Get Ready to Write: Develop a Logline and Roadmap for Your Novel | Kathleen Barber | Skillshare
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Get Ready to Write: Develop a Logline and Roadmap for Your Novel

teacher avatar Kathleen Barber, novelist & fiction consultant

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      1:26

    • 2.

      Project

      2:30

    • 3.

      What Is a Logline?

      3:07

    • 4.

      Logline Components

      5:32

    • 5.

      What Is a Roadmap?

      3:26

    • 6.

      Act 1 Plot Points

      4:11

    • 7.

      Act 2, First Half Plot Points

      4:26

    • 8.

      Act 2, Second Half Plot Points

      3:46

    • 9.

      Act 3 Plot Points

      4:43

    • 10.

      Conclusion

      2:13

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About This Class

Do you have a great idea for a novel? Before you pick up a pen, join me in this class! I'll share my favorite trick for writing a novel: creating a logline and roadmap to guide your creative process. Once you've created these foundational documents, you'll be ready to write your novel!

In this class, you'll learn what a logline is — and how it can keep you focused during the messy drafting process.

You'll also learn how to create a roadmap — and how that roadmap will be an invaluable tool as you dive into writing.

I'm a published author who has learned the hard way that taking the time to create a logline and roadmap before I begin writing saves me countless hours — and untold frustration — and I'm eager to share what I've learned with you!

This class is designed for anyone who wants to write a novel, especially those at the beginning of their writing journey or those just starting a new project.

Meet Your Teacher

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Kathleen Barber

novelist & fiction consultant

Teacher

I'm the author of TRUTH BE TOLD (2017, Gallery Books/Simon & Schuster), which was adapted into an AppleTV+ series starring Octavia Spencer, and FOLLOW ME (2020, Gallery Books/S&S). When I'm not writing, I'm passionate about helping other writers achieve their creative visions. Also, I like coffee. A lot.

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Level: Beginner

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Do you have a great idea for a story, but only a fuzzy idea about how to turn that idea into a full length novel with twists and turns and stakes? Do you sit down to write and find yourself just kind of meandering all over the place? Trust me, I know the feeling. My name is Kathleen Barber and I'm a novelist. My debut novel, Truth Be Told, originally published, is Are You Sleeping, received starred reviews from Publishers Weekly and Library Journal. And was adapted by Reese Witherspoon's, Hello Sunshine, into a series on Apple TV that ran for three seasons and starred Octavia Spencer, Aaron, Paul Kate Hudson, and Gabriel Union. My sophomore novel, Follow Me, was called A Must Read by bestselling author Wendy Walker and was named one of Glamor.com best books in 2020. Both of my novels start as just an idea, not unlike the idea that you have right now over the course of my novel writing career. Through more trial and error than I would like to admit, I have honed what I think is a pretty effective way of writing novels. And it all starts with a log line and a roadmap. In this class, we'll talk about what a log line and roadmap are and how they can help you write your novel. By the time you've completed this class, you will have some vital components to, in your novel writing journey. Six months. Let's get started. 2. Project: Welcome back. Now we'll be discussing the class project for get ready to write. In this class, your project is two fold. You'll be creating a log line and a roadmap for your novel in progress. Don't worry if you don't know what a log line or a roadmap are at this point. We'll cover that in class. At this point, all you need to know is that a log line is a concise one or two sentence summary of your novel introducing your protagonist, your hook and your central conflict, and your roadmap is going to be a few short paragraphs that cover the main plot points of your novel. Creating a log line and roadmap are important because they can guide you in your novel writing process later on. As some of you may already know, once you sit down to actually start writing a novel, it can be really easy to get sidetracked by tangents and little subplots and to lose focus of the story that you're trying to tell. But if you've taken the time to create a log line and roadmap at the outset, you've baked in a form of accountability for yourself, something to pull you back when you start to get sidetracked. Now, that's not to say that a log line and roadmap are set in stone. Quite the opposite. These are living documents that you should feel free to change and edit as you're drafting and discovering more aspects of your novel. But even as things might be changing, the login and road map are there to help remind you what's really important in the story that you're trying to tell for this project. It's the words that are important, not the form. You have a lot of latitude to create a final project in a way that is going to best assist your creativity. If you look at the example that I uploaded, I use a lot of color. But that's just because that's what helps me. Don't feel like yours needs to look like that. You can make yours a plain word document or you can just type directly into the project description. What I'm going to be looking for when I review these projects is that all of the components we've discussed in class are present. If you notice in the example that I uploaded, I added brackets to highlight the main components in the road map. Now if you're creating a log line and roadmap later on for your own personal use, you may choose not to take that step. But for the purposes of this class, I ask that you do. To recap, you'll be turning in a one or two sentence log line and a roadmap that is a few short paragraphs in length and has the components highlighted. I hope you're as excited to get started as I am. I'll say in the next session when we start talking about what a log line actually is. 3. What Is a Logline?: Welcome to the next class and get ready to write. What is a log line? Welcome back. You may have found yourself wondering what a log line actually is. Well, in this session, we're going to talk about what a log line is and how one can help you when you're writing your novel. Some of you may never have heard of a log line before, or you may have heard of a log line, but never in the context of writing a novel. That's okay. Many people have only heard of the log line in the context of screenwriting. Screenwriters generally have a very short period of time in which to pitch their story idea to a producer. Often, they only have the span of an elevator ride, which is why you may also have heard this referred to as an elevator pitch. As you can tell, I'm talking that these are going to be short. They're going to be 12 sentences at most. Now I know what you're thinking, you're thinking, but I have this great idea for a full length novel, and how am I supposed to distill that with all of its complex characters, and story lines, and plots, and subplots? How am I supposed to distill that all down to one or two sentences? And I get it, it sounds really daunting, but we're going to work through it together. First, I'm going to give you some examples from famous stories so you can see what I mean. The log line for the Godfather is the aging patriarch of an organized crime dynasty. Transfers control of his cleanacine empire to his reluctant son. The log line for Elf is a Christmas elf, goes to New York City in search of his biological father, knowing nothing about life outside of the North Pole. The log line for Back to the Future is a young man, is transported to the past where he must reunite with his parents before he and his future cease to exist. And the log line for Romeo and Juliet is a young man, falls in love with the daughter of his family's sworn enemy. What you'll notice is that these log lines are not the tag line. They're not those snappy couple of words that you're going to see on a movie poster, for example. The tag line for the Godfather is an offer you can't refuse. See how it's different than the log line. It's something that's great at piking viewer or reader interest, but it's not something that's as wonderful at selling the novel to an agent, or a publisher, or a producer. It's not something that's going to be explaining why your novel. Okay, you're thinking that's great, but why do I need to be worried about selling my novel right now? I haven't even written my novel, and I hear you do. I have found though, in my experience, by starting with a log line, you're really setting yourself up for success when you write. Once you sit down to write, it is really easy to start going down on different tangents to find a little character development here. A little subplot here. I found that if you have your log line where the elements are really set up very concisely, it's really easy to look at it and pull yourself back to the main essential elements of your story. To recap, your log line is a one or two sentence summary of your novel that can be used in pitching or to keep you on track during the writing process. In the next class, we're going to be discussing the components of a log line. 4. Logline Components: Welcome to the next class and get ready to write log line components. Hello again. In the last session, we talked about what a log line is and how we can help you in your novel writing. In this session, we're going to break the log line down into its constituent elements. If you recall, a log line is a concise one or two sentence summary of your novel. The parts of a log line are the protagonist, the hook, and the central conflict. In short, your protagonist is your main character, the ones who's driving your story. Your protagonist is going to be your Harry Potter, your Tins, Everdine, your Nick Carraway. Your hook is going to be the thing that hooks your reader. It's going to be the thing that makes your reader want to pick up the novel. It's going to be the thing that makes them think, wow, that sounds like a story I need to read. Your central conflict is going to be precisely what it sounds like. It's going to be the main problem that your protagonist faces throughout the story. To illustrate, let's look back at some of the examples we discussed in the last class. If you recall, the log line for the godfather is the aging patriarch of an organized crime dynasty transfers control of this clandestine empire to his reluctant son. Here the protagonist is the aging patriarch. The hook is that he's the patriarch of an organized crime dynasty. The central conflict is that control is being transferred to his reluctant son. The word reluctant is doing a lot of heavy lifting here in terms of showing us the conflict. Let's look at another example. In Elf, the log line is a Christmas elf, goes to New York City in search of his biological father, knowing nothing about life outside of the North Pole. The protagonist is obviously the Christmas elf. The hook is that the Christmas elf is searching for his biological father. The central conflict is that said elf is heading to New York while knowing nothing about life outside of the North Pole. As these examples show, you don't need to spell everything out in your log line. In fact, you shouldn't. You usually keep it as concise as possible. How do you go about creating your own? Pretty simply, actually, let's walk through it together. First, let's talk about your protagonist. In many cases, it's easy to identify your protagonist. Like I said earlier, the protagonist is generally the main character of your novel. But what if you have a novel that has multiple point of view characters or if you're working with an ensemble cast? Well first, if you think that you have multiple protagonists, I would encourage you to really drill down and think about whether you truly have multiple protagonists or whether one of them is the primary protagonist. If you think that you truly have dual protagonists. If for example, you have two protagonists that have an equal amount of time on the page and they have equally compelling and active story lines, then you might want to go through the work of creating a log line that heads dual protagonist. It's tricky, but it's not impossible. Let's look to Julie and Julia as an example. Here the log line might be something like a young woman unhappy with her dead end job, becomes determined to cook her way through Julia Child's famous cookbook and blog about it intercut with adventures for Julia Child's life. If creating a log line like that seems unmanageable to you, it's possible that you really only have one protagonist. And I would really encourage you to drill down and identify who your primary protagonist is. The primary protagonist is going to be the person who is driving most of the action of the story, who connects everything. That's going to be your protagonist. Next we're going to talk about your hook. The hook is the thing that hooks your reader. It is the unique aspect of your story that makes the reader think, I have never read anything like that before, I need to read that. In my opinion, determining the hook is the hardest part of this entire process. As an author, you sit back and you look at the story that you want to tell and you see all the things that make it unique. For example, when I was working on creating a log line for truth be Told, I was sitting there and I was thinking, well, there's a twin. There is this idea of a woman starting completely over. These are all unique things. But then I figured out that the hook is actually the true crime podcast. When the book came out and I saw read a reaction to it, I realized that that was in fact the hook. When you're doing this work, you might need to sit down and write out a few things that you think might be the hook. And really think about the thing that is going to be the most unique and the most grabby to a potential reader. That's your hook. Next we're going to determine your central conflict. Now your novel probably has lots of conflict in it, right? That's what keeps people turning the pages. Conflict. But what's your central conflict? What is the main problem that your protagonist faces? So think about the thing that your protagonist wants. And then think about what's standing in their way. What's preventing them from getting that? That's your central conflict. Now compile all those things and you've got a log line. Remember we want it to be concise, so don't be afraid to keep revising it until it's snappy. The log line is going to serve as your North Star when you're writing, but if you've got a great log line, it's also a great jumping point later on when you're pitching agents and publishers. To recap, your log line is a concise one or two sentence summary of your novel that includes your protagonist, your hook, and your central conflict. Next we're going to be talking about what a roadmap is and why you should have one. 5. What Is a Roadmap?: Welcome to the next class and get ready to write what is a roadmap. Welcome back. In the last session, we broke down a log line. In this session, we're going to talk about what a roadmap is and why you need one. Now, a roadmap is a two or three paragraph summary of your novel that includes the major plot points. We'll talk about what those major plot points are in later sessions, but for right now, just know that when I say it includes the major plot points, that's really all I mean. This is not a summary, it's not a synopsis, It's just something that gives you the tent poles. When you're writing, you can look back at it now wait a minute. You might be saying, what if I'm a pancer? If you're a panther or in other words you're somebody who writes by the seat of your pants. This might feel like a big challenge to you and I get it. I'm somebody who used to identify it as a panther as well, and I wrote most of the truth, usual completely by the seat of my pants. I then had to completely rip the novel apart and reorganize it in order to make the pacing right. Please, I'm begging you, Learn from my mistakes and at least consider the idea of having a roadmap before you get started. If you're still what, convinced. Let me give you three reasons why I think having a roadmap is really important. One, by forcing you to think about the essential elements of your story, it gives you a concise summary of what your novel is truly about. Two, it helps by establishing major plot points before you start writing. If you know where you're going, it's easier to figure out how to get there. Three, it helps by keeping your pacing on point. For example, I know that I personally tend to write really slow openings. I know that if I've expended about 20% of my novel, and I haven't even reached the point where it's going to be the catalyst yet, I know that I have a problem. Conversely, if you've only written about 15,000 words, you've already reached what you think is going to be the endpoint. You've got a different pacing problem. I have found, in my experience, that identifying the pacing problems as they go makes them a lot easier to fix than if you try and do it all after the fact. One thing I want you to note is that a roadmap is not a static document. Just because you wrote something down doesn't mean that you have to adhere to it. You're free to change this as you go along. If you're a Panther, I hope that makes you feel a little bit better. Now, in the next few classes, we're going to be talking about the major plot point in each of the three acts if you're unused to thinking about your novel in terms of acts. Let me give you a brief introduction to the three act structure. Act one, which is generally thought of as the set up, comprises about the first 20% of your novel. If you're thinking about a general 80,000 word novel, that's about the first 16,000 words. Act two, which is the longest act often thought of as the confrontation. This act starts at the 20% mark, goes to about the 80% mark. It's a big chunk of your novel. It comprises about a whopping 48,000 words. Then the final act, act three, is often thought of as the resolution. It's going to take up the final 20% of your novel. We'll talk about the plot points that go into each of these acts in further classes. To recap, roadmap is a short document setting out the major plot points of your novel. In the next class, we're going to be discussing act one and the major plot points therein. 6. Act 1 Plot Points: Welcome to the next class, you get ready to write act one plot points. Welcome back. Now that we've talked about what our roadmap is in general, it's time to dip into some of the nitty gritty details. In this class, we're going to be talking about the major plot points in act one. As a reminder, act one is the first 20% or so of your novel generally thought of as the set up. The first plot point we're going to discuss is stasis. Now, stasis isn't so much an individual plot point as it is a state of equilibrium. It is the normal. It is where your reader finds the protagonist and the other characters that inhabit their world. It shows us what the story is like before the plot happens. Now, Stasis takes up about the first 10% of your novel. If you're thinking in terms of like an 80,000 word novel, you wanted to vote about the first 8,000 words to stasis. When you're thinking about stasis for your own novel, there are three things that you want to consider. One, establishing a baseline for your readers. This is showing them what's normal and expected for your characters in the setting. Two, introducing your main character to the readers. Let them meet your protagonist and perhaps some of the other main characters and get a sense of who those people usually are. Three, contrast the norms with the forthcoming change or conflict. If, for example, your protagonist is going to lose their job, show us how the protagonist is doing in their job. If they're about to lose their relationship, show us the relationship. If you show the reader how things are before, it makes the change all that more impactful. Now again, stasis is not a single scene beat. It comprises a good chunk of words. And accordingly, you might find it difficult to summarize for your roadmap. I'm going to encourage you to do your best to get it down to the bare bones. Remember, this is just to help you. If you want to look at an example though, here is the stasis beat from my road map. For truth be told. Now living in Brooklyn and using the name Joe, Josie Berman has put her painful pass behind her. You see that gives you the name and location of my protagonist and shows you that she's working towards a normal life. The next plot point, arguably one of the most important plot points in your novel, is the catalyst, also referred to as the inciting incident. The catalyst is going to occur at about 10% of the way through your novel. In other words, right at the end of stasis, as you might guess, the catalyst interrupts the status quo. It's what ignites the main conflict of the story, sets your protagonists off on your journey. For example, in The Lion, the Which in the Wardrobe, it's when Lucy discovers narnia in the hunger games. It's when Catinus volunteers a tribute. When you're thinking about your own catalyst, here are three things you might want to consider. One, disruption of the status quo. You want to be really shaking up the established order and jolting the protagonists out of their comfort zone. Two, urgency here, your catalyst needs to be clear and urgent. It really should be impossible for your protagonists to just ignore the catalyst and return to their normal life. You're at a point of no return here. Three, introduction, the main conflict. You're going to want your catalyst to be tied closely to the primary conflict of the story. Either by directly introducing it or by hinting at larger issues that are going to later become central to the plot. If you want to look at my example, the catalyst for truth be told is when a Hip podcast begins reinvestigating the long closed murder of her father, her life is thrown into upheaval. The podcast makes it impossible for Josie to go back to the life that she was living before. After you're a catalyst, the rest of act one is generally referred to as the debate. It's how your protagonist decides to react to the catalyst. There are a number of smaller plot points in there that I'm not going to get into because they're not part of your roadmap. To recap, the major plot points of act one are stasis and catalyst. In the next class, we'll discuss the major plot points in the first half of act two. 7. Act 2, First Half Plot Points: Welcome to the next class and get ready to write act two, first half plot points. Welcome back. In the last session, we talked about the major plot points in act one, and now we're going to get started talking about the major plot points in act two. If you recall, act two is the largest act in your book. It encompasses about the 20% mark to about the 80% mark. There is a lot of book there. As you might have guessed, there are also a lot of plot points. I'm going to break the major plot points in act two up into two sessions. In this first session, right now, we're going to talk about the first two plot points in act two. In the next session, we'll talk about the next two plot points in act two. The first plot point you're going to encounter is Break into two. Break into two is the transition between the set up of act one and the confrontation of act two. This plot point occurs when your protagonist takes an action or does something that propels them into the next section of the narrative. Note that this is an active plot point. Break into two isn't something that passively happens to your protagonist. When you're thinking about your own break into two point, there are three things that you want to consider. One decision or commitment. Like I said, your protagonist has to make a definitive choice to engage. Here, there's nothing passive about this plot. 0.2 new world or environment. Often the protagonist enters a different environment or a world. Act two. This can be literal, like a new city or a fantastical realm, or it could be metaphorical, like your protagonist is going into a new situation or a new relationship. And three raised stakes. As the protagonist commits to this path, the stakes of the story become clearer and more heightened. The challenges and complications in Acto are more intense than those in act one. If you want to think in terms of examples in the movie The Matrix, the Break into two moment occurs when Neo decides to take the red pill in the hunger games. The Break into Two moment occurs when Catins decides to board the train to go to the Capitol. If you want to look at my example from Truth Be Told again, the break into two moment occurs when, after the unexpected death of her estranged mother, Josie returns to her midwestern hometown to confront her past. The break into two point is important because it maintains the narrative momentum and develops the characters further. You want to be sure that you have got a really sharp break into two moment. The portion of your novel that comes after break into two is often called the funding game section, or the promise of the premise. It includes a number of plot points that basically live up to the premise of your novel. These are smaller plot points though, and so we're not going to crowd your roadmap with them. Instead, we're going to move on to the next point, which is the midpoint. As you may expect, the midpoint occurs about 50% of the way through your novel. Something needs to change here at the midpoint. Something needs to swivel, the midpoint is what it's going to infuse your story with new direction and new energy. When you're thinking about your own midpoint, here are three things that you should think about. One, a major revelation or a twist. The midpoint often includes a game changing piece of information or some twist that alters the protagonist understanding of their journey or the conflict that they're facing. Two, escalation of stakes. The stakes are going to make the protagonist mission more urgent here. Or it's going to make the challenge that they're facing more daunting three, false victory or false defeat. Depending on how your story has been going as far, the midpoint can either be a moment of triumph or a moment of despair for the protagonist. But it is false triumph or false despair because your story isn't over yet. If you want to think in terms of examples in the hunger games, the midpoint occurs when there's the possibility that Tins and Peta are both going to be declared winners. That really shifts the dynamic between not only just the characters, but also the entire bit of the story. If you want to look at my example from Truth Be Told, the midpoint occurs when Josie's long term boyfriend, Caleb, makes a surprise trip from Brooklyn to her hometown. And discovers that Josie has lied to him about every aspect of her life, including her name. So to recap, the major plot points in the first half of act two are break into two and the midpoint. In the next class, we're going to be talking about the major plot points in the second half of act two. 8. Act 2, Second Half Plot Points: Welcome to the next class and get ready to write act two, second half plot points. Welcome back. In the last session, we talked about the first two plot points in act two. In this session, we're going to talk about the final two major plot points in act two. We left off at the midpoint. Now the part of the story that comes after the midpoint is often called the bad guys closing. There are bad things that are happening to your protagonist here in this section. I'm not going to worry too much about some of the minor plot points here, and instead we're just going to move on to the next major plot point, which is the low point. The low point occurs at about three quarters of the way through your novel, and this is when things get really bad when you're crafting your own low point. Here are some things you might want to consider. One absolute lowest point. This is the lowest emotional point for protagonist. The challenges that they face here appear insurmountable, and their goals seem totally unachievable. Two, isolation. Your protagonists might be physically or emotionally isolated from their allies, their friends, their loved ones. That isolation might amplify their sense of despair, loneliness. Three, reflection and introspection. Here your protagonists may reflect on the things that have brought them to this low point. It's often a very deeply introspective part of your novel. It can lead to some profound realizations for your protagonist for external consequences. Something significant has usually gone wrong in the external plot that's going to bring your protagonist to this low point here. An example of a low point occurs in Harry Potter and The Order of the Phoenix, when serious black dies. An example of the low point, in truth be told, occurs when Josie's twin sister line goes missing. And Josie is left wondering what she could have done differently. The low point is important in terms of character development and setting up mistakes. Finally, the last major plot point of jam packed act two is Break into three. This occurs at about 80% of the way through a novel, or about 64,000 words and an 80,000 word novel. This is the part that is unsurprisingly going to move us from the confrontation of act two into the resolution of act three. When you're considering your own break into three section, here are some things that you might want to consider. One decision or a commitment. Following the lows of the last part of act two, the protagonist is going to make a crucial decision. This is typically proactive. It's going to signify their readiness to face the stories climax to new information or insight. Often this plot point has some revelation associated with it. It's something that changes the protagonists understanding three emotional turn. Here your protagonists might experience a shift in their emotional state. Their feelings of despair that they were just feeling might turn into determination or hope for moving toward the climax. Breaking of three is important because it sets the stage for the climax of the story. Your protagonist is now on a clear path to the end. For a couple of examples in Star Wars, the Empire Strikes Back. The breaking of three point occurs when Luke decides to leave Yoda to go help his friends. And the break into three point in the hunger games occurs when the gamekeepers say no, there's actually only going to be one winner. If you want to look at truth be told, The break into three point occurs when Josie sets aside her own plans in order to look for her missing sister. To recap, the major plot points in the second half of act two are the low point. And breaking into act three. In the next class, we're going to be discussing act three and the major plot points therein. 9. Act 3 Plot Points: Welcome to the next class and get ready to write act three plot points. Welcome back. Now that we've finished talking about the major plot points in act two, we're going to talk about the major plot points in act three. Act three is once again your final act. It's going to be your resolution phase of the novel, and it's going to encompass about the last 20% of your novel. The first major plot point that we're going to come across is the climax. The climax is no small plot point. It is one of the most important plot points of your novel. The climax is when the action comes to a head. It's when the emotional intensity of your novel really ramps up. Climax is incredibly important. As you might have guessed, the climax is not a single scene. It is a crescendo of moments that lead to the final confrontation. If you're familiar with the save the cat method, it talks about the climax in terms of five separate steps. I'm going to briefly go over those right now. One, gathering the team, the protagonist and allies prepare for the final confrontation. Two, executing the plan. Initially things might go well as the protagonist supposed to plan of the action. Three High Tower surprise, an unexpected twist forces the protagonists to change their plan. Four, dig deep down here the protagonist faces a moment of self doubt. Must really muster their inner strength. Five, executing the new plan, armed with new insight, the protagonist is going to confront the antagonists and the challenge one last time. You might find it useful to think about those steps when you're working on your own climax. But whether or not you consider those ones from Save the Cat. Here are a couple of additional things that I think you should really think about when you're working on your own climax. One, this is the ultimate confrontation. The climax usually involves a final, decisive confrontation. It's the culmination of all the tensions and conflicts that have been building up throughout your story to highest stakes, what is at stake here is clearer than ever and it is intense. Three character arc culmination. Your protagonists internal journey is going to reach its peak here during the climax. The things that they have learned throughout the course of the novel are going to be tested and they're going to be solidified for pivotal choices. Your climax often is going to involve a crucial decision that your protagonists must take. This is not only going to determine the outcome of the story, but it's also going to reveal things about your character, such as how far they've come over the course of the novel. Five, intense emotion. The climax is usually the most emotionally charged part of the story. As you can see, there is a lot going on here in the climax. I know it can feel a little daunting to sit down and write that out for your road map, but remember the road map is just for you. You only need a couple of sentences that are going to tell you how things are going to wind up. The final plot point that we're going to talk about is the dinument. This is what comes after the climax. It's what ties up all of the loose ends. It's what's going to provide a sense of resolution for your reader when you're thinking about crafting your own. Here are a few things that you can think about. One, return to normalcy or a new normal after the upheaval of applied. This section often depicts a return to the state of equilibrium. Although that state of equilibrium might be different than the one that we saw in the stasis to character pads. The dinument shows where the characters end up after the climax. It's going to give us some insight into the final situations or their transformation. Three, reflection and understanding your characters may reflect upon the events of the story or their personal growth or maybe lessons that they've learned. This introspection can offer deeper thematic insights to your reader for resolution of subplots, even though your main plot might have been resolved in the climax. This section can wrap up your secondary story lines or characters. Anything else that you think needs to be wrapped up in order to have a happy reader at the end of the book. And five, you might want to set the stage for sequels if you're planning any. If you're writing a series or something like that. The dinument might include hints or set up for future installments. The dinuments important to your reader because it gives them emotional closure of this novel that they've invested so much of their time in. It's also important for you in terms of your roadmap because knowing where you're going can help you figure out how to get there. To recap, the major plot points in act three are the climax and the denument. Now I hope you'll join me in the next class where we can talk about how we're going to bring it all together and create your logline and your roadmap. 10. Conclusion: Welcome to the final class and get ready to write. Putting It All Together. Hi, I hope you've enjoyed everything that we've talked about together. In this final class, we're going to talk about how to take everything that you've learned and put it together for your final project. We'll start with the log line and move on to the roadmap. First, let's revisit your log line. As a reminder, your log line is a concise one or two sent summary that's going to include your protagonist, your hook, and your central conflict. Now as you did the work of thinking about the major plot points for your road map, your idea about what some of those elements are might have changed. That's okay. Remember, none of these are static documents, but once you've got this settled down, then you can start to pull it all together into a log line. You might want to go back and look at some of the examples from when we discussed log lines to help guide your own. Now, your log line is not going to be perfect on your first attempt. It's not going to be perfect on your second attempt, or maybe your third attempt, or maybe even your fourth attempt. But if you keep at it, you'll eventually refine it down to a really nice, concise little summary of your novel there. It's going to be something that, yes, you could use to pitch to an Asian or a publisher. Importantly, it's going to be something that's going to be there for you when you're stuck in the weeds in your novel. Now let's discuss how to create your road map. Think back to the eight major plot points that we discussed. As a reminder, those are stasis catalyst break into two, midpoint, low point break into three climax and Newman write one or two sentences for each of them. The more concise the better. And group them together into a document. I personally like to break my road map up into four paragraphs so that I can see act one, the two halves of act two and act three really clearly. Again, you don't need to have a lot of details here. This is just to help you as you're writing your novel. Once you have your log line and roadmap completed, again for your roadmap, please remember to highlight the components. Then just upload them to the project gallery in whatever manner you choose. Thanks for joining me in this class and I can't wait to see what you've done with the information. Please be sure to leave me a review and let me know how this class has helped you get ready to write.