Bass Guitar - Bass MASTERY FROM THE BEGINNING - Beginner Bass from Scratch - Quick and Easy Bass | Lesson Pros | Skillshare

Bass Guitar - Bass MASTERY FROM THE BEGINNING - Beginner Bass from Scratch - Quick and Easy Bass

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157 Lessons (12h 17m) View My Notes
    • 1. Bass Guitar Class Introduction

      1:57
    • 2. Introduction - Bass Guitar

      0:04
    • 3. Bass Guitar Parts

      4:22
    • 4. Bass Guitar Technique

      3:45
    • 5. Right Hand Technique For Bass Guitar

      3:55
    • 6. Left Hand Technique for Bass Guitar

      2:16
    • 7. Tuning the Bass Guitar

      1:55
    • 8. Tune Your Bass Guitar G - Bass Guitar

      1:06
    • 9. Tune Your Bass Guitar D - Bass Guitar

      1:06
    • 10. Tune Your Bass Guitar A - Bass Guitar

      1:03
    • 11. Tune Your Bass Guitar E - Bass Guitar

      1:12
    • 12. Example - Strings and Alternating Fingers - Bass Guitar

      4:13
    • 13. Practice Lesson with Backing Track ss FA LECTURE 12

      3:29
    • 14. Practice with a Band Open G String 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:07
    • 15. Primary and Secondary Tones - Bass Guitar

      4:19
    • 16. Practice Session - Primary and Secondary Tones the 1 and 5 - Bass Guitar

      6:55
    • 17. Practice with a Band Open G String 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:07
    • 18. Example - C Chord - Bass Guitar

      8:16
    • 19. Practice Session G and C - Bass Guitar

      5:59
    • 20. Practice with A Band - G and C Bass Guitar 85 BPM

      4:58
    • 21. Example - D Chord - Bass Guitar

      1:48
    • 22. Practice Session G C D - Bass Guitar

      4:31
    • 23. Practice with a Band G C and D 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:54
    • 24. Open Position Key of A - Bass Guitar

      5:57
    • 25. Open Position E chord - Bass Guitar

      3:35
    • 26. Practice Session - A, D and E chord put together - Bass Guitar

      3:46
    • 27. Practice with a Band A D and E 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 28. Learn Notes up the Neck with The Bass Players Alphabet - Bass Guitar

      5:18
    • 29. Example - Open 1 - 4 and 5 In the Key of C - Bass Guitar

      5:39
    • 30. Practice Session - Open - 1 - 4 - 5 In the Key of C - Bass Guitar

      2:34
    • 31. Practice with a Band Open C 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 32. Example - Closed C - F - G - Bass Guitar

      6:15
    • 33. Practice Session - Closed Form C, F and G - Bass Guitar

      4:10
    • 34. Practice with a Band Closed C 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 35. Trick - Bass Guitar

      8:55
    • 36. Slides Practice with Backing Tracks - Bass Guitar

      4:04
    • 37. Practice with a Band Closed C 85 BPM With Slide Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 38. Example - Combining Open and Closed Forms - Key of C - Bass Guitar

      4:29
    • 39. Combining Open and Closed Practice with Backing Tracks

      3:27
    • 40. Practice with a Band Closed C 85 BPM Open and Closed Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 41. Example - Change Genre Country Effect Taps Dead Tones - Bass Guitar

      8:15
    • 42. Practice Session - Slapping and Muting Technique - Bass Guitar

      3:29
    • 43. Practice with a Band Country Tricks Key of C 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:59
    • 44. Example - Closed Pluck Slap - Bass Guitar

      3:46
    • 45. Practice Session - Closed Pluck Slap - Bass Guitar

      6:04
    • 46. Practice with a Band Country Tricks #2 Closed Key of C 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:59
    • 47. Open and Closed Key of D with Country Backing Track - Bass Guitar

      4:50
    • 48. Key of D Open and Closed Tapping and Muting with Country Backing Tracks - Bass Guitar

      3:52
    • 49. Practice with a Band Country Key of D Closed and Open 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 50. Exercise Chromatic Scale - Bass Guitar

      11:53
    • 51. Practice Exercise Chromatic Scale E - Bass Guitar

      5:33
    • 52. Practice Exercise Chromatic Scale A - Bass Guitar

      2:26
    • 53. Practice Exercise Chromatic Scale D - Bass Guitar

      2:16
    • 54. Practice Exercise Chromatic Scale G - Bass Guitar

      2:09
    • 55. Learning the 12 Bar Blues Chord Progression - Bass Guitar

      6:06
    • 56. Example - 8th Notes - Key of F - Bass Guitar

      8:31
    • 57. Classic Rock with Backing Track Key of F - Bass Guitar

      2:46
    • 58. Practice with a Band Classic Rock Key of F 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:01
    • 59. Closed Technique 8th Notes with Slap - Bass Guitar

      2:21
    • 60. Practice Exercise Closed Position Closed 8th Note Slap - Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 61. Practice with a Band Classic Rock Key of F 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:01
    • 62. 12 Bar Blues Key of Bb with Backing Track - Bass Guitar

      9:43
    • 63. 12 Bar Blues Practice Key of Bb with Backing Track - Bass Guitar

      5:34
    • 64. Practice with a Band Blues Key of Bb 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:01
    • 65. Example - Swing - Double Picking - 12 Bar Blues Key of A - Bass Guitar

      2:54
    • 66. Practice Session - 12 Bar Blues Key of A Double Picking Swing Style - Bass Guitar

      4:40
    • 67. Practice with a Band Swing Key of A 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:59
    • 68. Example - Hammer-ons and Tones - Bass Guitar

      9:30
    • 69. Practice Session - Key of A Hammer-ons - Bass Guitar

      3:43
    • 70. Practice with a Band Hammer Ons Acoustic Guitar Key A 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 71. Example - 2nd Finger Closed Scale Key of G - Bass Guitar

      4:09
    • 72. Practice Session - Closed 2nd Finger G Scale - Bass Guitar

      2:18
    • 73. Practice with a Band Closed 2nd Finger Scale Key G 95 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 74. Example - Closed Ab Scale - Variation - Bass Guitar

      1:14
    • 75. Practice Session - Closed Ab Scale Variation - Bass Guitar

      2:03
    • 76. Practice with a Band Closed Ab Key Ab 95 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 77. Example - Double Hammer on Key of D - Bass Guitar

      3:15
    • 78. Practice Session - Double Hammer on Key of D - Bass Guitar

      4:20
    • 79. Practice with a Band Double Hammer ons Key of D 95 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 80. Example - Closed C Scale with a new Trick - Bass Guitar

      1:58
    • 81. Practice Session Closed C Scale - Bass Guitar

      3:13
    • 82. Practice with a Band Closed C Key C 95 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 83. Closed C# Scale - Bass Guitar

      8:17
    • 84. Practices Session Closed C# Scale - Bass Guitar

      1:26
    • 85. Practice with a Band Closed C# Key C# 75 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:03
    • 86. Open G Scale - Bass Guitar

      7:05
    • 87. Open G with Backing Track - Bass Guitar

      1:58
    • 88. Practice with a Band Open G Key G 65 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:01
    • 89. Nashville Number System - Bass Guitar

      10:45
    • 90. 6th Chord - Bass Guitar

      2:35
    • 91. Practice Session 6th Chord - Bass Guitar

      2:58
    • 92. Practice with a Band Key of B 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 93. Exercise Everything we learned Key of C - Bass Guitar

      4:58
    • 94. Practice Session Key of C - Bass Guitar

      4:46
    • 95. Practice with a Band Key of C 85 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 96. CLASS TOOLS #1 - 60 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:58
    • 97. CLASS TOOLS #1 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:58
    • 98. CLASS TOOLS #1 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:55
    • 99. CLASS TOOLS #1 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:58
    • 100. CLASS TOOLS #2 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:55
    • 101. CLASS TOOLS #2 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 102. CLASS TOOLS #2 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:58
    • 103. CLASS TOOLS #2 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:54
    • 104. CLASS TOOLS #3 - 60 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:55
    • 105. CLASS TOOLS #3 - 80 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 106. CLASS TOOLS #3 - 100 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:58
    • 107. CLASS TOOLS #3 - 120 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:54
    • 108. CLASS TOOLS #4 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:59
    • 109. CLASS TOOLS #4 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:59
    • 110. CLASS TOOLS #4 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:59
    • 111. CLASS TOOLS #4 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 112. CLASS TOOLS #5 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:59
    • 113. CLASS TOOLS #5 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 114. CLASS TOOLS #5 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:59
    • 115. CLASS TOOLS #5 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:58
    • 116. CLASS TOOLS #6 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 117. CLASS TOOLS #6 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 118. CLASS TOOLS #6 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 119. CLASS TOOLS #6 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar

      5:00
    • 120. CLASS TOOLS #11 - 60 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:55
    • 121. CLASS TOOLS #11 - 80 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:55
    • 122. CLASS TOOLS #11 - 100 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:59
    • 123. CLASS TOOLS #11 - 120 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:56
    • 124. CLASS TOOLS #12 - 60 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 125. CLASS TOOLS #12 - 80 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 126. CLASS TOOLS #12 - 100 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 127. CLASS TOOLS #12 - 120 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:58
    • 128. CLASS TOOLS # 13 - 60 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:56
    • 129. COURSE TOOLS #13 - 80 BPM - Bass Guitar

      10:28
    • 130. CLASS TOOLS # 13 - 100 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 131. CLASS TOOLS # 13 - 120 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 132. CLASS TOOLS #14 - 60 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:55
    • 133. CLASS TOOLS #14 - 80 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 134. CLASS TOOLS #14 - 100 BPM - Bass Guitar

      4:55
    • 135. CLASS TOOLS #14 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:55
    • 136. CLASS TOOLS #15 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 137. CLASS TOOLS #15 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 138. CLASS TOOLS #15 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:56
    • 139. CLASS TOOLS #15 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 140. CLASS TOOLS #16 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:58
    • 141. COURSE TOOLS #16 - 80 BPM - Bass Guitar

      10:07
    • 142. CLASS TOOLS #16 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:58
    • 143. CLASS TOOLS #16 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 144. CLASS TOOLS #17 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:58
    • 145. CLASS TOOLS #17 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:59
    • 146. CLASS TOOLS #17 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 147. CLASS TOOLS #17 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 148. CLASS TOOLS #18 - 50 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:58
    • 149. CLASS TOOLS #18 - 70 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 150. CLASS TOOLS #18 - 90 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 151. CLASS TOOLS #18 - 110 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 152. CLASS TOOLS #19 - 50 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 153. CLASS TOOLS #19 - 70 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 154. CLASS TOOLS #19 - 90 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:58
    • 155. CLASS TOOLS #19 - 110 BPM Bass Guitar

      4:57
    • 156. Final Thoughts - Bass Guitar

      0:50
    • 157. Thank you

      0:18
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About This Class

Beginner Bass Guitar - Bass MASTERY FROM THE BEGINNING Bass

Beginner Bass Guitar - Start Bass from Scratch - The most In depth Beginner Bass course online - Bass Guitar Lessons

Why take a Bass Guitar course from this guy?

My passion is inspiring others to feel more confident in themselves and their bass playing. After years of  performing and teaching bass guitar all over the US. at workshops, out of my home and through multiple schools, I was asked by many of my students to make bass guitar videos of my teaching style. So here is the result.

I hope you will join me on the inside of this bass guitar course where you will learn some awesome bass guitar secrets

Building a strong Bass Guitar foundation:

  • For the beginner bass guitar players who would like to learn and/or improve their bass skills

  • Learn your basics - I will teach you a shortcut way to play bass guitar to make it easier to learn bass guitar faster. Every Detail will be broken down and explained in easy to understand parts to help you succeed at bass guitar. 

  • You will learn everything to get you started on bass guitar.

  • You'll learn how to play bass guitar in time with real musicians in backing tracks, just like playing with a real band. It makes learning fun and effortless, because you're having fun while you're learning.

  • You'll learn intermediate and some advanced bass guitar stuff as well in this course, so there will be something for everyone.

Who is the target audience for this Bass Guitar course?

  • Anyone interested in learning bass guitar

  • Anyone who wants to play bass guitar and enhance their playing

  • Anyone who's never started playing bass guitar or those who have started and failed

  • Those who play bass guitar now but wish it was better

  • Those who are ingrained in the way they taught themselves bass guitar, but realize now that they need to go back and re-learn bass guitar the correct way.

  • Great for all ages - Kids and Adults too

Bass Guitar Course that's filled with all the information you need to succeed.

  • All these bass guitar videos are all broken down to the smallest detail. This course is geared to a person who has never attempted to play bass guitar. If you are a current bass guitar player and have experience, and it's too broken down for you, simply increase the speed of the video to skim over the topics and discussion points, and/or skip to a video that more suits your needs.

Questions       

Feel free to send me any questions you might have on this bass guitar course. I want to make your learning experience the best that it can be.

Thanks         

Thanks for taking the time to look at this Beginner Bass Guitar - Bass MASTERY FROM THE BEGINNING Bass course. I look forward to seeing you on the inside and teaching you how to be a better bass guitar player. 
Chuck Millar       


Beginner Bass Guitar - Bass MASTERY FROM THE BEGINNING Bass
Beginner Bass Guitar - Start Bass from Scratch - The most In depth Beginner Bass course online - Bass Guitar Lessons

Transcripts

1. Bass Guitar Class Introduction: - my name's Chuck Millar, and I've built this course from the very beginning from the ground up. So if you've never played a bass before, you've never held one before. You maybe have only heard one on the radio. This course is right for you. I started the very beginning and add little bidding building blocks along the way to increase our agility, our ability to play fun things on the base in all the way until the end, until we can play successfully as a bass player. If you've never played the bass before, this course is right for you. If you started to play the bass but are lacking confidence or lacking direction, where to go to make your bass playing better? This course is right for you if you've played bass before, but you really want toe, just learn a bunch of cool stuff. This course is the right course for you. So wherever you're at in your base studies, there's something here for you. There's a lot of content to go through, and I'm excited to teach it to you. So if you're willing and you're ready, I'll see you inside 2. Introduction - Bass Guitar: my name's Chuck Millar, and I'll be your instructor through this course. 3. Bass Guitar Parts : welcome to this. Beginner base scores. Today we're gonna be learning the basics of the parts of our bass guitar. And the first thing that we have to know is that it's a base. It has four strings. Although they make guitars with more strings than four will be focused solely on the fourth string bass for this class. In a basic electric bass guitar set up, we have our bridge, our pickups, our volume control and our tone control our input, Jack, for our cable that of course, you have these strings. And so far, what we're gonna learn is some basic stuff about these strings. We have our first string, this little bitty string. The second string, the third string in the big string, is the fourth string. They'll have names later, but for right now, let's just get associated with a calling them the first during the second string, the third string and the fourth string. You also have these metal things that are raised up there called frets and ah, they're responsible for when the the note is pushed down with a finger, you can I hear that metallic sound that's the middle on the metal the string metal on the front metal, and it's important that tone later ticking sound. The's friends help us be in tune when we play. Next, we have our nut. This white thing that you see appeared. It looks almost like thes frets, but it's a different material, and it helps hold the strings up and allows our strings to vibrate. Then we have our tuning pegs. This is our head stuck and are tuning pegs. You can also call these tuning machines, and they call them tuning machines because there's a gear back here that you can't see because they're covered in that gear and their helps us be able to tune our guitar slower and more in tune. Then we would if they didn't have a gear in them. We also have the neck. The neck starts here on this bolt on neck, and the neck goes all the way up to this nut and continues on through the head stock and its bold on you can see because of these little screws in this little box, you take this little panel off and you unscrew these screws and this neck would simply just come right off. It becomes helpful to have a bolt on that for a lot of different reasons. There's different types of Nick's, um, four bases, but since this is the base that we have right now, that's what we're discovering. Okay, let's review. We have the main body of our bass guitar, the pickups, the tone control, the volume control, the bridge, our frets, thes metal things that go pinned down our first string, our second string, third string and fourth string. Our head stock, which contains our, uh, tuning pegs and our nut that raises the strings. That some other things that you're gonna need for this base course is your guitar cable is gonna plug in from your input on your base. On the other end is going to go to the input on your bass AMP. If you find that you can't get your hands on a bass AMP. And you have to use a guitar, amp no worries. There's going to be three dials. One of them will say base. One of them will say trouble, and one of them will say mids simply turned the trouble down a little bit. Your mids down a little bit and you base up a little bit, and you should be able to hear you base just fine. When you're confident about the different parts of the base and you're already and set up to go, we'll see you in the next lesson. 4. Bass Guitar Technique : welcome back, and the first thing that we're gonna learn is just some proper technique about how to hold our guitar. And typically you'll see a lot of bass players have a strap coming from this knob coming around the shoulder and then attaching to this non for aesthetics in Not to get in the way of this mike. I've decided not to wear a base strapped for this session. When you do set up your base strap, make sure that it's the same length as you feel uncomfortable sitting down in a chair as I am right now, let's get started by talking about proper technique. Now, when we talk about proper technique, I'm specifically talking about our right arm and right hand. If you're left handed. No worries. Just think about when I say the right hand. You think of the left hand and vice versa. If you are left handed, you'll have to get a left handed base, and it will simply be turned around. Since most of us who are going to be taking this course are right handed will consider that the right hand is the right hand. The left hand is the left hand But what am I going to do with this right hand? It's right hand is simply about midway through of the arm between where the wrist is and the elbow is You're going to set it down right about here on your guitar. Now, this base, the style of this base has a little bit of a fold back on it. And you can kind of see that they're the The light's hitting it just right where you can see that little bend. And that's pretty much where you're putting your arm, this forum and the bottom of your forearm. And when you do that, you're gonna make sure that the rest of your fingers are just falling down, just kind of hang in there and notice they're not having any tension in the fingers. So attention would mean they're tight like this and they're squished or they're far apart and they're still attention. There were looking for us. You're not gonna wanna have any tension whatsoever in your fingers, and they just kind of hanging down there. The next thing we're gonna do is we're gonna take our thumb and place it somewhere on our bass guitar. But for right now and we're just beginning. We can place our thumb on a few different places, and you can place it on this top coil pickup, or you can take and make it a little easier on yourself. For some folks who have longer arms, folks of shorter arms tended gravitate towards these pickups. Some of them put it on the edge of the fingerboard. And this fingerboard has this little edge here, and sometimes it's a good spot to put your thumb. For those of us that have a hard time putting on the top of this coil pickup for the edge of the fingerboard, simply just set it down and planted anywhere that feels comfortable for you. For those of us who really, really big hands, much bigger hands. And I have sometimes the thumb is placed on the top of this white piece here on your bass guitar. So wherever it's comfortable for you, for me, I'm just gonna hang out back here on the top of this coil pickup. Now, notice if I touch this coil pickup, it's not gonna make any noise. If I hit it really loud, it'll make some noise. But we're not really worried about that because our main performance comes out of our base camp 5. Right Hand Technique For Bass Guitar: Let's get ready to learn proper right hand technique. Now, when we're learning proper rank and technique, know that there's a lots of ways toe have right hand technique. What we're gonna cover in this course covers about 90% of all base plane. No, keep in mind. Like I said, even though we're gonna use a two finger sliding technique, there are other uses. Four different versions of playing. In fact, when you're in a recording studio or as a studio musician, Lee a specific sound. What a bass sounds like plucked with your fingers. Here's the same thing with a pick I noticed they have a really different sound. Sometimes in a recording studio, one sound is better than the other. When we use the pads of our fingers the soft, pliable parts of our fingers we get a different sound than using the edges of our fingers. If we use the edges of my fingers, are the tips no sound like this? It's very common for a beginning bass player to feel like they need to pick physically, pick the strings instead of roll their fingers off, and we're going to shy away from that at this moment because we're learning the basics of playing the bass later on, you'll actually use it for course. So even though there are uses for just about any way to play the bass, we're gonna be really specific and saying that we're going to use the pads of our fingers. So our first step to understand what that means is we're going to take the thumb implant where? Replant it. It doesn't matter where Planet could be here. Could be here. Could be here. Could be anywhere on our on our bass guitar. What matters that your thumb, this planet just kinds of stays there. One of the things that we're gonna think about when we place her thumb is that the angle of our thumb is flat. So our thumb doesn't Curlin and give, uh, extra attention where we don't need it to. So flatten that thumb out wherever you decide to put it, and will be okay for now. So the other thing that we're gonna think about is we're going to touch our strings with the pads of our fingers. So when I talk about the pads were talking about this meaty part of our finger versus the very tips. So our thumb is gonna go down wherever goes down, and then we're simply going to touch the pads on the strings. So once we have the pads on the strings, it doesn't matter what string it's gonna be for right now. Uh, but now we kind of know what that feels like. And what we're gonna do is we're just gonna do, Ah, pre based techniques are not really playing or base yet, but what we're doing is we're just sliding the fingers across the strings. We're not really trying to make noises quite yet with our base, but we're just sliding the fingers across the strings and we're starting at the lowest strings of the lowest to the ground. The first string, and we're just coming up and just sliding it across the strings. So once you're comfortable sliding your fingers on the pads across the strings, we'll see you in the next lesson. 6. Left Hand Technique for Bass Guitar: Now that we know how to place our right hand and right arm on our base, we need to figure out what to do with our left hand. So the first thing that we're gonna do is we're gonna take our left arm and her left hand and simply extended out as if you were shaking somebody's hand. The difference between shaking somebody's hand and how we want to have our hand is take a thumb in, turn it outwards away from your body just a little bit. And what we're looking for is the point that touches our base to be right there the tip of our finger, this knuckle, this knuckle, the back nickel. And this is kind of where we're looking for. You should see little crease. And depending on where her hand growth is, if we have little hands, we might be back here little ways. If we have a gigantic hands like that could be back up your ways. So know that it can change depending on your hand size. But for me, it's right about there. And if I have my hand out and I think of that little spot that's right there, I'm simply going to touch my bass with that part of my hand. That's important at this time that your hand doesn't try to grab the neck of the guitar at this point, right? All we're trying to do is take your hand, have it out like that, think of the spot and then touch your guitar. That's it. So practice touching your guitar without getting your hands toe. Want to try to grab or curl around because it's a pretty human thing toe Want to do? Once you ready getting your hand in position, Just leave it there and then simply set your thumb down on the top of the bass guitar and then your fingers get curl around and then they touch the strings somewhere. It doesn't matter what front right now. It doesn't matter what string right now. They're just curled around a little bit. Once you have your right arm in place in your left arm and hand in place and you feel comfortable to move on. We'll see you in the next lesson. 7. Tuning the Bass Guitar: we're gonna be tuning our base and you'll want to try to get Elektronik tuner to tune your bass. And there's lots of great resource is on how to tune your bass with an electronic tuner for right now. Since this course is offered across the world, there's lots of folks that don't have Elektronik tuners. So we're going to be using our ear to match your base at home to this base here. Some basic things about two in your your base. Is that the tuning peg that's nearest our body. Tombs string. Biggest strength 2nd 1 away from our body. So 1st 1 second one, this one turns our third string and then I go one down more sort tours second string to our first string, so it just goes down the line to furthest away is no. 1234 If I tune, turn these counterclockwise, another going counterclockwise. That means they're increasing the tension on the base so that the Internation comes up to pitch with too high, and you need to de tune it or make the strings go looser. You'll tune the strings or the tuning peg counterclockwise, and that will make the pitch go lower. So in these next videos, you'll be hearing me play simply big long notes for you to have the opportunity to tune your bass guitar. 8. Tune Your Bass Guitar G - Bass Guitar: tuning note G The first string open Oh, do you thing is your opportunity to tune your bass guitar Oh oh, you 00 oh oh! 9. Tune Your Bass Guitar D - Bass Guitar: tuning note. D The second string open. Uh oh. Uh uh uh uh uh. 10. Tune Your Bass Guitar A - Bass Guitar: tuning note A the open third string. 11. Tune Your Bass Guitar E - Bass Guitar: tuning Note E your fourth string open Oh! 12. Example - Strings and Alternating Fingers - Bass Guitar: welcome back, and this is the first time we actually get to player base For the first time, we're gonna work on this little bitty string, and that string is called G. That's the name of it. The G string. Our thumb is going to go where wherever he wanted to go, as long as it's flat. And then these two fingers are going to go down to that first strength and noticed that my fingers are not completely flat down, not 100% pointing down to the ground, but they're just in a little bit of an angle. There's times when I want to use my fingers completely flat, but for us it's more ergonomic to have a little bit of an angle, so your fingers point in a little bit towards the middle of your body slightly. Okay, so the first pluck that we're going to do when I say pluck it's really that slide across the strings versus a plug. Ooh. So slide those pads across the strings, slide the pads across the strings. No, When we do this, we're going toe alternate. Our fingers were going to call this our index finger and your middle finger or first finger or second finger, and that's the standard terminology that will use. We'll take your middle finger first, so I kind of always goes first on base and we're gonna go middle finger followed by index finger. This is what your fingers will look like up close. First, the middle finger extends out and then plucks in. At that point as that plucks in your first finger or index finger will be jettisoned out, pull back and pluck the string and out. So both of them are moving at the same time, so one doesn't move, and then the other moves is simply the culmination of both doing the same thing. So middle finger goes out. It plucks in as it plucks in your first, but your grows out, ready to pluck so plucks and then the middle fingers out and ready to pluck and then happens over again. Kind of like a cyclist or swimmer kicking little different with a swimmer kicking more like , uh uh, two different orbital movements with your fingers came Now. Now that we know how that works, we're just gonna practice, uh, with our thumb in the right spot and then our arm so our middle finger goes out and reaches . The same thing happens with my index finger and my ring finger, and I just repeat so middle finger index finger and you notice the one that you look like that's moving. When I say middle finger, it's the one that plucks So middle finger pie Lux for index finger dread is's out. Index finger comes in, middle finger jettisons out. Middle finger comes in plucks index fingers, Edison's out, the first finger comes in and plucks and and the middle finger jettisons out, and we simply turn back and force a middle. 234 index. 234 Middle 234 index 234 Middle 234 index 234 All right, when you feel comfortable using your middle finger and your index finger, alternating them back and forth to try to do it in slow motion, if you can do it in slow motion, it's always easier to do it in fast motion when we get up to speed. So once you feel comfortable with using the first drink, alternating your index finger and your middle finger, we'll see you in the next lesson. 13. Practice Lesson with Backing Track ss FA LECTURE 12: Welcome back now what's gonna happen? It's on long to include a backing track right after this lesson. So this is a practice lesson, and we're hearing that backing track in this lesson. We're practicing with it once we're done with this practice session, so I'm teaching you how to practice along with it. Then you will take some time and you'll play that backing track and play along with it for us, long as it possibly can. The longer a practice, the easier it is to get us to where we want to go the fastest. So here we go. What's gonna happen is you're gonna hear too long. Clicks click Click, followed by four faster clicks, so you have the long click click click than faster clicks. Click, click, click, click. When we hear those faster clicks, we're gonna count in our heads or out loud. 1234 Now we'll play this G tone, the first string open without any fingers on our friends at all, and we're going to play starting with our middle finger on the 1st 1 So click click won t 341234 Then switch on the next 1123412341234 Okay, so when you're ready, um, you can always pause this while you get ready. If this is moving too slow for you at any time, there's a spot in the lower left hand side of your screen where you can speed up the video . What's moving too fast? You can simply, uh, take that a speed and moving at a slower speed. So however you need to learn there's tools for you in that bottom left hand part of your screen disputed up or slow it down. So here we go. Slow earns 1234 Middle finger one index finger. One one Next one three index 1111231 one. I think this is the last time. Great job. Now that we know how to play along with that backing track, move onto the next video where the backing track is and practices much as you can. Once you're done, we'll see you back at the next lesson. 14. Practice with a Band Open G String 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute? Yes. In this case. Here? In this case. That is it. Yes. Here it is. And this is what this is. 15. Primary and Secondary Tones - Bass Guitar: Welcome back. We're gonna be discussing primary and secondary tones. So the only tone that we know so far on the base is this Jew tone. The first string that's open and there's lots of secondary tones that we possibly could play. But what do you first start out? We think of the five as a secondary tone, and in this case, the five of G or one of the fives of G. The one that we're gonna play is the open second string. So here's the primary tone, the open string followed by the secondary tone, the second string. So again, the primary tone is the first train, and in the secondary tone is the second straight open. There's some rules to this primary and secondary tone. If we're using alternating fingers like we just learned how to do, our middle finger will be in charge of the bottom string. The first string and our index finger or fingers First finger will be in charge of our second string. There's another thing that's gonna happen. Our left hand hasn't had to do much quite yet, and we're gonna talk about left hand muting. So what happens is if I want a tone to stop bringing. I simply let my fingers and barely touch the strings. There's curls in your fingers. There's can be space in between them. If there's if your fingers or flat there flat against the strings, there's no space. Can't even fit a sheet of paper in there. Now here's the thing that's that's gonna happen when we do muting were wanting to be able to put a small amount of pressure, the least amount of pressure because we don't want your note. We want to hear a dead tone. So what's gonna happen is I'm gonna take my middle finger and I'm gonna play that open first. String that G tone and then the fingers are gonna collapse on the strings, barely touching because one hand one and where those fingers come down on the strings On the end one hand, 11 When we do the right hand muting along with our exercise that we're going to do, we're going to do the primary tone encountered as 1234 just like we did in the past. But it's gonna look like this one meat. Then, after my middle finger gets done, plucking my index finger will now pluck the second string. And I will go three mute. So look like this in conjunction one of you to Butte. One new to mute, one new to Newt, one mute to food. We're gonna count it a little slower than what our practice exercises. Just to get the right idea one to three, four, plug, lead, pluck, middle finger, mute index finger, second finger index vendor plug. You'd plug, need plug, mute pluck. All right. Gets in practice. And you can do it really slow to, like, pluck who moved, pluck. However, you need to build it comfortable with it and slowly build up your speed to the speed that we're doing it here in this lesson. Take the time to do so and we'll see you in the practice session. 16. Practice Session - Primary and Secondary Tones the 1 and 5 - Bass Guitar: welcome back to this practice session. So what we've done so far is we've learned how to alternate. Our fingers are middle finger than our index finger, and now we will also learn our primary tone and her second Terry's tone. We called it the open string and the second stream, but we also called it the one in the five. The reason why it's a one or five is because they're notes in a scale. If I went Dole Remy s so and I counted them 12345 our second tone that I end up on 12345 that open string that open second string. That's the five tone of the he M. Jean, because I had my note that I started thinking with a G g a B c D happens to be a d tone eso that's the next thing we're gonna learn is this open second string is our D string. It's also the five of G 12345 So that's one way we could get to it, and we don't necessarily have to know how to do that. We just have to understand how I got there to be able to understand what a five means versus needing to play the scale on your base. That's all we need to understand. Right now we can also get there by going from our one or our G tone that we started on and I can sing backwards the scale Doughty lost. So now I sing it a little out of tune. But I think you get the idea right. So is long as I understand that this is a dough and this is a So I also understand that this is also means it's a one out of 51 being the dough, So being doh ray me fast. So five Right now I'm gonna count these as one mute one, 12341234 So the one gets a tone. The two gets a mute, the three with the other finger, the index finger gets a tone and the next beat is four and it gets a mute one. Newt three meat. 123412341234 All right. Just like before. We're going to play a backing track, and I'm gonna help you practice a lot with it right now to get you up to speed. And after this lesson is the backing track by itself. And that gives you an opportunity to play along in practice without me talking over it. Okay, here we go. We're gonna hear too long. Clicks, tick, Think. Then tick, tick, tick. Faster ones. And those are accounts that will actually count out loud. 1234 at the end of those four, the musical start, and then we'll start practice along. And if you feel like you need to watch me do some of that practice for a while before you, um, you come in, that's totally fine. Watch for a little while, get your bearings. And if for some reason you like, I just don't know, just go back to the beginning of this video, go back to the beginning and then watch it from the beginning. Or watch it from when those first clicks come in and then start again. All right, here we go. Here's the two long ones. Fast, fast, fast. Next primary, Secondary primary, secondary Primary, secondary Primary Secondary. First ring. Second string, first string, second string, first drink, Second string first string seconds from going primary secondary middle finger in next year's open straining first string. Second string. Remember your bucket like a slide off straight. Going again? You feel 13 at any moment. Go ahead and stop, but you can power through it. He's going. It's on. All right, great jobs. Here's the last one word done. 17. Practice with a Band Open G String 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute? Yes. In this case. Here? In this case. That is it. Yes. Here it is. And this is what this is. 18. Example - C Chord - Bass Guitar: we know how to do our open G chord, the open the primary, followed by the secondary or R one and R five. Now you notice that it was an open string. No fingers in the five is right above where the one is. So the one is an open, and I'm pointing to the nut, exclaiming that it's an open just means there's no fingers, right? So it's an open, which is the one, and the five exists directly above it, with also no fingers. This happens over and over and over and over again on the base. So doesn't matter what court I'm playing. If this happens to be the one on the first, fret if we follow the same logic. I go up one string to the second string and also play first finger on the first Reckoned that is my five, so it doesn't matter where I am. So let's say I'm on the third string here, and I'm pretending that that is a one. My five will also be the exact same way. It's now the very next ring above where that was on the same fret saying finger. Another is also five, so it's just a common thing that happens on the base over and over again. We're going to use this commonality in a C chord. So we've learned G primary secondary 15 And now we're going to move to using our third finger third finger zehr ring finger. So our fingers have members. The thumb doesn't get a number, But this is my first finger, second finger, third finger and fourth finger. What's gonna happen is I'm gonna find my third string 123 That's the third biggest string that we have. It's happened to be known as an a string This a string If I go up to the third fret is going to be a C tone a B flat B c chromatic Lee speaking if you know anything about, uh, music theory and we'll learn a little bit more about that later. But right now, just know that the third fret these metal things the third fret with the third finger third finger on the third string A is called a C. It's see tone. Now what's gonna happen is I'm going to get this finger all the way up to the front and touch it so it's not going to be in the middle friend middle of the front, so notice that there's two parts of the front on both sides and space in between the middle . We don't want to see space, so we're going to slide it up and touch the front. This is gonna happen again. Were the hand touches, the fingers curl around? We're making sure that there's space in between where the fretboard is in my hand. So there's some space there. We're making sure that the part where the pinky touches isn't going to come up and touch the instrument. We wanna have some space there in the most open my hand. You still see that kind of a 45 degree angle from with your hand. It's very important. Now. Notice that when I have my third finger over this third finger, this guy right here, the ring finger. You can also see that the finger is coming in at a 45 degree angle. It's not straight up in the air, it's not towards the strings that's halfway between, so make sure that your fingers are also at a 45 degree angle with our C chord. Our primary note of C is C. It's the third finger on the third string of the A string, just as if I played my G chord with my primary with my middle finger and my secondary tone with my index finger. The same thing was gonna happen with this C chord. So my middle finger on my right hand is going to pluck or slide off the strings with a C tone. The thing that's gonna happen now it's a little different to mute. This note is, I'm gonna lift up pressure someone to pluck lift up the pressure and it stops reading. It's really important that this finger doesn't lift up all the way off the strings because you'll get a different tone. The wall wall Now again when I pressed down and I play the seat Oh, it's simply just going to alleviate all the pressure and ST on the string. It's gonna mute string. All right, so I'm going to play that primary tone, see, and then go, as I did on my G string goes straight up straight up over to the next front, the exact same front, but on the next string up. So I'm not playing the third fret of my fourth string and that'll be my secondary tone happens to be a G tone. So, Juan playing see mute g mute that muted again is just lifting up slightly Still having contact with the finger on the string. So I'm pressing down, making sure that it's my middle finger I pressed down, get a good tone I'm you'd it by just alleviating pressure And then my index finger is now on my fourth string Third fret playing that g tone the third front of the fourth string And then it alleviates pressure and I muted So it looks like this really slow pluck Newt Pluck , mute, middle finger in next finger, second finger. First finger See tone mute G tone mute. See tone Newt G tone need If I was gonna count just like I did the G string 1234 I'm going to do the same, but I'm gonna pluck counting as one, do them you just to gonna pluck again that lower tone. That secondary tone has three. And then the mute is four. So it's gonna be this. 12341234123412341234 So, just as a quick exercise, let's go ahead and do it together. I'm gonna count. 1234123412341234 In the next practice session will be going back and forth between the G chord and the C chord. Jean on now the sea. All right, when you're ready and you get really comfortable with that See, uh, go ahead and load of the next lesson. 19. Practice Session G and C - Bass Guitar: welcome back and we're almost ready to do some practice. Let's just go over one last time before we hit the play button with the backing track. Simply, you're going to hear the too slow beats tick than four fast speeds to at first bet Beat is gonna be. Then base no middle finger, followed by a mute, followed by index finger second string, followed by a meat to the 1234 That happens four times in a row now. So there's four measures in this structure. Well, there's four beats in a measure, so 1234123412341234 For all of that time, you plain gene Primary secondary Primary secondary. Second measure of primary, secondary, primary, secondary and so on. And so forth for those four beats a 1234123412341234 That whole time, period. Then we're gonna move to see so we have our third finger on the third fret all the way. I've been touching not on top of it, but right behind it and still touching. And I'm gonna go back and forth between C and G, the primary or the secondary or the one of the five, as we've determined before and our mean structure is a little bit different. Instead of tapping slightly on the strings, we just lift up the strings and stop the vibration from vibrating. So it's gonna look like this one, too. 341 you to be 23 and then you would before and that happens again four times one, 123412341234123 For that whole stretch of time for four cycles of four. All right, when you're ready, we're gonna begin two peas that are slow and for bees that are fast A little Now, - Okay , great job. The video after this is simply a backing track so that you can practice without me talking and trying to give instruction and practice. With that, um, it's at 85 beats per minute. And at the bottom of this course, there's faster tracks and slower tracks of this and the ones we worked with before, along with backing tracks that will use in the future. So, um, practice a lot. Get some good working, and we'll see you in the next lesson. 20. Practice with A Band - G and C Bass Guitar 85 BPM: 85 beats per minute. And okay. Okay. Okay. Yes. Okay. Yes. 21. Example - D Chord - Bass Guitar: Welcome back. Now we know our g chord r c chord Now we're gonna learn our d chord. Now, when we do our dick order is gonna be very similar to the G chord where we had to open strings and those two open strings that we had for G We're the first ring and the second string The D chord is simply the open d string in the open a string So my primary is D that second string open and then my secondary tone or my five So my one or my primary my secondary arm a five is gonna be the A string open or the third string open And much as before I did the mute by take my fingers and setting them down on the string was trying not to create a percussive sound, but just setting them down in the strings. Uh, I was able to achieve my mute for G, and we're going to use the exact same mannerism for De if this was G. Mm. The same thing is gonna happen for D, except it's the to middle strings this time D string a string d string a string d mute a mute denude pain you'd still using our two fingers and alternating the middle than index middle and index. In the next lesson, we're gonna be working with another backing track, but using all three chords this time G, c and D looking forward too excited about it, and we'll see you in the next lesson. 22. Practice Session G C D - Bass Guitar: welcome back. And now we're ready to do our practice Exercise where we're doing G see And then D so again RG waas do you? Then we have our c chord and our meat is simply just lifting up those fingers just a little bit to stop the string from vibrating but not all the way off the string And you're still taking your fingers and your going middle Index middle index The last thing we're gonna do is do our new chord D and oh, just like G has that silent tap for the mute. So it goes like this through the whole song G c d g c d g c D g CD all the way through the song. So get yourself ready. You need the positive video. Just pause the video. And when you're ready to play again and will continue, remember, there's four measures of each. Get ready for Dean G. Last measure C way back to Jean. Here's D last time. Great work. This next video is simply again the backing track without me doing instruction so you can get some good practicing by yourself. We'll see you in the next lesson 23. Practice with a Band G C and D 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute, right? Good. Sure. Yes. In this case. 24. Open Position Key of A - Bass Guitar: welcome back, and now we can play in the key of G playing open chords. Now the term Open simply means five play an open note, its primary tone and then it's secondary tone. And remember when he played in the key of G. We also played this C chord. So whether or not it's an open string or it's not, it's still what we're gonna call an open position. That's just the term that describes that movement. One to the five onto the five. One day the five doesn't matter where it is, it's still an open position. Now that we have that terminology down, let's move to the key of a The three chords that we're gonna be playing really are those same open position chords that we've been playing. But they're in a little different spots on our bass guitar and we're discovering are open a string That's the one to third string open, and then we're also going to be using our D string open second string open. We're also going to use the D string again. That's that second string. But now the second fret first finger. Okay, so there's some other things that we have to discuss, too, because we're playing the bass. We've will start toe, integrate some music theory into the base. And we're gonna bring you along really slow with that music theory because too much can be overwhelming. The only thing that we're gonna discuss for right now and what we're about to go over still applies to that key of G that we played before. But we're expressing the the learning part or aspect now in the key of a Okay, so here we go. A is the first note in my scale because I'm in the key of a Now if I went a and then B and then see you, Andy and Andy in an F and so on what I would need to know off what my chords are. And in the beginning, when you start to play, the bass you play was called the one chord, The four chord, And then the five chord. The first note of my scale. Because I'm in the key of a would be naturally a. And then I think of what my other notes are and I go with a is one B is too, See, actually a C sharp when I'm not worried about that right now, So a B c d. So I've now I found my four a b c d d is my four chord That means my open string d and then five a b c d e e is my five chord So five being e I'm going to play either this open sounding string. But since I don't know how to play a close position yet, I'm gonna play this open e note my first finger on the second fret of the D string. So my example Oven accord would be first my middle finger on a And what do you suppose my five of a would be That's going to be the note directly above where it will be. So this is also my five tone of a so it's gonna look like this middle finger, followed by index finger, third string, followed by fourth string and that little mute that we did by taking our fingers and putting them down on the strings, stopping the vibration So it goes like this middle finger mute index finger mute, middle finger mute, and this is gonna be your record. All right, so that's our accord. The next court that we're gonna learn is our D card, which is our d string open and notice this that all has the same feature with it. Open sounding chords is that if I have a d the very next note that I play for my secondary if I play my primary is gonna be straight up, up towards the ceiling, that string and that's gonna be open to So my five tone of D is a so I have ah, open second string open, third string open, second string open, third string. And of course I'm alternating those fingers, so it's gonna be middle finger index finger, middle finger index finger, and then the same thing happens with my mute. It's that pad pluck, mute, pluck, mute, pluck, mute, pluck, mute. Okay, so what we're gonna do in the next exercise is we're going to go over our e chord and then put it all together so we'll see you in the next lesson. 25. Open Position E chord - Bass Guitar: welcome back and we're gonna go over our e chord, put it all together. One thing that will really want to discuss is the actual term of a chord. Now, when we played the bass, it's very rare that we actually play chords because cords require three notes, a Route three and five and most the time we're playing one note single note at a time. So even though we're calling these cords, they're not actually cores. We're just playing the bass along to a guitar playing chords or a piano playing chords. And it's just common terminology for a bass player to use. If they were in a band, okay, now are making that e chord. So our index finger is gonna be on this e tone. It's gonna be that second fret of the D String, that second string, and it's gonna play with our middle finger. And and then the secondary tone, as always, goes straight up from the note that we just got done playing and hammers or secondary tone . Yeah, there we go. So it's a B tone e and then being so e and then be middle finger than Index finger and how we do our pad like we did before, with notes that are not open are going to be play the note of that constant pressure and then alleviate the pressure so it doesn't ring out anymore. Using this finger to just lift up just a little bit. There we go. So this is how it's gonna wait. We have middle mute, middle mute, middle mute Middle meet, Middle Nude, Middle need. And if I was going to use this accord and then the D chord and then the e chord or my one chord and then my four chord and then my five chord, I'm going to play the single its first or just the primary. So here's an a tone. Here's a D tone and then here's an E tone. Now I'm gonna use four cycles. A cycle is just simply a primary and secondary primary and the secondary. So these four cycles of those primaries and secondaries we're gonna do it really slow is gonna be a to three four. Then we're going to switch to D, which is our four chord. Here's the 2nd 1 Now here's E the five corn, Then we're back to a all right in the next lesson, we're gonna do something a little bit different organ going to use all of those same chords . It's gonna be that same backing track that we did in the key of G. With all of the court changes being the exact same accepting this time we're gonna do it in the key of a versus the key of G. So when you're ready, we'll see you in the next lesson. 26. Practice Session - A, D and E chord put together - Bass Guitar: okay, Some things to think about before we start playing along with his backing track. If I start in a and I'm playing along my middle finger has to now do a little bit of a lift to get over to the D string. So that's gonna be something important we have to do. Now, when I finally start playing this e note, I'm still on that same string because I'm still in the same two sets of strings with my middle finger. The thing that I have to think about now is now that I've switched strings to go back to the Accord, I have to now move that middle finger down one set of strings or up one set of strings. If you think about it like that, and then we're gonna have to play that accord. All right, So let's get started. We're gonna have those too long ticks than four fast ICS. And we're gonna play along now if for some reason you can't start right away no worries. Just sit there and listen for a while. I wait till the a chord comes back around and then go ahead and start with us. Two long ones. Here's the fast ones. Here we go Way. Third measure fourth measure now to the way. Third measure fourth measure Last measure. Do A. Here's a measure for Measure E back to a fourth measure. Here's that. All right, great work with your practice in the next video will simply be that backing track at 85 beats per minute, the same backing track that you heard in this video. Siri's just for you to bail the practice with before you move onto. The next lesson at the bottom of this course is our course tools. And if you need to make this faster, if you want to make it slower, all of those backing tracks are for you at the bottom of this course. So when you're ready for that practice, we'll see you in the next lesson. 27. Practice with a Band A D and E 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute. Thank you. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. Here it is. 28. Learn Notes up the Neck with The Bass Players Alphabet - Bass Guitar: welcome back. And before we move on, we're gonna learn a fun trick on how we can learn some of our notes up the neck of our bass guitar. Pretty simply So what we have to do is locate these dots that you see. So the 1st 3 dots and sometimes your base won't have dots, and sometimes your base is missing this dot on the third front. So let me describe it for those of us who don't have these dots the first dot and I'm talking specifically about this little dot that you see here the fifth fret in the seventh front. We don't have to worry about any other frets at this point in this exercise, we're going to start at this fourth string that big, fat one up here. What we're gonna do is we're just gonna play the note, listen to it and know that we have an alphabet. Our musical alphabet goes like this a b c d e f g, and it only goes to G and starts over again. A B, C D E f g a, B, c, d e f g a, b, c, d e f g, and so and so on. Now, even though that we're not starting with a we know that if we start on G, the next note is a B c D e f g than a. The first note that we're gonna play is G. Now I go up to the next dot or from the third front to the fifth Fret No, I'm on the fifth fret and I go, Ah, I name that note as a a So g a. The very next note is the next note in the alphabet, and I have to go up to the seventh fret or the next dot, which is being so Those notes are G A B G a B G a b. The next note My alphabet after B is C And at that point, I'm after I've used the 1st 3 notes, I go to the next string down So in extra down to the ground. And that's my third string and those same three dot supply. I'm gonna start the first dot or the third fret that's gonna be seen. So I had g a B C. Now that I have that, my next note that I have is gonna be from my third front to my fifth threat on my third string. And that is a what do you think? G a B c D. It's a d note. So when we're learning these these air helpful reminders to us So if I ever find myself needing to find a C Nope, I know where it is. If I never need to find a denote besides it open string. I know where what is and so on. So this becomes very useful, especially in our next exercise. So let's continue. I have G A B c d. I go up to the next dot that you see g a B C D E u notice. That's that same Eastern. You know that we played before, right? So f after I go from g A B c d e Then. So I am now. I I've done all of the three tones that I can do on my third string. I now move over to my second string and that no is f g a B c D E f. Then there's G and I finally finish up with a this and, um now so I have on the fourth string G A B on the third string. I have see de here and then I have on the second string F g and A. So as long as I can do my alphabet G A B C D e f g a. Then we know and can memorize certain parts of our neck on our base. So take some time, really try to memorize those notes. And if all you can do is just say those bass players alphabet for no, that's OK. Soon enough, you'll have memorized them. And if you need to write them down for those of us who are learners of moving and those of us were learners of vision versus just hearing, it's a really great way to learn is by just writing those down. G A B C D E. Effigy A. All right, Do some practice with that and we'll see you in the next lesson. 29. Example - Open 1 - 4 and 5 In the Key of C - Bass Guitar: welcome back and all of the cords that we're gonna be playing are based off that bass guitar players scale that we've just learned The G A B c D e f g today, the 1st 1 that we're gonna work on is this seat own the third fret of the third string, and we're still doing, uh, open sounding chords. So my primary is the sea tone there in front, but with your index finger and make sure that your finger is all the way up to the front and touching. All right, so now we have the primary tone and then the secondary tone, which is on my fourth string. Same fret, same finger. So I have that C chord. Now that's my one court out of the key of C. If I go to this next note way could find out what that note is if we go G a b, c d e f or if I want to say, well, if C is my one. Tone D is my two tone. He is my four tone F is that four tone and then I have GS, my five tone. So if I have play out of a one for five position like we did before, which most common music is most music that you hear on the radio today. We'll have a one chord, four chord and a five chord, just like we've discovered here and we've played with. But some ancillary records are some minor chords, but we'll discover all of them. By the end of this course. Just know that most of the songs, let's say 70% of the songs that are out there on the radio on Lee consists of three chords , the one Before and the five. It's good thing we're starting there so that we can play most of the songs on the radio. Okay, so if this is my C chord, that third fret of the third string and here's my primary tone on my secondary tone. And then I have this F note, which is the third fret of the second string, and I play my primary tone, and then my secondary tone is just that. See, Tony, we just got done playing on the third string. Third fret First finger. It'll look like this. I'm gonna start with C first, do one measure, so I have middle, and then my finger comes up for that mute. And then I move on to that secondary tone and in the mute middle finger, you'd index finger, middle finger. I'm gonna move on to that F tone deaf primary secondary, F C F c. What's happening now? As I have my one tone, I find that my four tone is directly underneath the one that I just played. So one, almost all the time on our guitar debating where If unless you're on the first string, of course, if I have my one, my forecourt is gonna go directly down towards the ground on the same front. I just draw a straight line down. So one chord for chord one Gord for corn and just a zai found that four chord The easy way to find the five court is from the four chord and go up two fronts. So for corn, I go up one to France. So from the dot to the doctor one, four, five, and then back to one. So I'm making a straight motion motion here. One string away from my one to my four and then a straight motion from my four to my five. Here's my one again, my C court, my C chord. But I'm gonna move to F, which is my third front of my second string. Here's my five court. I am on the same string as my four corn, but I'm going to go up 12 fronts and that will be my G corn, right? And then when I go back to my one chord, I've just got done playing a five of the five, and that's simply the third string and I go. One fret two frets down and known back to my one chord C Okay, in the next lesson, we're gonna be playing with a backing track. Justus. We did before, with four measures on each chord, the first corn being seen, the next court being f, the next court being Gene. And then we'll do that over and over just to get comfortable playing in the key of C with open position chords, and we'll see there 30. Practice Session - Open - 1 - 4 - 5 In the Key of C - Bass Guitar: Okay, we're ready to play. Are open sea cords to our backing track on. Let's get to it. Here we go. Get ready to play. Seeing middle finger Index finger, Middle Finger Index finger. Fourth measure moving S Get ready. Oh, straight down to see. Here's the move. See you. Go on. Here's Jeanne way. Great work. The next video is simply the backing track that you heard in this video at 85 beats per minute. As always, if you find that 85 beats per minute is too fast for you, simply choose a slower tempo at the bottom of this course. And it's too slow for you. You want to challenge yourself. I've included faster tempos there as well. So what, you're done with that practice session and you're ready for the next lesson. We'll see you there. 31. Practice with a Band Open C 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute. Nice. If food choices. Yeah. Right. Yeah. Thank you. Okay. 32. Example - Closed C - F - G - Bass Guitar: welcome back. And now that we can play see in a open position, we're now gonna learn our next steps as bass players. So far, we've Onley experienced playing out of the open position Next out of the key of C The thinking that we were just playing open, we're not gonna use a closed position and less described the closed position as this. We're still gonna use the same primary tone, works the 11 and then the five and then the one of the five we're just gonna choose a different five than we previously used before. And the five that we're gonna use is on the next ring down. So my primary tone or my one of see Issa see, tone is the one to third fret on the third string, and now my five tone is going to be one string down. So now it's gonna be on the second string and it's gonna be two frets above where I waas So instead of the third fret, it's now gonna be on the fourth front. So if I play my primary telling with my index finger and then I'm gonna reach with my fourth finger some of us might have really long fingers and you can reach with the third finger. But for most of us, probably gonna be that fourth finger reach for you're five tone. Okay, so it's gonna sound like this we're gonna have on index finger on the primary tone followed by a middle finger down on the secondary tone, the five index finger middle index Finger Middle. That's a little different than we did before where it was middle index middle index. Now it's index middle Index Middle. That says these air closed the mute that we're going to use, at least at the beginning. There's always more mutes. There's finger meets. There's thes finger meats that you could have here. But we're just simply going toe, take the pressure off slightly with their fingers here with their index finger or RPG and just take that pressure off and then we'll mute it like we have been. And this is gonna be for every single chord. So we have our C chord. And when we're doing this practice session, um, if you're having trouble at any time muting at the same time as we're playing, just play along big notes. You can always go back and do the muting later Once you feel comfortable. One, we're playing with backing tracks. Our structure is going to be index finger mute, middle finger meat index finger mute, middle finger mute. Okay, now, the next core that we're gonna do is f And we already know it because our four chord was straight down and we ended up playing just one set of strings down. Same fret and is going to be the F tone and then the five of the F. So the same thing happens with the closed part of the form. We have our index finger playing the F tone, and then we reach up with our pinky at this 45 degree angle, and we're going to get the head end of our pinky of flattened part of our pinky. So it's not curl over and touching, but it's gonna be flattened on the string, and we're gonna put a fair amount of pressure there to get her pinky working, and it's going to come up and touch the fret, so there's not any fret distance in between the front and it comes up and touches not on top of it but burn, but right behind. And when we do that, we're done playing that closed position F So we have primary secondary primary secondary with the mutes primary mute secondary mute primary need secondary mute. Something to think about mutes. Is there sometimes that mutes are appropriate? And sometimes we just want a big long note. Since we're in a practice setting, we're gonna practice our mutes, and you should be practicing your big lung notes to so which whichever way you decide to do it is gonna be fine. Just make sure that you practice the mutes because it's gonna be important moving forward that we know how to do our mutes. The next scored that we're gonna play is the G chord or the five chord of C 14 five. Remember, the one was Adah. See, we went straight down for a four, and then now we're going up that same string two frets for a five chord. So what's happening now is I'm doing my index finger on the G tone and and for the five were doing a pinky. So it's gonna be a index than middle for these two fingers index than middle than index than middle. So as we're doing their practice, it looks like this Index middle Index Middle. We're moving over to the F court index Middle, this is the forecourt Index middle. Now we're gonna go up to the five court index middle index middle and or back to the one. So when you're ready, when you feel comfortable playing this close position with the mutes worth out the mutes, we'll see you in the next lesson. 33. Practice Session - Closed Form C, F and G - Bass Guitar: welcome to our practice session where we're doing closed forms in the key of C. In our practice, were we going to be doing a C just like we did in our exercise. Then we're F court, then a g chord, which is our five 145 in the five of each chord is gonna be that pinky one set of frets, one set of strings down and two sets of fronts up. Okay. When you ready to play along with this practice session, get your base ready and let's go. Cheerio. No way. Corn. Five chord way, way. Go back to see. Wait for court. Wait. Five Last measure. Last time on star dorm use. Here's the way. No way, Forecourt five chord use wears the last quarter. Okay, The next video is gonna be simply a backing track at 85 beats per minute, and you'll want to try to play along with this backing track without me trying to say words and stuff. So you get a good, good, good amount of practice, really get used to that closed position, See? And when you're ready and you feel like you got it, we'll move on to the next lesson with you. 34. Practice with a Band Closed C 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute. Nice. If food choices. Yeah. Right. Yeah. Thank you. Okay. 35. Trick - Bass Guitar: welcome back. And this is the first time we're gonna learn a trick, something fun for years to hear and for us to play along with these chord forms that were playing. Now we already know how to play in the key of C using closed position. Now, what we're going to do is we're gonna start out just like we did before. Now, these are gonna be notes that don't actually exist in the scale, but they're just interesting notes, and we call them passing tones that lead into the tone that were about to play. We're gonna start on this one chord C in a closed position, and we would normally go to this f tone. But what we're gonna do is we're gonna go one fret lower. That's the second fret of the second string and and then we're gonna slide it up. So constant pressure, because if I don't have constant pressure, it's gonna either buzz out on me and not make a sound. Or, um, it's going to go away as I slide. This tone will actually go away if I don't have constant pressure. So I'm putting pressure down. Not a whole lot of pressure, just enough pressure to hear the tone. And then once I hear that tone, I'm going to just slide it up and then you can hear that shift in tone. So look like this. I want to go my primary secondary, primary, secondary, primary, secondary. And then I'm gonna use that second friend and then slide it up without plucking the tone. So I didn't do any plucking. I just did it with my fingers. I plucked once. So this is what it's gonna sound like He wears a second friend way. Heard it. So what's happening is we have that last time that we do it that fourth time in the fourth measure and it sounds like this primary secondary second friend, and then I bring it up. So let's do it really slow. Primary secondary to three on the two threes is the fronts. Primary secondary to 31 more time. Primary secondary to three. Yeah, there we go. Primary secondary to three. Yeah, the five second friends third Fret it with a slide. Stood a few more times the primary secondary to slide Primary, secondary. Now it's gonna be within a lot of us really unnerved to try to pluck that next note. Make sure it's slid without a pluck. Stood a few more times before I move on. If you can't do it that fast, it just do. It's nice and slow and and try to work up your speed and when you work up your speed to a really small increments at a time until you can get it up to speed the speed of 85 beats per minute for our practice session in the next video. Okay, so that the next that's gonna happen is we have we're gonna play are four corgis like normal when way go from. The four were actually going to slide to the five now per secondary. So I'm going to come out of my four chord primary secondary primary so it looks like this primary Secondary primary slide one more time. Really slow primary secondary primary slide up to the five. The G tone primary secondary primary slide of the five primary secondary primary slide up to the five one last time A little faster primary secondary primary slide up to the five. Here we go Now we're playing this five. Now we get there so I finally get back to this five tone the primary of the five town and then as if I was playing that f and I went from the second front of the third fret. I'm gonna go the second front of the third friend. But now it's gonna be on the third string so I can go back to my one. So it'll look like this. So it'll look like that's amore time. Uh, primary of five. Secondary of five. All right, I want to give you a breakdown. Is going to show you how this works. Uh, and I'm gonna take this at the 85 beats per minute. Here's your 85 beats per minute and just listen. Second measure, third measure for measure Way, way. Remember, sex is just slide up five ways. Five blocks line five blocks. Just watching a little bit longer. Find smooth. E. Once we have our little ants, Larry notes are second front of the first friend for our one chord, our second Fred to the third fret for our four chord and then the slide from the four to the five. And make sure that one were in those transitions were playing the five of the previous cord before the move. Here's a primary and then the secondary. That's what we're calling the five. There's a primary secondary and the move happens. Secondary primary secondary than the slide secondary primary secondary then the moves was always right after that secondary being played. All right, Once you have that down practice that a bunch, we'll see you in the next practice session. 36. Slides Practice with Backing Tracks - Bass Guitar: Welcome back or we're doing slides up to our notes and these notes again aren't actually in our scale. We're going to start playing at 85 beats per minute, and we're gonna make sure that at the beginning, we're not going to use our meats. And But when we get more comfortable with it, whenever you feel like it, whenever you feel comfortable adding those mutant after we get our slides and then go ahead and start to add in your mutes, it's gonna be important that we're gonna player meets along with our slides before we move on to the next section. So here's our practice session. Here we go. Here it is. Slide up to five. Wait, secondary way. Here it is. - Last time around Secondary. The next video is a backing track again at 85 beats per minute for you to practice along with if it any time, this is too slow for you. Just go down to the bottom of this course. You find faster ones and slower ones. Um, depending on your speed, just make sure you do a lot of practice and get comfortable out of before moving on. We will see you in the next lesson 37. Practice with a Band Closed C 85 BPM With Slide Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute. Nice. If food choices. Yeah. Right. Yeah. Thank you. Okay. 38. Example - Combining Open and Closed Forms - Key of C - Bass Guitar: welcome back and we're gonna be talking about combining are open and are closed forms in the key of C like we just got done playing our closed form is primary secondary or 15 and our open position, see, was one in five for this exercise, we're first going to start with a closed position. Primary secondary one followed by the five. Then what we're gonna do is we're gonna switch our fingers instead of being index middle. We're gonna go back to middle index like we did before for an open position scene, Primary secondary. So look like this. I have my primary secondary. My finger, after it had gotten done, sliding through the strings is now sitting on the correct string and I'm ready to do my open position. See Primary Secondary Middle Index. So I put it all together. It looks like this closed over, closed, open, closed, open. Oh, closed, open. And we're going to do that with every single chord that we could do. And so far, every every song that we've done, every backing track that we've done goes from the one to the four to the five, and that's not gonna be any different here. So the pattern is just the same. We're just playing it in different places. Okay, We're gonna put it all together, and we're going to use that closed, followed by open all of my course. 1st 1 court before court, and then the five chord. All right, let's do it really slow. We're gonna do the closed C chord followed by the closed F court and then open. No. Now we're gonna move over to our G chord closed than open for extra credit. And again you don't have in this. This is just if you feel comfortable moving forward doing it as a variation, you conduce your closed like normal middle index. And instead of getting your index backwards, we're just going to do a index finger for both notes for the open, and then the one comes back again. It looks like this index middle index index index is just to get our agility with our right hand a little better. So we're gonna do it like normal. And if you feel like you're moving along and you want to push yourself trying to do that new right hand finger technique along with this too So again, this is gonna look like this. So listen, huh? And go way . Okay. That example included a couple of different variations with my right hand. Um, for example. Now practice that using our closed and open, combining them. Once you feel comfortable, we'll see you in the practice session. 39. Combining Open and Closed Practice with Backing Tracks: Welcome to the practice session where we're combining our closed form and our open form. Here we go in 85 beats per minute way you're gone last time through way E. All right, make sure you do a lot of practice again. This is a little too slow for you. There's always at the bottom of this course faster backing tracks and slower backing tracks . If it's too fast for you, get a lot of practice done. Once you feel comfortable for the next part, we'll see there. 40. Practice with a Band Closed C 85 BPM Open and Closed Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute. Nice. If food choices. Yeah. Right. Yeah. Thank you. Okay. 41. Example - Change Genre Country Effect Taps Dead Tones - Bass Guitar: welcome back, and we're gonna be learning a new effect. So what's gonna happen is we're gonna change genres of music, and it's not important. That is the genre of music. The changes. I'm choosing this show honor because it fits this effect really well, even though you can do this effect on many other different kinds of music and genres. Okay, so what we're gonna do is we're gonna do some taps to create a percussive feel, and we're also gonna do some dead tones for a percussive field. And the whole thing was gonna sound like this. I'm gonna show you how it goes first, and then I'm gonna break it down. So this is do a country drag. So in that particular feel of bass playing, there's a really hard, um, sneer, drum bo about a bunch. So just listen for the snare drum when I play it again. That's that snare drum. Now that we understand what that snare drum feels like, it's the two and the four of every beat. Want three want three? 123 Now let me get the right count. It really helps me play this tack that we're about to play. When we start doing this particular effect, it's going to be done on open sound in court, in the key of C. So this looks like this. I'm gonna pluck the tone and and then I'm going to tap it. So I'm going to pluck the tone with my index finger this time. And then a tech and my two fingers are gonna come down and actually hit this string. I'm about to play, and the stream about to play is my same string I've already plucked. So it's the third string. I'm gonna come up pretty far. Look how high my fingers are up off the string. So just practice that for a while, just by itself. It's somewhat difficult, so you can change the dynamics of how hard we're slapping by how high or how not high were coming from Ed angled. So this is a pretty soft slap. And if I want to get aggressive with it and have a louder slap, No, I'm gonna come up from a high angle and aggressively slammed those fingers down, and it's up to you what dynamic you want to use right now. Let's use on medium one for some reason you feel like your fingers are not actually hitting the right string, then simply shortened the distance of that tap. All right, Once we get that done, the next thing we're going to live on, Pluck Tap and then that my middle finger is gonna pluck the string. And then I'm gonna use the secondary tone with my index finger, and we're gonna put it together. It sounds like that I have a pluck temp middle index, and then I'm gonna tap again. So it looks like this really slow luck Temp middle index, and I'm gonna tap again with the tap. That second tap that happens is gonna be on my secondary tone in this case is gonna be the fourth string. It looks like this against five pluck tap middle index tap. Now, at this point, if I could do that, I'm gonna use this form again. But I'm gonna use my index for my secondary tone in my middle for my primary tone middle index. And then a tapa happens again. So the whole portion looks like this. I have my primary tone with the index finger. I could do it with a middle finger to Doesn't really matter, but I'm just gonna choose an index finger at this time. So index finger Ted Middle. This is the important one middle index than a tap followed by index middle back to my primary tone. Tep. No, If I revolve that around and I don't stop, it'll sound like this. I have Index tap middle index tap index, middle tap Middle Index tap Index, Middle Tap Middle Index Tap Index, Middle tap. This is it A little faster. All right. Now, if you feel like it's easier to not plant your thumb like I'm not doing at this point, it's fine. If you feel like you still need tohave, that anchor is just a little bit harder to get your hands up and then tap if you have a plant. So the whole time we're doing this tapping, we're not actually planting our thumbs. But if you still feel like you need that as a crutch, totally fine. It's just a little bit or difficult to get your fingers up and touch. So let's hear it as example again, and then we'll move on to the practice in the next lesson. Here's my move. - All right, this one's a little tricky, so it's gonna take some time to be able to get all those moving parts together. Once you feel like you got it, move on to that practice session and we'll see there. 42. Practice Session - Slapping and Muting Technique - Bass Guitar: welcome back. And we're using our tapping and muting technique to be able to play along to a country track to give it a little bit of flair for base plane. And here is your practice track. So play along. If for some reason you having a hard time starting, just listen. Wait. We get back to the Sea court again and then go ahead and start along with us. Here we go that way. Five. Corn, - five four course. Find a way. Fourth measure, five chord. - All right, get a lot of practicing. Once you feel comfortable, we'll see you in the next lesson. 43. Practice with a Band Country Tricks Key of C 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute. Yeah. Wow. Okay. Okay. Okay. 44. Example - Closed Pluck Slap - Bass Guitar: Welcome back. We've both learned the slapping technique in the slapping and muting technique. We're going to take all of that information that we learned and apply it towards a closed position. So when I play the first note, that's gonna be with my index finger that closed, see? And we're gonna pluck followed by a cat, followed by a sounding note does not a muted one this time. So it's gonna look like this. I have a note with my index finger, the slap, and I play an index finger again. Right. Next note is gonna be a pinky with my middle finger so that pinky is on the five tone of one. So we have the tone g the slap, the tone g again with the same index finger than the middle finger place. That five tone sounds like this together. Yeah, uh, great. The next step after is another slap. So after we play this pinky on the five tone of G, it's gonna get a slap, and you're gonna want to slap it with the finger or fingers that you're going to play next . So in this case, I'm gonna use my middle finger as a slap. But if I want to get bigger, fatter slap I'm gonna use two fingers for that slap. And then the middle finger is going to play that five tone again, followed by the one since every cycle is the same for record that we play the C chord, the F chord, the G chord and the C chord. We're gonna go back and use if you want to. And if you're able to use some of those other tones that aren't in our scale than make things sound interesting, so what we're going to do besides, our round is when we transition. After we play that primary, we're gonna go from that second friend and then slide it up to the four tone. Remember this one? After I played the secondary tone, it's slit up to the five tone, and then the one was the second fret, and then the consequent tone was the one. Remember, it's if even if I'm not in the key of C, uh, let's say I was in the key of deal is just gonna be the front underneath that tone. So, and that doesn't always mean the second front. It just means the tone underneath the tone that I'm intending to play as my one. So let's do some practice, get comfortable with those tones, and when you're ready to move on to the practice session, we'll see there. 45. Practice Session - Closed Pluck Slap - Bass Guitar: Welcome to the practice session. Here we go. Here's the fourth measure. Get ready. Fourth measure, Get ready. Fourth measure, fourth measure. Fourth measure, fourth measure. Get ready. Fourth measure, - fourth measure way. Let's get going one last time through way. All right, great work. Remember, as always, if this was too fast for you, go down to the bottom of the course and choose a slower country backing track. And if it's too slow for you and if you like, you can speed up a little bit, just use a faster one in practice with that. This is good median tempo this 85 beats per minute, and I have included it in the next video so that you have a chance to practice by yourself without me speaking without interruption so that you could just have a good practice time. So after you have a good practice, if you're comfortable for the next lesson, we'll see there 46. Practice with a Band Country Tricks #2 Closed Key of C 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute. Yeah. Wow. Okay. Okay. Okay. 47. Open and Closed Key of D with Country Backing Track - Bass Guitar: welcome back. And we've previously learned how to play in the open position and a close position out of the key of C while using slaps and taps for effects. And we also used a country track to be able to play these things. What we're gonna do is we're gonna put those two things together First the open sounding see position and then the clothes sounding See position. But instead of keeping in the key of C or changing to the key of D now so remember our bass players Alphabet was G A b. See the e f g a. So how I find my D is G A B, c d. And for those of us who have dots on our bases, it's the second dot on the third string. And just as always, my open position is always one four. I go down to the next string, same fret, and then my five is 12 frets above that. I'm still working on just the dots. These tones are D G and A Now that we've moved the key of D were first gonna play the open position, followed by the close position D. So if I put the two together. It looks like this. Okay, then it happens again. At the beginning of this last note is the beginning of my new cycle E C that really slow together. So I have my primary secondary. Then I switched to my closed scale. Here's the close back to open for extra credit and again, you don't have to. You can just go through the different chords. But if you feel like you can get those extra tones when we switched to the cords so look like this. And after every chord that we do, we go back to that open position cord versus the closed court. Even though in the last version of what we did, the next thing that we did was another closed. This goes back to an open so open and closed, open and closed, open and close. Here's how it looks like Slow, open, closed open. Here it is, But I have to go back to open open first and then the last note that we have is that one front below D and then we bring it up to Dean. Okay, Once you're ready to be able to move through that system and you've done enough practice. And you can switch your brain from going from the closed position in the closed position to being open. Closed, open, closed, open closed, open, closed. And you got a pretty good handle on it and we'll see you in the next practice video. 48. Key of D Open and Closed Tapping and Muting with Country Backing Tracks - Bass Guitar: welcome back and we're practicing in the key of D with their tapping and muting in open and closed positions. Remember the first ones open? Here it is. Here it is. Remember, it's open. Way to go opened . And if you happen to stand open for a while or happen to stand in close for a while, it's fine. Just get back on track way. We're gonna get back on track. Oh, last one great work. And the next video is just simply that backing track at 85 beats per minute and the key of D. Get lots of practice done, and we'll see you next lesson. 49. Practice with a Band Country Key of D Closed and Open 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute. Yeah. Okay. So okay. Okay. Yes. Yes. 50. Exercise Chromatic Scale - Bass Guitar: Welcome back in in this exercise we're gonna be learning are chromatic scale, and it sounds like a kind of a difficult word. But all it really means at the end is we're going to be able to know what all these notes are wherever we are on our neck of our bass guitar at any time, by mixing what we know with our chromatic scale and our bass players alphabet. So let's get started. The first thing that we have to know is if I just had a set of letters. The musical alphabet goes like this A B C D E f g, and that's it. That's all it goes. Do it doesn't go to a B, C D E F G, and then anything else just goes to G and then starts over again. So in a cyclical cycle, it would go a B C D e f g a B c d e f g a b c D e f g forever. No. There's three rules that exist in a chromatic scale, and the first rule is, and you have to understand when you hear the first ruled, it also means that there's gonna be other rules. So that means the first rule isn't exactly solid, right? And these other rules that come after will kind of change What happens to this first rule? The first rule is we're going to change every A B, C D E F G into a series of a flat and then a natural. Now keep in mind that every note, every single note, this is the first thing, and it's very important and awfully overlooked. Let's say if this is a G note, this gee note is a G natural. Every single note and repeat, every single note has its own sharp. By going up one fret or it has its own flat. By going one fret down. So this is G. If I go one front up, it's gonna be g sharp. I go back to G G flat, G G natural in G sharp, G natural G flat, G natural G sharp and so on. It doesn't matter what note it is. They all have their own natural sharpened flat. So in this case, I'm gonna move over to a d tone a note that we're familiar with This is D natural. If I moved down one fret I have d flat. I'm gonna go back to the natural. No. Remember that This tone the fourth fret What? We called a d flat. If I play, see and I move up one front from it because it has own sharpened flat is going to be C sharp. But wait, I called it D flat a while ago. Here's some crazy music theory fax To put it all in perspective, any note can be called whatever I want to call it. So in the case of the sea tone, I can call it seeing. And now if I go up one, I'm gonna call it C sharp. But if I go up one more, we know it has a deep But I could call it if I wanted to see double sharp see triple sharp see quadruple sharp and so on, even though they're not really called that in today's speak, I really could, with music theory so understanding that knowing that there are several names for different notes understand that when we learn this chromatic scale, you have to take it with a grain of salt. These air just common names for us to remember a chromatic scale with Remember these names of these notes. Now we just have to keep in the back of our brain that sometimes they're called different notes. But this is a good first step toe understanding the entire fretboard of our base. So let's get started with it. That first rule means I'm gonna change my A B c D e f g into ah flat, followed by a natural. So what this means is I'm going to go from a flat to a and then to be flat to be and notice when I just said b B flat to be and there was no flat or sharp or natural to it. It's assumed that when you just say G a B C D e f whatever it is that is assumed to be natural, so you don't have to say the word natural. It's just assumed to be natural. So if I say a flat that says means it's flat when I say a, that just means it's natural, but I'm assuming it to be natural now that we understand that my natural progression of rule one is a flat A B flat B see flat, C. D flat d e flat e flat, F G flat G. Now that's just one single rule that goes that spans all of the notes of our scale. A B C D E F G turns into a flat a B flat BC flat C and so on. Now the problem is, is Rule one doesn't exist that way. In the real world, the real world world music. So there's rule to rule to says there's exceptions to Rule one now. Isn't that interesting? There's exceptions to Rule one now. When I think about these two exceptions, we're going to have two of them and they're very similar. One is with a C tone and the others with an F tone. My first exception is going to be C, and the exception is C and C sharp. So it doesn't go see flat anymore to see natural. It goes, see natural to see Sharp So C and C sharp once I understand that, and I just insert the first exception of Rule one. If I said my new chromatic scale, if I only had those two rules, it would look like this. A flat a B flat, B, c c. Sharp that's the exception D flat D five e and so on. Now notice that I said that there's two exceptions. The other exception is, if so, now instead of f f flat two f. I'm going to trade that out with F an F sharp. Now, as long as I've had my first exception and my second exception, it'll look like this in my chromatic sale on Lee. If Rule one and rule to exist a flat A b flat, B c c sharp, that's the first exception. D Flat D. My next exception F f Sharp. Then I have G flat and then G and then I'm done with my chromatic scale. But wait, there's more. And there's on Lee. One more good thing. The last rule to my chromatic scale is after every exception is a note that just sits there by itself. So in the case of my first exception, I have seen see Sharp what is the note that in letter form that comes after see it's d right a B c. D. Now the real last rule says it's just a note that sits by itself. That means there's no flat and no sharp to it and I have two exceptions. So I have to notes, That's it by itself. Since I have the first exception, CC and she sharp the denotes that's by itself. And then I have f an f sharp What comes after f in my alphabet. It's G A B C D E f g. Since G comes after my exception, my second exception F in F sharp. That's going to be a note that stands alone. So since I have two notes to stand alone, they don't have a sharper flat. It's his D and G, my new chromatic scale without any more rules and the correct way to say my chromatic scale that we're going to learn and memorize is called a flat a B flat. Be just like that first roll. Right now we have our exceptions. The exceptions is C and C Sharp, after my exception is a note that sits by itself. D after d. I start back with Rule one e flat and E after e flat e. I haven't exception F and F Sharp and after that exception is a note that sits by itself, Gene. So we're gonna repeat the exceptions to help us memorize what they are. First, we have a flat A B flat B, a flat, a B flat. Be go ahead and say it a couple times with me. A flat a b flat B, a flat, a B flat. Being that's pretty easy. And we're gonna remember Rise the second set, which is the exception and the note that sits by itself. D c c sharp D c c sharp D c c sharp d Try to save by yourself C C Sharp, D C c sharp D The next step that we want to memorize and say out loud a few times is our next set of of notes, and it starts with Rule one again e flat e e flat, e e flat e e flat e. And that's memorized by itself. Then, finally, I have my last set of exceptions in the note that sits by itself at the very end. I have F f Sharp and you F F Sharp and Jean F F Sharp and G. Sit with me a couple times F f sharp in gene F F, Sharp and G and last time F f Sharp and G all the way through a flat A B flat B C c sharp D e flat e f f sharp in gene. All right. Once you feel like you're on your way to memorizing it, it doesn't have to be all the way locked in yet. But in our next practice exercise, we're gonna be playing our base along to this chromatic scale. And by the time we're done, will have memorized it. And if for some reason, you haven't memorized but by then, do a little bit more practice with the next practice exercise until it is memorized. Before you move on, we'll see you there. 51. Practice Exercise Chromatic Scale E - Bass Guitar: welcome to this practice exercise where we're practicing our chromatic scale. Now we know that our chromatic scale is a flat A B flat B C c sharp D e flat e you know, someone to say e and hold on to it for a little while. Then there's F f Sharp and G So I'm gonna start on my e string. Remember that the strings are G Dean A and E So my big string, my fourth string is an eastern. And where does E lie? In my chromatic scale, it's a foot A B foot B C c sharp d e flat e And I finally found my e string And we're gonna relate this to our friends. Every single fret that I go up is one more step up my chromatic scale. So I'm gonna start with this e tone What comes after my e tone? I have a flat a b flat, B, c, c sharp, d e flat E. And then becomes my second set of exceptions f and then my next tone. So I'm going to go up one more friend ball above that, and that's gonna be a f sharp. And then what comes after F. Sharp is the note that sits by itself. G and it starts all over at the beginning. A flat A B flat, B, C, c sharp, D e flat and e and notice. Right here on my base, you can see two dots and a lot of times there's two dots here, and sometimes there's two dots up here for us to be able to look at that indicates 12 fret . 123456789 10 11 12. Even if you don't have the dots to be able to work with, you can count them. And if I go up to my 12th tone, it should end the same place where I started it. So I ended on a E and I started on a e. So let's go through that one more time. A little quicker. We have e if f sharp g a flat A B flat, B C c sharp, d e flat. I get to my 12 front on it is be. And if I get up to that 12 fret and it's not E. There's something that I did wrong and I have to start over. OK, So that's our E string. Now it's expected for you to do in practice, just like we did several times, though E f f sharp all the way to eat, Just do it over and over and over. By the end, you'll have memorized at least the chromatic scale in your bring. You probably won't memorize exactly where these notes are, but here's the trick. You already know your bass players alphabet. You know this is G and A and B, and as long as we have G and A and being, we already know that every note has its own sharp and his own flat and its own natural. So if you know that this is G and you say, Well, I want to play G flat I only have to go one fret down. I find g flat when you go back to G. And like I said, if I played GS let well, I need to play g sharp. I just go one Fred above, and now I found G sharp. Same thing with a Here's A I want to be able to to play in a flat. Let's say so. I'm going to move my finger one down, one front down and I have a flat. Go back to a and I want to find a sharp. All I have to do is move it. One set of fronts forward and I have a sharp and that takes care of most of our notes. All of the rest of our notes, all the way up till you don't have any threats anymore can be found with our chromatic scale. Now we don't always have to go all the way back to E right. We can just start where we know that there's a note. We know that this is G A B, but I want to play a C sharp up here. So here's be what comes after b, you know. So you have be see and then see sharp. So I can know where a C sharp is all the way up here, and it becomes tedious a little bit, always needing to count your chromatic scale. But we're just at the beginning. After you do your chromatic scale for a long time, you'll eventually start to memorize these notes because you play them over and over again. Kind of leg Cosmos is so it's not really important at this stage of the game to memorize all of these notes because you have tools to be able to help you find the notes. All right, in the next practice, exercise will be doing our chromatic scale, but on our A string. 52. Practice Exercise Chromatic Scale A - Bass Guitar: and this practice exercise. We're gonna be doing our chromatic scale on a string. So we start with a what's next in our chromatic scale. It's b flat after B Flat is be, then becomes my exception. See, and then c sharp. The note that sits by itself is D. Then I have e flat and e the exception f f sharp, the note that sits by itself after the exception. A flat and a And again, I started on the eighth home. I ended on my told threat on a tone, and that's how I know I did it right. Let's do it a few more times. A B flat being seeing C sharp d e flat e f f sharp G a flat a a couple more times. With this time a little slower a B flat, be see C sharp de e flat E F f sharp jean a flat a a little faster this time. Here's a B flat. Be seeing C sharp D e flat e f f sharp G a flat A. Started on a ended on a one last time a little faster. Here's a B flat being seen seizure D E flat e f f scher G A flat a. All right, Take some time to practice. Get that nice, memorized and buying. Now, once we get through the second string, the next two streams will be a breeze. So when you ready to get through your a drink and you feel comfortable? What? This? See you in the next practice exercise. 53. Practice Exercise Chromatic Scale D - Bass Guitar: Welcome back to our practice exercise D String Chromatic scale. All right, so we have a Dean. What comes next? After the D? That's the note that sits by itself. It's e flat. Mm Exception F f sharp Jeanne a flat A B flat. Be exception. C c sharp. What's last note? Dean, I get to my 12 threat the double dots. So if I started a d and ended at D, I should have done it correctly. D e flat e yes, f sharp G a flat A B flat B C c sharp indeed. De e flat e f f sharp g a flat A B flat, B C c sharp and D one more time A little faster D e flat e f f sharp G a flat A B flat, B C c sharp and Dean one more time. That same speed D e flat e f f sharp G a flat A B flat B C c sharp in Dean. All right, practice your chromatic scale on your D string. Get comfortable with it by now, it should kind of start sinking in to be memorized. And when you're ready to get that G string with our chromatic scale, we'll see you in the next practice exercise 54. Practice Exercise Chromatic Scale G - Bass Guitar: welcome to this practice exercise on her G string. So I start on this little bitty string G the first string. Then I am a flat A B flat be seen C sharp D e flat e f f sharp and then g started on G ended on a gene. And now I know that I've done it right soon. A few more times, but real slow G a flat and B flat B C c sharp D e flat e f f sharp in the last notice G. Let's do it a few more times. You a flat A B flat, be see see shirt de e flat E f f sharp on their last numbers gene and a little faster for the last two time G a flat A B flat, B C c sharp, D e flat, E f f sharp and Jean ju a flat A B flat, B C C shirt, D e flat, E f and G. All right, do some practice. Get real comfortable with your chromatic scale on all of your strings. And when you're ready, we'll see you in the next lesson. 55. Learning the 12 Bar Blues Chord Progression - Bass Guitar: in this exercise, we're gonna understand what a 12 bar blues pattern sounds like. And it's just simply a pattern and doesn't have to be the blues. It could be attached to any piece of music. It's just a chord progression, and so far we've worked with four bars of a one chord. It doesn't matter what court it was just a one chord four bars of a four chord four bars of a five chord. And then it repeated itself. And when I say bars, it equals Measure. A bar is a measure in the case that we were working with. Each bar or measure had four beats. I could also say this is called the 12 Measure Blues and would make the same amount. In a sense, I'm going to describe the 12 bar blues in the key of Gene. Now think of three different lines the first line, the second line and the third line, and each line has four measures or four bars. The first bar has four beats, and it's all gonna be Jesus. The whole top line is all G or the one chord, so I'm gonna count him out and I'm gonna count the measure number in the first Siris of numbers that I do so like 1234 That's the first measure to 234 That's the second measure. So look like this is the whole first line, all with G tones or ones. 1234223432344234 Now that gets us to this second line. So that was the first line. This is the second line. The second line looks like this. I start with, ah, four chord for two of the measures. So four chord for chord. And then it goes back to the 11 chord. One chord. Four corners of those. 12342234 Back to the one court 32344234 Now I have my last line. That was my first line. Second line. This is what the last line looks like. I'm gonna go to a five corn. So 145 The five chord. I have one measure of a five one measure of a four and then to measures of a 15 411 I want to start on that five. I'm gonna go. 12341234 Back to the 12341 t 34 Now the measure numbers. 12342234323442 u 34 If I put it all together that sound like this. Top line. Second line. Third line. First line one. Teoh, 34223432344234 2nd Line. 123422343234 43 4 3rd Line five Corn 1234223432344 t 34! And that represents all of our 12 bar blues So it doesn't matter for playing country. Just simple straight lines. It'll happened in the same way all those measures done in a 12 bar blues and it also doesn't matter what chords on playing. I'm playing a 14 a one of five of 41 so in that case I was playing in the key of G. But if I was playing in the of D, I could play the 12 bar blues appear 12341 t 3412341234123412341 won t. 34 Won t. 341234123412341234! 1234! And that's my 12 bar blues. If I count out my bars and specifically one bar record, it makes it pretty clear that there are only 12 bars or 12 measures in this chord progression. So I want to start, and I'm gonna assume that I'm doing four beats, but it really just having been one big long note permission. So I have 12 three, four, 5678 9 10 11 12 Or, if I think of them is Onley my tones that I'm playing or the cords that I'm playing. It's a one chord, one chord, one chord, one chord. Four chord four chord, one chord, one chord five chord four chord, one chord, one court and that makes it my 12 bar blues practice that get used to the idea of a 12 bar blues rather than the court progression we've been working with and, well, um, get started on our next lesson in the next session, 56. Example - 8th Notes - Key of F - Bass Guitar: in this video, we're gonna be playing to a classic rock backing track using eight notes with slaps. So this includes a floating thumb, slaps, hours, air floating, thumbs. We're gonna be in the key of F Now, if you'll remember from our chromatic scale our e string, the fourth string E one fret above that is going to be F and that's part of our second exception from the chromatic scale. All right, so now that I have f I'm gonna play, I can only play either the single, um, root of that, which is the one because I don't have an open version of an F From this exact point, I have other efs that I can play open positions on. But from this, if I can Onley play that primary tone or a closed position, all right, now that I know that I'm going to play my four chord, which is one string down from it on the third string, first fret, and that's gonna be a B flat tone followed by my five chord, which is one two frets above where my b flat tone waas and that's gonna be a C tone. So my won the B flat is the four chord. The scene is my five chord 14541 Now in the last video, we discovered. What a 12 bar blues progression Waas. We're actually pairing a 12 bar blues chord progression along with classic rock, because 12 Bar Blues has nothing to do with blues and everything to do with the chord progression. So my 1/4 that f my forecourt is the B flat, and then I have my C tone being played with my pinky, my fourth finger, and that's going to buy a five chord. And at the very beginning, we're only gonna play single. It's so a single. It is just a primary and I'm not using a five done. I'm just playing that f tone when it comes to the B flat tone, I'm only playing the be toned, and when it comes to the five tone the sea tone, I'm on Lee playing the five tone. We're gonna get used to this cycle and the cycle sounds like this, and we're gonna break it down. Look, sounds a little bit like this. We have of the middle finger, followed by the index finger followed by a slap. Then the next part sounds like this. So looks like this. I have my middle finger, my index finger, my middle finger followed by a slap. So I have middle finger. First finger Slap Middle index slap. That's the first part. Let's just get used to it. Middle Index Slip Middle Index Slap Middle Index Middle Index Slap Middle Index Slap Middle Index Slap Middle in next life. Good. So that's the first part. The second part is middle index middle slab, so we're gonna do it together again. Middle index Middle slap. Mend it Middle Index Middle Slap Middle Index Middle Slap Middle Index Middle Slap Middle Index Middle Slash. Okay, So when you put the two together, have middle index slap Middle Index Middle slab Middle Index slap Middle Index, Middle slab. All right, So I put the whole thing together and we're just listening up to speed is all right now. We have a good understanding of the tone of it, how it's supposed to sound the rhythm of it. Let's hear an example of the backing track. Here's another great example of very hard snare drum when we hear that snare drum is exactly the time when we're going to use our tap. Now that we're hearing the rhythm of the snare drum, it really keeps us on time. So I'm gonna do four measures of that f chord The one chord, Two measures of my four Corn And then I'm gonna move back to my f chord, followed by my five Chord five court. Then there's the forecourt five chord four chord and I go back to my one And then the last part We could stay on that one and just hold their But in this case, the last part of my 12 bar blues we're just gonna add a little flair and add the five tone of one. Even though it looks like we're playing a five chord, it really is still a one chord. Except we're just gonna play the secondary tone of it. And we're just going to just play it over and over again. Eighth notes. I I'm going to start up the backing track and show you how it works. Second measure, third measure, fourth measure. Second measure Back to ask. Get ready for the five for five Chord four chord. Back of the one court last measure. There's 1/3 measure. Fourth measure 442 times back toe. One last measure, then 55 four Chord eighth notes. All right, Once you're able to play your 12 bar blues progression along with your eighth notes slap technique, then you're ready for the practice session and we ready. We'll see there. 57. Classic Rock with Backing Track Key of F - Bass Guitar: Welcome to the practice session of our 12 bar blues with a classic rock backing track, and we're using our eighth notes lap technique one last time. - Make sure you're doing a lot of practice with this video, and when you feel comfortable to be able to do it on your own without a visual representation, go along to the next video, which is just this backing track at 85 beats per minute, like always, if this is a little too slow, I've included Mawr backing tracks for you at the bottom in the course tools, and if it's a little too slow, you can go faster. However, um, your level is is where you want to be yet, so just make sure you're choosing the right backing track for you. And when you're ready, we'll see you in the next lesson. 58. Practice with a Band Classic Rock Key of F 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute? Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. And the rest of it? Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Okay. 59. Closed Technique 8th Notes with Slap - Bass Guitar: we now can perform our eighth notes slapped technique, and we're going to take it one step further and use it with a closed technique. In our closed form. We still have our middle index slap, but we also have another index that sounds how followed by the same thing that happens on our secondary tone except instead of our index finger that plays that tone. It's our middle finger, so it looks like this. Middle Index Slap Index Middle Index Slap Middle Middle Index Slap Index Middle Index Slap Middle We're going to do a quick example of the whole thing. No. Once you're confident with your new closed eighth notes slap technique, let's listen to what it will sound like with the backing track for it's once you feel comfortable cycling through a few times with your clothes position and we'll see you in the practice session. 60. Practice Exercise Closed Position Closed 8th Note Slap - Bass Guitar: Here's Aaron. Practice exercise for our clothes position, eighth notes lap one last time. - Great work. And once you're ready to start learning by yourself, Um, go on to this next video, which is a backing track at 85 beats per minute. So you conduce, um, extended practice. Were you ready? We'll see you in the next lesson. 61. Practice with a Band Classic Rock Key of F 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute? Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. And the rest of it? Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Okay. 62. 12 Bar Blues Key of Bb with Backing Track - Bass Guitar: Welcome back to this exercise where we're gonna be using the actual 12 Bar Blues 2 12 Bar Blues and we're gonna be in the key of B flat. And here's what it sounds like. First, the regular version, and then we'll simplify it. But for us, what we're gonna do right now is just use single tones. All right, Now that we heard it, this is how we do it. We're gonna take that first finger on the first fret of the third string, and then we're gonna grab the third fret. We're not gonna play a single tone as soon as we play that note, our fingers going to be immediately sliding up to the fifth threat E one constant pressure or we're just gonna have, ah, dead tone so constant pressure down and then we're gonna slide it up. Here we go. Our first finger's gonna go on the third fret of the second string. Oh, then our third finger is going to go on the fifth fret of the segment. String way. We're gonna switch over to the first string and it's gonna be the first finger on the third front. No, we're just simply gonna go back the same way we came up the scale. So we're gonna go back to this three and then to the one followed by the three on 1/3 string. And now my hand and my fingers travelled down to that first fret B flat. We're going to do it all together real slow. So go ahead and play with me first friend, Fifth fret Third fret. Fifth friend, third friend, fifth fret third fret fifth fret. First fret for fingers there. 131313131 and four Fingers for strings. Four strings there. Third string, third string, second string, second string. First string, second string, second string, third string, third string. All right. After we get that done, this represents R B flat walk, and that also represents our first line of those four beats of B flat. This represents our four bars of B flat. After I'm done with my B flat, I'm gonna move on to an e flat tone. I was gonna look like this very similar to what b flat looked like, except I'm starting out on my second string first fret I slide up to the to the fifth fret next during first string. Third friend, third finger on the fifth. Threatened. And then I'm gonna play one higher in that it's a six. And then back to the five. Both of those tones air played with 1/3 finger. Now, when you go back to the second string fifth fret with my third finger, then my index finger back to that B flat tone. All right, let's put it all together real slow. B flat. Uh, fifth fret Next string, third friend, fifth Threat six. Threat with 1/3 figure. Go back to the third finger B flat. All right, Now that we have that, we're gonna put e flat and B flat together. Those two runs, so look like this. All right, we're gonna play it real slow. Index, slide 131313 We're not gonna go all the way down to E flat. This is where we switch to B flat B, Flat way, just like we didn't go down to B flat previously. We're not going to go down to e flat this time and we're going to switch over to B flat starts all over again. So both forms looked like this B flat. What? B flat. All right. Now, when it gets to our five chord, it's gonna be a series of four notes. I'm playing my five tone and I'm going up. 1234 Oh, so I'm adopt to the dog. I'm going to play the 1/7 friend. The fifth fret on the first trip. Fingers are 1313 strings are 2 to 12 in the exact same way that I've just got done playing that just like that, I'm going to recede back to the four chord, and I'm gonna play the exact same thing. But it's gonna be you first. Fret five to the first string third friend and I went back to the five into the one 13134 strings. They're gonna be 2 to 12 preference there. 1535 And then finally I end up on my B flat again. All right, so I have put the whole thing together in conjunction. It's gonna sound like this. So listen first. No way. Wait. Five back. Ah, all right. Once you feel comfortable playing the 12 bar blues in B flat and it's you know, it's a little bit farther along. It's It's the next step that's a little more challenging, minimal. We usedto work on, you know previously. So once you feel comfortable, spent a lot of time doing it before you actually get to the practice session. Feel comfortable for moving on, and when we are, we'll see you on the practice session. 63. 12 Bar Blues Practice Key of Bb with Backing Track - Bass Guitar: welcome to the 12 Bar Blues practice session. No, we're playing this at 85 beats per minute if at any time it's too fast for you. Um, you can simply go down to the bottom of your screen in the lower left hand part and slow it down. And if it's too slow for you, you can always use that, uh, faster part. You could do that. And, um, if that's too much for you, you can always listen to what the sounds like. You get a good visual. You're looking what what's happening. And then you can always go down to the course, tools the practice tools and find a, um, beat structure that works for you. Maybe something that slow already, something that's faster and make sure you do a lot of practice but pretty move on. So here we go with our practice for the 12 Bar blues and B flat. Here's five way back to the beginning way. 45 Beginning four 54 Get ready for the four way fine. Back to the beginning. Way. Five five one Last time. Five. All right, make sure you're doing a lot of practice before you move on that self practice in the next video. Again, it's 85 beats per minute. It's a little too fast, too slow down, Uh, go down to those those course tools and choose a little slower one for yourself. You want to challenge yourself. You want to get some extra practice and choose something that's faster than 85 beats per minute. All right, get that work done and we'll see you next lesson. 64. Practice with a Band Blues Key of Bb 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute? No. Okay. Who? Okay. Yeah. Why? 65. Example - Swing - Double Picking - 12 Bar Blues Key of A - Bass Guitar: Welcome back to our next exercise where we're still using the 12 Bar Blues. But we're gonna be in the key of a and we're going to stay in a close position of a. We're familiar with A as being open. And while there's still a 12 bar blues and open, what we're gonna do is still use that close position. So where isn't a When we go back to our base, players help a bit. We go g a. And that's the A that we're going to use. So everything is the same, except we're on different fronts now. So we're going from the fifth front to the 3579 5 to 9. Good. Now that we have our bearings on where our fingers are and our front placements are were using 397979795 The difference here, besides the key of a and B flat, is that we're going to use double plucking on single notes. And it's gonna be long, short, long, short. So get used to that pattern. Long, short, long, short, Long, short, long, short, long, short, Long short. That by itself is kind of a Swinney tone doesn't have long, long or short, short, short, short. It's long, short, long, short, long, short, long short. It's kind of like a trot. It's your choice on which notes to be able to play those duplicate tones on you can play on every one of the tones or just the edge tones, the beginning at the end or just middle tones. So it doesn't really matter where you do those double tones. That is long as you spice it up with double tones, so get used to playing some of those double tones in that Swinney type of plucking. Long, short, long, short, long, short, long, short. And when you're ready, we'll see you the next practice session. 66. Practice Session - 12 Bar Blues Key of A Double Picking Swing Style - Bass Guitar: welcome to our key of a 12 bar blues where we're doing double picking in a swing style. Long, short, long, short, long, short, long, short. And even while I'm going to be doing variations, you don't have to do it exactly like me. What you're going to try to do, however, is make your own choices on where you're going to double pick. Here's the five you go. Five. You going last time. - Do a lot of great practice practicing that next backing track in the next video, We'll see you in the next lesson. 67. Practice with a Band Swing Key of A 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute. Okay. Ok. Okay. And by the way, okay. Yeah. Okay. 68. Example - Hammer-ons and Tones - Bass Guitar: welcome back to our next exercise. We're going to try to discover hand Rose, and we're also going to discover a little bit about tones out of our base. And it's much different than this tone knob, even though we can turn it into considered a little different. We could also makes Intel adjustments by where our fingers are on the base. The further we get into the neck of the guitar, we have more dulcet dull tones. Get up here about midway in River for get a little bit more presence than if I get back over here by the bridge. He hasn't more presence yet, so depending on where and what you want, your bass sound like if you want to be more in the background. If you want to try to be more before round, depending on a lot of different variables, you could make your bass guitar has a different personality. Now onto the hammer on exercise, we're gonna be in the key of a and that gets us to a different type of backing track. It's just a simple guitar back on track, and it allows us to bear produces more stuff without competing for a musical space. Since we're in the key of a, we're going to start with a nice solid eight com, followed by a hammer on to the 80 from open. So our finger comes up in the air and slams down strings and where it comes down, it's right next to that threat where it's touching the front. It's not on top of the front. It's not behind so that their space we want to touch that. And the higher my figure goes, the more pressure that comes down on the strings. Then the better sound Get so note, followed by hand, Ron. Good. So yeah, give us note. Oh, by slap, then my hammer. Okay, so I have you. Let's do that again. Yeah. Then solid number. Yeah. I'm going to pluck the note as an open and that's gonna hammer down. Let's do that together. Here's a note spot open here a few more times. There you go. Oh, good. The next note that we're plays. So I've done this hammer followed by I think he do the five and two dozen, followed by a hammer. So I have chinos and followed by Hammer the middle back to my primary time. Okay, so it sounds like this. Put it all together. It's like this big note hammer secondary tone. The five followed by it doesn't happens again. All right, so I have a big toe hammer efforts After a slap. Two notes. Hammer chinos one more time being Note. Humor knows Hammer Geno's All right. So if I put together Yeah, time to know once I get into my pattern is simply going to go hat starting at the hammer. Oh, okay. So I'm starting at the hammer this time. She knows after the two notes I could to start the hammer and said Big long again. So the only kind of the big long what happens is first start to play engine goes away. So he's big note. No, they all right, So let's do it really slow. Here's the big note just to start. And now here's your cycle. Even slower. Yeah, Slap him too. Slide now, once a transition to my next chord, I'm gonna hit the primaries as a Handwara. Now, I switched to my primary of my next court. Same for happens, except I'm now in two streams. Lower, more transition. I'm hitting the secondary total of my forecourt. And then I'm gonna go up to my five chord e again on the transition. But I still have to do by secondary tone of my five or go back to my one, which is a secondary tone. Yeah. Now, making sure that we're still doing our double figures. We have index finger, middle finger, Middle finger does all the work on the second Territo. The next singer does all the work on the primary tone. So they have their individual roles. One takes a string. Okay, so we're putting together, we'll listen to it. So we're just listening. We're seeing how it sells. We're hearing the back on track for the first time. Here we go. - Okay . When you ready to play your hammer out effect to the key of a we'll see you in the practice section. 69. Practice Session - Key of A Hammer-ons - Bass Guitar: welcome to the practice exercise were using the key of a and doing hammer ons. Go as always. If you find this too fast, there's going to be backing tracks down at the bottom of this course in the course tools or practice tools, and it's gonna be important that you're comfortable or you're playing at a speed that you feel that you could accomplish. So we're moving along too fast. You're just go down there and choose a slower tempo. Or, if you want to play a little faster, you want to challenge yourself a little more. You can choose the faster speed. If this speed is perfect for you, continue to practice at this speed. But make sure that when you feel comfortable at the speed, challenge yourself. Go down to those backing tracks and she's a little faster speed each time and then start over again. Increase your speed and get better and playing the bass all right. The next track is gonna be that 85 beats per minute, as always for you to be able to practice, get a lot of good practicing. We'll see you in the next lesson 70. Practice with a Band Hammer Ons Acoustic Guitar Key A 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute? Yeah. Okay. No. Okay. Okay. Okay. 71. Example - 2nd Finger Closed Scale Key of G - Bass Guitar: All right, let's play a scale. This is gonna be a close scale. And the great thing about clothes scales is that when we play them, we can play them anywhere on our bass guitar That would want to. And this is what we call a second finger. Close scale, second finger. Close scale simply means you're starting with your second finger on whatever note you decide to start on. We're going to start on June note, and it's gonna be important that our fingers are able to stretch a little bit. And since we're starting on our six string, this is going to be the biggest stretch that we have. Now we're going to stretch at that 45 degree angle, but it's also going to require your fingers to stretch out a little more than just that standard stretch so that pinky is going to come down and do a little bit more of a stretch for those of us with a medium size hands. For those of us have large hands, he probably won't have ah issue with it, but you may need that extra downwards pressure from your pinky to be able to reach this note Also, these other fingers are going to be pulled back. Notice how they, um this is gonna be worth feels like it's comfortable and then we're going to have them bend backwards for that extra reach for this next part. So it's also going to be very important that our finger when we have our starting finger, it doesn't have the space in between work touches down and the fret, so it should be touching the front right behind it. Okay, now we're ready to start. And as we play this, we're always making sure that we're alternating our fingers. We'll start with that second finger on a G tone. That's the third fret. Then our pinky is going to be a whole step away or two frets away. That's what it means. A whole step half step is one Fred away, and we're gonna play that pinky and you're even if you can't reach all the way to the end of that front halfway is gonna be OK, but it might buzz on you if it starts to buzz on and you have to just press a little harder . No press too hard or it'll go out of tune So it's careful balance by not putting your finger on the, uh, correct spot. But for those of us with little bitty hands, you might not have a choice. So we're gonna have that two followed by the four, and then the one is gonna be on the index finger is gonna be on the second fret of this of the third string. The middle finger is gonna be on the third fret of the third string. And then you have that pinky again. In the fourth front, you have to 4124 Or don't unify soul The rainy soul. Our last notes are gonna be on the second string. Our first finger on the second fret la third finger on the fourth fret tea and then dough Dole Rainy fossil rto doughty. Last funny Rado. So we're just going to simply play the notes back and forth. 24124134 And then backwards, but without playing the fourth finger again. So we don't go notice how that fourth finger got played again. It's simply going to go instead to 4123434314 to you on for two. There we go. In the next video, we're gonna be using a backing track in on Lee with this G scale. So once you're ready for that practice will see their 72. Practice Session - Closed 2nd Finger G Scale - Bass Guitar: This is our practice session for our key of G scale. Closed started with that second finger one last time. - That's a great introduction into a closed scale. So do some practice. Get used to that stretching and we'll see you the next lesson. 73. Practice with a Band Closed 2nd Finger Scale Key G 95 BPM Bass Guitar: 95 beats per minute? Yes. Right? Okay. Right. Push? No. Okay. 74. Example - Closed Ab Scale - Variation - Bass Guitar: in this video, we're gonna be doing a closed second finger, closed a flat scale. This a flat is gonna be on the fourth fret of the fourth string, and we're gonna do the same clothes scale that we did before. But now we're starting on that fourth fret. There's gonna be a variation of this now. We're gonna be a long, short, long, short, long, short, long, short, low. And these fingers over here are going to start long the same finger for the short, short, long switch fingers. Same finger for the short, short, long, same finger for the short, short, long and so on Short, Long, short, Long, short. Long. And then you're going back down the scale, just as we did before. So get that under your fingers a little bit and we'll see you with the next practice session. 75. Practice Session - Closed Ab Scale Variation - Bass Guitar: years. Our practice session, along with our A flat closed scale, - great work. Do some practice and we'll see you in the next lesson. 76. Practice with a Band Closed Ab Key Ab 95 BPM Bass Guitar: 95 beats per minute. Okay. Right. Okay. Yeah. Mm-hm. Okay. 77. Example - Double Hammer on Key of D - Bass Guitar: welcome back, and in this exercise, we're going to use a double hammer on effect. It looks like this. We're in the key of D, and we're using the close position D. But at the very beginning, we're going to start with just a single note, followed by a double hammer on. So what's happening is I'm having a hammer on with my index finger, followed by a him or on with my pinky. So I have my note followed by a tap double hammer on my primary tone is on my second string . E hit it twice Oh e student a couple of times for more time and again followed by another double hammer on. But that double hammer on this time is gonna be on the second string, followed by two notes on our primary tone, and that cycle looks like this. Remember, that big, long tone is the Onley time. That it happens is the very beginning. Double hammer on two notes. All right after those two notes is gonna be another tat. All right, let's hear what it sounds like. - All right, once you're able to practice that a little bit and get up to speed to that 85 beats per minute, then we'll see you in the practice session 78. Practice Session - Double Hammer on Key of D - Bass Guitar: Here's our practice session for our double hammer on effect in the Key of D Way. - This will be the last time. - Okay , there's our double hammer on effect. Do plenty of practice, and, as always, if it's little too fast for you can always go down to the bottom part of your screen and slow the video down, or simply go down to the bottom of this course where the backing tracks are and find a backing track that's a little bit better suited. Toe the speed that you like, whether be slower or whether it be faster. All right, do lots of practice in the next section is just that 85 beats per minute by itself. So you have plenty time to practice. We'll see you in the next lesson. 79. Practice with a Band Double Hammer ons Key of D 95 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute? Yes. Yes. Yes. Yeah. So 80. Example - Closed C Scale with a new Trick - Bass Guitar: in the previous lessons, we've learned a close scale can move from one front to the other. So on we're gonna do is we're to take those things that we've learned from the fourth string and move it directly down to the third string. So the fingers are the same. The pattern is the same. But now it's gonna be a C scale. But we're starting on the third string instead. So 241 team for four. There we go. Now, remember, we did. In this scale, we're gonna be using slaps, lows slap. Same note after the slap. Then the next note, Bolland by that slap, and it repeats the process of really slow. Oh, they were going. We'll see you in the practice session. 81. Practice Session Closed C Scale - Bass Guitar: Here's our closed C scale in a practice session one last time. Get some great practice done in the next video and we'll see you in the next lesson. 82. Practice with a Band Closed C Key C 95 BPM Bass Guitar: 95 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. A. Okay. 83. Closed C# Scale - Bass Guitar: in this lesson. We're gonna do a close scale out of C sharp and we're gonna add some or interesting things to it Really did before. So in this particular version of C sharp, we still use the nurse Close scale. Really? What's happening is you have to starting notes We're going one note down on the scale back to the note in the scale that we have. And then after the next known skill Doe Dome Doe Tito, Ray Ray, let's do it really slow together. Good. The next section is 4 to 411 on the next string. We're gonna do that again real slow. Good. And now on this one finger, we're gonna go one for 1 to 2. And so if I was at the very beginning, I started out with 22 notes. And then I didn't end up with any of those other two notes on any of those consequent notes to 2 to 1 to 444 to 411141 to two. Now you're starting to see the pattern. So from the one we have 14122 21244 for 24111413331344 On the way back, it's gonna be 4431433 must do that slow. 4431433443143314311 for 2144214 to 2. 14211 for 2144214 to 2. Then we start at the beginning again. So you're gonna want to be able to write these down, Um, in a ledger in tab, however, you want to be able to learn it or memorize them. I'm really a fan of memorizing or writing down notes. I'm big fan of notes, so you can learn as ah kinesthetic learner would learn versus an audio learner or on a visual learner. There's a lot of moving parts in here, so you can just write those notes down. Um, so you could memorize them. If you're good at learning and listening, we're gonna go through one more time. So from the beginning, we'll go through each little part 22 to 1244 4 to 41114122 21244 for two, For 1114133 3134 All right, now we're going back down! 4431433 4431433 14311 for 214 for 214 to 2 to 142 to 14 to 11 for 21 for four last 1 to 14 to two, 214 to 2. All right. And if you can. If you've gotten comfortable with that, we're also gonna add a slap. All right, let's hear it once with a backing track and then we'll move on to the practice session. - All right, do some extensive practice on this version of your C sharp scale, and we'll see you in the next lesson. 84. Practices Session Closed C# Scale - Bass Guitar: Here's our practice session for the clothes scale. C sharp. Great work. Let's do some practice and we'll see you in the next lesson. 85. Practice with a Band Closed C# Key C# 75 BPM Bass Guitar: 75 beats per minute. Okay. First though. Okay. Okay. Okay. 86. Open G Scale - Bass Guitar: we have all of these clothes scales that we can play anywhere on our base. And really, the possibilities are endless. Now that we know are chromatic scale and our bass players alphabet, there is just really one more scale to learn. And that's this G open scale. Kind of like a close game, but it's going to be on open scale. That means we're using open strings. So it's gonna be that G tone with the to open, followed by one and then to, and that one is going to be on the second fret of the third string. The second finger is going to be on the third front of the third strings way of it. Two on the third fret. There's a G tone open first finger on the second front, the second finger on the third fret, followed by open D. Then the first finger goes on the second fret of the second string. Third finger goes on the fourth fret of the second string, and then we have open open Gene. All right, we're gonna play just nice and straight for this time around. All right? Now that we know are open G scale, we're gonna use a triple hammer on so we have G G play twice followed by Open hammer on hammer own. Next ring open. Let's do it real slow. Slow again. Notice There's a tap in between. Oh, after we have the G tone twice in the slap and we do those hammer owns, then we're gonna do one to open first finger. Really slow. I'm going to start out with the one hammer on my to play open and then won, and I'm muting that at the very end. And the very beginning is the next part is the G. So I'm playing the gene, complained the Open. I'm hammering on my first finger and then I'm playing the second finger. Really slow hammer pluck. So from the beginning we have The next part is open D Hammer Hammer open and my slap ends up muting it. So from the beginning we have. Then my next step is one hammer on the to open 11 So from the beginning we have. That's the last one to open Hammer Haner to open Hammer 33 and that three is plug roast slow hammer playing to open hammer play play all right from the beginning. A little slower this time we have. Then we have open 13 open in the open. The one is hammer on and the forest hammer on. And then I have G s A N Again. It's open. It's a hammered on the one hammered on the four And then I end up with a gene. So at the very beginning, we have All right, try to practice that. Try to get up to speed, and we'll see you in the next practice session. 87. Open G with Backing Track - Bass Guitar: in this last practice session. We're going to try to use your open G scale and want to try to put all those hammer ons in there. All right, we're gonna take everything. Will it learn in that last little park and then claim right now? Last time. 88. Practice with a Band Open G Key G 65 BPM Bass Guitar: 65 beats per minute. Okay. Things like that. Okay. Yeah. Okay. Okay. Okay. 89. Nashville Number System - Bass Guitar: In previous exercises, we've learned what the one in the four and the five chord were and how they look like a little l. So in the case of the key of B, I have this a tone B flat. Be so says my chromatic tone. And now when I have be, I know that my one tone is be because it's the first note of the scale or the first note of the key. And then I went and I went straight down one string and I found four. And then I went up to frets, and I found five. And that's been our base world so far. What we're gonna do is we're gonna discover the different types of sounds that we have on our base as far as it relates to a major scale, which ah, I would say good. 60 to 70% of the songs out there are and is the entirety of what we're working on in this particular course. So here's how I find the rest of my scales using my Nashville number system. We've already been using this national number system. This whole course, we didn't actually define it yet. When we say Nashville number system. We mean that instead of calling this a B note, the beginning note of my scale or the beginning note of my key, it's just simply a one. And it's easier to think about when we call cords or a scale by a national number system. It just simply means that the beginning of my note while being a B note is the first note of my scale. It's also as a bass player, the cord well, besides there being a 14 and five, there's eight notes in a scale. But consider the eighth note being doh Doh Ray Me facility dough. I'll get all the way to dough. I noticed that dough and dough are the same, so it's really thinking about it like seven different tones. Once I get back to that dough, I can just simply play the same one chord that I was always playing. Or I could play it octave up. No big deal. But in this case, in this depth of field that we're in, we're thinking about the one always being the one, and if I want to call it a eight, it's also going to be eight in the easy case of it. So what's gonna happen is it is very simple in we're not using the dots in this case like we have previously just to be able to stretch us a little bit. So I'm starting on this be tone. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna count up to France, so I count one to if I count up two fronts, I have my next number and that next number is two. So if this was a one, this is a tube. And typically, when we talk about music theory, our one is major. Our two is minor, are three is minor. Are Fouras Major are five. His major are six is minor in our seven is 1/2 diminished chord, followed by our one. This is a beginning based course, and we're when we're thinking about the things that we need to do as bass players in the beginning, we don't have to think consciously quite yet. We will down the road. We don't have to think consciously quite yet about minor chords or major chords or augmented chords or diminished chords or any other chords that sound fancy, right, because we only have to think of our REIT and our five. The thing that makes it a minor sounding chord or a major sounding chord is the three tone . The thing that makes a chord sound like a cord is three tones. When we play a chord, there's always a Route three and a five. When we played of cords as a bass player, we only play a one and a five or one and a 55 way below where that route is. We rarely ever play a three, and the three is the thing that dictates or gives the signature. Where that three is it. It's a little higher of it's a little lower. If that's a major sounding chord or minor sounding chord when it comes toe things we don't need to know about yet diminished chords and augmented chords. Our one in our five will change depending on what we want to play. But just know that in most cords that you'll ever run across there either minor or major chords, and we simply don't have to differentiate for ourselves when we read them. Oh, how do I play an a minor chord. Just play on a like you normally would. It will fit over an a major chord. And that's one of the beautiful things about playing the bass later on, when you have walking bass lines or 12 minor three aspects in jazz or minor chords, that will come later. We don't have to worry about it now. We don't have to worry about for a long time when I have this be tone, it's my one and I go up two fronts, as is my two chord and notice. I'm not calling it a minor to At this point, it's just to cord. And again. I won't call any of these major either, because of that same simple idea that I don't have to worry about majors or minors. So here's my one. I go up two fronts. Here's my two chord. I go up two frets and here's my three chord. I already know where my four is straight down from one. So 123 and then straight down from one's my 445 and then six Dole rainy, fast, so la ti. When I get to seven, it's still a whole step above where my six tone waas when we talk about whole steps. We're talking about two front set of time. We'll talk about half steps. It's one friend at a time. So 123456 and then here seven and the seven is in a major form. When we're talking about modern music today, what they've primarily done is they've taken the seventh tone and flattered it. One degree and all that means is where classical music waas, where traditional music theory is. It goes 123456 And there was that whole step that we just learned about seven. That whole step turns into 1/2 step. It's flatted one degree. There was a flat in it. One degree. That's what it means. So now in modern music, like I said, the the songs you hear on the radio today, unless you're talking about jazz aspects that may still use that major sounding seven. It'll look like this for most things, and when I say most things, I'm talking about 97% of the songs is 123456 1/2 step away to get to seven. Now that I know where my chords are out of the key of B and they could be anywhere. I was just starting on be. If they were on a G, they'd be 123456 and seven if they were starting on this F tone. Maybe 1234567 and so on. The same pattern happens anywhere on our base as long as we know the key signature, but specifically in B, we're going to be doing one, 23456 and we can use any effect that we've used previously. Whether it be open sounding chords, closed course or my two chords, I go up to He's my To Corn or the closed version, The three chord and the closer version, my forecourt or the closed version Next one is going to be my five chord were pretty familiar with these guys. My six chord I go up to yet and he's my seven and I go back to one. Now that we understand fully our national number system and how to be able to move our fingers into that 123456 and occasionally that seven chord in the next exercise, we're going to be learning a chord progression that includes a smiler six chord and for us . Good thing it's just a six chord. So when you're ready and you could have a good foundation, solid memorization of what your national number system is, we'll see you in the next lesson. 90. 6th Chord - Bass Guitar: we're ready to use our six scored in in this particular song. It's really not a song. What? It's a playing track for us to get used to play in the six scored. What's gonna happen is we're gonna start out on R B corn, and that happens for two measures. So two sets of four beats. Then the next measure is built up into to bees and two beats. And that's gonna be a six chord, followed by a five chord. And it goes back toe one for the last measure. So I count. 12341234 Those are my two measures of my beat own. Then I have to go to my six chord, which is four 56 and I'm going to play simply that six chord six. So the 12 followed by the the five chord being one, too. And then I go back to be 1234 So if I put it all together, I'm gonna do a little slower is 12342 to 3 for six. Court for 25 Court for 21234 begins again. 12341 2342 beats on a six. To me, it's on a five won t 34 If we want to get a little bit more involved with this particular type of music that we're gonna play, it's kind of this really pretty folky stuff. A great way to complement this type of a song without drums because it's pretty folky is toe. Add secondary tones and mutes in off beat pattern, and we'll discuss that a little later. For right now, it's just straight up chords, all right. Once you feel comfortable finding your six chord and then moving back to your one, it's a pretty big reach six 51 then go ahead and then move along to that next practice session. 91. Practice Session 6th Chord - Bass Guitar: with this particular backing track in this practice session, it's going to be hard for this little microphone toe. Pick up the small details of that countin. So instead of coming in with me, you're going to listen to the first line. That's four measures all the way through, and when it starts to repeat is when you'll come in. Here we go that way. Here's 6651 Yeah, here's that 66 fine. One. - Go on 651 one Last time. 65 one Great work. The next video is going to be simply that backing track, so you can have plenty of time to practice before you move on. And once you're ready, we'll see you in the next lesson. 92. Practice with a Band Key of B 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute. And what does it tell us? And then, once they belong, OK, we'll come back to the formula for the augmented book the other way around. But I could go on and on, on the other side. Which is one. We can take English as well. 93. Exercise Everything we learned Key of C - Bass Guitar: in this exercise, you get to have a Colin ation of everything that you've learned so far with mutes using off beads, having odd tones using hammer ons along with something that was just very familiar to us as we've practiced that six chord. And really, it's the same backing track that we were just worked with. But instead of the key of B, we moved to the key of C so that we can follow our dot structure one, 23 456 So it's a little easier for us to be able to find our cords because we're going to try to add things to it instead of having a big, long note. For my first note, I could have a open sounding cordant. I have a close sound in court. I could stand single is, and it's a mutes I could do a hammer on. I have to do a hammer on what the slat. The key is, is that you should try to be creative with this version of this type of a song because it has so much musical space for you to do so, and I'll just give some basic things that I might try, and I might try to start the song with a five instead of a one in an open position. We'll see how it works. I'm also going to try to use a five to slide up to wear the sixes. Oh, and I might play the six a couple times by itself. It doesn't matter what rhythm you played, since the sun lends itself toe a lot of different rhythms. And then I go back to the five. I want to play that in single. It's in several times, and then I finally go back to one. So I want to start out in this exercise. I'm gonna play that backing track and I'm gonna play it really simple first. And then I want to start adding in some small things that we've learned along the way to try to jazz up the aspect of the song. So just about anything you can do creatively is totally allowed in this setting. Once you start playing with the band, you'll have to understand the proper musical space needed for a song, and that's something far, much farther down the line to learn. Right now, you're just trying to have a good time playing your base practice, making up a bunch of fun stuff out of this version of the song and see and we'll see you in practice section. 94. Practice Session Key of C - Bass Guitar: this practice session is in the key, see? And we worked on our song that had the that six tone in it, and we worked on trying to come up with some different things to play. Rhythmically speaking, slapping, speaking, using our mutes, our clothes position are open position and really trying to go seamlessly between one to the other to try to make something happen. So what's gonna happen is I'm going to start to play very simply and just as it a listening perspective, and you don't have to follow exactly what I do. But I'm gonna play some of those interesting things that we talked about in the previous video. And then I'll back off and play on Lee the regular tones without playing anything interesting so that you have an opportunity to try out some of those things your mutes, your slaps, your closed position, some different rhythms with your fingers. - Now you try one last time, all right, do a lot of practice being creative. With that practice that next practices at 85 beats per minute, you find that it's a little too slow for you. No worries. Just go down to that practice session down below in the course, in the course tools in the bottom left hand portion of your screen. There's this slow down, speed up version for your video. You can always choose a faster backing track, but there's one there for your next video. Do a lot of practice trying to get it up to that speed, and if you can go faster than that, that's great. But get a lot of practice done. We'll see you for the next lesson. 95. Practice with a Band Key of C 85 BPM Bass Guitar: 85 beats per minute. Well, to think about taking, taking, looking at plant that grows. But don't forget that. Well, what can happen? But what we can do, the fact that every action potential coming back. But that doesn't work. I think for me. The subject matter. 96. CLASS TOOLS #1 - 60 BPM - Bass Guitar: 60 beats per minute. 97. CLASS TOOLS #1 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar: 80 beats per minute. Okay. Yes. Okay. Hi. Yes. Yeah. 98. CLASS TOOLS #1 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar: 100 beats per minute, - Yeah . 99. CLASS TOOLS #1 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar: 120 beats per minute. 100. CLASS TOOLS #2 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar: 60 beats per minute. 101. CLASS TOOLS #2 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar: 80 beats per minute. 102. CLASS TOOLS #2 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar: 100 beats per minute. 103. CLASS TOOLS #2 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar: 120 beats per minute. 104. CLASS TOOLS #3 - 60 BPM - Bass Guitar: 60 beats per minute. 105. CLASS TOOLS #3 - 80 BPM - Bass Guitar: 80 beats per minute. 106. CLASS TOOLS #3 - 100 BPM - Bass Guitar: 100 beats per minute. 107. CLASS TOOLS #3 - 120 BPM - Bass Guitar: 120 beats per minute. 108. CLASS TOOLS #4 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar: 60 beats per minute. Yeah. Okay. Okay. Okay. Great. Well, knows okay. 109. CLASS TOOLS #4 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar: 80 beats per minute. Okay. Yes. Okay. And okay. Okay. Okay. 110. CLASS TOOLS #4 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar: 100 beats per minute? Yeah. Yes. Mr. Okay. This is a. This is B. Okay. This 111. CLASS TOOLS #4 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar: 120 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Okay. Yes. Okay. Okay. Okay. 112. CLASS TOOLS #5 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar: 60 beats per minute? Yes. Okay. Okay. Mm-hm. Okay. And the way it is. Okay. 113. CLASS TOOLS #5 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar: 80 beats per minute. Your turn. But for this week, nice. Okay. Who's there? Really? Thank you. 114. CLASS TOOLS #5 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar: 100 beats per minute. Her first. Okay. A proof. Nice. Nice, please. And then yeah. 115. CLASS TOOLS #5 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar: 120 beats per minute. Here's the first okay. Okay. Yeah. Okay. Yes. Okay. 116. CLASS TOOLS #6 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar: 60 beats per minute. Right? Okay. Okay. Right. Okay. Okay. 117. CLASS TOOLS #6 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar: 80 beats per minute. Okay. No. Okay. Okay. Yes. Okay. Right. 118. CLASS TOOLS #6 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar: 100 beats per minute. Okay, sequence. What we do. Okay? Now another question. 119. CLASS TOOLS #6 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar: 120 beats per minute? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. 120. CLASS TOOLS #11 - 60 BPM - Bass Guitar: 60 beats per minute, - way , - way , - way . 121. CLASS TOOLS #11 - 80 BPM - Bass Guitar: 80 beats per minute. 122. CLASS TOOLS #11 - 100 BPM - Bass Guitar: 100 beats per minute. 123. CLASS TOOLS #11 - 120 BPM - Bass Guitar: 120 beats per minute. 124. CLASS TOOLS #12 - 60 BPM - Bass Guitar: 60 beats per minute. 125. CLASS TOOLS #12 - 80 BPM - Bass Guitar: 80 beats per minute. 126. CLASS TOOLS #12 - 100 BPM - Bass Guitar: 100 beats per minute. I don't 127. CLASS TOOLS #12 - 120 BPM - Bass Guitar: 120 beats per minute. 128. CLASS TOOLS # 13 - 60 BPM - Bass Guitar: 60 beats per minute. 129. COURSE TOOLS #13 - 80 BPM - Bass Guitar: 80 beats per minute. 130. CLASS TOOLS # 13 - 100 BPM - Bass Guitar: 100 beats per minute. 131. CLASS TOOLS # 13 - 120 BPM - Bass Guitar: 120 beats per minute. 132. CLASS TOOLS #14 - 60 BPM - Bass Guitar: 60 beats per minute way . 133. CLASS TOOLS #14 - 80 BPM - Bass Guitar: 80 beats per minute. 134. CLASS TOOLS #14 - 100 BPM - Bass Guitar: 100 beats per minute. 135. CLASS TOOLS #14 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar: 120 beats per minute, way, - way . 136. CLASS TOOLS #15 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar: 60 beats per minute. 137. CLASS TOOLS #15 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar: 80 beats per minute. Uh 138. CLASS TOOLS #15 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar: 100 beats per minute. 139. CLASS TOOLS #15 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar: 120 beats per minute. - Uh 140. CLASS TOOLS #16 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar: 60 beats per minute. - Oh ! 141. COURSE TOOLS #16 - 80 BPM - Bass Guitar: 80 beats per minute, okay? 142. CLASS TOOLS #16 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar: 100 beats per minute. 143. CLASS TOOLS #16 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar: 120 beats per minute. 144. CLASS TOOLS #17 - 60 BPM Bass Guitar: 60 beats per minute. 145. CLASS TOOLS #17 - 80 BPM Bass Guitar: 80 beats per minute. 146. CLASS TOOLS #17 - 100 BPM Bass Guitar: 100 beats per minute. 147. CLASS TOOLS #17 - 120 BPM Bass Guitar: 120 beats per minute. 148. CLASS TOOLS #18 - 50 BPM Bass Guitar: 50 beats per minute. 149. CLASS TOOLS #18 - 70 BPM Bass Guitar: 70 beats per minute. 150. CLASS TOOLS #18 - 90 BPM Bass Guitar: 90 beats per minute. 151. CLASS TOOLS #18 - 110 BPM Bass Guitar: 110 beats per minute. 152. CLASS TOOLS #19 - 50 BPM Bass Guitar: 50 beats per minute. 153. CLASS TOOLS #19 - 70 BPM Bass Guitar: 70 beats per minute. 154. CLASS TOOLS #19 - 90 BPM Bass Guitar: 90 beats per minute. 155. CLASS TOOLS #19 - 110 BPM Bass Guitar: 110 beats per minute. 156. Final Thoughts - Bass Guitar: thanks so much for taking this course. Take all of the things that you've learned in this course and use it as the best you can do your ability. These tracks will always be here for you. All the backing tracks will always be here for you. You should know enough stuff now. If you wanted to move on to the next steps of learning how to read music being in a band, you should have a good foundation about having the agility, the ability to create beats being in time, playing in tune, playing the right way so that you can move on and succeed in the next steps of your base plane. So good luck. Thanks again and we'll see out there.