. The color doesn't actually super matter because it's just going to get covered up with photos. We're going to be doing a fun photo collage for this piece so go ahead and just choose an orange. Then I'm going to set my brush size, let's say 25 percent and we're going to draw the body of our bird, and this is going to be a half circle. Let's draw a half circle shape and then close it like that, it doesn't have to be perfect and then you can fill that in with color. Then we're going to use our eraser tool to edit this shape a little bit so tap and hold the eraser icon and that's going to choose the Blackburn brush as your eraser or you can just find it here in the menu. Then we're just going to chop off the top of this a little bit so we have a little bit shorter of a shape and we get these really nice sharp corners on the edges. It's really hard to draw a perfectly sharp corner, especially with some of the brushes that are more round. I often use the eraser to give me these nice sharp corners. Next we're going to draw the head of our bird and we're going to be separating all the different parts of this bird onto separate layers. That's going to make it a lot easier when it comes time to add the photos into it. Let's go up to our layers and we're going to tap the plus sign to create a new layer and then we're going to drag this layer underneath the bird body, that half circle that we just drew. I'll make that layer on the bottom and then just choose a different color. I'm just going closer into red just so I can see what I'm doing. I'll zoom in here and then for the head, we're just going to draw like a little hill shape like this. Then we can actually use this layer to do some of the tail feathers. You can combine parts onto the same layer as long as they don't touch each other so we're going to do some of the tail feathers on this layer. Let's zoom in there and we're going to draw four feathers. Let's draw the first one. We'll do this teardrop shape. It's a little bigger than it needs to be because we're going to come in with the eraser and sharpen the bottom so that it's a nice point so we have this nice teardrop shape. Then we're going to leave a little space where another feather would be so just leave a little space and then draw another teardrop shape and then use the eraser to edit that. Now we're going to do the little beak. I'm going to go up to my layers and I'm going to create another layer. I'm going to place this layer below all of my other layers because I want my beak to be behind the head. Then I'm going to choose a nice yellow for the beak. This is the one part of the illustration that will show once we add the photos so I'm going to do a yellow for that. Then I'm going to draw the beak this way, pointing back towards the tail. Just draw a triangular shape and then grab your eraser and use that to make it a little more pointed, something like that. Then I'm going to use this same layer to draw my other two tail feathers. I'm going to zoom in here and I'll draw one of the feathers. Then I'll use my eraser to edit that down so that it fits in-between the other two and then we'll do one more down here. Make it bigger than you need to, and then use the eraser to edit it down. I'm just going to move my bird around so it's a little more centered. I'm going to go up to my layers and swipe to the right on each layer to select them all and then go to the transform tool, which is this little arrow. Then I can move that around to center it and I think I want to make this one feather a little smaller so I'm going to go to layer with the red feathers and I'm going to use the selection tool, which is the s icon here. I'm going to draw a selection around that one feather and then use the transform tool to resize it a little bit. Here we go. The last thing that I need to add to this piece is the wing so let's go ahead and do that. I'm going to create a layer above all the other layers and then I'm going to choose just some other color and draw my wing. Starting here rounded to a pointy shape, draw very loosely and then use the eraser to clean it up. There we go. You can always use the transform tool to move it into a more desired position if you'd like. Then one more little thing before we get to adding photos in, I'm just going to draw a little eye so let's go ahead and create a new layer for that. I'm going to choose black as my color, make my brush size a bit smaller and then I'm just going to do a little closed eye for my bird so like a U-shape to insinuate a closed eye. Now we're ready to start adding some photos into all these little shapes to make a digital collage. I wanted to share with you a couple of really good resources for getting free to use stock photography. In this course, I've provided you with a folder of photos that you can use for your bird illustration. You can download these photos from the projects and resources tab of the Skillshare class page, just make sure you're not in the app or otherwise you won't see the downloads. Once you download them, you'll find them in your downloads folder of the files app. You can just tap the zip file to unzip it and then you can open up the folder and you'll find 10 different photos that you can use for this piece. These photos come from a couple of different, free to use stock photography websites and I'll just show you those really quick. The first one is pexels.com. You can type something in like colorful background. It will return a bunch of different photos that you could use for this project. The other one that I like to use is unsplash.com. It's a similar website. They have lots of free-to-use stock photography. Let's go back into procreate and let's add our first photo. We're going to start with the body of the bird. I'm going to go to my layers. I'm going to tap the layer with the bird body, so it's this half-circle shape. Then I'm going to go up to the Actions menu, which is the little wrench right here. Then I'm going to go to add. There's a few different options for inserting a photo to your canvas. If you want to use the photos that I provided to you in the download, you would choose Insert a file. This is going to take you into your iPads files app. You can tap, browse, and you can go to your downloads folder and then you'll find that collage images folder and you can choose one of the photos there. I'm going to choose blurry beads. Now, I want to resize this so that it is bigger than the shape that I want it to be inside of. You can see that there's a bit of the bird body sticking out there. I'm just going to rotate this so that it covers up the whole thing. Then I'm going to go up to my layers. I'm going to tap the photo so you can see we have the photo in here now. I'm going to tap the photo and I'm going to choose clipping mask. Now, only what's within the shape of this bird body that's all the photo that will show. I can actually go to my transform tool and I can resize this if I wanted to get a different part of the photo in here, I can do that. I think that looks pretty good. Now I want to add photos to this layer, the one with the bird head and the two red feathers. I'm going to go ahead and tap that layer in the layers panel. I'm going to go ahead and create a new layer. This is another way that you can do it where you can see instantly once you add the photo in, I'm going to create a new layer, I'm going to set that layer to be a clipping mask and make sure that new layer, that empty layer is selected. Now I'll go over to the Actions menu. I'll choose Insert a file. You can also choose Insert a photo if you want to import something from your camera roll but we're going to choose Insert a file. I think I'm going to choose this parrot image. I want to use that for the head. I'll tap that. Because we had already set up the clipping mask, you can see that now I have this photo within the shapes. I want to make sure it doesn't touch these feathers over here. I just want it to be on the head so it looks something like that. I'm going to resize that a little bit. Good. Now, I like this, but it looks a little dark. Maybe I'll go up to the Adjustments menu. I can choose hue, saturation, brightness, and I can make it a little brighter, maybe a little more saturated. I like the way that it looks a little more brighter and more colorful. Now I want to add photos to these two feathers. Let's go ahead and create another clipping mask to do that. If I tap the layer with the head and the feathers, so this one with the red shapes. Then I tap Plus, it's going to create a layer that's automatically a clipping mask and that's because it's right underneath another clipping mask. It's between these two layers so it will automatically be clipping mask. Now I can go to the Actions menu, insert a file, and maybe I'll choose this painted wall. I can move it around until I get something that I like. You could add another clipping mask if you wanted to just do the brick wall on one of these feathers and add another one, but I like the way that looks. Let's do these two feathers now. I'm going to go to the layer with the two yellow feathers. Tap the Plus sign, tap the layer and choose clipping mask, and then go to the Actions menu, insert a file and let's choose painted canvas and I'll resize that. Decide what part of it I want to show. These blues look nice. That looks good and I think I'm going to do one more photo for this other feather. I'll create another clipping mask, tap the Plus sign and make it in-between the other two and then I'll go to the Actions menu, insert a file, and this time I'll do the yellow paper. Here we go. I can rotate that a little like that. I can see here if I zoom in, I have part of I think this photo overlapping this. I could just go to that layer and just select it and then erase the part that I don't need like that. One more thing, we're going to add the little bird wing here. I'm going to tap the layer with the wing, make a clipping mask right above it. Create a new layer, tap it and choose clipping mask, and then go to the Actions menu. Insert a file, and let's do this water ripples photo and then I can turn that around. I like this it almost seems like the direction if you're going to draw lines for feathers, it's like that. Now if you wanted to edit any of the photos, make them brighter or more saturated, you could do that like we did with the head. Maybe I'll do that with the bird body. I'll go up to the Adjustments, menu, hue, saturation, brightness, make it more saturated. You can even change the hue if you wanted to play around with colors, the colors that it had actually that looks good. You make it brighter not so bright. Then for this piece, I'm going to add a background color. Now when I am working on something that has a lot of colors in it like this piece does, I really love adding a really nice navy blue background or a cobalt blue. I'm going to go to my layers and I'm going to go to background color. I'm going to go down here into the blues and then I'm going to get a nice dark blue and play around and see what color blue you want to have. I always love a bright and colorful piece on a blue background. There you have it. A really fun, really colorful digital collage-style illustration of a bird. There are a lot of really fun ways that you could incorporate digital photography into your artwork. You could import a photo and then paint it over the top of it. You can make digital collage like this. There are a lot of things that you can do. I hope you had fun with this piece. In our next drawing, we're going to take our animals under the sea and draw a fish. I get to introduce you to the Smudge tool, give you some tips on working non-destructively and a really fun digital effect that you can add as a finishing touch to your piece. I'll see you in the next lesson. 27. No.13 - Fish: Welcome to drawing 13. At this point, you have already reached the halfway point of this course, so congratulations on that. Today we're going to be drawing a fun and colorful fish. In this lesson, I'm going to introduce you to the Smudge Tool. I'm going to give you some tips on utilizing a non-destructive workflow, and I'm going to show you a fun effect that you can do with Procreate filters. Let's get started. Let's start by creating a new canvas. Tap the plus sign in the upper right and choose the Kick-Start course Canvas template. We're going to begin this piece with a sketch. So let's go into our brushes, and we're going to go into the sketching set and choose the 6B pencil, and then you can just choose black as your color or dark gray. I always used to struggle with drawing fish for some reason, but I've learned that if you reduce it down to just like an almond shape and you learn how the fins are drawn, it's a lot easier. So let's start this piece with a sketch and we're going to start our fish body with an almond shape. Be sure to leave some room over here for the tail. Draw a curved line for the top of the fish and another curved line for the bottom of the fish, and for the tail, we're going to draw two lines that come out like that and then connect them with a curved line that way. For the top fin, we're going to draw a line that curves out and back like that, and another line that curves out and back, and then connect those two lines. Then for the fin on the bottom, we're going to draw a line that curves out and back like before and then another line that curves out and back like that, and then connect the two, and one more fin, which is just like a rounded triangle on this side, and then we'll draw a curved line for the fish's head, goes like that. A circle for the eye, with another circle in the middle, and then a little mouth. We're all done with our sketch. Let's go ahead and move on to color. I'm going to go up to my layers and create a new layer by tapping the plus sign and move this layer below my sketch and then I'm going to reduce the opacity of the sketch by tapping the n and sliding the opacity slider down. Now I'm going to go over to my brushes, and I'm going to go into the calligraphy set and choose the shale brush. Now I can choose a color so I'm going to go over to my colors and I'm going to start with the fish's body. I'm going to do that in a nice purple, not too dark. I'm actually going to choose a pretty light-colored purple like that. Now, my brush size is 20 percent and I trace over the outline of my fish and then color it in by hand like this. This brush has a nice texture to it, so I don't want to fill in with color drop because I would lose some of that texture, and it's nice to have some of these little white spots peeking through. It gives it a more hand-drawn feel. You can make your brush size a little bigger to make the coloring go a little faster. Here we go. Completely fill in your fish body shape, and we're ready to do the fins. We're going to do these on a separate layer. So let's go up to our layers, tap the plus sign, and we're going to move this layer under the fish body layer like that, and for the color, I'm going to do like a nice medium blue, something like that. Now we're going to trace our fin shapes. Color those in, to this little triangle one. We'll do the top fin and this brush does have some nice thin to fix. You can get those really nice tapered lines, so it's helpful for doing these pointed parts of the fins if you use light pressure right there near the point and color it all in. There we go. The tails, same thing. Maybe I'll make a nice pointed line by using light pressure there and here and then connect and then I can fill that in. If it's hard to make the pointed tips just using pressure, you can always come in with your eraser brush. Just use the same shale brush as your eraser and erase a part of it away to make it nice and pointy like we did with our bird. Here we go. We've got our fins all done. Now, I want to introduce you to the smudge tool. We're going to be using the smudge tool to blend the color of the body into the fins. But in order to do that, we need to merge these two layers together. So here are my layers. We have the fish body and the fins on separate layers and in order to blend the two colors together, we need to merge them onto the same layer. But I don't want to do that because I know I'm going to be using this fish body shape to add a scale pattern and other things, so let's go ahead and duplicate this fish body layer. Swipe to the left and choose Duplicate, so now we have two copies of that. Whenever you know you're going to be making a change that you can't undo, like merging two things together, it helps to make a duplicate. This supports a non-destructive workflow, and all that means is you're working in a way where the changes that you make are reversible so if you know you're doing something you can't undo later, try to make a duplicate of something before you do that. Now we can go ahead and merge the fin and the body layer together. We could do that in a couple of different ways. We can tap the fish body layer and we can choose merge down or you can do the pinch gesture to pinch them together. But now we have two copies. We have the fish body and then we have the fish body combined with the fins. Now we're going to turn on Alpha Lock on the one with the fins, so two fingers swipe to the right, close the layers, and now we're going to use a smudge tool. It's this little finger icon right between the brush and the eraser. Go ahead and tap that and open it up. We're going to go into the painting set and choose the dry brush. I just wanted to jump in and let you know that if you can't find it in your brushes list, dry brush is from a previous version of Procreate. They stopped including it in version 4.2, but you can download the old brushes directly from Procreate and I have a quick link for that. Go to bit.ly/old-brushes, and you'll find the old brushes there. We worked a little bit with dry brushes in our acorn drawing and this one is very