LIGHTROOM CLASSIC CC Masterclass: The Complete Photo Editing Course | Mario Guimarey | Skillshare

LIGHTROOM CLASSIC CC Masterclass: The Complete Photo Editing Course

Mario Guimarey, Photo | Video | Youtube | Editing

LIGHTROOM CLASSIC CC Masterclass: The Complete Photo Editing Course

Mario Guimarey, Photo | Video | Youtube | Editing

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26 Lessons (3h 42m)
    • 1. Lightroom Classic CC Course Presentation

      1:18
    • 2. Introduction

      2:10
    • 3. Raw Files VS JPG Files

      1:00
    • 4. Importing and Organizing Your Photos

      6:57
    • 5. The Library

      12:12
    • 6. Rating your Photos

      4:57
    • 7. The Develop Workspace

      3:42
    • 8. Cropping Your Photos

      4:09
    • 9. Basic Corrections

      16:29
    • 10. Tone Curves

      7:29
    • 11. HSL/COLOR

      4:25
    • 12. Color Grading

      5:44
    • 13. Sharpening Your Photos

      6:49
    • 14. Lens Corrections And Transform

      10:46
    • 15. Effects

      5:12
    • 16. Calibration

      4:09
    • 17. TOOLS Part 1

      14:15
    • 18. TOOLS Part 2

      12:50
    • 19. Panorama

      4:17
    • 20. Presets

      10:45
    • 21. Exporting

      13:41
    • 22. Full Editing Session / Portrait

      23:37
    • 23. FULL EDITING Landscape 1

      24:19
    • 24. FULL EDITING Landscape 2

      19:29
    • 25. Project

      0:18
    • 26. Conclusion

      0:43
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About This Class

If you want to learn how to transform your normal photos into AMAZING photos, this course is for you.

Lightroom Classic CC is one of the most powerful and popular Photo Editing Software in the world and is used by beginners and professional photographers.

Either you are starting in the world of photography or maybe you are a professional, this course will give you everything you need to know to create amazing photos.

In this course you will learn:

  • You will understand the layout of Lightroom
  • Importing and organizing your photos creating collections and folders
  • Basic Corrections to start improving your photos
  • How to make your photos sharp and unique
  • How to use presets
  • Detailed Corrections and the use of advanced tools
  • Ho to use the brushes to adjust details
  • Full editing sessions to improve your workflow
  • How to export your photos
  • and more

I am attaching a pack of photos for you to follow me in this course and some extra one to practice. Just click in this link to get them. This is the link:

Pack of Resources

What are you waiting for, let's start creating amazing pictures. 

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Mario Guimarey

Photo | Video | Youtube | Editing

Teacher

I was borned in Lima, Peru and since I was 18 years old I've been traveling around the world working in cruiselines. I found my love for PHOTOGRAPHY and VIDEOGRAPHY watching the beautiful scenarios that the world has for us.

I started to study PHOTOGRAPHY online as well as VIDEOGRAPHY and I opened my first YOUTUBE channel to share my adventures with family and friends but something happened...

Many people around the world started to watch and comment my videos, that was so exiting that I wanted to make more videos and with better quality.

I kept studing but now it was the turn of SOFTWARE, Premier Pro, After Effects, Photoshop, Lightroom, etc

After Years of editing videos and photos, learning more and more about YOUTUBE and social media, I decided to share my... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Lightroom Classic CC Course Presentation: If you like to take pictures and you would like to learn how to edit them and make them amazing, this course is the one you are looking for. This course is made for everybody. If you are starting in photography, or if you want to share your photos in social media like Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook, or any other platform, or maybe you want to make photography as your career, this Lightroom Course is going to be what you need. I will go into detail from zero and I will give you photos to edit with me so that we can learn by editing. By practice, we will understand the layout of Lightroom, how to import files, and organize them. We will learn how to fix from little imperfections in our photos all the way to color, white balance, tone curves. You're going to learn how to retouch your pictures in a way that you'll be able to create your own style. We will learn how to export our photos for social media, for printing, or even for a job. As you can see, we will learn everything you need to know about Lightroom Classic CC so that you can start creating amazing photos. Now, I'm going to give you full support as well. If you have any doubts or questions, I will be there to answer them as soon as possible. If you want to create amazing photos and start editing now, what are you waiting for? I'll see you in class. 2. Introduction: Hello and welcome to my Adobe Lightroom Classic CC course. My name is Mario and I'm a videographer and a photographer from Peru, currently living in Slovenia. I edit pictures every single day. Let me tell you that I never post or share any picture without editing at first. My main tool for that is Lightroom. You can do almost everything with Lightroom to make your photos stunning and take them from amateur to pro. I want to let you know that this course is about Adobe Lightroom Classic CC, which is the version that you install in your computer and basically all your files are saved in your hard drive. I'm saying this because there is another version of Lightroom called Lightroom CC, and that's the version for the Cloud. Everything's going to be in the Cloud, just to be clear. Also, we will be using the last version of Lightroom Classic CC. If you have an older version, don't worry because at the end it's the same idea. If there is a new version coming in the market and they make some changes in the software, don't worry because I will be updating this course all the time. In this course, we will start understanding the layout of Lightroom, what is the first thing that comes up in the screen when you open the software? Then we will import the files to start editing. We'll see how to organize them for a better workflow. Then we'll learn how to rate our pictures, and this is to know which are our favorite ones and get them ready to start editing. Then we'll start with the editing process from zero, how to crop, how to do basic corrections, tone curves, find editing tools, basically go into more detail edit. We'll see how to install and use presets, we'll learn the best ways to export our pictures, and at the end, we will edit together different kinds of pictures so that we can put in practice what we learned. This is actually the best because we learn by editing. This course is for beginners. But if you already use Lightroom, you never know, you could learn something from me. Which files are the best ones to edit? Let's start this course, understanding the difference between raw files and JPEG files. 3. Raw Files VS JPG Files: JPG or JPEG files are compressed files. When you take a picture, the sensor of the camera get the information of an image. Then the camera is going to take that image, assume what is important in it, and compress it to reduce the size of the file, losing some information. Basically here the camera is helping you, so when you take the picture, you can already share it. You can still edit these pictures, but you will have less possibilities and options to make them better. On the other hand, raw photos are files with all the image data captured by the sensor of your camera. These pictures are bigger files, but you will be able to edit these pictures in another level, producing much better images and correct parts that with a JPEG file would be unrecoverable. For example, we have these details in the shadows or in the highlights. Most of the cameras nowadays are able to take raw photos and even some smartphones can do that. Now let's open Lightroom and start editing. 4. Importing and Organizing Your Photos: Okay, guys. This is basically what you see when you open Lightroom. You have here on the top, these work rooms or work spaces. This is basically where you are going to work. We're going to spend the bigger part of this course here in the develop section. That is basically where we are going to edit our photos. Library is where we import and organize our pictures, and this is what we're going to do in this lesson. Don't worry if you see a lot of buttons here because we're going to be explaining everything during the course why we're using it. Like I said in the intro, we're going to learn by practice. Before we import our photos to Lightroom, I want to tell you that organization is very important for a successful editing. Every time you work with something creative, like it's a video editing, photo editing, or painting or whatever it's creative, you need to be organized to make your workflow faster. So I'm going to show you how I do it. By no means, this is the perfect way to do it, but this is the perfect way to do it for me. You can organize yourself however you want, however you think is going to be the best for you. In my case, for this course, I put everything in the desktop, as you can see here this PC, then this desktop, then these new courses, Lightroom courses, and then it's images where I have these three folders that actually you're going to be able to download and use it. We have full editing and this is very cool because we are going to be using these pictures for our full editing sessions. Then you have lessons that basically these pictures are the one that I'm going to use to teach you all the tools that you need to edit, and then we have panorama. We're going to show you how to create amazing panorama pictures also using Lightroom. This is basically the three folders I'm going to give you that you can download, and yap, let's go and let's start importing these. There's few ways to import our pictures. You have here, the Import button here, or you can come to file and you can look for import photos and video. As well, you have here Control, Shift, I. This is also the short keys that you can press to come to the import. Let's press Import, and this is what is going to appear. Basically, this is your computer. If you have external hard drive or you have, maybe, I don't know, a pen drive plugged in, it's going to appear also here so you can choose the photos you want. For example, we go to a local disk, we go to users, remember I told you I have everything in the desktop. We go to desktop, then we go to new courses. It's a lot of folders. Then we go to Lightroom cores, and then we have here images, remember, full editing, lessons, and panorama. What you can do is you click here images, and as you can see, there's no pictures here because they are in the folders inside images. What you can do is include subfolders and then basically all the pictures are going to appear here. This is all the pictures we're going to use. Now, you can actually go back to images and just choose by folders, like full editing, just this folder, or lessons, just these folder. You have also the option to unclick the pictures you don't want to import. If you have a lot of pictures and you want just few of them, you can actually uncheck all here on the bottom, and then you just choose the pictures that you want to use or you can check all. Now, if we come here to this side, to the right side, you have this file handling. You have the preview, is going to be the minimal by default, but you have standard, one-by-one and things like that. This is how you're going to preview the photos, so don't worry about this. You have here don't import suspected duplicates. I always leave these click because you don't want to have two pictures that are the same, then your workflow is going to be crazy, so you better click this here. You have also here Add to Collection, and this is something we're going to see in the next lesson. This is basically how to organize your pictures because Lightroom is very good for that. For organization, Lightroom is the best. Don't worry, we'll do it in the next lesson. I'll explain you how to create collections and folders to organize your pictures. You have also here Apply During Import, so when you import the pictures, these things are going to be applied to the pictures. You have some effects here like color, not well bright, high contrast. When you import all the pictures, all your pictures are going to have these settings. Then you have metadata. You can add metadata to all the pictures when you import them. You have here how to do it. You can even edit the presets and you have here also some keywords that you can add to a specific picture, so then you can select them and find them easier. Like I was showing you, if you press images, they're all the pictures here and you can import them like this, all the pictures. But in this case, I just want to import these folder, lessons, for now. So I can show you in the next lesson how to organize them and create collections, and then in the collections, we're going to import all of them. All the pictures that are here. Couple of things I want to tell you before we go to the next lesson. We have here the grid, where that's the way we're looking at the pictures now, that we're previewing the pictures with the grid. But if you click here, it says the loupe view. You're going to be looking at the pictures one by one. You can zoom the pictures, make it bigger, smaller. If you want to look for the other pictures, you just use the arrows on your keyboard. Let's click Import, and that's it. Now, you have the pictures. They are imported already. We're still in the library because in the next lesson we're going to organize them and we're going to import the other folders as well, and we're going to leave everything ready so we can start editing. One last thing, I want to let you know that Lightroom is not storage in your pictures. Lightroom is just reading the pictures for you. Is reading the pictures from wherever you have the pictures storage, like your hard drive or a pen drive or your external drive. If you do a lot of editing here, Lightroom is going to storage just the editing, just what you did to the picture, but not the picture. If move the picture from folder to folder or you erase the picture from your hard drive or take them from the pen drive and put it in the hard drive, Lightroom is going to be confused because it's not going to find it, and then you're going to have a problem. This is why you have to be very organized before you start editing. Then you don't need to move your pictures in your hard drive. You're going to leave them there until you finish your editing. Let's go to the next lesson. Let's organize our pictures and let's get ready to start editing. 5. The Library: Now that we imported our first folder, we're going to talk about library. This is the part basically where you organize your features and let them ready to be edited. Let's start here in the left and we have the first navigator, and this is basically a little bigger preview of your photos. You select the photo and you can see it over here. You can make a zoom in the picture, for example, click in here, click in here. You can drag this square and zoom exactly whatever you want to see if this is the correct picture that you wanted. Now we're going to start to talk about the organization in Lightroom. Lightroom is really good for that, for organization. The first way to find your pictures and organize them is the catalog. This is basically what Lightroom does for you. This is a preset. By default, Lightroom is always going to put here. Now we imported just five pictures, just this folder, so you're going to see all photographs, five. But then we start to import more folders and maybe tomorrow, we're going to import something else, and maybe in a week, something else. This is the all photographs that you ever imported. They're always going to be here, and this is the way you can find it. Now, in All Synced Photographs are going to be the photographs that you have synced with the Creative Cloud, if you are working with the Creative Cloud with Adobe. Quick Collection, it's also when you have some collections, they are going to appear here. We're going to talk about it in a bit. Then the previous import is the last import that you did. This is the catalog. I don't use it much. Just to see the previous import if I'm in a hurry, but I don't use it much. I don't think this is the best way to organize your pictures here in Lightroom. I'll show you which is my favorite, but before, let's talk about folders. Folders is another way to find your pictures and folders is basically allowing you to go in your hard drive and look for the pictures through your hard drive and maybe your external hard drive, or pen drive, or SD card, wherever you have your pictures. As you can see here, it says Lessons 5 because this is the only pictures that I imported, and this is the way to find it in folders. Now, let's talk about the next one. This is my favorite, the Collections. This is my favorite because basically, here you can create your collections, you create your folders, your subfolders, you put them there, you organize them. For example, we're going to create a collection. Create collection, as you can see here. We're going to put in the title Lesson Pictures. Lesson Photos. Remember that I told you that these pictures are the ones that I'm going to use for the lessons to teach you all these tools that we have to edit. Then we can add an inside collection set. We don't have a collection set yet. Don't worry, we're going to do it, so we don't need to use these for now. Let's create our folder. Now, inside the collections, we have Lesson Photos and we just have one photo. But why do we have just one photo? Because we didn't select all the photos. We just selected one when we were creating our collections. How do you find the rest of them? I just showed you. We can go to Catalog, we can go to Previous Import, and we can see all the photos. You can go to Folder and you come here, and you come to Lessons. It's the same thing. Now, how are we going to move these pictures to my new collection, Lessons Photos? We can click here and drag the picture to the Lessons Photos. There you go. Now you can see we have two photos in the Lesson Photos. Other way to do it is, you can select the picture and then go to the end, and pressing "Shift," select the last one and you're going to select this. It's basically in every software, I think it works like that. Another way also is, if you want to select all the pictures, use Control A or Command A, and you select all of them. But we already have these two there, so what we're going to do is we're going to select with the Shift and then we just drag them into here. There you go. Now, we have our collection, Lesson Photos, with our five photos. Now, what we can do, because we still have two more folders to import, let's import. Let's click "Import." Now we have here, the images, remember, and then we have full Editing and Panorama and we just imported lessons. What we're going do is, we click in Full Editing and we have all these pictures, all selected like we want it. Remember we were talking at the beginning, this Add to Collection and I said we're going to do it later. We can import all of these pictures, and then create a collection, and then drag these pictures into the collection, but a faster way to do it is to Add to Collection and we have Lessons Photos here. But we don't want them there. We want to create a new collection that is going to be called Full Editing. You see here, the plus button? We press the plus button and we have exactly the same as creating a collection. We're going to put here Full Editing and Create. That's it. It's just created. Now we put import and it's created. As you can see here, we have Full Editing and Lesson Photos. Now, another thing that I want to show you about the collections, we can create a master collection where we're going to put these folders in. We come here in the Collections in the plus button to create a new one and we put Create Collection Set. Let's name this collection set Lightroom Classic CC Course, because this is what we're doing now. We create this. Now we have here our master collection, our collection set, like Lightroom calls it. What do we do is we go to Full editing, we just click it and drag it inside this collection set. Then we go to lessons and drag it inside this collection set. As you can see, we have this Lightroom Classic CC course, the collection set, and inside, we have these subfolders. This is amazing. Why? Because now we're just doing the course. But imagine if you did a wedding yesterday and then you have another wedding on Saturday, and then you went for a trip, you went for a trip and you have such amazing pictures in the trip. What are you going to do to edit them? You have to be organized, remember it. You create collections, the master collections or the collections sets. You can create, for example, wedding one master collection, and you can create a collection set over the trip to Japan. I don't know. You're going to have here these collections sets and inside, you can put your subfolders. This is the best way. You're going to be organized. Now, remember that we are missing one folder, so we're going to go to Import. Again, we have this window. We're going to come to Panorama. Remember, we're missing this folder. We're going to put Add to Collection, but remember, we're going to create a new collection and this is going to be called Panorama. Now, you see here inside the collection set, this is the only collection set that we have, so by default, it was marked. Be careful because if you have more collections, you have to click here to check which collection you're going to add. We're going to add it to that Lightroom Classic CC course, this is the collection set, and we create it. Then we import and that's it. As you can see, we have Lightroom Classic CC course, and then we have Full Editing, Lesson Photos, and Panoramas. We have already all our collections done and inside our their set. This is very, very cool. Now, let's go to Lesson Photos. Let's go to, I don't know, this photo over here, this macro photo. Here on the right side, you have the Histogram and don't worry, we'll talk about it in the editing part of this course. Under the Histogram, you have some information about the picture. You see, you have the ISO, you have the lens that they were using, even the shutter speed and everything. You have here, basically, information about the picture. If we go to Quick Develop, develop basically is here also, if you press Quick Develop, it's basically a very fast editing, it's like adding presets, creative, black and white, default, curb, grain. You can add some presets, but I never use them because the idea of Lightroom is for me to edit the picture, not this Quick Develop. You can change the white balance, the tone, you can go for auto and it's going to change the picture. Then let's go here to Keywording. In Keywording, you can add keywords to your photos, so then they are going to be easier to be found. Then you have the Keyword List, so you can filter by keywords. Now, here in Metadata, I guess you know what is Metadata, you have the information of the picture, the name of the picture, where is the folder that we put it. This is the collection. Then we come here down and you can see where the picture was taken, when I took the picture, the dimensions of the picture, and everything. Let's go here in thumbnails, this is the size of how you see the pictures. Actually, if you have so many pictures, you can make them smaller, you can make them bigger and this is something that I like about Adobe softwares like Photoshop or Premier Pro, Lightroom in this case, that it's very user-friendly. As you can see, you just come close to the edges and you can drag them, make them bigger, smaller, however you want. Actually, you see these little arrows here? If you're going to be now working just with the photos and you don't need this part, you just click this little arrow and it's going to hide these parts so you have a bigger workspace. Then you just hover over and then it's going to appear again, or you click the arrow and it's going to come back. You can do the same with all of these layers. Now let's talk a little bit about this part here on the bottom. You have the grid, we talked about it already. If you come here, remember, you see one picture, and with the arrows, you can go forward or you can check the pictures in the back, that's it. Then you have X/Y, that it's basically putting two pictures together so you can watch by two pictures. Also, with the arrows, you can go and then you can change them and go back and forth. Then you have here the Survey View, that is basically another way to preview your pictures. Let's go here, you see the face? This is something really cool that Lightroom has. You press the face here and Lightroom is going to select specifically faces, people that are in the pictures, like portraits. You can actually look for more and add them here, if they are not all here. But let's go, for example, to this one. We go, we double click, so we open the picture, and then we're going to select this square in her face, and we're going to put her name, which is Gloria, we press Enter and there you go. We have it. Now, let's go to the second one. Let me see. It didn't recognize her because she has a lot of makeup and the hair is in the back and it looks like she has a short hair, but she is Gloria. The thing is that sometimes, and it happens many times to me, it was really fun and really cool, that Lightroom recognize faces and I have a lot of pictures, and Lightroom is going to put the name here already because it recognized the face. In this case, Gloria. Let's go. Here, for example, it doesn't recognize her. It's a question mark here because we didn't put her name. But have fun with it. If you have a lot of pictures of the same person, put the name on one of the pictures, and let's see if it recognizes the other pictures. This is a really cool thing to do. I don't use it much, I'm not going to lie to you, but it's really cool to have it. It's really cool. In the next lesson, we are going to rate our photos, but before we go for the next lesson, I want to show you something that I was missing. Here, under collection, it says Publish Services. This is the way to publish your photos. You can actually publish in Adobe Stock or Flickr. You can find more services online, you can add them here and things like that. I don't use it. If I want to publish my photo, I don't know, in Instagram or something, I just export all my pictures, I put them in a folder, and then from there, I can post my pictures and so on. Let's go to the next lesson and let's start to rate our pictures so we can start editing. 6. Rating your Photos: Now we're going to rate our photos. Why rating is important is because, if you have so many photos, if you went for a trip, for example, you have hundreds of photos, or a wedding or an event and you have so many pictures, it's good to rate them so when you are editing you know which ones to choose, which ones are the best, which ones are the ones that maybe you will edit or maybe you will not, so you can start editing the best ones. Now there's different ways to do it. First, you have to get out of the grid. Let's go here on the bottom and let's go to watch the pictures one-by-one. There you go. Let's start from the first one here. We have here this picture, and then we're like, I like this picture. You can see here that you have flags and stars. You will say, okay, this is a five-star picture. Then you go to the next one, she has a lot of makeup, maybe this is a four. Then you can keep going with the stars. This is a way of rating. Stars would be like the more detailed way because you have five options; like really you don't like it, maybe you like it in the middle, or you like it a lot and you put five stars. The other way would be the flags. Flags are basically not that specific. It's either you like it or either you don't like it. You go, for example, to this picture, I don't like this picture. You flag x, the x here in the middle of the flag. Then you go to the next one. I love this picture, and you flag it. This you can see that you have a flag, and when you see the pictures that are flagged, the opacity goes down. You see they're a little transparent already here. You know that when you're editing you have to jump this one because you didn't like it. At the end, when you finish your editing, you never know, you can come back and see maybe now you like it. But you can leave them for the end so you go and you speed up your workflow. Now, how to find the pictures. Now, if we come here to the right side, on the bottom, you see here it says Filters Off. We can come here and we put, for example, Flagged. This is the only picture we flagged, remember, so we're filtering. Instead of flagged, you can put, for example, rated, and all your pictures that are rated are going to appear here. It doesn't matter how many stars, but if you put a star to a picture, they're going to appear here. Then here on the bottom you can choose how many stars you want; two stars, three stars. But there's no pictures that we put with three stars. If you see here, it says rating is greater than or equal. In this case, we put, for example, five stars. This is the only one with five stars. But if we put four stars, they appear too because this is four stars and this is five stars. It's greater or equal. Now, if we click "Filter", look at this. It's not just about flags or about stars. You have colors here. Why you have colors here? Let's put here Filters Off. We go back to all our filters. Here you can add colors. For example, the pictures that you took in the trip to, I don't know, Japan. You right-click here and you put Set Color Level. Let's put it to red. As you can see now, it has a frame that it's in red. This trip is to Koper, Slovenia. Let's add to this one the color level. Let's put it like green. Now you can see that this is red. If you go out, you can see that now this is green. Like this, you are actually coloring your picture so you know which ones are the ones that you want. Then you can filter them also here pressing the buttons. For example, let's go to red. If I click red, we go to the picture that you selected in red, simple as that. This is a very nice way to rate and filter your photos. This is something I will suggest you to do, rate your photos, not necessarily with colors. It doesn't matter if you do it with colors or however you do it, but I will suggest you to rate your photos if you have a lot of photos because it's going to help you to edit faster, to choose the pictures that you want faster. Other way to do it, it's always few ways to do it, is by numbers. For example, you select this picture, it's not rated yet, and you press four. Immediately, you're giving to this picture four stars. You select this picture and you give three, you're giving to this picture three stars. It's five stars. What happen if you press six, for example? Let's go to the number 8. If you press six, you are in this moment selecting this picture as red. You gave the picture a color, and that's really cool. Let's go here. Let's press seven, for example. You are putting the color yellow to this. It's really cool. With the numbers also, you can speed up your process. Always try to look for keywords. You can see that you don't need to come all the way here and press the stars, you can put the numbers and your pictures are going to be already rated. Just an easier way to do it. 7. The Develop Workspace: The time has come. We're going to start editing. We're still in "Library". We're going to click here in "Lesson photos", we have to have it selected, and then let's go to "Develop". This is going to be the layout where we are going to spend most of the time in this course. This is basically where we're going to edit our pictures. Let's start very fast with this part over here, the left part of the layout where you can see "Navigator". We already talked about it in "Library", it's exactly the same thing. You can see actually here a preview of the picture. Now, the question would be, but if the picture is here, why would I have a preview here? Because here, you can zoom in a specific places. This is really cool. For example, if you click here, you can see here that instead of the little arrow of the mouse, it's now like a plus, like a loop. You can zoom in if you click it. It's basically zooming in in the middle of the picture. But as you can see here, there is a little square here in the "Navigator" and you can move the square and start to do the zooming in specific places. This is really cool if you want to check some details that you would like to erase or fix. Now, if you double-click here in the "Navigator", you go back to the normal size of the picture. Now, the zoom that we are doing is 200 percent. As you can see here, it says 200 percent. You can actually come here and go up to 1600 percent. That's crazy. For example, we go to 400 and it's really, really a zoom in. This is basically to fix little imperfections. I normally have it in 200 all the time but, of course, I can change it as soon as I see that maybe we could fix something in more detail. Double-click, we go back. We have also here some presets. We're going to see that in our future lesson. If we come here to "History", for example, we're going to see everything we do in the picture. We didn't do anything yet, any edit in this picture, so the only thing that appears here in the history of this picture is that we import that picture on this time and this date. But as soon as we do some changes in the picture, maybe we add some exposure or we fix the highlights, this is going to appear here, everything we do in the picture. "Collection" is basically what we have. We have full editing lessons, photos, and panorama, the collections that we did. We can switch collections here to start editing. But remember, presets and stuff, just we're going to talk about this in our future lesson. If I missed some buttons, don't worry, because during the process of the course, we're going to be editing. Basically, at the end, we're going to use all the buttons so you'll see everything. Now, this is the part where we're going to edit, these are the tools we're going to use. This is the "Histogram" where you can actually see in the left side are all the darks and shadows, and in the right side, all the highlights and whites. It's funny that there's no highlights or whites because their picture is actually underexposed. We'll fix that, don't worry. Then, you can have also here some information of the picture. It's exactly the same as the "Histogram" in the "Library". Then, when you hover over the picture, you can see, remember that there was a loop, as you move in the picture, you can actually see under here, under the histogram, some information of the picture. I want you to check here under the "Histogram". Check here and I'm going to hover over the picture. You see? It says RGB and it says 14.9, G says 9.1, and B says 2.4. This is the percentage of the colors that you have in this specific part of the picture. This is really cool because like this, you can see what is a lot, what is not too much, and you can fix it then in the process of editing. This is very important. Always check the "Histogram" to make a perfect picture, perfect editing. 8. Cropping Your Photos: Now we're going to go here to the tools. Let's go for this picture. These are the tools. Now, I'm not going to explain in detail all of the tools. I'm going to do the crop and then we're going to go to the basic. Don't worry, we are going to be talking about every single tool here. But for now, let's go to the crop. Because normally, the first thing I do before I start editing is cropping the picture. How I want the picture to be. There you go. We're going to crop it. This is actually the original size of the picture. If you want, for example, for Instagram, you come here where it says original. You can come here, and for Instagram is one by one. You can see here is very good for Instagram, or four by five is good for Instagram also. I like it a lot when I use four by five because you take advantage of all the screen in Instagram. Let's pick four by five. You can see still it's in a horizontal position, and we want the Instagram to be in vertical position. What we do is we press the "X" in the keyboard, and there you go. Immediately, it switches from horizontal to vertical. Now let's crop this picture. Maybe I want less of this top. There's like a house here or some building over here. I don't want it. Let's try to put this path in the middle. One thing about cropping also is that, in Lightroom, is going to give you these grid so you can play with the rule of thirds. Actually, you have more grids to choose. I'll show you that in a bit. Let's go like this maybe. I want to crop it like this, so we can use some rule of thirds, but I don't want this building here. We can even go shorter. There you go. That's it. I think this is the way I want the picture to be. You just click "Done" and it's done. There you go. You cropped the picture. Now I'm going to show you something else. For example, let's come here again to this picture and let's crop it. Let's do the same thing. We go to four by five, we press "X", now we have it standing. Let's go a little bit. I want to use these columns like a frame. There you go. I think that's nice, but there is something that I don't like. You see here in the ceiling, it's not perfectly straight. You see it's a little bit thin into this side to the left side. What we're going to do is we're going to use here, you see this like a ruler that is straighten tool, this is for the angle of the picture. We're going to click it. We're going to draw a line. There you go. Let's try to draw the line exactly like how it is. You're going to see what it's going to happen when you release the keyboard. There you go. Did you see? It straighten a little bit the picture. Now I think here we are done, and then you click "Done." Now, let's go back to the picture we want to edit for now. Let's go back to the crop. It's already cropped. This is what we want. But I want to show you something here. You can fix the angle also pressing "Auto" but I don't need it because this is actually properly angled. This picture is how I want. What I wanted to show you is here, where we choose four by five, you can choose one by one, you can choose 8.5-11, or whatever you want to choose from here. You want to use for a thumbnail, for example, 16 by 9 is the perfect measurement for a thumbnail or maybe to watch on the TV or on a computer, 16 by 9 is what you want. You can also put custom measurement if you want. But if you want to size this, look at what is happening, it's going to size it exactly like four by five, like what we chose. But if we want to be more like flexible with this, you see here, there is a lock. If you click in the lock, you just open the lock. Now, actually, you can do whatever you want. You see, you can make a picture like this if you want. But that's not what we want. I just wanted to show you that everything is possible. What we're going to do is we're going to go back, Control Z to go back, and we're going to click "Done" because we're actually done with this. Let me change a little bit more here. There you go. 9. Basic Corrections: Guys, let's start to make our picture beautiful. You have here so many options that you can use and we're going to start with the basic corrections. There you go, you click just the arrow and it opens all these options. Start with Treatment here on the top, you have Color and Black & White. You are editing a colored picture right now because I want to add colors and I want to teach you how to use all these tools. I think it's better if we do it in color. But if you want to edit a black and white picture, you just click here and the picture is going to become black and white and then you can keep editing. Let's go back to Color. Now, here in Profile, you have Adobe Color. These are basically a set of presets that you can use to give some color to the picture. But let me tell you something, these are presets that you can use that can help you to start the editing. Now, let's go here in white balance. There's different ways that you can correct your white balance. In this picture, I think the white balance is okay. It's maybe a little bit warmer. When I remember taking this picture, it was not that warm, so it's maybe a little bit warmer, so we could fix it. We have an option here where it says As Shot. We took the picture like this with that white balance, but we can go to "Auto" and the Lightroom is going to fix the white balance by itself. Lightroom is going to assume what is to be fixed. Let's use Auto, and you can see that the change is very, very subtle, is not much. Is very subtle, but I saw that it actually went a little bit colder. It's not warm anymore. Let's go back to As Shot. You can see now it's a little bit warmer. Now, let's go to "Daylight", for example. That's actually much warmer. You see that it's very warm. That's not the way I want it. But you can use here any of these ones. You have Cloudy. If it was a cloudy day, let's see what was going to happen. It's even warmer. You can use any of these ones. Let's go to As Shot. We are going to change the white balance. The other way to do it is to change it by yourself. Here, you see the sliders, you have Temperature, you have Tint. If you play with the sliders in Temperature, if you go to the right side, you're giving a little bit more like it's warmer and warmer and all the way to another planet. If you go to the opposite side, this is the opposite. You give cold. You see it's getting bluish and to another planet. Let's reset it. Remember that to reset whatever you did, you just come to the name of the effect or the name of the slide you used and double-click. I'll show you. It's here, it's super warm. You double-click here and it resets. The Tint is you're going to give more green or more magenta. Let me tell you, it helps a lot when you are changing the slider on the top, you have to move a little bit the one on the bottom to make these contrast and make it better. Other way to do it and to apply the temperature in a picture, and for this, I'm going to show you another picture. We're going to this picture over here with the bee. Why? Because in the picture before, we don't have anything white specifically. Here we have the flower and you see the petals of the flowers are white. We can tell Lightroom, "You know what? This is white." We take here the white balance selector. We're going to come to the petal, and you know what? I know that this is pure white, and we tell Lightroom, "This is white." We click, and did you see what happen? It became a little bit more blue here on the back. The picture is colder. But actually, this is closer to reality because the picture was like this. You see the Lightroom is assuming this is white, so then it's correcting the picture with the selector. That's another way. Let's reset it because we'll edit that picture later. Let's go back to our picture and let's talk about the tone now. In this part, basically, we're going to make our picture nice, giving the picture contrast and correcting the exposure of the picture. I think that the exposure here is okay. But when I think that the exposure is okay, I normally give a little bit more of exposure, because as soon as I start to add contrast and shadows and blacks and things like that, the exposure drops a little. So that's why I always give a little bit more. Let's give just a little bit more of exposure just in somewhere there. Now, something I want to do actually to use these tools better, I'm going to make my space nicer and organized. You see these arrow over here? Let's click it because we're not using this part. Then you see this part over here, we're not using it either. Let's click this little arrow here. Now, we have a much better view of the screen. Also, maybe in your Lightroom, this part over here where you have all the tools are thinner. It's just that I expanded. You can actually expand this. You see, normally in Lightroom, it's like this but I like to expand it a little bit so that I can have more space here in the slides. Let's go back to Exposure, we decided to do plus 0.22. Now, let's go here in Contrast. If you add contrast, then the exposure drops down a little bit that's why I added a little bit more. Let's explain what is contrast actually. It's going to make your blacks better and your whites better, so it's actually making the picture very nice and it gives the colors something like it's very vibrant. I'll show you, giving an example like exaggerating. Let's go to 100 percent of contrast. You can see now that everything is better, but it's too much. I think it's too much. All the colors and everything in the dark parts are going to be stronger, and in the white parts are going to be stronger. We want something in the middle. We don't want to go extreme. Why? Even though it could look cool if we don't look at the subject here, but we look at the leaves and here it could look cool, but it's not natural. What we want when we edit is to look for something natural, unless you're looking for something different. If we go to the opposite side of the contrast, it actually takes all these vibrance and all these darks and white. It makes the picture super flat, and we don't want that either. Remember, we come to the name here where it says Contrast, and we double-click to reset what we just did. Let's add contrast, but not too much. Let's add just a little bit of contrast, just a little bit. There you go, in 29. Still you see, you know what? I could add more contrast. It's true, but that's why we have here the Highlights, Shadows, Whites and Blacks. We're going to move them a little bit, so we're going to keep adding more contrast. This is why the tone is for. Highlights, this picture was taken like noon, and that's why you see the sun is very strong. You see the shadows are on the bottom of the subject. What we do is the highlights. We can take the highlights, we can take all the highlights. If we take all the highlights, you see that it doesn't look that bad. Why? Because it was a lot of sun on the top, but when the picture is okay and there's no much sun, when you take out the highlights, you could make the picture look very bad. If we go to the opposite and we add a lot of highlights, you can see that these parts are already overexposed. We don't want that either. Let's go to reset it, then let's go in the middle. In my case, I think we could take out a little bit of highlights, like maybe around there. Don't worry. The picture is not done. There's so many things we can keep doing. We're going to make this picture amazing. Let's keep going. Shadows, the name says it all. You can add shadows or you can take out shadows. In this case, if you go to the left side, as you can see, you're adding shadows, and if you go to the right side, you're actually taking out the shadows. If we go to the normal picture, you cannot see details here. You see in the bag pack, you cannot see details. But if we go completely to the other side, now you can see some details here in the back, in the bag pack and everything. So it's not natural. We don't want that either. We could use it, but just for the subject, we're in this moment using it in all the picture and we don't want that, so let's go back to zero. In a future lesson, we're going to use all of these tools here on the top and these tools are going to make possible to do all of these changes that we're doing, but just in a specific areas. This is what we're going to do later in this course to make the edit perfect. Because it was a very sunny day, we add the shadows going to the left. There you go. Don't worry that adding the shadows is actually taking out details of the subject because the subject is going to be fixed by itself later. Whites, we don't have whites here, so I will not touch it, but I'll show you what is happening with the whites. If we go all the way here, it's making the image darker. If we go all the way to the other side, it's making the image blown, there was an explosion somewhere around. Let's go and let's put in zero. Blacks. Here, we're adding blacks, and we go to the other side then we're taking out blacks. In this case, I like to add blacks. I like to make it like this, for example. It's more contrasty. Still the picture is not done. Let me tell you something that I keep saying to everybody. All the students that are coming to me, I'm always telling them, this is not the perfect editing. A perfect editing doesn't exist. Editing is an art and every person has their own style and if you don't have it, practicing and practicing and learning all the tools of Lightroom, then you will create your own style. There is a big chance that something that I love to do in the editing, you will hate it, and there is a big chance that it could be the opposite. So not exactly what I like in the editing is going to be your taste. Everybody has a different taste. I'm teaching you how to use all the tools so you can come to Lightroom, be happy, and make your creativity go all over. This is my way. I like to add a lot of blacks and shadows in my pictures. Let's go down and we change now from Tone to Presence. In presence, we're going to talk more about color, textures and how the colors are going to be the vibrance of the colors and things like that. The texture is going to be like sharpness. You're going to add some sharpness to the picture. Of course, I have to show you, so we can see what is going to happen. If we take out the texture, let's go to the left side, look what is happening. It takes the sharpness and the details of everything. It looks more like a painting. If we go to the opposite side, it's adding too much sharpness, too much details in-between. The problem with this also is that you add more texture, you add more grain to the picture. So let's not exaggerate because this doesn't look real, doesn't look natural. Let's add just a little bit of texture, just like around there. It's just a little bit of texture. Clarity. Clarity is going to make your picture either very clear or very soft. Clarity, you can use it a lot for correct the skin, for example, in portraits. In this case, if we go all the way to the left in the clarity, look at this, it took out all the clearness of the picture and make it super soft. If we go to the opposite side, it's too much, the clearness. It's too clear. Every little branches is visible. We don't like that. We don't want that. We go to the middle. But in a landscape photography, like this one that we have a lot of trees, I like to add a little bit of clarity. So let's go and add a little bit of clarity. Maybe like 18, 19, the same as texture. Now let's go to Dehaze. Dehaze is going to give this shadowy idea in the picture, this shadowy feeling in the picture. If you go to the opposite side, instead of shadowy, it's going to give more like cloudy in the picture. I'm going to show you. Let's go all the way to the left side. You see? It's like a huge cloud covering the picture. Now, if we go to the other side, it's all these shadows in the picture, all this darkness. Dehaze is very good for landscape photography. I use it a lot. I don't use it much in portraits or baby pictures. I don't use it actually most of the time. But in landscape, I always use it. Look what is going to happen if I don't exaggerate with the dehaze like I did before. I'm going to go just a little bit more. Look at the picture, it's getting this feeling of shadowy, it's super nice. I like always to do that. It's very nice. I love it. Now let's go to Vibrance and Saturation. This is a very interesting subject because many people are asking me all the time, what is the difference between vibrance and saturation, because both of them are going to add color to the picture? The explanation is not as simple as you think. Saturation is going to make the predominant colors stronger. Vibrance, actually, it's going to give saturation to the non predominant colors in the picture. It's more subtle. What vibrance does is recognize the saturated parts of the picture, also the skin tones. It's understanding: what are skin tones? What are saturated? It's going to add color to the other parts, not to the saturated parts. Vibrance actually is very smart. It's a smart tool. It's understanding the picture, but saturation is not. Saturation is going to give a lot of colors and it's going to make your red, super red, and your green to super green, and so on. That's why this is the order to use it. You first use vibrance and then you can add a little bit of saturation. I'm going to show you in practice what is vibrance, and I'm going to show you an example, you know what? Compare vibrance with saturation. Look what is going to happen. If I go to it's saturation, all the way to 100 percent, all the colors are super saturated: the yellow colors, the green colors, look at the red, it's blown up. If you see here, the leaves are super orange. I want you to check out the leaves and the greens of the trees, the yellows that I have, this grass over here. Why? Because these are the saturated colors. I want you to pay very attention in these greens, the oranges of the leaves here in this tree, and also the yellows of the grass. We're going to go back and we're going to do the same thing, but with the vibrance. Let's go all the way to a 100 percent. Remember what I told you. Look at, the greens are saturated, but not as saturated as with the Saturation tool. Look at the leaves here in the trees. They are not even saturated. The colors are perfect here. So vibrance is understanding that these colors were too saturated, so it's not are they saturation here. You can see here in these trees on the top, it's not saturated. That's why, still, there are some oversaturated parts. Vibrance is not a human that understands the colors, it's a computer, but still it's making a better job than saturation because it's understanding the oversaturated parts. What we do, I add vibrance a little bit. Like I see, for example, here I like the colors. There you go. I think vibrance there is okay. Then, after I add vibrance, I can add saturation, maybe a little bit of saturation. This is the order I always use: first vibrance and then the saturation. Then, if you want to add some saturation in these parts that doesn't have much color, we can do it later with these tools over here on the top, doing these specific edits in specific places. Now, we're going to the next lesson, where we're going to talk about the tone curves, and we're going to give very nice contrast to this picture. 10. Tone Curves: Okay guys. Now we're going to talk about the tone curves. This is very important actually. I normally start my editing always coming here. For the course and the purpose of the course, I was starting from the top and I'm going all the way exactly in order so we can understand where everything is. But when I'm editing, I always start with the tone curves. To start, I'm going to show you this. We have the picture, we did few changes in the picture already, but there is a way that you can see how it was before and how it is now. Here, on the left bottom corner, you have these y and y. You press here, and then we can see how it was the picture when we started and how it is now. You can see it's much better, but still we're going to do more things in the picture. We're going to make it amazing. Now to go back, you just come here to this square. There you go, we go back here. There is another way where you can see how it was before and how it is now, and there's always these short keys that you can use to speed up your workflow. In this case, you can use the backslash, not the normal slash, but the backslash. If I press the backslash, look what is going to happen. I'm holding the backslash, I didn't release it. You can see the previous picture and then when you release it, you go back to the picture how it is now. It's you press the backslash, you don't release it, you hold it there and you are looking at the picture how it started, and then you release it and you go back to the picture how it is now with all the editing we did. Super cool. Let's go with the curve. As you can see here we have four circles. The first circle is the white one is the point curve it says there. This is basically this line over here, and you can create curves and give contrast to the image, but to the whole image. Now if we come to the red one, you're going to work with the reds in the image, then the greens in the image, and then the blues in the image. This is the RGB. What the curve is going to do is to give you this beautiful contrast to the picture. We already had some contrast with the blacks and the whites and even if you remember in the basic corrections, you have the contrast light that we can also use. But here is going to give you a different contrast. It's much better because it's more into detail. You can work just with contrast in the darks, just with contrasts in the highlights or in the mid-tones. You have in the left side all the dark tones, and then in the middle, the mid-tones, and then in the right side, you have all the highlights and the high tones. What we're going to do is you see that when I get close here, there is a plus button and I'm going to click and I'm going to create a dot over there. Then I'm going to do the same in the middle and then I'm going to do the same in the top. Then when I get close to the point, you see there is these two arrows. If I pull down, I give the contrast and the darks to the dark side. You see I can go all the way, and it's like a lot of contrast to the darks are the one that I just give a very soft contrast here. The mid-tones, I want them to be a little lower. You can see here is a representation of what he's going to happen. You have like a mountain here, so I'm going to put it in the middle. Then here I'm going to give a very subtle, very soft highlights a little bit over there. There you go. I think I like it like this. I can even give a little bit more darks here. Still you see the picture is very contrasty, but don't worry, because we're going to fix the subject and this part by itself. Just look at the surroundings, look at the trees. The colors now are very nice. If we press backslash, this is when we started and look how it is now. Now if you want to see just what we did with the curves, here you have these turn-off tone curve adjustment. You see this is like a turn on and turn off the effect. If we turn it off, look what happened. This is how we started before the curve and this is with the curves. Now of course if you want to play with the colors individually, you can also do that and you can actually add reds and make this a crazy designs, look at this is so pinky. But if you do this here for example. Let's do it, let's give this contrast here. It has already an S curve here. But you can see that we added a little bit of red in the darks and in the highlights. But if we do the same with the green and if we do the same with the blue, you'll see that all of these red is going to disappear and it's going to give just a little contrast. Now we're adding greens to the reds that we just added. There you go a little bit here, there you go. Now let's go to the blue. I know a friend of mine that normally is doing this. Every time he starts to edit pictures, he gives these three curves to the RGB. It's also a start point because we give this S curve in the whole picture, now it's really contrasty. But if you can see here around, the colors are very strong. It's actually pretty cool, I like it. Remember is very contrasty, a lot of the highlights, but don't worry because all of these is going to be fixed. You know what, we're going to leave this picture like. This is super like blown, like very colorful and contrasty. Let's do it like this, let's see what happened at the end of the editing. Also if you want to adjust, for example this part over here in the curve and you want to look like, which is this color? Where is this color located? You have here the selector. We come here and then you just drag it up and down and you're going to start to move the curve. If I move the cursor here in the tree for example, let me see here this darker park over here. Now look in the curb, there is this dot that I'm adding. You see the dot that is moving there in the darks. If I want to change something from here, that's the dot I have to create. Now, you have another way also. Here where it says point curve and it says custom, you can actually use some presets here. Custom is because we are doing the curves. But if you come here to preset, you have like a linear one that is the one that we start is just a line and then you have medium contrast, a strong contrast and then you can save what you just did here if you want to in the future add it to some other pictures that you're going to take also. Before we go to the next lesson, I'm going to show you these here. You see you have the wide one here. The circle is for the whole picture and then you have the RGB, but you have this thing here. What is this? This is when you want to start to create a curve, but using slides. If we click here, you see that clicking here you got this straight line, so you can start to create the curve using this light here. You have the highlights, the lights and darks, so you can play with the picture like going like this and checking you know what I like a little less highlights here and then I want maybe some less lights here and more darks. Look at the curve is moving by itself because we are using this lights. Normally don't use it much, but if you want to try, it's always good. Like I said in the previous lesson, every creativity is depending on you; everybody is unique, everybody has their own tastes so try it and have fun with this, this is the idea. Now let's go to the next lesson and we're going to talk about the HSL. 11. HSL/COLOR: Now, with the HSL, what does it mean? HSL is Hue Saturation and Luminance. What does it mean is that we can work with all of these three things and specific colors in the picture we can manipulate in the hue, for example. Now we are in hue. Let's check that we have a lot of greens in the tree here, and all these trees are very green. Let's play with the hue of the greens. If we go all the way to the left, we go towards the yellowish part, look at the trees what happen. We took the hue towards the yellow because we went to this side. If we go to the opposite side, will be like completely green. Look at this, this is like a drawing more than a picture. This is the best if you want to deal with little colors, a specific colors in the picture. For example, here the backpack, which is the color of the backpack? I'm going to show you another way instead of looking for colors here, and you say which color is the backpack, if I want to change the backpack, which are the colors that I have to play with, you see here the selector, we're going to click here. This is the color selector. We're going to come here where the plus is, exactly there. We're going to click and we're going to drag it all the way to the top. You can see that the backpack changed and specifically, red and orange. It's basically, these two colors that make the backpack. But the problem, is that when you move this, you also change the reds and the oranges from all the picture, and you don't want that. In this case, it's okay if you have a lot of colors around like the greens for example, and if I would like to change the hue of the greens or go a little bit more with the greens or a little bit less with the greens, this is the best way to go. But if you want to change just the backpack or you want to change just the leaves, then using the tools from the top in future lessons, I'll show you how to do that. Let's go to saturation. Is basically the same idea. In saturation, you can change the saturation of each color, so let's go to the green, for example, and you go all the way there. You're adding a lot of saturation. What you can do also with the green, if you want to change the green in saturation, you can go to the hue first, and you say, "You know what? I want the greens to be a little yellowish." You come here, and then you go to the saturation and you change the saturation of the greens. But you told already lightroom that the greens are a little yellow, and look what it's going to happen. You see the saturation is stronger, but it doesn't go to green, it goes to the hue that you added to the green. This is something really cool when you want to play with the colors and create your own editing. Then what is happening with luminance. What luminance is going to do is to add highlights to certain colors. For example, let's go here to the greens, these trees here, because these greens are very strong. Let's go here to the greens and let's check what happens if I come to the green here and I add luminance in the green. I go to the right side. Look what is going to happen. It's like there's a lot of lights and highlights now in the greens. For example, you see a lot of oranges here around. In all the leaves over here, there is this hue of orange all over this part of the picture here. Even here in the grass, you have yellows, but there's also mix with oranges. Look at this part. Look at the dog for example, there's also a lot of oranges. If we add highlights to the oranges, look what it's going to happen. You see all the orange parts of the picture are going to have a lot of highlights now. We don't want that. It's too much. This HSL is really cool when you want to work with a specific colors. Now, you see here hue saturation and luminance, and then you see All. All is simply a display. Is changing the display and now you have hue saturation and luminance in the same screen instead of going one by one. This is HSL. Now, next to the HSL, you see color. What is color? When you click in color, is basically the same idea of the HSL, but it's in a different display. Now for example, you have just the red and you have the hue, the saturation, and luminance. If you want to work just with the red, the orange is the same thing, the yellow is the same thing, all the way to the end, where you're going to work with all the colors. Exactly the same as if you would be hearing the HSL is just a different display. Now, let's go to the next lesson and we're going to talk about color grading. 12. Color Grading: Let's talk about the color grading. To start talking about the color grading and what these circles or wheels are going to do in our picture, we have to understand what is the difference between color correction and color grading. Color correction is basically what you do when you start editing. You look for the colors in the picture and correct whatever the color is there. If it's wrong, you have to correct. You have to try to make your picture as natural as possible. Now, color grading is completely different. Color grading is, when you have already the picture edited and the colors are correct, then you color grade. You add your style. You add your creativity to the color. So color grading would be more creative, and is basically for you to add emotion to the picture. You want to add to the picture something that is going to show everybody what you feel when you are editing that picture. That's more you, it's more unique. Now let's go to the color wheels here so we understand basically what I'm saying. You have three wheels here, the Midtones is on the top, and then you have the Shadows and the Highlights. How does it work? You see here on the top you have different buttons. The first one, these three little circles, that is called three-way. It means that you have these three here, Midtones, Shadows, and Highlights. If you go in these ones in the middle, are going to be specific. Let's go to the shadows. You click here, it's just the shadows. Let's go to the midtones is just the midtones. At the same is if you go here, it's just the highlights and the last one is, actually what you do here, you do to the whole picture is to everything. Let's go back to the beginning here, the three-way. Now, you have here the circle and you have here this slide. This slide is basically called the luminance. If you come here individually, you're going to have it here, luminance. How the circle works, you have here a circle here outside, and you have a circle in the middle. This outside circle is basically representing the hue of the wheel and the middle, the saturation. For example, I want to add, and these are the shadows. I want to add a little bit of blue in the shadows. I choose this hue, it's written here 205 and you go here is 185, 100. You can move it here, if you want to add in a specific color or like, you know what, it's a little bit, but it's not that in detail. You can come here, just click and you can add the number, for example, 200. This is the hue, it's blue, it's over here, but there's no change here. You see there's no change, why? Because I didn't add any saturation, I just chose the hue. Now here I'm going to move a little bit and I'm going to add a little bit of saturation. If I go all the way, the picture is going to become bluish. You see here on the top, it changed. Now it's a little bit bluish. I don't want that much. But if you move like this, you can even add more or you can go all the way to the pink and look what's going to happen, all the shadows become pink or magenta. You can add the shadows more reddish or orange or even green. This is what I wanted to show you. This is actually crazy, this is not natural. Color grading is actually adding unnatural colors, it's to show your creativity. Maybe I'm doing an advertising or publicity or something and all the colors are pink and I think this picture goes good with the brand, but I want to make it pink. That's it, you add the pink here. This is basically what you do. Now that we understand that the hue is the outside circle and then the saturation is, this imagine if I put the saturation less. I'm taking out the pink, you see, I can add a little bit of pink, but this is the way so you can create your style. You can create these, from now on, I don't know if you're posting in Instagram for example, and you have to look for a specific style and you know what, I'm going to make all my pictures towards this orangey. Maybe it's autumn and you want to take a lot of pictures of autumn and you want to make it like that. You can come here, you do your color grading and you can apply that to all your pictures so they are all looking the same. That's your style and your creativity. This is basically what this part in color grading is. Now let's reset this because we don't want to add any different colors. Let's go back to the three circles here and you have here blending and balance. What does it mean? Blending is basically shifting how the colors are going to blend together in the image. I'm going to show you, if I go all the way blue here and all the way blue here, this is super cold. How the colors are going to blend in the image. You see it's more subtle, you can go here, it's stronger, so this is basically what blending does. The balance is if you want to make these effects stronger in the shadows, or maybe you want to make them stronger in the highlights in this case, because we're using shadows and midtones here, in the highlights, nothing is happening. But if I go here and I put blue here, look what is happening. It means that the effect is going to be stronger in the highlights. If I go to the other side, stronger in the shadows. This is basically what the balance does. Remember always double-click in the middle here also to reset. The middle, to reset so we can have our picture how it was. Now let's go to the next lesson and let's talk a little bit about how to make an image sharper using this over here, it's called the detail. 13. Sharpening Your Photos: Detail. What is detail? Here in detail, we're going to be able to make our image sharper and also to take out the noise of the image, noise reduction. Normally when you add sharpness to the image, also you add noise, and that's why they're together here. Let's talk about sharpening first. You can see that the image is a little bit already sharped and it's because the amount of sharpness here it says 40. Normally light from every time you come to sharpness, Lightroom is by default giving you these, so you have a very good start. Now you can add a lot of sharpness to the image. You can see it's becoming sharper, but also, as you can see here it's adding noise, a lot of noise in these white petals. We don't want that, so we reset, it goes to 40. If we take out the sharpness, then it's a little blurry, it's like you didn't focus properly, and we don't want that either. Normally, what I do is I go a little bit more, I go maybe to 50. Sometimes the image in a portrait or something is so sharp I don't need to do anything with the sharpness, but this is what I'm going to do in this picture because it's very nice. This is a macro picture, and you can see that these little petals and these little things here, if they are sharper, they look better, even the bee that is standing here, when it's sharper it's better. That's why I'm adding a little bit more of sharpness. You have here, the radius, the detail, and the masking. What does it mean? The radius is basically how thick those lines are going to be sharpened. The detail is the amount of details on your sharpening. If we just want to sharpen the edges or maybe more than that. How do you see exactly what is going to be sharpened with the masking? What you do is you press Alt or Option if you're in a Mac, and without releasing the Alt, you move the masking and you can see it's all white. When it's in this side masking, it's all white means that all the picture is going to be sharpened. If you start to go to the other side, you see starting to change, the black parts of the picture are the ones that are not going to be sharpened. Now you can understand specifically the white parts that are going to be sharpened, you can see the radius. You can see how thick are the lines that are going to be sharpened. You can actually come to the radius and make the lines thinner. The detail is specifically which parts do you want, is it just the lines or you want the whole image. What is you want to be sharpened? You can go all the way here in the right side, and then you can see actually that most of the picture is not going to be sharpened, just the lines. This is just what you want. This is happening when you are doing photography in nature or some mountains, and you don't want the back mountains to be sharpened, you just want the front to be sharpened, then you can play with this masking, this slide, and you decide specifically what is it that you want to be sharpened. In this case, I'm going to go just around here. I know that this blurriness here, it's not going to be sharpened, it's going to be sharpened just this. As you can see also, the bouquet here is very nice. It's just this center to be sharpened. Again, we press Alt and we move this and we can see specifically what is going to be sharpened, and I think it's enough, so it's okay and that's it. This is the sharpen that I did, but I added a little bit of noise. Every time you do a sharpening, you add noise. Let's go here to the petals and let's zoom so you can see. You see here the noise, it's a little bit of noise. Now you see here, around the petal there is a greenish bluish, I don't know if you can see it in the video, but there is a little line here. This is a mistake of the lens and most of the lenses are going to have this, and this is called chromatic aberration, and we're going to fix it in the next lesson. I'm going to show you how to fix this in the next lesson. You can see here the noise in this part over here. Let's correct the noise. How do you do it? You have here the noise reduction, and there's two kinds of noise. The noise that is basically in the highlights, this is the luminance, and you have the noise that appear in the colors, and you have here colors. I'm going to show you, normally when you want to take out the noise, what this is doing is soften the image a little bit. We don't want to exaggerate with this because also you lose sharpness and it looks very not natural, it's so soft. I'm going to exaggerate so you can see what is going to happen. You can see this part of the image, and I'm going to zoom in, is very soft, it's like a drawing. If I go to the opposite 100 percent, now the noise came back, but you can see the sharpness. You don't want to take it to the next level. You don't want to go all the way to the other side. Normally, I add just like 25, twenty-something in the noise. I think that is the best spot for the noise not to take out the sharpness and start to make something unnatural. I'm going to leave it there. The detail is basically how much detail you want to add or take from the noise. You can go back all the way here and you are actually taking out this effect, but this is basically what you do with the detail in the effect. Now the noise is basically these little grains that normally have a color actually. They are little grains and you can actually play with the contrast of the noise and it's going to be the same thing. In this case, I don't want to play with the contrast of the noise because everything is very wide and I don't think it's a big deal. Here, the bee is very sharp, so I don't want to move anything else. I think this is okay. If we go to the color then I want to show you what is going to happen if I exaggerate and I go all the way. Let's move here so you can see these colors over here and the noise that it has. If I take out everything, the noise came back as you can see here, it's a lot of noise. If I go all the way to the other side, it took out the noise, but it's a little blurry, and I don't want that. In color also, I will go around 20, twenty-something, but you know what, Lightroom by default gives you that, so if we reset, look, it's in 25. This is what Lightroom is giving you. In this case, Lightroom knows, so we just leave it like that. Basically, here we're playing with the sharpness and the sharpness at noise, so we take out the noise, but we have to be in the middle, and that's it. The image is already better. In our next lesson, we're going to do the lens correction. What I told you, this chromatic aberration here, we're going to take it out. Let's go to the next lesson. 14. Lens Corrections And Transform: Now, we go to the lens corrections. What is going to happen? Remember I showed you this image, if we go with this zoom, you can see. I don't know if you can see it in your computer, but here around the petal, you can see these little line that doesn't supposed to be there. It goes all over here. That doesn't happen in the leaves over here, or here in the middle, or in the bee. It's just here in the petals. Sometimes, most of the pictures, actually, not sometimes, most of the pictures are going to have, in some parts of the picture, this chromatic aberration. But, not always is it visible. You don't have to worry much about it, but if you manage to see it while you're editing, maybe with the zoom, when you're fixing the, noise and then you see it, and it's uncomfortable to your eyes, you can take it out. Here in lens correction, you can do it with the profile, that is basically these options that the Lightroom is giving you, or you could do it manually. Sometimes the lens, is not just the chromatic aberration, but the lens gives you a vignette. There are some lenses that I saw from Sony, Canon, they give you these little vignette around, and sometimes you don't like it, so you just take it. Also, some lenses are going to give you this distortion in the picture, like in buildings, they look a little bit distorted, and you don't realize that it's happening until you fix it here, and you are like, "Oh wow, it's true. It was wrong." Let's start with the chromatic aberration, and let's see this over here. It's already, uncomfortable for me, so let's take it out. You just click here in remove chromatic aberration, and it's going to do the best it can. It went just a little bit, but it's still there. Then manually, you can also take it out, but sometimes it cannot fix it. We have to pay attention in that also. Sometimes it cannot be fixed. The picture is just like that. This helped us a little bit already, so let's go to enable profile corrections. By the way, sometimes Lightroom is going to understand which lens you were using, and it's going to give you the details of the lens here. It's just here make built-in, but you can actually look Leica, or I don't know, the GoPro, Fujifilm, even Google is here. Apple, maybe if you are taking pictures with a DJI drone, Minolta, you have options here. If you don't find it here, not all the lenses are here, so don't get too excited that everything is fixable. Some things are not fixable. But like I said, you have to really go into a really deep zoom, so you can see this chromatic aberration. It was not fixed 100 percent, it was just a little that left. But well, let's see what can we do. Because it's not recognizing the lens, but I'm going to show you now another picture where it is recognizing the lens. It is not recognizing the lens, it doesn't give you the option to distortion of these things over here, but then you can do it manually. Then you come to manually, and then we can do the distortion. We can change the distortion manually. If we get close to the amount of distortion, you see the grid there that appears. This is basically when you have like buildings, and things like that, you can actually change or fix the distortion. Also vignetting, like I was telling you. Some of the cameras are going to give you this vignette, over here in the corner, some of the lenses, and you can actually change the amount, like add more vignetting. In this case, I'm taking out the vignetting. As you can see this lens is adding vignetting. You don't see it much, but it is there, and you see it when you take it out. Look, when I start to go in this side, I start to take out the vignetting, and now it's gone. Now you realize, "Oh, it's true. It was a vignetting here." Sometimes the lenses are giving you that. Sometimes you want that, because some lenses are giving you these beautiful vignetting that you want, and it helps you to center your attention in the subject. In this case, I like the vignetting how it was. We're not editing this picture for now, so, let's just reset it, and let's keep doing the vignetting. We center in the middle, of the picture. That helps a lot. Also, you have here the defringe, and it's to fix when you are in the chromatic aberration that it was here. It was not recognized by Lightroom, so even if we use the color picker, and we try to come here, you see here that the color is changing. It's like a little bluish. It says it cannot set the purple or green fringe color, it cannot find it. Sometimes this happen, and there's nothing you can do, so just go with it. The picture is nice, so it doesn't matter. When you want to get rid of this color picker, you come where you took it from, and you put it there again. This is basically the lens correction. I'm going to show you an example now of one that actually, Lightroom is going to recognize. I'm going to show you in this picture actually how it works when you want to, fix the distortion here. You click here, for example, you are enabling the profile corrections in this picture over here, and you can see that Lightroom is recognizing the lens here, SIGMA 35 millimeters, 1.4. It is recognizing, in this case. What are we going to do with the distortion? You can see there is a distortion. Very easy to see. How? Look at the pillars. They're not straight. You see? They're not straight. How can you do it? You just come here, and you can correct the amount of distortion. Following the grids, you can move these, and you can start to correct. It's fixing a little bit, the distortion of the picture. I'm going to show you how can you see, how it changed. Remember the backslash, where you can see how it was the picture before, and how is it now? Let's check how it was. You see, it's different. Now when I release, look how it changed. It's more flat, it's better, but still the pillars are not correct. This is also not correct, and there are a lot of things that we can change. If we go to manual, we can change the amount of the distortion, if we exaggerate. Look at exaggerate. If we go to the other side, we exaggerate. Because actually now I can see that the pillars are straight, but over here it's not straight anymore, it's like blown. It's like a fish-eye, the opposite of a fish-eye. We don't want that, but that was to show you how it is. Sometimes, the lens is distorting everything, so this is the way to fix it. Imagine if we say, "You know what? Here I see the pillars are straight. This is how I'd want it." Then you see here these constrain crop. It means that, Lightroom is going to help you to crop the image, so you don't see these white spots around. If you click here, you see, it's cropped, so you don't see the white spots around. Let's reset this picture. Now we're done with this part, the lens correction, and let's go to transform. I'm going to show you something here in transform. What is transform? This picture is perfect to show you what is it, and also when you have buildings, and streets or cities, or even when you take a picture in nature, and you see that the trees are not properly straight, there is something wrong, so what do we do? You have here, upright, it says. You have here this icon here. It is going to help you to do it manually. But let's start with these buttons over here. It's off right now, but let's go to auto and you see, how the Lightroom is going to automatically fix it. Did you see? Lightroom just fixed it, putting the pillars now, straight. This is supposed to be like that. All straight. That's the correct way. Sometimes the way that you take the picture, or the angle that you take the picture, made the image wrong, and this is what is going to fix it. Guided is basically what we're going to do after using this icon here. Then you have level. If we go back, double click here, so we go back, you see that this ceiling is not level, it has an angle, so in level you're going to be able to do it. It's exactly the same thing that we were doing with the cropping, like I said, remember in cropping we have these ruler that we use, to level making a line. Then the vertical, is the same thing, and then the full is to basically do all together, to try to fix everything. In level, it's going to fix just the level, and the vertical is like the pillars, but not the level. That's why when we put auto, it fixed everything. Let's go to off. Now, I'm going to show you this part over here in transform, because you can do, by yourself manually, just the horizontal, just the vertical, just to rotate, maybe, the images properly angled, maybe the horizon is not perfect, the aspect, the scale, you have all these to make it manually. You have also here that constrain crop. Why? Because also when you change the image, sometimes, it doesn't crop, and you can see these white spots here. Of course I'm making something wrong, but imagine if the image is wrong, and then when I do this, this becomes perfect, and you have these spots. When you take this constrain crop, it's going to crop the picture, so you don't see the white spots. Let's reset this. Now I'm going to show you the last way of how to use transform, and it's here, with this icon. Let's click in the icon, and now you have this plus, and this zoom square over here. The zoom square is going to show you where the plus is, so you can be more precise. Let's put the plus in this pillar, very close to this edge. I can see just by my eyes that it's already in the edge, but when I see this zoom, I'm not in the edge, I have to be there. That's the edge I want to use. There you go. Then I'm going to click, and I'm going to drag it all the way to the bottom, making a line, and based in this zoom, there is where I want it. That's the first line. I'm telling Lightroom, "You know what? This is supposed to be a straight line, but just to confirm, I'm going to make another line". This is what you tell Lightroom doing these things. Let's go here, and let's make the second line, and you'll see what is going to happen, there. Let's make the second line. We put it exactly there, and look what Lightroom is going to do. Immediately based on what you told Lightroom, it is making the pillars straight. That's how you supposed to be. You can see now the picture is fixed, but you have these, white spots here. What you do here? Remember, you press here constrained crop, and immediately Lightroom is going to crop it. Then always, every time you do these effects, when you finish, you have to press, done, and the image is done, and now you have your image straightened, and that's it. This is basically how you use the transform, option here in Lightroom. 15. Effects: Now we're back in our beautiful picture, the one we're editing and we're going to talk about Effects here and it's basically the vignette. We come a little bit here so we can see it properly, Post-Crop Vignetting, it says. The effect is actually that, is basically Vignetting and adding grain and you have the amount of vignetting. I guess you know what is vignetting. You see here in the corners of the picture, we make it a little bit darker or wider so we can focus in the center of the image. Let's go, for example, all the way to the left, what you are is this vignetting, this darkness in the image. It's all the corners and around here you're adding these darkness, the Midpoint means from where is the vignetting. In this case, this is the surroundings and the vignetting is all the way outside this midpoint but we can make it bigger. Basically, when we make it bigger, we are making these edges very small or we can make it actually very small midpoints so the vignetting goes farther inside the picture. Let's leave it in the middle and then maybe we can go a little bit more outside, like bigger, so there's no much vignetting, can actually also take out the degree of the vignetting is too much, the amount. Now, Roundness is that you can actually make a vignetting square. I'm going to exaggerate so we can see it properly. Let's go like this and let's go to a lot and let's do the roundness. If we take out the roundness, it's becoming more like square, the vignetting and then if we go all the way to the other side, it's very round, normally, I leave it in the middle and I'm going to leave it, not in zero, but I'm going to add a little bit of vignetting. The Feather, the name says it all, it's basically how the vignetting is going to banish towards the important part of the picture. Look, this is a lot of feather, so you don't see in between the vignetting and this is very subtle. But I like the vignetting to be visible, so normally I add less feather here. But if we go to the opposite side, look what is going to happen, there's no feather. You can actually see exactly what the vignette is. But we want to feather it out, so we're going to do like this and we're going to come normally over here. I like it when I do it like this and then Highlights, is basically what you're going to add or take to the vignetting, the highlights in the vignetting. Because in this case, vignetting are dark, you don't see the highlights much. It's basically zero. They're not there. Now, what happens if you do the vignetting to the other side? It becomes white. Remember, we're doing the vignetting to the left side. It becomes dark, it gives these little shadows, very nice. But if you go to the other side, instead of dark, it becomes white. You will say, the white is not nice, why would you use it? Imagine if you have a picture of a baby and the background is very pastel colors, like very clear, very nice. This white vignette would be very nice for these pictures. Now here on the bottom, you see Grain. Grain is basically you add grain to the picture, like you add a little bit of noise to the picture. You would say, why would I add noise to the picture? When normally what I want is the picture to be sharpened, actually take out the noise. Well, it's creativity, it's a creation that you are making. Maybe you want to add grain and you make a vintage style picture. If you want a lot of grain, cannot see it properly here but if we zoom in in the picture, you will see that we are adding a lot of grain and this makes the picture very vintage and maybe this is the idea, maybe this is what you want to do. You never know, maybe you find some pictures that with the grain they look so cool because they look vintage, so there is a way. First you have the Amount of grain you're going to add, the Size is the size of this grain that you are adding because the grain is like a little miniature dots over there. I think in this dark part you can see the grain over here. You can actually add the size and make the size bigger of the grains, but that makes the image very blurry. Always don't go to 100 percent, always try to be subtle. Then the roughness is if it's a lot of grain. Sometimes when you are playing with the pictures and you're creating something, you're doing a very cool color grading, very nice color grading. You want to add grain also to make it be in touch and everything, well, you have the options here to play around. I'm going to reset the Grain and I'm going also to reset the Vignetting because for now, I don't want to use any of that. I'm going to add it at the end of the editing, when we finish editing this picture. In the next lesson, we'll talk about the calibration and then we will start to play with the tools over here, so we can start with the full editing process. 16. Calibration: Now the calibration. The calibration is the same idea of the color grading. It's not going to do the same, but when I say the same idea is that you're going to use the calibration for your creativity. It's not to fix your picture to correct the colors and to make your picture perfect and natural, it's more to create an idea of a picture, what you want to express, an emotion. You can change the hues of the picture, change the colors, exaggerate with saturation of a changing of hue and things like that, and I'm going to show you how you can do that. You have here first the tint and it's the shadows. You can add the green or the magenta to the shadows like this. You can go all the way to the left and you are actually changing and making a greenish picture or you can add the magenta to the pictures. Sometimes if you play a little bit, just in the middle, maybe a little bit of green because we have a lot of trees over there and you are in the woods like we are now, maybe the green could help. For now, for example, I add just a little bit of green and you can see that these greens are popping up. I can leave it there. Then here you have the main colors, the primary colors, the red, the green, and the blue. If you go to the reds, you're going to move the hue and choose the hue here and you're basically going to change the hue of all the reds around this picture. If you go all the way to the left, for example, you are changing the hues of the red and you're going towards yellow. Then when you change that hue, you can go to saturation and exaggerate the saturation of the yellow going all the way to the side or taking out the saturation of those parts that you just changed the hue. So basically, you can play with the colors in a way that you change the hue of the color and then you can add or take out saturation of that new color. Because basically when you change the hue, the color is not more natural anymore. You are converting the color in another color in all your picture. In this case, for example, the green, I want to change the green. I don't want the green to be green, I want the green to be yellow. So I go to here in the green and I go all the way to this side, so I'm changing the hue of the green. I going to reset this and I want you to pay attention in the trees here that are very green. I'm going to change the hue to, for example here, yellow. You can see it's not very green anymore, it's still some green, but it has this yellow hue in this green. Now, I can exaggerate with the saturation and it's going to be more and more yellow. You see, all the greens, the thing is, you have to pay attention in these because you are not changing just these greens, you're changing basically every part of your picture that had this green. But look at the picture, the colors are nice. It's different, it's not natural. It doesn't look like a natural picture, but the colors are nice. So you have to actually experiment and try to play with the colors to see what can you do with this. So soon as you start to practice and play with this calibration and also the color grading, you will understand when to use it. We're editing this picture, but imagine if you are editing a picture where there's a lot of sky, it's a lot of sky here on the top. Maybe you can go all the way with the blues to 100 percent. We don't have many blues here, but still the blues that are in between and mixed here and the greens changed. You can see that it became a very weird color here, more greenish. Then you can take out the saturation of those colors or add the saturation of those colors, and you're basically creating something new. It's a creation. This is not a natural color, but still it's cool, very nice editing. Just open your mind and start creating and experimenting with this, it's very nice and very, very cool to use it. So I resetted all of these so we can go to the next lesson and start to play with these tools over here. That is actually very nice because we're going to go into detail in every single part of the picture to fix this editing. 17. TOOLS Part 1: My friends, we're going to talk now about this part over here, the tools. We started already with this one over here, crop overlay in our first or second, I think at the beginning of the editing processing this course. We talked about how to crop the image, you can see the image is cropped four by five, remember, like to post in Instagram. Let's go to the next one and this is the spot removal and there's Q over there. If you can see there is a Q. It means that's the short key. If you press Q, it's going to open this panel. Now you are using this tool. Here on the top, it says brush, you have clone and you have heal. Normally goes directly to heal, but now I just click in clone so we're going to start from the left. What is the clone is doing. It's basically that it's cloning parts of your picture. You have here the size, and what is the size? If you see here, if I put the cursor here, is like a circle, with a plus in the middle. If you go with this size and you make it smaller, you can make it huge. We're going to do this size. The feather also is what the name it says. You're going to feather out from the edges of the circle. As you can see, if I go more, you start to create a feather. Circle start to get smaller and the feather is from outside. You can actually make the circle bigger and you can see better the feather. Normally when I'm cloning, I don't use the feather much. I'm going to put just a little bit of feather, but not much. Let's make the size smaller also not that big, maybe there because I know what I'm going to show you. The opacity also is how transparent is going to be the part that you're going to clone. In this case, we want to use the a 100 percent opacity because we want to literally clone something that I'm going to show you now. Let's go here. What if I want to clone the dog to make another dog next to him? Let's look for an empty space where we want the dog to be cloned. Let's put it here. I want the dog to be there also, so we're going to click there. Well, by default, the second circle came to the dog. But actually if you want to clone, for example, the backpack, you just drag this circle over here and you're going to clone that part over there. You see what I'm doing? But I want the dog. Let's go here and let's come here and we're actually cloning the dog. You see? That's really funny. Well, what happened with opacity? I told you I wanted to clone the dog, but what if I want just like a shadow of the dog? If I move the opacity, it started to become very transparent. That's the opacity. But if I wanted to clone it, I can go all the way to a 100 percent, and that's it. That's what the clone does. Now, why would you want to clone the dog? I don't want to clone the dog, so I'm going to press "Control Z." I'm going to erase what I did or you can click here in the dog and just press "Delete" and you're going to delete what you did. I use the clone, for example, when I do astrophotography. I have a picture of a very nice place and the sky is amazing but you can see just three stars come on. You can clone the stars and make a sky full of stars. This is actually something you can do with a clone and it's really funny. Maybe we'll do it in a future lesson. Let's go to the hill now. This is actually what I use the most with this tool over here. Imagine if I want to take out this stone, you see these little stone here where the plus is? I want to take it out, I don't like it. We come here to heal, remember the size of the tool. We come here and we start to make the size bigger or smaller. Let's make it smaller. Like more or less the size of the stone, I think there is okay. We come here in the stone and we just click it. What is going to happen is Lightroom is going to take a place in the picture that looks very similar than that place to replace it. Lightroom is going to assume which is the best place to take from. There you go, let's click it. You see that Lightroom is taking this part over here because Lightroom assume that this part is very similar color. Actually, Lightroom did a very good job. What happens if Lightroom is doing something wrong? For example, the thing appear here. You can actually select which is the part that you want. But in this case, Lightroom did a very good job so we're going to go back to where Lightroom chose and let's click "Done". You see, there's no stone anymore. We erased it and this is what the heal does. I'm going to go fast with all the tools, but don't worry, because we're going to start with the full editing process. I have some portraits there to edit, I have also a landscape photography that I want to edit with you guys. You're going to see exactly how I'm using these tools. For now I'm going to tell you what these tools are for and how to use them. When I click "Done," it goes away. Now we finish with this process. Now if we double-click here, we go back to the same picture and there's no stone anymore. Now we can close this part here, now we have the whole picture. Now let's go to the next tool. The next tool is the red eye correction. We don't have here a face, so we're going to look for a face and I want to show you basically what the red eye does. I don't have pictures with red eyes because I couldn't find them. I found a lot if you go to Google and you put red eye pictures, you're going to find a lot. But you can use them for practice. But I cannot use them for this course because of copyright, and I cannot use him for tutorials or anything because of copyright. It's very difficult to find those pictures. I'm basically going to explain to you what the red eye is going to do. When you click here in red eye, this is going to appear. You have red eye that is normally for this kind of pictures. If you have these red eyes here and you have the pet eye, this is in case you have a picture of your cat or your dog, I don't know with these red eye. This red eye is selected. This is for the portraits. Is by default selected. You're going to come to the eye, you normally look for the red part of the eye, as you can see there is a plus button with the red dot on the middle, this is what you're going to put exactly on the top of the red eye. Imagine that the red eye is here. When you click it, you just see it appears something there like a circle. Because she doesn't have a red eye, you don't see it. But if she would have a red eye, you will see exactly something dark in the pupil. You can see here the pupil size. You can actually make it bigger or make it smaller. Why you don't see it? Is because she doesn't have any red eyes. It's not going to recognize it. But let me tell you, if it will have a red eye, you can make it so big that is going to look from other world. Then you can darken also that spot that you're going to create here. Then you have to come to the other eye and do the same thing. As you can see, Lightroom is telling me that it's not finding the red eye. I'm okay with it because I know that there's no red eye. Immediately, as soon as you find it, you have these two lines here where you can play with. If you want to use the pet eyes, exactly the same thing, the pupil size, the darken, so you will do exactly the same. It's very easy to use. Let me tell you that that is not going to fix the problem 100 percent of the times. Sometimes it's just too much, and it's not going to fix it, but you have the tool, and you can try to use it and try to fix in case the picture was wrong and you have these red eyes in some of the subjects in your picture. Now we reset. Let's go to the next one. Okay, now we come to the next one and this is the graduated filter, or M if you want to use a short key, let's create one. You see these plus button that is exactly here in the middle of the picture, there is a plus button that I'm moving the cursor. Let's say here, you're going to click and drag it down. You see what I'm doing? Now, the question is why the picture is black and white here? Because by default, as you can see here, the saturation is minus 100. As soon as you put the graduated filter, it came to that, but let's reset it. Now, what you need is create a mask. Whatever you do here is going to affect part of the picture. You already saw that it was the top part of the picture. But if you want to see exactly which is the area that is going to be affected, you can come here on the bottom where it says show selected mask overlay, and click it, and everything that is in red is going to be affected. Now, if you unclick here, there's another way to check it out and this is actually to make a faster workflow, you just press the keyword O, and it's going to do the same, it's going to tell you exactly which part is affected. In this case, let's click O again so we can see the changes we're going to do, and I'm going to show you, if I go overexposed, it's just this part and it's called graduated filter, so it doesn't go that harsh, it's like a feather, you see? It's exposing a little bit here, is exposing more here and then all overexposed on the top. We don't want to do that, so we're going to reset it, it was just to show you what is going to happen. Now what we want actually, is to take out the highlights of these path. I think I can make it less exposed or take out a little bit of highlights, I want these on the bottom, but if you press O, you can see that it selected the top. How am I going to select the bottom? You remember when we start, we click it and drag it down, so next time if you want to select the bottom, you click it or drag it up, but how are we going to change now? You see when you get close to the lines, you get these little hand over there. You just click that hand, and drag it down, and it's going to change the mask as you can see, but we want to grab all the path, so you just get close to this black circle until you see the hand, and you move it a little bit higher until you see that it's covering exactly the path. Now what is happening? There is a problem. I just want to select the path, and here is selecting actually everything. What we do, we come here in this panel, and this is very nice that here on the bottom you have range mask and it's off. If you click it here, you have luminance and color. If you'll click luminance, you're going to have a range, which is exactly what you want to mask. Here in the range in this part, in the left part, are the darks, and in the right side, it's going to be all the highlights. Imagine if I want to take the highlights from the bottom, not the darker parts. Let's press O, we're going to look at this and we're going to see what are we going to select. We move the range here all the way to the highlights and then you can see that all these red is clearer because the darks are not selected. If we go all the way here you can see that basically all the highlighted, the most highlighted parts are selected, but still I just want the path and I can see that here is also selected a little bit, even the subject is selected, the dog, and part of here, because there are some parts here in the subject that are exposed also the same as the path. What should I do? Let's forget about luminance and let's go to color. In color, again all the red is selected, so we have to choose the color we want to select. We're going to come here where it says color range selector, and we're going to select the part of the path that I want, like more or less maybe here, but the majority of the path is this part over here, this color. Right? We select it and now, it's more focalized in the path. Still, even though it's more focalized in the path, I can see that part of these is selected, and also the subject a little bit is selected because colors that the path has are also repeated here. Like for example, in these rocks over here, maybe some of these colors are repeated here, that's why it's already selected but you have amount here, you see this is light amount. If we go all the way to the right, it's basically selecting more and more, but if we go to the left, we're going to start to select just the color that we chose. As you can see, if we go all the way here, basically it selected just the path, you see? Just the path and just these rocks here. This is super cool. Just the path. Let's go a little bit more because we have these little lines here that are not going to be selected, so let's go a little bit more. Maybe there. Now we selected just the path, maybe some little parts here, but it doesn't matter. It's not a big deal. We see that the subject is not selected. It's just the rocks, the path, and something here, these can be fixed, don't worry, it can be fixed. What we're going to do now that we selected, let's press O again so we can see what we're going to do, and let's return these color selector to it's place, there you go. We're returning it there. Click, there you go. Now we're going to go up, and like I said in the beginning, this is a little bit more exposed than what I would like, so I'm going to go here, and I'm going to go down in exposure maybe 20 or 30, and then highlights also. I'm going to take out some highlights from here. I think there, I can see more details of the path. I think that's better. If we come here all the way down, where is this range mask color, here it says reset, close, and you have here this button, remember? It's the same button that you have in every single module that you have for editing. If you click here, you're going to turn off or turn on what you just did. This is how it was and this is how it is now. We just did something with the path and this is so cool, that's it, we're done. Now there's another way to use the graduated filter, so don't worry. What I'm doing now is just to explain you how to use the tools and what these tools are for but we're going to start now with this full editing tutorials, where you're going to see my workflow, and I'm going to be editing few pictures with you so you can see exactly how I'm going to use all of these tools because practicing is better. You're going to learn more practicing, [MUSIC] than just listening to me and looking at what I'm doing in this picture specifically. Let's go first with the tools so we understand them. Okay? 18. TOOLS Part 2: We've finished with the Graduated Filter and let's go to this one. This one is the Radial Filter and this is "Shift M" If you want to use the keyboard, the short keys. I'm going to use this now so you can see. As soon as I click it, like always, you can see here it appears all this panel that is very similar than the panel before. What are we going to do? We come in the center of the object, let's go to the center here because I want to grab also the dog, we're going to go like this. As you can see again, by default, is this black and white, actually it looks very cool. But we don't want that. Let's double-click in the "Saturation" so we go back. Let's move it a little bit more here. You can see if you press "O", that basically everything around is selected, but are subject. Let's make it a little bit bigger because you can see that is grabbing a little bit of the legs here. Let's see here, let's see here a little bit, there. Now what you can do also, if you want to be sure, you come here on the top. You see here we are in edit because we're actually editing now here, you press "Brush". You can do the same in the graduated filter just for you to know. Then we click "Brush", and then we're going to come here and you see here it says, erase. Let's click "Erase", now we are erasing. We can erase this part over here, it means that in this part, you're not going to do anything, you're not going to be affected. In this moment, everything is affected, but I can see that here around or maybe the legs of the dog, it's still affected. What we're going to do is we come here in this size and we make it a little smaller, maybe like this, and then we're going to be sure, we're going to do this. You see, I'm erasing actually this part. I'm erasing the mask actually. It means this is not going to be affected just in case because I don't want the object to be affected. There we go. Now, we come back here and we press "A" because we have the brush here, brush A, brush B and erase, we are erasing now. Let's go back to brush A. Brush B is actually, if you want a brush that is, if you click "Brush B", you can create another brush that is going to be more subtle. The size is going to be bigger, maybe more feather, the flow is going to be maybe lower, then you can play with two brushes to make it more in detail. But for now, we don't need it. We go to A, this is the main brush that we have. Let's go here. Let's click "O" again we can see what we're going to do. When you have portraits, I do exactly the same, you select the face and then you click in the "Sharpness" and you go a little bit to the left to the sharpness. It makes everything around less sharp and it leaves the face or the portraits specifically the subject clearer and sharper, that is something I do a lot in portraits. But in this case, I want everything to be visible. What you can do to keep attention in here is you're going to go to exposure, and you're going to underexpose a little bit the rest of the picture. Let's go to maybe 20, it's okay or maybe 30, 30 would be too much, 20. Now, I'll show you what we just did. Again, you have this button here that you can change. If we unclick it, look how it was before and now how it is now. You see all the surroundings are a little bit darker than the subject, the subject is more visible. As you can see here with the radial filter, you also have the range mask. Remember the luminance and the color, you can also select colors. Imagine if we click "O" and then we go to the luminance here or the color, you can select the specific areas around it, but for now it's okay. Remember that all of these is going to happen in the next editing that we're going to do together, don't worry. We have to press "Done", we are done with these tool. Now let's go to the next one, and this is one that I use a lot also is the adjustment brush. With this one, you're going to go into detail and we're going to use it now for the subject. What we do is we're going to zoom in this object, and I'm going to use the brush. When you click the "Tool", what is going to happen? As soon as you click the tool, you have another panel here that is basically very similar than the ones that we used before, and also you're going to have a brush. As you can see, it can be bigger, can be smaller. When I use it like this, smaller. Now, we're going to come here down because this is very important. I want this auto mask to be selected. That means that what I'm going to be selecting my mask, for example, if I start here, the mask is not going to go to the grass here, because it's going to auto mask exactly where I want. Lightroom and photoshop are very clever, very smart for these things, you'll see what he's going to happen. Let's press "O" or you can come here like I was telling you before. Show selected, but it's marked already because I press "O". The size is okay, the size of my brush. I'm going to start with the head. Do you see that the brush has in the middle a plus, a little circle, gray circle with the plus? When I click here, this is the part that is going to auto mask. Every time you go around different color, I will stop clicking and click it again and keep brushing, and then stop clicking and click it again and keep brushing. It's going to take all their parts of the picture. I'm going to show you what I mean. I click and I'm already painting the head as you can see, but you see that this part over here, the neck, didn't catch it because it's a different color. I'm going to put the plus next to the neck there, click it and it already catch it. There you go. Now let's go to the backpack and all the body. I'm going to start, I'm going to keep brush in everything. There you go. Let's keep going. Keep going, we're brushing everything. Don't worry if you go a little bit out or if you see that the auto masking is not working and it's actually go in a little out, don't worry, we can actually fix it after we finish masking. There you go. Now, I'm missing part of the shoe. What should I do? Because there is no hands. I cannot move the picture. If I want to move the picture up to work with the shoes, what it's going to happen, I'm going to brush. You press "Space bar". When you press a space bar, look what is going to happen with the brush. It becomes a hunt. Pressing space bar, you go up, you see what I just did there? There you go, and now you can finish with the shoe. You finished with the shoe here. Now let's go with the dog also. There you go. The dog, the tail, the feet. There you go. We just mask the dog and the subject. Let's press the "Space bar" and let's go back here where we can see both. We finished masking already. It didn't go out much. I think here it went out a little bit, here next to the hand. What we're going to do is we're going to come here, you see erase, you remember we were doing that before. We click "Erase" and we're going to erase this part. You see, it went a little bit out. I don't know if you can see it in your screen, but he went a little bit out. Then I think here also a little bit out. There you go. That's it. We come back to the brush A, this is the one we're using. Now we click "O", there you go. Just remember that sometimes saturation by default is marked. Maybe you already took out all the colors of the image. Don't worry if you just double-click on the top of saturation and you go back. Let's go here up. What do we want to do with this subject? Where the subject is, we want to take out some shadows, we want the details here. Remember at the beginning of the course I show you, I exaggerate with the shadows and you could see all the details in the jacket. It's go just a little bit so we can see a little bit the jacket. You saw what I just did? It's a little bit here. Now, I want to show you a trick, and this is a super cool trick. When you click "J", it's a short key. J is going to tell you what is overexposed and what is underexposed. I think this picture is pretty good. I don't think there are overexposed parts in the picture. You know what? I'm going to click "Done", and then we'll come back with this. I'm going to zoom in so you can see appropriately. When I click "J", you see there is a red line there, also in the backpack. On the top of the backpack, you can see a little red. That means that those parts are overexposed. Now, if I go in the whole picture and I press "J", I think that's it. The picture is super nice, is very good exposure. Is just this little two parts that are overexposed and I like it. But what you can do is you come here. Let's go back to the brush. Remember we were using the brush. Now we have to create a new brush. We click "New" and be careful with the saturation. I can see here the saturation is minus 100 again. Let's go back. This is a new brush, let's make it smaller. Let's press "O", and let's paint here. Remember that here was overexposed. I mean, it's not necessarily, I'm exaggerating. But let's do it we can understand how it works. Now, press "Space bar" and let's go high over here in the backpack, and let's do the same in the backpack. Remember it says that here is overexposed. There you go. I saw also here on the top of the head of the dog was some overexposed part. There you go. This is really into detail because actually it's not necessary, is not visible in the picture. I press "O" again, I take out the mask, we can see what we're going to do. Let's go to the exposure, let's go to minus 10 maybe. Now minus 20. It's not much, but it's just here in the leg and here. Let's click here "Done", and let's go back to the size of the picture. I think it's okay. We have the details here. We are not overexpose anything, but that trick is really cool. I'm going to show you another picture so I can show you what happened when I press "J" in other picture. Here, for example, in this picture, more than overexposed is actually underexposed. If I click "J", look what is going to happen. All of these blue parts that you can see are completely dark, it's like pure black and when you see the red parts is pure white. In the picture we're editing now, the exposure was already good. We see just little red spots here that means that it is pure white. You can see in the histogram actually that is very good. There's nothing in the sites. When you overexpose the picture, let's exaggerate now and let's overexpose it. When you see that in the histogram, this is going towards this side, this is called clipping. You can see show highlight clipping. It's written there. This is called clipping. When you go to the opposite side, is the same, is clipping, but it's like you have too much. The idea is to be a little bit flatter and maybe more in the middle. Not too many dark parts or super highlights, that's not ideal. Let's reset it. We go to the picture that is actually very good as you can see, it's not sleeping at all. When we press "J", that's is telling us that everything is good. We don't have any blue spots, or any red spots anymore, it's perfect. Now, if you want to see the picture, the editing is basically done here, and we are like, okay, I really like the picture." I want to see how it was before, what do you press? Remember I told you already, backslash and you can see how it was and then you release the backslash and you can see how it is now. Now, another trick, and this is super cool. When you go to the keyword and you press "L", look what is going to happen. It's isolating the picture so you can see just the picture. If you click again the letter "L", it goes completely dark, just a picture, and then you click "L" again and you go back to the screen. That is super cool, don't forget about it, the L. I always do it when I'm finishing the editing. Something also I recommend you to do when you are editing, when you think you've finished the editing, stop editing, go drink a cup of coffee, do something else, maybe a soda, a coke, whatever you want, and then you come back and look at the picture again, because sometimes you think it's perfect, you were too long in the picture and it's not necessarily perfect. That's what I'm going to do now. I'll see you in the next lesson and I'm going to show you how to install presets, how to use presets, and then we can start editing, full editing portraits and landscape photography. This is going to be very nice. I'll see you in the next lesson. 19. Panorama: Guys, I want to show you something really, really cool. You remember that we created these collections here. There is one collection that is called panorama, we're going to go to this collection. Why panorama? We're going to put three pictures together. I went outside and I took three pictures in the port. I actually live in front of the port so I took this picture, so I'm going to show you these pictures. This is the first one, this is the second one, it's basically moving a little bit to the right, and this is the third one that is basically a little bit to the right. What we're going to do and this is really cool is to click the first picture, and select pressing Shift until the third picture. We select all of the pictures. Now, here we are going to right-click and you see options here. Here in the options, you see Photo Merge and you have Panorama. Also, when you selected the three pictures, you can press Ctrl+M, as you can see here, and it's going to do the same so you save your time. There you go. Now you have this panel over here, and you can see that it's creating the panorama preview. Look what Lightroom did. It created a whole picture of the three pictures together, super cool. This is artificial intelligence that is analyzing the three pictures and analyzing what is exactly the same in the pictures to connect them together, and it creates a panorama. Then you have option here, Spherical, Cylindrical, Perspective. But for me because this is the picture, Spherical is perfect. If you go to Cylindrical, it's more like you can see here, curve, maybe this is the one you are looking for. Let's go to Perspective, so you can see the options that this is giving you. That's not what you want. Perspective, you can use it for buildings and stuff, but let's see also, it depends of how Lightroom is going to analyze your picture. It's between a spherical and cylindrical. In this case, I think that cylindrical looks better, because in spherical, I see a little bit of distortion in the image here. Now, you can see that there is these holes here that are covered with a white color, this is normal. What you're going to do is you can put fill the edges. What fill the edges is going to do is actually artificial intelligence, Lightroom is going to analyze what could it be good to put here in these holes. Maybe because of the clouds are here, they're going to repeat or stretch the clouds over here, stretch these, Lightroom is going to analyze it. Now, Auto Crop. What is Auto Crop going to do is actually make the picture bigger to fit in this. It's not going to add anything, it's just going to make it bigger so you can see this white part. But let me tell you, I use this fill edges often. Lightroom is doing a very good job analyzing what can they repeat here, and add here like cloning. Let's put fill edges and you'll see what is going to happen. It took its time, but look at this, it's perfect. I don't see any mistake here. I think Lightroom did a very good job. Lightroom analyzed this part of the picture and added these metals over here, added a little bit of more of clouds, so I really like this one. What you do now because you already did everything, everything is done, you're going to put Merge and Lightroom is going to merge the three pictures. You have to wait a little bit. Check here on the top, it's actually a line that is telling you how is it merging now. It's about to finish, it takes its time so you have to wait. It's done. Look at this, super nice. Now what you do with this picture, you edited, Of course, you edited. You have all these tools here that we did in the whole course, so you can edit it. First thing I would suggest you to do besides the curves and the basic correction is that you can see here is a curve is not straight, so you can go and transform and fix these things, but that's actually a job for you. I wanted to show you this panorama that I'm excited, very nice. I use it a lot. I go to the mountains and I take few pictures and then altogether, and Lightroom is doing a good job. Enjoy it and let's practice, practice. Go in this, do this panorama, or go outside, take your own pictures, do your panorama and edit the picture. Let's see what is going to happen. I'll see you in the next lesson. 20. Presets: Let's use presets. We're going to start from here. Remember at the beginning of the editing process in this course, when we came to the basic corrections, I show you here where it says profile and it says Adobe Standard and you have here when you click some presets here. One thing I want to tell you before we dig into the presets, is actually that the presets are not something that are going to edit your picture completely. The first thing you have to do, and I always recommend that these, do the color correction. Take your picture, fix the colors, make it as natural as possible. As you can see, this picture is not just color corrected, this is not with just color correction, this picture has more things than that. We're going to do something else with this picture, we're going to create a virtual copy. I'm going to show you how to do it now so we can start to use these presets and I'm going to show you all the presets. These presets are from Adobe, it comes here and then you can come here. Do you see these little four squares here? If you come here, you're going to have more options as you can see here. You have here presets for these and you can see here, if you click it, you can see how they're going to be, how the picture is going to look like. You see, now it's very over too many colors and everything, because we already fixed the picture, we already did the editing so this is why it looks like this. Adobe Color is basically the main one, how we start it. We're going to come here, then we have the camera matching, then is more presets here and then you have here the artistic presets. As you can see, you have many options here and you can come here and play with it. If you go to vintage, I guess you're going to give you a little bit of grain. Also, remember I was telling you about vintage pictures that gives you grain, look at this one. The color is vintage, it's nice, but I don't want it, so we go back to the Adobe row, we go back to Adobe Color. This is basically what we are using. Now whatever the preset you use, you have here these light, the set amount, and it's a 100 percent, because basically this is what you are adding when you put the preset. But if you add any preset from here, you can actually take out the amount of the preset. The colors are too harsh, I can take it out, the colors are too good I can put it more. It's up to you. This is in all, but you can go just for presets in color and just for presets in black and white. These are the presets here, it doesn't mean these are all. Now what we're going to do, we're going to close this and I'm going to show you where we have more presets. But first what we're going to do is we're going to come here down. You see the picture we're going to right-click in the picture and we're going to click here, you see create virtual copy. What is going to happen? That Lightroom is going to create exactly a copy of this picture how it is right now so that you can do all the editings that you want and you don't need to destroy the picture before. Whatever you do here is just in this picture and the other one, you still have it there as a backup, so let's create a virtual copy. There you go so we are here. This is the virtual copy, it's exactly the same. You come here, you'll see now here on the bottom you have two pictures. What I just did is reset everything, so now we have the picture how it was in the beginning. Let's do something very fast, because to use the presets, basically, you don't want to have already the picture completely edited and all these calibrations that we need, just color correction is enough if you want to use a preset. Let's do exactly the same thing that we did with the other one. I think there is okay, just click done, then I'm going to edit this picture a little bit, just color correction. This is the virtual copy. I just did a little bit of color correction, not too much and now we're going to come here and let's click here. You can see presets here. You see, so what are you going to do? We're going to open these so you're going to see all the presets. You have presets for color, creative black and white. You have the defaults, you have presets in the curve, in the grain, optics. All of these are presets that come with Lightroom and the ones over here are presets that I purchased or that I got and then I created or I don't know, it's all the presets that are coming after that they are not coming with the Lightroom. But let's start with the presets with Lightroom. If you go with color, you can see natural color, bright color, high contrast. You can see that when you put the arrow on the top of them, you already can experience what is going to happen with the picture. Now something you can do also is to use these presets as a start for your editing. You just, for example, click here, I like these high contrast and detail. You just use it and then you can start clicking and moving these and tweaking a little bit this light to make it exactly how you want. You can actually use it as a start. Now you can purchase also some presets. You can actually get some presets for free also. You can go to YouTube, you can go to Google, put the free presets for Lightroom and you'll find a lot. Also the purchase ones are very good, you can use them. I don't use presets much, I prefer to edit my own pictures, but in this case, if you want to use some presets it's okay. You have also another option, like all the editing we did before with that picture. Imagine that you really like the editing that we did, and you are taking so many pictures in the nature, in the mountains, and the pictures are very similar and maybe you want to have a preset, to add it to all the pictures and you like the editing that you did in the previous picture. You can come here where it says plus and when you click here you have Create Presents, Import Presets, and Manage Presets. Manage presets is basically all the presets that you have, you're going to organize them. But then let's talk about these top ones. Create preset is, for example, everything we did here now you can see all of these exposure is zero, but the contrast we have plus 16 and then highlights and then the shadows minus 19. All of these that you did and maybe if you did the curve, I did the curve here and maybe something else that you did. Everything is going to be considered as one editing that you did. You click here, you click Create Preset and what you're doing is, this is everything we just did in this picture. You see, basic tone, everything you did, and you just put "Create", you add the title here, and let's put for example, Mario first preset. Then you just click "Create" and it's going to create a preset of exactly the editing you just did here. Actually you know what yeah, but I don't like the cropping or I don't like the vibrance in all pictures. So you can unclick this part or unclick the color completely. It's going to create a preset without what you did with the color and that's really cool. You can create your own presets and that's how you can buy presets because these people are working hard making their editings and then selling you the preset so actually you can also sell your presets. We don't want to create these Mario first preset, because I already have some presets, so there you go. This is a way you can create presets. Now what happened if you've purchased some of the presets? Normally when you purchase a preset, it comes in as zip file or a router file. It means It's a folder with few presets there so what you do is you come here and you put Import Presets, as simple as that. Then your explorer is going to open where you can find where the presets were saved. Normally goes to download or however you have it, these presets with XMP, that's the extension. It means these are the new presets that you can actually use also in Photoshop, so you use them in Photoshop and in Lightroom. Back in the day I'm talking about 2017, 2018 if I'm not mistaken, the presets were just for Photoshop or just for Lightroom, but now it's for all of them. What you're going to do is you're going to select all the presets and you're going to click "Import". I already did it so I'm not going to import it now, but when you click "Import", they're going to appear here as you can see. These are the presets that I just showed you so you can see that some person created all of these, took the time to sit down, check some pictures and create all of these. Be careful if you want to purchase presets and you go online and you see amazing pictures because this preset is creating that and then you want to buy that preset because the picture looks amazing. Be careful every picture is different, so it doesn't mean that because the preset looks amazing in that picture is going to look the same in yours. Every picture has different highlights, different colors, it's different locations is completely different. What you do with the presets if you want to use them, is you for example, select this one that says Red October. Let's select this one, now we have Red October here. If you come here on the top, you can see all the tweaks that were done in this preset. This is not me, this is not what I did. This is actually what is in this preset and still you can add contrast to the photo. You can add exposure, takeout exposure. Even though you are using the preset, it doesn't mean it's final. You can still, do some tweaks in the picture. You can see if you go to the red, there is a huge curve in the green, in the blue and this person didn't do any curves in the main curve here. He did it in the RGB, that's pretty cool. You can go to HSL and see that he did some tweaks, you can see. This is the way you install presets, this is the way you create presets, and this is the way you use them. Remember my suggestion, remember that presets are not final. You have to tweak a little bit the things to make the picture become what you want. I don't use presets much, but it's always good to have some, it's always good also to know how to use them, because you never know. Don't forget what I just did, I created the build to hardcopy, remember? If we come back to this one, this is actually the editing that we did. Our editing I can see now because I came back, remember I told you I'm going to go and grab a cup of coffee and then come back. Now that I am coming back to the editing actually, I see that is very vibrant, a lot of vibrance in the picture. What I can do is come here and take out the vibrance of the picture a little bit. Maybe here, the saturation also, maybe I can put it in five now, I don't want that so saturated and now I like it better. You see. Sometimes it works when you finish your editings, just take a break and then come back and look at it. Now we can see actually how it was before and how it is now. I like it. I'll see you in the next lesson. 21. Exporting: My friends, now we're going to export our picture. How to do it? There's different ways to do it. You can come actually here to File and you can look for export, and you can see here export. But you can see here that you have the shortcut "Control Shift E". So if you press "Control Shift E", you're going to go to the same panel that is the Expert panel. So let's click it here and this is the panel, and it's very easy to use. In the top you have here export to, and you have the hard drive. You can send it through email or you can actually create a DVD or a CD to export it. You have here in the left side some presets. So the oldest specifications are already done by Lightroom, like to burn full-size JPEGs, export to DNG, for the emails and you have these presets. I like to do it by myself, but you can use the presets and user presets. This is like for example, if you are exporting a collection and there are a lot of pictures there that you would like to export, they are for the same purpose, then you can put all the specifications that you need here and you save it as a preset. When you finish all your specifications, you decided how are you going to export the file, everything is done. You're going to come here to add, and you're going to put the name of your preset like it could be Lightroom course, and you click "Create" and immediately it's going to be created here under User Presets and there you go. Then you save time and every time you want to export the picture, you have your preset. You know that this preset is for the pictures that I'm going to post in Instagram, for example, you can have here an Instagram preset. So every time that picture goes for Instagram, you just click in this preset and all the specifications are done. This is always to save time. So let's keep going with the exporting. Let's go on the top again. Here it says export to a specific folder. It means that there is going to be a folder where you are going to choose. You have all the options here. Same folder as the original photo. Normally where I have my original photos, I have a sub folder that is edited photos. This is to be organized since the beginning of the course we were talking about organization. So it could be same folder as the original photo and then here put in sub folder, you just click it here and you can add here the folder that you want. Maybe edited photos, for example. If you didn't create the folder, this is going to create the folder for you just because you click it here. So don't worry. I'm going to erase these. In this case, what I want is in a specific folder because I chose to save the pictures in the desktop. Because it's just for an example, I'm just going to export one picture. So it doesn't matter. Now here existing files, what happened if you are exporting a file called, for example, it's here, landscape. But you already did one that is called landscape, and they're different files, but it's the same name. So then here, existing files is asking what to do. Every time you want to do that, you want to export the picture that already you did, or is the same name. It's going to come here a panel saying, wait a second, you already have a picture like that. Would you like to override it?" So they are asking you, "What do you want to do?" But if you know that you're going to do it a lot of times and you know what you're doing, you can come here, for example, and put overwrite without warning. So immediately saved is not going to ask you anything or they can choose a new name for the exported file by itself. I always leave it in us what to do because you never know. I prefer Lightroom to tell me, "Hey Mario, wait a second, something's happening here. You already have this file," so I'll fix it. So I always leave it here. Filename, in the name, I have custom name. I like to put names to my files; but Lightroom gives you an option that is really nice, that is here, custom name sequence. This is super cool, for example, you go to the mountains and you take 20 pictures of different landscape photography. All of them are amazing. All of them you edited and you want to export them. You don't want to be changing the names of every single picture like landscape with the mountain in the back, landscape with the mountain in the right landscape, forget it, that's too much work. What you can do is custom name sequence. Custom text is going to be landscape, and then you start number is one. You can start with 0, 1, for example, you can start actually with 10 and you can see that the picture is going to be saved like this, landscape 10. Then the next one would be landscape 11, and the next one, landscape 12 and so on. So Lightroom is going to create a sequence for you. In this case it's just one picture, so I'm going to put just custom name. Here in extensions you can put lowercase or uppercase, that's just your preference, how you want it to look. We're going to skip video because this is not what we're doing and we're talking about photography. Let's go to File Settings. Now here you have the option to choose the image format is going to be as a JPEG, normally when you export the picture and you want to share it with the media, Instagram, or you want to share it with somebody. Normally is JPEG, but you have the option to share it as a PSD. This is actually a Photoshop file, so somebody else can open it in Photoshop and still have the possibility to pay a little bit with colors and saturations and these things. Because if you send it as a JPEG, you are already compressing the picture, but you have this option. You have the option to save it as TIFF, PNG. Basically all of these ones are going to be a little bit bigger than JPEG. JPEG would be the more compressed file. You can save it actually as DNG. What DNG is? DNG is going to save the picture, as if would be a raw file. So you will be able to keep editing the picture in the future in some other program, some other application with all the editings that you did. Now, if you choose original and your picture was a raw picture, this is going to export your picture as the original picture, but is not going to take any of the editings you did. So I always going to do it as JPEG or DNG if I want to keep editing in the future. Photoshop is going to take DNG also. So at the end, normally I go for both of them. Quality, I always leave it in a 100 percent. But what happens if you actually are going to save 20 photos just to show the customer. These are, the pictures I have, choose one of them. You don't need to have them be like the best quality possible. If that's the scenario, you can reduce the quality. But normally I always leave it in a 100 percent. Color space, I will leave it here as RGB. But if you want to bring the picture, I saw some photographers that are using Adobe RGB. Normally, I just leave as RGB, but you have these options. So I will suggest you to go around, try to check these options. Try to compare how fun and check which one you like better. Limit file size to ,it says here a 100 K. You cannot change it because it's by default, but if you want to change it, you just have to click here. You select limit file size to and then you can add for example, 1,000 K. That would be like the top quality you can put 2,000 K. Wow, it's amazing quality. But this is going to happen, if you click hearing "Limit file size". If you don't click it, then whatever the quality of the picture is, the camera you use, the resolution of the picture and you put quality a 100 percent, it doesn't matter. It could be more than a 100, 200, 300, a 1,000, 2,000, it's just depending of how you took the picture. It's not going to change unless you select this. I don't like to select it because I always want my pictures in the highest quality possible. Of course, you are risking a little bit of space because when the quality is the highest, the file is going to be a little bigger. So then you need more space to save your pictures. But that I don't care. I want my pictures to be the best quality. Let's go to Image sizing. In image sizing you can resize the image that you have. It says resize to feet. So width and height it says here and you need to by default 1,000, 1,000. But maybe you want the short edge, megapixels percentage, dimensions and this is like really when you are going to change the pixels in your image, the image is going to change and the picture that we have here is a four by five; so it means this is going to stretch the picture or shrink the picture to make it fit in this. I don't want that. You can click here, "Don't enlarge", then the picture is not going to change. But still I normally don't do it. I always leave it like this. This is in case somebody said, "You know what? I need your picture to be specifically like this." Then you can use this. I'm not going to use it for now. In resolution, it's by default 240. But normally, most of the time, just to know for online purposes to share on media, I could change it to 150. It could be even 75. From 75-150 is good for Instagram. You don't need that much quality in the Instagram because when you check the pictures in Instagram, they are so small, it's in your phone. You don't need that. So a 150 from 75 to a 150 would be okay. Now, if you want to bring the pictures, that's a different story. I normally do a minimum of 300 pixels per inch, if you want to print the picture. Now these file settings and image sizing is completely different, don't get confused with this. These when we were talking about quality and file size, we're talking about that size of the file, how much space the file is going to take in your computer and image sizing, the name it says it all, is the size of the picture. So not the size of the file, but the size of the picture. How many centimeters or how many inches the picture is going to be? So let's leave it then here in a 150 because we're going to use it for maybe social media and then sharpening. What is sharpening? I normally don't use this sharpening because I already sharpen the picture in the editing. But if you want to sharpen it, for example, here in matte paper or glossy paper, if you're going to print the picture, maybe you want to make it char before this paper or this kind of paper. I'm going to tell you something. I tried it. I print pictures in both of these presets and I didn't see a big difference. So it's up to you, but they are here. This is here. So you can check, you can try to print and maybe your printer is different. Maybe you're going to see a difference and you can get your favorite. The amount standard, because I already gave sharpness to the picture, I wouldn't go too high because it means going to sharpen and more and more. I don't want that if you're going to use these stains standard. Don't go too far. Don't go too high, don't go too low, just leave it in the middle. Now metadata. It's not that because you add metadata the file size is going to be amazingly bigger, is just tiny bigger. But if you want to include your metadata, here are your options. You can see here copyright only, all except camera raw info. You can add the metadata you want in your pictures. Normally by default this remove person info and the location. But if you want to add it, you just click it and it's going to be added in your metadata. Now, watermark, just click "Watermark" and you have here a simple copyright watermark. Is going to be copyright. Then you have edit watermarks. It means you're going to make your personnel watermarks, is going to personalize? As you can see here, this is the picture in here on the bottom it says Mario Guimarey, that's my name. You can actually put something else. You can put the picture 1, picture two. You can put here whatever you want. You have the option here to change the font, to change the opacity. Everything is here. You can change all the details. If you don't want to put your name here, if you want to put your logo here, you have the option here where it says choose. You can choose a PNG or you can choose a JPG. It's here, selected as text, but you can actually add also a graphic. If you go to Graphic, you're going to be able to add a little picture here, something. So if you click "Graphic" Explorer is going to be open so you can choose the file that you want to add here. Here on the bottom you have the anchor, it's selected here in this corner. But if you put it here, for example, the watermark is going to come here on the top. That's pretty cool. Again, whatever you do with the watermark, for example, for these pictures that I'm exporting now, these collection, I want the watermarks here on the top. I want this font, I want these. You're changing all these. You can create the presets. You can create presets for everything here in Lightroom. You just put here saved current settings as new preset and you add the name of the presets so you can use presets. Then when you come to this part of the watermarks and you come here in the corner, you're going to have it here. So now post-processing, what is going to happen after the export is done? When you export the picture, in my case, I always have it in do nothing. So I export the picture and I'm back in Lightroom so I can keep editing or exporting more pictures. But you have another option. You have show in Explorer. So as soon as you export the picture, Explorer is going to be opened with the picture there so you can see it. You can export the picture and as soon as the export is finished, you go to Photoshop or you can open in another application like Lumina or any other program. You have these options also, but I normally leave it here in do nothing. Then you click "Export" and there you go. We exported our picture. 22. Full Editing Session / Portrait: Okay guys. We're here in our full editing collection. Let's take this out so we have a complete picture, and we're going to start editing these. Let's also take this out, there you go. This is going to be my workflow and how I edit it. Remember what I said, everybody has a different taste, a different way of editing and you'll get your own style. I have my own style, so it doesn't mean this is going to be the perfect editing, but let's have fun with this. The first thing I do, I told you before, I do the curves. What we're going to do is we're going to come here, we're going to come here, we're going to do the three dots and I like to do these S curve that gives a very nice tone and very nice contrast to the picture. Let's go here, let's go here a little bit, we make the S curve that I like. Maybe we can add a little bit more of these to make it perfect S curve. Just with the curve, let's press backslash and let's see what happen in the picture. Look at the change just with the curve, it's super nice, I like it. Let's go. Basic corrections. I like to add a little bit of blacks in the picture. Let's take out some shadows because when I did the curve, it gives shadows to these part of the picture, so let's take out some shadows. Highlights, maybe we take out some highlights, there you go and when you take out highlights and add some shadows, you can see that the picture is getting a little bit darker, but don't worry with the exposure because we'll fix it. We'll start to go in detail just in the eyes, just in the lips, just in detail, that's going to be really cool. In texture, I will add just a little bit. We go all the way. It doesn't look good if we go all the way on the other side. It looks like a painting. Actually in the skin is very good, but I will use it later. I'm going to add some clarity in the picture. Sometimes depending on the model, I can take out the texture a little bit, but in this case, I want to add a little bit of texture. Clarity, actually, if we go to the other side, look what's happening. If we go completely to the other side, what happens? In portraits, I normally take out clarity a little bit, so let's go like there. I'm not exaggerating because I'm going to go into detail in every single part of the picture, so don't worry. Now, when I am doing portraits, I don't use saturation much, I choose more vibrance. Let's go like these so you can see exactly what vibrance is. You see I'm exaggerating so we can see, and I'm going to go just a little bit with the vibrance. Let's see if I use saturation, I think it goes too much, I'm not going to use it in this case, I think that is enough. Now, we've finished with the basic correction. I don't know if I should add contrast because I already added contrast with the curve, so I'm not going to add contrast. In temperature, I think it's okay, maybe it's a little bit warm, I can come a little bit. I'm going to go like a little bit there. Actually, I cannot warm this, it looks very nice with warmness. I wasn't when I started 5,100, let's go just a little bit, there you go. Then we can take out actually oranges and things like that, so don't worry about it. Let's go to HSL, let's go to saturation and orange, we can actually take out, like I said, we take out a little bit of orange. You can see actually what is happening, if I click here, we turn off what we just did with the orange. This is the only thing we moved in HSL, so look at the difference is very subtle, but it's very nice, I like it. Maybe red so we can take out a little bit also, there you go. I think this is set. There is no greens, there's nothing else here that we can move from HSL, the eyes. Actually, we're going to do it separate. Let's close this, let's close also these to be more organized. Color grading, I don't think I'm going to use the color grading now because it's a portrait and I mean, if I would like to create something different, you never know, we can come back to color grading later, you never know. Detail, I'm going to use it later because for now, we are not adding much, but then I'm going to be starting to add sharpness to certain parts of the picture, so I think at the end, I'm going to use detail to take out some of the noise. In effect, for example, I don't need effects because I'm not going to add anything yet for now, maybe later when I'm finishing this editing, you'll never know. Now we're going to come with the brushes. This is the part that I like a lot, the brushes and these tools over here. We start with the first one, that is the Spot Removal. Some models and some people are going to tell you, you know what, I don't want you to take anything out of my face, so you have to ask if the person you took the picture to is going to like it or not. Do you want me to take out this spot in your face? You want me to take out that? You have to ask. For this lesson, we're going to take out the scar that she has here, and we're going to take out these over here. Just these two things, maybe something in the face, we'll see. Let's zoom in here and there is a scar as you can see. Let's click in the Spot Removal and remember it was a little circle. Let's make the circle the size what we want. Let's see this size over here. This is a little bit thicker, this size. Now, something I didn't tell you when we were talking about the Spot Removal because we were talking very fast about the tools, remember that you just find a spot, you click it and Lightroom immediately is going to find another spot to replace it. If you click and drag, you can make a line, so let's do that here. We click and we drag it, drag the Spot Removal in the scar. You see? There you go. Look what it did. It just analyzed that this part is very similar and actually, we can go a little bit further. There you go. I think it's very good. Let's move it a little bit here, and that's it. I think we just made it. Let's click "Done". Let's see how it looks. No scar. We disappeared the scar. Let's come here, let's zoom in and let's take out these over here, let's put these as Spot Removal. I have so much fun every time I'm editing, it's super fun, so let's do it. Let's make it a little bit bigger, there you go. We click it here and for example, in this case, I don't like where Lightroom is taking their replacement from. What we're going to do is we're going to click the space bar and we're going to move the picture to see where Lightroom is taking this from. No, I don't want it to take it from here. When you come here, you can see the little hand and you can move the hand, move it, move it, move it maybe from here next to it, so it looks for the same color and now you can see that is much better. Let's click the space bar again, let's go here and let's click Done and let's see what happen. Look, it took it out. Now it's better. This is the way when Lightroom choose the wrong place, you just go in that spot and delete that little bump gums, and then you can move it and drag it wherever you want the spot to take the image from. One click, so we go to the same size of the picture. Now we're getting better. Now, let's zoom in the eyes. There you go. We're going to do something really cool. We're going to enhance the eyes. What we do is we're going to come with the brush here, adjustment brush. There you go. You can see that this size is not correct. I want to make it a little bit bigger. I think that is okay. What we're going to do is we're going to enhance the center of the eye. What we do is we come here, we have some presets. By default, you can see that is giving minus 30 of saturation. We don't want that. We come here to the Effect, and we go to "Burn Darken Edited", it says, we're going to click here. It says Iris Enhance, you see, we're going to click this one, and as you can see, it's changing here. It's like giving a little bit of clarity. The saturation went to 40. You can see here exposure went to 0.35. This is a preset. We're going to come here, we're going to press ''O'', so we can see where are we painting? Where are we masking? Now we're going to start with the masking. We want to mask just the eye, just the iris. There you go. This is done. Now we press the spacebar, and while we press the spacebar, we drag the picture to the other eye, and we're going to do the same. We release the spacebar, and we're going to do exactly the same. There you go. Now let's click ''O'', and we can see that the eye is clearer. Now, if we come here on the bottom and you see this bottom here, let's click it off, so we can see what we did with the eye. Let's see. You see the eye was darker and now it's clearer. You can actually make it even clearer, even more saturation. We don't want that much because the preset is really good. But okay, we will clear it. You know what, because she has blue eyes, if we change the temperature maybe towards the blue, it's going to become bluer. You see the eyes are becoming a little bluer. We don't want to add more exposure because sometimes I try, sometimes it works, but in this case, I think it would be like really unnatural with the eye superexposed. I think this is it with the eyes. Now what we're going to do is we're going to create a new brush. Creating a new brush, we're going to click here where it says "Effect", it says "Iris Enhance". We're going to double-click. When you do double-click, it says "Edited", it means you finish with this editing. Now everything is reset for this new brush. What do we want to do with the brush? Now we're going to tell Lightroom, here in Iris Enhance, when I click here in the presets, we have this Soften Skin, this Soften Skin is lite, and Soften Skin normal. We want to use the Soften Skin, the normal one, because it's very nice. You'll see what it's going to do. What we're going to do is we're going to brush all the face. We actually don't need to press ''O'' to see because I want you to see what is happening. When we start to brush the face, we brush, we brush the face. You just go like this. There you go. Not too much. We go to the nose, we go to the front here, there you go. It's the skin, so we can come here, we can come to the skin. There you go. All the skin. Let's try to go all over the skin. I think it's done. Now, let's go here. I want to show you what we just did. Let's take it out and look at the skin. This is before, this is after. Now we're going to click ''Done''. Let's see how it looks. Let's go to how it was, the picture before, and this is after. This is like for a magazine. But we're still missing some things. We're still missing some things. We're going to come back to the brush because I think I like it, I like the editing, but I think this soften of skin was too much. We come back to the brush. You can see that when you come back to the brush, you have here one dot and one dot here. You see this is what we did in the eyes, and this is what we did in the skin. I didn't click anything. I just put the hand on the top, and you can see exactly the parts that you softened. We're going to click here, when you see the hand, you come here and you click it. This is what we're going to fix now. You see that it changed from gray to black. It means this is what we are going to work with now. Remember, Soften Skin, it make the sharpness more like stronger. If you come here, you see the clarity went completely to minus 100 percent. But like I told you, I think it was too much. So we're going to go maybe in 50 percent, like around there, I think. Now we're not taking it to the next level. It was really soft, the skin. Now it's not much, now it's better. But you know what? I want to fix the white part of the eyes. This white part over here. We're going to come here on the top, and we're going to click ''New''. Now we're going to come to the eye here in the navigator. You see we just came to the eye. Pressing spacebar, we're going to center the eye. Because we created the new one, remember that it's soften skin, this is what we did before. We double-click in ''Effect'', so it's going to appear edited. We're done with this. We're going to do something new, and we're going to auto mask. Let's check that here is Auto Mask marked; normally, by default it's always there, it's okay. We can see that this size, it's perfect. That's the size I want. But I don't want the change to be too harsh. I don't want it. The feather is in 100 percent, the size is okay. But the flow, it's in 89. I want to put it a little bit less, maybe 70. I don't want it to be too harsh in what I'm going to do. What is flow doing is if it's a 100 percent, everything you do, if you add color, it is going to add more, it's going to be stronger. Everything that you add is going to be strong. But if I go to 70, the flow is less, and you can see it actually when you press ''O'', if you're in 100 percent is very red when you paint the mask, but now it's going to be a little subtle. Because it's marked the auto mask, this is going to be very nice, you You it goes exactly in the corners. It's auto masking very good. It is actually a new thing because before the auto mask, it was not that perfect. It was not that good. We can click here, the spacebar, and go to the other eye. Or you can come to the navigator, and just move and drag this square to the other eye like this. We're still in the same masking, so we just click here. We go like this, we go like this. Perfect. We come here, we go like this also, it's perfect. You see it's perfect. There you go. Now what we're going to do, double-click here. We go back. Let's click "O" so we can see what we're going to do. Now, to make that part wider, what I normally do is I take out saturation. Let's take out a little bit of saturation. Not much because then it's going to look really freaky. There you go. Now we go up and we can actually add a little bit of highlights. There you go. Just a little bit, not much. I don't want it to be freaky, like I was saying. The whites, we can also pull them a little bit more. There you go. I think we are done. Now, if we come to the eye, you can see that it's wider. Let's click the backslash. This was before, is now the eyes are super nice. Now we can work with the mouth. Let's go to the mouth. Let's maybe go here to 200 percent because, it's going really very close. Now we're going to keep working with the brush. You see that when I told you I use a lot the brush it was true, I'm not lying. We are going for a new brush. If we come to the eye, you'll see that they are one dot here and one little circle here they are gray. This is all the things that we did with the brush. We're going to come to the mouth now. There you go. Just in case we double-click in "Effect", always just in case it's better to do the things properly. The size is okay. I just want to reconfirm that we are in Auto Mask, Auto Mask is okay. Seventy here in flow is perfect. Density also is the density of the mask is also the strongness of the mask. So 90 for now it's okay, but there are some cases where, for example, it's super overexposed and you make a mask there with the brush and you want to fix it. You want to take out a lot of exposure, you go to 100 percent. But if you want to be subtle, you want to just take a little beat of the things. Everything has to be a little bit softer, then you use the flow on the density and you can go all over to 100 and 100. But in this case, I think this is perfect. Let's click "O" so we can see what we're doing, what we are masking, because the lips are red, you don't see properly. I hope you can see properly, sometimes the compression of the videos are not allowing you to see properly. But I'm painting the lips. Here we didn't take the lip, there you go. Now I'm going here also in the bottom lip. There you go. I cannot even see properly the red because the lips are red, but it's okay. There you go. I think it's okay. I think I manage to mask properly the lips. Now I'm going to click "O" so I can see the lips and I'm going to add a little bit of saturation. I want the lips to be a little bit more like reddish, a little bit of saturation, just a little bit there. Now you come here, temperature, tint. Maybe I can go a little bit to magenta. You can add these colors there. Then the rest, I think it's okay. Now there is something you can actually do. You see here it says color and you have this palette, you can actually come to the palette and you can select the color and apply that color to that mask specifically. For example, if you come here, you see I'm adding blue to the color. You can come to the yellow and you are going to add more yellow to the color. Green, for example, green to the color. This is really fun. There's something maybe you could use it. But in this case, I don't want this. I'm going to reset this with "Control Z". We're going to go back to the color that I was using. This is basically a little bit of saturation and a little bit of tint to magenta. I think this is okay. Now we can see how it is the lips if I turn it off here. That was before and this is now. Is very subtle, but it's better. This is the idea of the editing. When you're doing a portrait, you have to go deep into details. It's making the picture better. Now let's do one last thing. Let's go back to the image, to the real size of the image. Let's click in "New", the new is resetting everything, I just want to reconfirm. Always reconfirmed. Now we want to do something, the hair, the Auto Mask is on and we're going to paint these. Let's put O so we can see what are we painting. I want to paint the hair because this is very dark and it's okay. It's not bad that the hair is dark, but I want the hair to be like a little bit more details in the hair. Let's go here. I think it's okay here. As you can see, I'm not just brushing over these blue part in the back here. I finish here, I release the button and I keep brushing here, because if the brush pass through the blue is going to paint it. Now auto mask is analyzing that we don't want that blue. You see I'm releasing and I'm coming here just to paint a little bit there. That's it. We click "O". Now what we're going to do is a little bit of shadows, so we go here. Now we can see more details in the hair. If we go here and we take it out, you'll see what happened with the hair. Now look at the hair, it looks better. I think that we're pretty much done with the brushes in this picture. Now we can come in at the Vignette if you want to add a vignette. For example, if we add this, the vignette a little bit, maybe here. The feather, we can make it more, and there is a vignette there. If you want to see what we're adding, you should look at the corners, and we add vignette. We center here in the center of the picture. Now we can go up actually one more little tweak that we can do. We come here to the Radial filter. We make a radial filter, a big one like these for example. Let's click "O" so we can see what is happening there. You see what is happening? It's basically part of the face covert and we don't want that, so we make it a little bit bigger. Now remember we have the brush here, then we go down here and we look for erase. Let's make it a little bit bigger. We're sure that we're not touching our subject, so we're erasing the subject. Here we're erasing the mask over the subject. There you go. I think this is okay. Now we come to the brush again, but what are we going to do? We're going to come here, you see sharpness? Let's press "O" again, and let's take out the sharpness of the outside, like here. You can see this is becoming blurrier and also here a little bit, but it's not that noticeable, but I do that all the time so that we center our attention in our subject. I think that is it; done. Now just in case we can come to detail. We can come to zoom in the face. The picture is very nice. We don't see any green or any noise. But if you still want to fix the noise if there is a possibility of some noise I will not go more than 25, maybe 22 or 3, something like that to take out some noise. But that's it. That's all I will do. Lightroom already analyzed by default is putting the noise and the colors for 25. Let's leave it like that. This is basically it. 23. FULL EDITING Landscape 1: Okay guys, we're going to edit this picture, as you can see is a landscape photography. It is really nice picture but it's underexposed and some places actually very underexposed. You see here you have this orange color, this magenta over here pinkish. So it's giving me a lot of things to do here and I think we're going to make a nice editing. First thing to do, I'm going to crop the picture. I don't need to crop it because I like it like this, but I think this part over here is a little distracting, the bottom part of the picture. The main subject here is going to be this hill over here and the contrast with the sky and the stars is super nice. Again, I'm going to think about Instagram, so I'm going to come here to four by five. I want the sky, the sky is nice, so I'm actually just going to go all the way up. Let's start, I'm going to start with the Tone Curves, I'm going to go here and I'm going to do something different now. I'm not going to start with the wide one that it means that it's older picture, but I'm going to do the RGB. I'm going to do a curve in every single color. Let's start with the red, we are going to make our dots here points, let's give a little bit of contrast to this, let's see over here I think it's okay. The center, I want to put it in the center, I don't want the mid tones too high, maybe a little bit. I'm going to give a little bit of highlights here and I think this is okay. The funny part of doing the RGB curves is that when you start with the red or you start with one of them, the colors are so weird. But as soon as you keep going the colors start to change, and start to become really nice. Let's go to the green and now you'll see that as soon as we start to add colors, they start to blend together and they start to make something nicer. Let's see here, little bit of red here, midpoint I want to put a little bit in the middle. We are creating the S curves, so. There you go. You see that it doesn't look that red anymore, you go here. Let's go to the blue one. We'll do the same thing. What the curves are doing to the picture is to adding a lot of contrast, and in this case I'm adding contrast individually to every single primary color. I think this is it, I can see that the colors are stronger, from white to blacks, they're all stronger. Still the picture is underexposed, so don't worry, okay. With experience you will understand how the contrast works, you just have to edit and edit as much as you can, Tone Curves are done. Let's go to the basic correction now. Now we have our contrast properly done. Of course the picture is underexposed, I like the sky how it is, but I'm going to fix first the whole picture. Let's add a little bit of Exposure, let's go maybe to 40, I think that's okay. You still see that it's underexposed, but as soon as we keep working with this, is going to be better, so don't worry. I'm not going to add more contrast because we did a proper job with the curves, so it doesn't need more contrast, we're going to skip that. I wouldn't add highlights in this case because we are working with the whole picture. We're going to fix some highlights and shadows individually with these tools and the brushes, for now I think shadows are important. I'm going to take out the shadows, maybe to 50 something. Like this, we can already see details here as you can see, we can see already the trees and these things. Now, let's add a little bit of blacks because that gives that the contrast is nicer, I think minus 9, it's okay. I think we can add some texture, texture and clarity when it's a landscape I always like to add a little bit, but just a little bit. Remember that we're going to do individually everything here. Lets just a little bit of texture and just a little bit of clarity. We're going to do some color grading here, don't exaggerate with vibrance and saturation. I'm going to add just a little bit maybe like five, just a little bit, because then we're going to play with the colors individually, okay? Just a little bit. What basic corrections is doing basically, is helping you to start the edit. For fun click "Backslash", so we see how we started and how we are now. This is the picture how it started, and this is how it is now. It's very nice but still it doesn't look natural, so we're going to keep going and keep fixing the picture. Now let's go to the tools, let's go to the graduated filter I love it, I like to work with it. We're going to select the bottom part of the picture, there we go we selected it. Remember you have the plus here in the middle, the cursor. What normally you do is, you click and you drag down, but because we want to select the bottom we're going to drag up, so we click and we drag it up. As you can see it's in an angle. Because you are dragging from the middle it goes in an angle, don't worry. As soon as you come to the middle line, you see there is these two arrows with the curve, you can come all the way to the edges and then you just do this, you have to see these arrows with the curve, there you go. Of course the bottom changed already because we have this by default, the saturation, now is minus 60, so we're not going to do anything, we go back to the picture I think it's not straight yet. Let's press "O" to see what is it that we are selecting. We want to select all so these hills and rocks over here, so we can move these a little bit higher. You remember to move it you just have to come to the middle, the circle, the black circle, and you see the little hand and then you can move it. We are selecting the sky also, you see all this sky here and we don't want to select the sky, we just want to select this bottom. We go to range mask, we click it here and we go to luminance and we're going to look for the darker parts of the picture, where the darker parts? Remember I told you dark is in the left, and highlights are in the right, so we're going to do the range over here, going towards the darker parts. Now you can see that everything selected but the sky. Just incase, just to be 100 percent sure, we come here on the top and we're going to click in the "Brush", we're going to click "Erase" just in case, we're going to erase a little bit, if we were selecting the sky. I don't see that the sky is selected but because this part was already pink and magenta, it looks like it was selected but it's not. So it's okay, but it's always better to be a 100 percent sure. We come back to the brush, in case we need to brush something. But there you go, now we have selected all the dark parts of the picture, so we click "O", we know that that party selected, let's start to do our magic. The first thing to do for me is to add highlights and maybe take out some shadows and things like that. Let's go to the highlights, let's go maybe to 82 or 85, let's see how it works. I think there is okay. Then even exposure, we can actually expose a little bit more. Maybe in '50s. Let's go to shadows and let's take out shadows. Don't take much because we want the picture to be not too the lighting, maybe just like 11 or 10 it's okay. Still the picture is very orangey, but that doesn't have to do anything with these corrections we're doing. We're going to fix that later. Let's come here and let's add some texture. We can see the texture here. A little bit, maybe like 10 or something like that. If it's difficult to reach the 10 here, you just click here in the number and you can type it down, and enter and you got it. Let's go to clarity. Let's see. In clarity, we go all the way to the edge, look, it's horrible. So play with this lights like this so you can see exactly where you are and where you want to be. Thirty five, I think it's okay. Thirty-four. I think this is basically what I want to do with this part. Let's see what the Dehaze will do. The Dehaze is giving this contrast that I like. I'm going to leave it in 10, I think. Now we have here the noise and the sharpness. Always when I'm editing landscape photography, I like to add sharpness, so let's add some sharpness. Maybe like in 20, it's okay. But then, remember, that every time we add sharpness, we also add noise. Let's take out the noise. I think something like 20 or as close as I can, it's okay. They both went to 19. Okey-dokey, I think this is okay. Now, I want to tell you something. If we come here in this part, with is the range mask that we're using now, remember we selected the range towards the darker colors and that's why we are editing this part of the picture. You have here smoothness and it's in 50, that's normally by default, it goes to 50. What is going to happen is if we go less than 50, everything we're doing, all the editing we're doing in this part it's going to go smoother. If we go to the right side, so we put the number of the smoothness higher, then all that we were doing gets super-strong. If you add a little bit of saturation and you go all the way, this saturation's going to be stronger. We don't want that soft, but we don't want the middle either. Let's go maybe to 60, so what we are applying, it's going to be properly applied. Don't go too far with this. We have to be very careful. If we go all the way to 100 percent, you can see that because we added highlights and shadows now everything is stronger. The texture, look, everything got stronger. We don't want that much. Maybe 60 was okay, like I chose before. Let's go in 60. There you go. We're going to leave it there. We are done with the gradient filter. We just click done. Now, I wanted to do the sky with a gradient filter also, but you can see here that the difference between the sky, and the mountain, and the hill here is very strong. I think that with the brush, it would be a better job. We're going to go with the brush. Let's always check that the auto mask is on and normally it is, but let's always check that. Remember what I told you, to reset everything. I can see here that it's scene forty, it's in 60. Let's reset here. It says teeth whitening, that it was selected, that's why it's giving you all of these. Why? Because I was editing a picture before. Every time you're editing a picture, and then you come back to another picture to edit, by default it's going to come the last thing that you did. You just have to reset every time you come to a brush, or to use a tool. You have to be very careful. Sometimes you're moving the tool, you don't realize that you were adding a little bit of white, a little bit of black. If you want to have 100 percent of control, it's better to reset it. Let's start from zero. Now, let's start with the brush. We check that auto mask is on. Let's make it a little bigger, well, not that big. Let's press O to see what is that we are painting, and we start with the painting. There are different colors in the sky. You see, it starts from a little orangey then magenta, light blue, blue, dark blue, then you have the stars that are all very highlighted. This is a problem if you want to brush the sky and you just go with the brush like this, you have to be releasing the button and clicking again, and releasing, and clicking so it goes better. It didn't want to capture these part, so I'm going to click again here, and now it's capturing this part, you see? So this is something that you have to keep in mind that the auto mask is still a computer, so you have to tell the auto mask what to do. What you can do here in these little corners is you release the bottom. You come here with the plus button, you go there, and you click it again; and then you come here because they are small places that you want to fill. There you go. Here also, click. There you go. I think we have pretty much everything selected. We're going to click O so we can see what we're going to do. Now the sky is blue. What I can do actually is to give the sky a little blue, adding a little bit of blue with the temperature. We can go to the blue part of the temperature that is the left side and we can go maybe to minus six, I think minus five. Remember that if you cannot get it, you can type it down. We come here and let's type six. So we're adding a little bit of blue in the sky. Now the highlights. When you are editing sky, when you take out highlights, making the sky more detailed, you can see the details in the sky. Let's take out highlights in the sky. That's too much. I think somewhere there is okay. Now you can see that here there's some magenta, some pink, and some orange, and I want that to be expressed better, to be shown better. So let's add a little bit of saturation. Just a little bit, maybe like 11 or 10. I think that's okay. Now you can see that this sky is sharper, is nice, you can see it properly. The blue is very strong. I really like that. I want to check something here. We're going to open here. If we open the navigator and we zoom in in the sky, we can see that there is a lot of noise, and this is normal. It's not that we have these grain because of our editing or because what we are doing is adding grain, it's basically because their picture was taken a little bit underexposed. So we had to add some highlights, and we had to add some exposure, and that normally gives a lot of grain. What we going to do now here to finish with this brush and the sky is to take out this noise. Remember that we cannot exaggerate because then it's going to give a lot of smoothness, and we don't want that. We want the picture to look like a picture and not like a painting. What we're going to do is we're going to go just like to 20. I told you not to go more than 25, 26. Let's leave it there in 25. If you see that it's becoming horrible, then you can go lower. If you see that it's still okay, like I can see it's still okay, I think I can go a little bit higher then let's do it. Let's go to maybe 30. But I will not take a risk going farther than that. We're done. Let's click done. Let's go to color grading. What I normally do in color grading is, always the shadows and the highlights, I do almost the same thing to both of them. Then in the mid-tones, I'll do the opposite just to create these contrasts. This picture is too orange here on the bottom and two blue on the top. What I want to do, to the shadows and the highlights I'm going to add a little bit more of blue, but just a little bit towards maybe here, towards this blue, and then in the highlights I will do the same. You go towards these blue. You can see that picture is turning into a little different color, it's not that orange anymore. But to make a contrast and to not make it bad I'm going to come here in the mid-tones and I'm going to go to the orange. That would be the opposite to bring back these orange color that it had before. But we created a nice contrast now, and we can see what we did. If you come here on the top, you see the switch. Let's see what we did with this color grading. That was before, and this is what we have now, I think it's better. Now, here on the bottom you see the blending and the balance. I want this to be blended properly. A little bit smoother, not that harsh. What I'm going to do is I'm going to add a little bit of blending. Let me see, maybe to 60, maybe there. When you are editing, what I will suggest you to do every time you want to add something is go all the way to 100 and go all the way to zero and start to slide and slide everything so you can see what is happening. You will understand exactly why I'm doing this and you'll understand where to go, where is exactly the point that makes you feel happy in the editing. In the balance, we are in zero. But I think I want to add a little bit of balance also. There you go. I think we are okay here. Color grading is done. Now let's go to calibration. I want to do something with calibration. Here in calibration I'm going to do something different. I'm going to change a little bit the color of this blue just to create something nice, something cool. I see the blue here is very predominant, is very nice. Let's see if we can make it better. Let's go in blue. We look for the hue of the blue first. If we go all the way to this side, you can see that we are changing the color. We don't want that color and we don't want the opposite, that is going to be super purple, even though it looks cooler. It looks super cool. But we want to do something like this, let's add something like 20 something. Let's see what happens if we go to 23. You see the difference? The sky is not blue anymore. Is more towards purple and then it becomes blue. I wanted to do this because I saw this magenta color here before and this orange here. So I thought we can maybe create something cool here. Now, what we did is the hue. Let's add saturation to that hue. Let's do the same, 23, the same as the color that we did. Now look at this, it's super cool. We can see that actually the picture here on the bottom had also some blues, so it changed a little bit. But it doesn't matter, it was not that harsh. Still we can do some changes playing with the colors. Still I want to add some details here in the trees, for example. This is what I want to do with calibration. It was really cool, it was fun. Goodbye calibration. Now let's go to the HSL to play with the colors individually. Here, before I start with the luminance, it's basically why I came to HSL. We're going to go to saturation, because I think it's too orange. We can actually take out a little bit of that orange. Here you know that it's some reds and some orange. We can actually move these towards the left side to take out the colors. We can actually click here in the selector and look for the color and drag it down, click and drag it down. You can see that we're taking the colors out. Let's take the color, it doesn't matter if it goes too much because then we can correct it here. Now we know that basically all of this is made with red and orange. We know because we see how it moves that is more orange than red. We can actually add the orange, don't take it too much. The red actually we can take a little bit more. Now the picture is better. It's not that orange. But still I don't have details in the trees and we could add a little bit more of lighting here. Let's go to luminance now. We have all these colors that we can light up now. This is so amazing. Let's go to the red and let me see how much we can give to the red. Maybe 30-something, that is okay. To the orange, let's give a little bit more. Remember, we're not changing the color, we're just adding a little bit of highlights to that color. I think that it's also okay. Maybe it's too much, maybe somewhere there it's okay. Let's go to the yellow, to the green. Let's add a little bit. I think here it's okay. The green I want to add more. I want the ring to be visible. It was not visible at all. Maybe we exaggerate. Let's see what happened. I think that is okay. Now let's go to the purple and the magenta, because you see we have here this magenta and purple. I think this is also magenta and purple, the color of this little water over here, it looks very similar. Let's see what happened. Let's add just a little bit of purple. We can see that there are some changes. Let's see what happens if we add magenta, we take out magenta. I just see something. Checking this side, these highlights over here, especially here, when I take out the magenta, this gets better. It's less highlighted. I'm going to take out their magenta so you can check there. I'm thinking minus nine would be okay. You can see that this is actually now less highlighted. I really like that. Now, let's click here off to see how it was before the HSL corrections. This is not the whole picture, how it was before and how it is now, it's just HSL. Let's click it here. That's how it was, and that's how it is now. Is very subtle, very soft the changes, but this is the editing process. Little details make the picture much better. Now I think the picture is done. But before I finish, I want to show you something that I mentioned when I was talking about this spot removal tool. Remember, I mentioned that, actually, when you are editing the sky, you can clone the stars. I like how the stars are here. I wouldn't clone more because it will look like it's a lot of stars. We illuminate this very nice so we don't want too many stars, but we're going to come here to the navigator and we're going to zoom in this corner. I want you to see something. Let me see, somewhere here. There you go. You can see here in this spot, there's no many stars. Let's clone a couple of them so you can see how I do it. Let's come here to the spot removal and then you put Clone. Normally goes to heal so you select Clone. Let's see the size. The size is perfect. We come to an empty space. Where do you want to put the star? Maybe here you want to put the star. You just click and immediately it's appearing another circle. Let's come to the other circle that just appeared, not the one with the plus, the new one that doesn't have any plus. You see the little hand there. We're going to click and drag it into a star. What we want to clone, let's see, there. We release, and now you can see, we just added a new star here. There was nothing and now we have this star here. Remember, you have to come to the empty space. You're just going to click there. The new circle is going to appear. You come to the new circle and you're going to click and drag it to the star, or whatever you want to clone, and you release. That's it, we just added two stars. That's it. Then you click "Done", and it's done. Now let's go back to our picture. Let's click here in this Y, Y and then we can see the difference, how the picture was at the beginning and how the picture is now. It's very nice. I like it a lot. Then we come back to the picture. Remember, if you press L, you can actually isolate the picture. If you press L again, completely dark and you just have the picture. Look at this. I like it. I'm going to go for a coffee and maybe when I come back I'm going to do some changes. But like this, now, I'm loving it. 24. FULL EDITING Landscape 2: Okay guys. We're going to do another landscape, but I came to this picture because I wanted to show you something. Let's zoom here in the mouth, you see the teeth. I wanted to show you something that I didn't show you when we were using the brush. Let's click in the "Brush". Remember that we have this custom, it says here and you have the Iris Enhance that we were using, and the Soften Skin. Well, you have also Teeth Widening. Actually, if we press "O" we can see where are we painting. Let me see. Where are we masking, let me see. Let's go, let's mask the teeth. There you go. A little bit here, there you go. What we did, I'm going to press "O" and I'm going to show you what we did with this brush. If we come here and we click it out, you'll see the difference in the teeth. The teeth is whiter. Look, there it's before, and this is after. It's like it's adding and if you check here, it's adding exposure taking out saturation. This is basically what it's doing to white teeth. This is pretty cool. Let's click "Done." Other thing I wanted to show you with this picture is the radial filter. Before we were using the radial filter masking the outside remember. Let's click here, let's make a radial filter here. I like that it's black and white, I don't know why. Let's reset this. Because we were using the teeth whitening, we have to reset the effect. Let's center over here. If we click "O" we'll see what is selected. This is what I wanted to show you. What happen if what you want to change is in the center of the circle and not the outside? This is very cool when you want to mask a specific faces for example. If you come here on the bottom, you see Invert, when you click "Invert" it goes the opposite. Now you are masking the face and not the outside. This is something I missed telling you before so I'm telling you now, and now we can start editing our landscape. This is the picture I chose because it's nice, but it's very simple. You see the colors, and here you're going to have some greens, the sky is not amazing, it's just white sky. The idea of this full editing session is that we're going to create our own style. I want to make this picture moody, maybe autumn, using a lot of oranges and things like that. It's not going to be just color correction, but we're going to add our style. First we're going to crop because I don't like this over here. You see this branch or a tree here, I don't like it so we're going to crop. When we start to crop, I just want to crop this part, but you see that when I move, everything moves because it's trying to keep the same idea of the shape of your picture that is this rectangle. Let's click here. You see where it says Original, this is how you took the picture, but you see here it's a lock. Let's open this lock and now you can actually crop however you want. You can do something like this for example, but we don't want that. Let's just take this three that I don't like, I think that's okay. Let's click "Done." I see the horizon is good, so I don't need to do anything else with this cropping. You know that I like to start with the curves, but now it's not going to be the RGB. Now we're going to start with the main curves first. Let's start with this one that is basically the whole picture. We're going to give some contrast to the picture, there you go. You know that I like a lot to do this S curve, I love it. Don't worry, at the beginning when you start to make the curve, it always looks very weird, but don't worry. There you go. This is the S I always like to do. Let's close it. Let's go to basic corrections. You see that the picture is actually underexposed, so let's add a little bit of exposure. Don't go too far because we are going to be using the tools. Let's go 0.30, I think it's enough to start fixing the picture. We go here. I'm not going to touch contrast because we already did it with the curves. If we need more, we'll add it later. Maybe a little bit of highlights. Burns get to highlights because we have the sky here and I think I better add these highlights and shadows specifically to some sounds of the picture. I'm going to leave all of these like this. Maybe I can go to texture, and I'm going to add a little bit of texture, maybe 20 or something like that. Then in clarity also, a little bit of clarity. I'm going to add maybe 15 or something like that, I think. Yeah, this is good. It's getting very nice. You see here the sharpness of the grass even though it's under exposed, but don't worry, we'll fix everything. I want to add even the haze because I know more or less what I'm planning to do, what I want to do. The haze is going to give this little darkness, this little contrast in the dark parts and I love that, I like that. I think this is it with basic correction. As I told you, these vibrant saturation highlights, I would like to do it in the specific zones of the picture because if I do it in everything, I'm going to be affecting the sky and the sky is too white for what I want to do, so let's just leave it like that. We can always come back if we are not happy at the end. Let's go to some graduated filter. Let's do the sky now. Let's do a graduated filter. We click and drag down because we're going to mask the top. We click from here and we drag down. This is taking an angle like in the last editing. Remember you go to the center line, you go here and you see these two arrows. You can actually level it up. Now, you come here where it's the center, the black circle, you see the hand and then you start to move it because we just want the sky. There it's capturing the sky. Now, of course, you can see that it's capturing everything here, all the trees and everything, so what to do? I think you know already what to do. I can see that the exposure and saturation we reset these. Don't forget always to recheck that everything is reset. Then we come here to range mask where it says off, and we do luminance because we're going to actually look for the sky. We're going to mask just the sky and the sky is very highlighted. We want to mask what is highlight? What is the sky? We're going to go towards the left and you can see that actually the masking is starting to get better. We go a little bit more. Now, I think that just the sky is selected and this is what I want. Now I see that the smoothness in 50 and I think it's okay. I'm going to leave it like that. First thing to do, let's click "O" so we can see what we're going to do. First thing, I want a moody picture so I'm going to take out the exposure maybe to minus 20. Remember, we're just doing the sky. Minus 20, I think it's okay. It's a little bit darker. Then the highlights we're going to take out minus 44. Let's see. There is okay. Saturation. We want the sky to be white, not much color. I can see here there is a little bluish colors, or something like that. Let's take the saturation a little bit, let's go to minus 50 or somewhere there. Because I want to make the picture moody and orangey, I want to change the temperature. Let's go here in the temperature and let's put warmness. Let's go just a little bit, not too much because then we're going to keep fixing this. Let's go in 11, 12, there is okay. I want to dehaze also because the dehaze takes some highlights and give these little shadows surround. No? Let's do that. Let's add a little bit of the haze, maybe 15. You can see that it's changing the sky and I like that. Maybe a little bit less. There you go. No, here. Now what I want to do is to change the color of the sky. It's not going to change drastically because we have the smoothness in 50. Let's come here. Remember, I told you I want something very warm, so let's go to something orange somewhere here, I I know. Let's look for something orange. Let's see how it's going to look. You know what, let's click here 35. I like that. I like that. Let's make maybe better 37. I like that. Then saturation of this color that we just choose, let's do it stronger. I think that's too much. I think 88 is okay. There you go. We have the sky done. Now let's do another graduated filter, but now for the darker colors for the bottom. What we do is we come here to the top. We click "New." Still remember that even if we click "New," you can see that you can create a new one it's better to always reset the effect. Now we're going to start with a new one because we want to select the button. Instead of clicking and dragging down, let's click and drag up. Let's do it like this. There you go. Now we're selecting the button. This is not straight. Remember what to do it. You just go to any etches in the middle line and then you can straighten this up. Let's see. There you go. I think it's okay. Now let's press "O," so we see what are we selecting? I think it's okay, we can actually go a little bit higher. Now, I'm going to give a little bit more highlights and light up this part and take out the shadows. I don't care about these dark trees over here on the top because they are already highlighted, they have the sky towards them. This part is very dark and we're going to fix it. Let's come down and let's select the specifically what we want because you can see that it's actually select and also the sky. Let's do luminance again. But now we're going to do the opposite because we want to select actually the dark parts of the picture. We're going to go to the other side. There you go. You can see we are selecting the dark and the sky is not selected. I like that, that's what I want. Now, we're going to click "O," so we can see what we're going to do. I think we want exposure on the bottom. We're going to add some exposure. Let's come here to exposure. Here, let's add maybe, let's see 10, 20, 30, let's see how it looks. Maybe 0.40. There you go. Still underexposed, but don't worry, we still have some things to do. Let's take out some shadows, maybe like in 20 or let's see. Maybe there, there is okay. Remember that at the beginning, I said I want something moody and orangey, so I don't want like a lot of light and all these super illuminated. I want even to add some contrast here, even though we did already the curve, we can add a little bit always. Let's see, if it doesn't look good, we take it out. I think there is okay. Now, because this is grass and trees, I would like to add some sharpness. Let's go maybe in 20, maybe less, maybe there, I think there is okay, now, here, I want some color, so we're going to add some saturation. I think there is okay. I think we're done. We're done with the graduated filter. Let's click "Done." I would like to do some color grading before we do the HSL because I want to give some luminance to the colors. But first, let's go to the color grading, because this is the idea of this editing. We're going to create our own style. Like I said before, in the last full editing session, I like to give the color that I want to, the shadows and the highlights, and then the mid-tones do the opposite to give these contrasts. In this case, because I want this orangey and this autumn, moody colors, we're going to add oranges. We're going to give warmness to the picture. Let's go to this shadows, just a little bit. Also, in the highlights, just a little bit. Then here in the mid-tones, we're gonna go to the opposite, it would be blue. Let's take out these a little bit from the mid-tones. I think that is okay, we're creating colors now. We're going to now go to the HSL and give some luminance. We're going to add some highlights in the callers. The last thing before we say goodbye to color grading is the blending. I'm going to add a little bit of blending. Let me see what happen if I go too much in the other side, it's becoming everything orange. If I take all the side it becomes too bluish. Let's go like somewhere here, maybe 55. We can come here and type it and balance. Like I told you, I like to go all over. You see, you go from here, you go from here, you see it's completely the opposite. You just go a little bit. Maybe 10, you would be perfect. There you go. Then we can close the color grading, we're done with that. Let's go to the HSL, specific colors. First in the HSL, I want to give saturation. I want the colors to be, like I said in the beginning, orangey and these colors. We're going to go to the orange because we can see we already applied the warmness in the picture, so we can add some orange now in saturation, but it's just a little bit, not too much. We can go there. Not too much. Then we can add some yellows. There's not many, but they are somewhere there. You can see that there are some yellows. Let's go and let's add a little bit more than the orange, maybe like 20-something. I want these colors to pump up. Now we go to the green because this is supposed to be green, it still have some greens over here in the top. The green also, I want the greens to be stunning. Let's go to maybe 18. Picture is changing and I like it. I'm starting to like it a lot. I think this is okay with the saturation. Let's go to luminance. I'm not using the other colors because there's no much of those around this picture. Let's go to luminance. This is where we're going to start taking the colors and make them alive, giving them some light, some highlights. We're going to start with the yellow. Let's go like here. You see that it's lighting up a little. I want to go all the way to 100 percent. Actually, 100 percent, I like it. All of this part over here got better. I'm going to reset it so you can see what happened. It's a little darker, as soon as you do this, it's very nice, so I like it. Now let's do the same with the greens because the greens are not there anymore. There are not many greens anymore because we change the temperature. If we add some greens all the way to 100 percent, you can see that these little top of the trees over here and some here, it's starting to line up. Let's see. I think there's some aqua because there's always blue when you mix these colors. Let's go to the aqua maybe a little bit, or maybe not a little bit, maybe let's add a lot of aqua. Maybe over here, I can see the changes. I can see the changes and I like it. Every time you have grass like this and these green colors and yellow colors, for sure, you're going to have hidden colors there like the aqua, like these light-blue and colors like this. I know that because of experience. Now you know that every time you want to change some colors, give luminance or saturation, in the greens, you can play with the aqua so because there's some aqua around. Actually, let's go to saturation and let's see what happened. I can add some aqua also. There you go. I think we're done with the HSL. Let's close it. Now let's go to calibration here because I want to add some little tweaks, some little details there. When there is a lot of orangey colors, but you want to expose a little bit more the green, you can go towards the green. Let's add a little bit of green in the tint. Maybe like minus three, it's just a little bit of green. Every time you want to just recheck the picture, how is it going, you you press the backslash. Let's see how it was, is that you went to the park and took a picture, it's very simple. But then look how it is now. It's nice. Like I said when I started the editing, this is not going to be color correction, we're creating something, we're giving an emotion to the picture. That's why I'm using a lot of calibration and the color grading. We went to the tint in the shadows and we went towards the green, so it's minus five. Now let's go to the next colors. Let's see what can we do here. I think still, I want to change the hue of the greens. I think if I come here, this is the green, because I wanted this orangey, yellowish color and autumn color in the picture, I can change all the greens to a different hue. We're going to go maybe to minus, let's see. I think here is going to be okay. It's not going to be perfect green, it's going to be tending to yellow. Then to that hue, we're going to add a little bit of saturation, but not too much. Just a little bit, maybe eight or nine. Yeah. Let's put eight. For some reason, I said eight, Let's put eight. There you go. Now we can go to detail. As you can see here, it's not 100 percent sharp. We can add a little bit of sharpness, a little bit, just a little bit like maybe 50. You know that every time you add sharpness, I always add a little bit of noise reduction. So I'm going to add like a 13 or 12, maybe 15. There you go. I think I'm done here because the color is always in 25 by default and I like that is a perfect number, I think. Let's go now to effects to finish the picture. Let's add a little bit of vignetting, just a little bit. Maybe just a little bit, maybe minus five. I think we are okay with the vignetting. I think this is it. Let's click "L" to see how it looks, double L so we can see the picture properly. I like it, you know what? I maybe could add more exposure here on the button. But I like the idea that the button is not too exposed and then it starts to becoming more and more exposed towards the top of the picture. It's like a gradient exposure and I like that. I think I'm going to leave it like that. Yeah, we're done. Let's put them together to see how we started and how it is now. I like it. I think this is okay. This is what I wanted to do. It's perfect. It's amazing what you can do with Lightroom. 25. Project: For the project of this course, I want you to share with us a picture that you're editing using everything you learned in this course. You could even use one of the pictures we used in this course. Share with us your version of it. I'm looking forward to see all your creations. 26. Conclusion: Thank you for choosing me as a teacher. I'm very happy that you finished this course. You made it. Now there's no excuses. Now you have to start creating amazing pictures. I have more courses here in Skillshare, so you are welcome to check them out and also, I would like to invite you to follow me so that every time I post a new course, you will be notified. I would like to invite you also to check out my YouTube channel. I have a lot of tutorials there, and not just about photography, but also video editing and more. Thanks again and don't forget to leave me a rate or a review so that I can improve my courses. Also like this you are going to help other students to find the correct course for them. Until next time.