POSCA Pastels For Beginners: An Introduction To Sketching With POSCA Pastels | Imran Mughal | Skillshare
Drawer
Search

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

POSCA Pastels For Beginners: An Introduction To Sketching With POSCA Pastels

teacher avatar Imran Mughal, Graphic Designer & Illustrator

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      3:47

    • 2.

      POSCA Pastels

      6:05

    • 3.

      Class Supplies

      1:47

    • 4.

      Application Methods

      10:11

    • 5.

      Surfaces

      10:09

    • 6.

      Special Surface

      5:13

    • 7.

      Techniques

      1:58

    • 8.

      Layering

      12:05

    • 9.

      Tonal Values

      6:26

    • 10.

      Small Sketch

      9:12

    • 11.

      Blending

      11:33

    • 12.

      Blending Sketch

      10:37

    • 13.

      Other Mediums

      10:24

    • 14.

      Full Sketch

      10:33

    • 15.

      Smoke & Sky

      3:51

    • 16.

      Boaty Boat

      10:58

    • 17.

      Details

      6:10

    • 18.

      Housey House

      10:08

    • 19.

      Light Burnishing

      3:59

    • 20.

      Final Details

      5:06

    • 21.

      Inspiration

      12:06

    • 22.

      Class Project

      3:42

    • 23.

      Final Thoughts

      2:44

  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

37

Students

1

Project

About This Class

Have you heard of POSCA Pastels? Are they not just glorified crayons? That’s what I thought when I came across these in my local art store – but to my astonishment, these were no crayons!! Let me introduce you to the wonderful world of Posca Pastels!

My name is Imran and I’m a graphic designer & illustrator and I am totally obsessed with traditional art mediums and naturally when I spotted these POSCA Pastels at my local art store, I was obviously intrigued and so just couldn’t help myself especially due to the sale, and so I got myself the full set!

This class is an introduction to POSCA Pastels and is suitable for all skill levels from beginners to experienced artists and everyone in-between!

We will start the class by going through the basics of POSCA Pastels and then quickly run through the essential class supplies that you’ll need to follow this class.

We will then delve into the application methods and see how these Pastels work on a few different paper surfaces.

We will then look at three different techniques focussing on layering, tonal values and blending… and we will practice each technique by completing a quick mini sketch.

We will then observe how other mediums such as ink, markers and coloured pencils work with these Pastels. 

And then, we commence the exciting part of completing a full step-by-step sketch using the techniques that we’ve learnt.

All the materials required for this class along with each exercise from all the lessons will be illustrated in the class resource sheet including a few of my own sketches with POSCA Pastels so do check it out!

After completing the lessons and the full sketch, you will be ready for your class project where you will be able to unleash your POSCA Pastel magic on your own piece of artwork!!

And remember, when you’ve completed the lessons and uploaded your lovely class project on the project gallery don’t forget to leave a review on the class so other amazing students like yourself can learn from your experience and enjoy the world of POSCA Pastels!

So what you waiting for? Grab yourself a nice warm drink, get your POSCA Pastels ready, and lets get started with the class.

 

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Imran Mughal

Graphic Designer & Illustrator

Teacher

I'm Imran - graphic designer & illustrator based in the UK. I have over 10 years experience in the field of graphic design and illustration in both traditional and digital output and absolutely love all things to do with art!

In addition to my full-time graphic designer role, I am also the art wellbeing lead for my organisation where I deliver wellbeing classes and advocate mindful colouring to relax and de-stress - check out my published colouring books for adults.

In addition to my design & illustration life, I am an active father of 3, oh and I'm naturally addicted to coffee! My illustration classes are all about getting back to basics mainly with traditional mediums and escaping away to relax with art!

I love to sketch, draw and illustrate on a daily basis so fo... See full profile

Level: All Levels

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
    Exceeded!
  • 0%
  • Yes
  • 0%
  • Somewhat
  • 0%
  • Not really
  • 0%

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello and welcome to my class, Posca pastors. Four beginners. My name is Imran, and I'm a graphic designer and illustrator, and I'm totally obsessed with traditional art mediums. So it comes to no surprise that when I saw these fantastic pastels in my local art store, I just couldn't help myself, and I went ahead and ended up purchasing this lovely set over here. And because it was on offer, I ended up getting two. So I've got two sets of these lovely pos capastols. So I know what you're thinking. What are these pos capastols all about? Are they just glorified Crayola crayons? Well, let me tell you this. They are not glorified crayola crayons, and you'll come to see why when you start the class. This class is an introduction to post capastols, and it's aimed at all levels of skill from beginners, all the way to professional artists and everybody in between. We will start off the class by going through the ins and outs of these post capastls, and then we'll quickly run through the class supplies that you're going to need to continue and follow along in this class. We will then delve into the application methods of these postcapastols and see how they work on different paper surfaces. We will then look at three different techniques, focusing on layering, tonal values, and blending, and we will practice each technique by completing a quick mini sketch. We will then look at how other mediums such as ink, markers, and a range of colored pencils work with this medium to see how they interact with these post capastls. Then we will commence the exciting part of completing a full step by step sketch, following the lessons that we learned and implementing those lovely techniques that we went through. All the materials required for this class, along with each exercise, from all the lessons will be illustrated in the class resource sheet, including a few of my own lovely little sketches that I've done using these post capastors for you to be inspired from. After completing your lessons and the full sketch, you will be ready to unleash that Posca pastel magic onto your very own artwork for your class project. And remember, once you've completed all of the steps of the lessons, done the full sketch, and completed your class project, take a few pictures of them and upload them to the class project gallery, and don't forget to leave a lovely review on the class of your experience so that other fantastic students, like yourself, can find the class and learn from your wonderful experience of Posca pastors. So what are you waiting for, grab yourself a iced drink, get yourself a nice cake, get comfy and relax, and grab hold of your posca pastors. And let's get started with the class. 2. POSCA Pastels: Let's now start off the class by going through some of the basic features and the ins and outs of what Posca pastors are all about. Poscpastls are made up of wax, oil, and pigment. They have a smooth color application and finish. They leave a gorgeous matt dry appearance once you've used them, and there's no waiting time for them to dry, and they are just fantastic compared to cheaper alternatives like crayola crayons. So no, these are not just like crayola crayons, they're far superior. They have superior materials inside them, and their finish is just immaculate. These pastls are robust and easy to sharpen, which is a huge advantage. They're easy to hold like a pencil or a pen or a normal drawing instrument, so you don't need to spend ages trying to figure out how to hold them. They are very natural and easy to use. And therefore, because you can have a sharp point, they are good for detailed work, and that is a huge advantage. These pastls can be applied as they are dry on different surfaces. They can also be diluted with solvents, and they can also be pliable under heat. But we're not going to be diluting them with solvents or heating them up. That's for another adventure. We're just going to stick to the standard application using them dry as they are on different surfaces. In terms of color options, they have 24 colors in the main set, and that's the set that I've got. They can also be purchased separately from different vendors, and they can also, in some places, be available as smaller subsets that have a specific type of color variation or color matching code or just a special selection for a certain purpose. A nice thing about the colors with these are that they are nicely labeled with the color name and the color code. So if you run out of a particular color, you can easily replace it by just purchasing that individual exact color again to continue that color journey in your set. However, some of the names of these colors can be a little bit dodgy in my opinion, but that's all good. These are very unique pastors. They have a unique formula generally. When you think of pastors that contain wax in them, you tend to go towards the crayola idea. You think that these are just crayola wax crayons, but they're far from being crayola. They have more wax in them than oil and they are more vibrant in terms of color, and they have very little sediment in them, and the field and application of these actual pastors is way superior to Creola, but there's nothing wrong with Creola. And because they have more wax than oil in them, I tend to refer to these as wax pastels. So you'll hear me saying, Oh, look at these lovely wax pastors over here, we're going to be using these wax pastors. And sometimes I might just say these pastors, pasta pastors. You'll hear me say wax pastors throughout the class. These pastels can be used on any paper surface. They can be used on plastic and wood. Yes, they can. They can be used even on glass and metal. So look at that. Totally versatile. However, in this class, we're going to be concentrating on the paper surfaces, and we're going to leave the plastic wood and glass and metal for another day and for another adventure, if that's what you really want. These past stores are quite expensive, especially if you go ahead and buy the full set of 24. But again, you do have seasonal offers throughout the year. So if you really want to get that full 24 set, then what I'd do is just wait until the offers are on and keep checking the prices, and then maybe get them then. I personally bought mine when they were on offer, especially toward the Christmas time, when the art stores usually put quite a lot of the materials on offer, and I found myself an absolute bargain. So I didn't just get one. End up getting two. So I got two sets for myself, and they've been fine. The wear down of them is very, very slow, so they do last a long time. And again, you can buy them individually. So if you just want to maybe have a black and a white and maybe three primary colors just to start off with to see whether you like them or not, that would be a good idea. And that would work out a lot less expensive than buying the whole set of 24. But again, it's an absolute fantastic medium, and I personally think they're well worth the price, but do look out for those seasonal offers. It's always a good idea with whichever colors you have to do a color swatch of the colors along with the color codes, because they come with the color number codes and the color names on them. And that way, you'll be able to keep track of which pastor you've got. And maybe if you haven't got all of them, it's a good idea just to build up a beautiful, little chart, color swatch, so you have something to refer back to. Now the names of these colors can be dodgy on some of them. They do make me laugh. Because they just have their own version of their names, whereas I personally think a color might be a yellow, but they've labeled it as an orange or vice versa. But yeah, they will make you laugh on some of them how they've actually gone ahead and done the color naming of these colors. But again, it makes no difference. They're 24 colors, and they're all gorgeous. And that's all it is. Nice and easy posca pastors in a nutshell. Now we can move on to what you need for your class supplies. 3. Class Supplies: Okay. So for this class, the essential supplies that you will need in order to follow along are number one, the posca pastors themselves, regardless of how many you have, even if you have five, three, ten, or the full size of 24, you can still do the class with the colors that you have. But if you do have the full set of 24, then that would be absolutely fantastic. Then number two, you need any pencil to do sketching with because we're going to be doing a little bit of sketching that we start off initially with and then use the pastors. Number three, you need some smooth paper. Again, we're going to go through the types of paper surfaces that these work on. So maybe have a look at that lesson before you go ahead and buy yourself some paper. But most likely you're going to have a decent smooth paper lying around somewhere, and they even on printer paper because they're so versatile. You don't need to really go out and buy a beautiful, expensive, really high value cartridge paper with beautiful texture on it. You can even use your printer paper for it. I've done loads of little sketches on printer paper with these pastels. So number four, you definitely need a sharpener. So I would suggest have a sharpener that's decent because you will need to sharpen these to do detailed work like we're going to do in the class. So they were the essential supplies that you need to go through and follow along in this class. Again, if you don't have all of the essential supplies, that's absolutely fine. You can still watch the class and then go get those supplies, or if you want to get the supplies first, then watch the class that's entirely up to you. And now we can move on to the exciting stuff. 4. Application Methods: Okay, Dokey, Welcome back. Let's now start off by going through some of the simple application methods of our wonderful post pastels. So let's get our attention back to the screen, and we have our beautiful set of 24 colors. So I'm just going to pop these open. I was just doing a little bit of sketching with these before, so they're going to be randomly placed in the tin. You can see we've got our lovely set of 24 over here, all mixed up and jumbled up. But that's all good. So let's now maybe select a blue shade over here. And then maybe a nice kind of magenta shade, this kind of like purply pink shade over here. Now, if you want to follow this step by step by using the same colors that I'm using, then I'll mention the numbers of those colors just for reference, and then we've got the same colors for the exercises that we do in the class. So for the blue, it's the number ten, and for this magenta color, oh, I've gone ahead and I've gone ripped off that number. So that's not good, is it, but it's that magenta color. Again, you don't need to use the exact same colors that I've got. Just use whichever colors you want from your set, and we're good to go. So we've got this magenta color, and we've got this bluish shade. Preferably use darker colors for these exercises so that they can show up a little bit better on the paper and surface that you use. So let's now grab hold of these two and move the rest out of the way. Fantastic stuff. So what we're just going to do now is we're just going to get a sheet of paper more on the surfaces and the types of surfaces to use with these pastors in the next lesson. But for now, I'm just going to be using this standard bristle board paper, which I will go through in the next lesson. So just grab hold of any sheet of paper that you have, just to practice these application methods, it's super simple and easy. So let's start off with our blue color. And as I mentioned in the previous lesson, you can sharpen these. So what I've done is I've got this sharpen point over here, if you can see on the camera that we've got this nice, kind of like Crayola crayon star held sharpen bit on one end. On the other end, I've actually not even taken off that piece of paper, but with the purple one, with this kind of magenta shade, you can see on one side. We've got this kind of like the normal shape of the crayon or the pastor, should I say, and then we've got the sharpened side. It's always a good idea, in my opinion to actually have a sharpened side and an unsharpened side because it just gives us a nice variance. So grab hold of your blue color or whatever color that you want, and we're going to effectively just hold this like a pencil. So I can hold a normal pencil, just like this in your hand, rest it in the most comfortable position. We're just going to go ahead and start using this upward and downward motion like this to create a nice swatch of color, and it's as simple as that, like you would do with any other dry medium. We're just going up and down using this sharpened part of our pastel. So just like adding in that swatch, going in that up and down direction. And you can see it's just so easily applicable to the surface that we use. Now, as I mentioned in the previous lesson, these can be used on multiple surfaces, on wood, on glass, even on plastics, but we're going to focus more on sketching on paper in this class. I will let you experiment at your own leisure. So just finishing off this first swatch, using the sharpened part. And then what I'm going to do is, I'm going to go this direction. So we've got this diagonal direction here. So again, just up and down, nothing too complicated, just showing you how to apply these as you would normally do using your other dry mediums or even wet mediums in some circumstances. So just up and down, nice and easy in a diagonal motion. And then what I'm going to do is, I'm going to go ahead and do a circular motion. So just like this, create these nice, little circular patterns going round and round. Filling up that area, and you can see that the texture just looks fantastic. So just like that circular motion. And then for the final one, what we're going to do is, we're going to go ahead and do exactly what we did on the first one here, so just a quick little swatch of up and down. With medium pressure, again, the pressure that you use will depend on how quickly the lay down of color will be. So you can see now that I'm getting quite a lot of this kind of breakdown of the tip, you get this kind of like, you know, that kind of dust if you like. So you will get that because this is a wax material, but it will be a lot less than when you would use a normal standard crayola crayon. So, again, that's one of the huge advantages of using this, that the breakdown or kind of like the kind of dusting off of it, the wear down of the actual pastoral is very minimal compared to pure wax crayons. So again, Just finished off this swatch like we did on the first one over here. And then what I'm going to do is, I'm going to go in over it again by using the diagonal swatch. So just like this, going to use that diagonal swatch to just fill in the area, and this is just effectively a layering technique. But again, we're going to go more on to layering and blending in the coming lessons. This is just backward and forward in that diagonal motion. And then I'm going to finish off by doing that circular motion on top. Won't be able to see the exact results. But what this does is it just gives you a complete swatch of color. So you can see if we take a look back now, we've got four lovely little swatchy swatches with our blue lovely posca pastol, and you can see that the application was so quick and easy. Fantastic, isn't it? So what we can do is we can just compare this and contrast it to what it would be like if we use unsharpened part. So with my magenta color here, I've got the unsharpened part over here, and then I've got the sharpened. So let's switch to the unsharpened part. So we've got the unsharpened part like this. And again, you can see that the lay down is really easy. What I would suggest is that if you've got a lot of lay down of color to do in a big area, then you're probably better off using the unsharpened, more natural crayon tip like this. And then when you've got details to do, then go ahead and use the sharpened part rather than using the thicker unsharpened area. And that's just to save yourself from having too much of a wear down. So you can see that I've laid down some color, and I don't have any of that kind of like wear down dust that's falling off like I did with the sharpened parts. So that's something to bear in mind. If you don't want too much of that dusty kind of like thing falling off, all those kind of, like, like, little clouds of fluff falling off of that pigment Then use the thicker point because that way, the laydown will be a lot more smoother, and it can be less kind of wasteful. But again, there's a lot of advantage of using this tip. So again, I'm just going to go ahead and I'm going to quickly do this with the unsharpened bit so that we can have a complete picture and we can see what results we have. Okay, Dokey, now you can see that we've got a nice swatch, and if you actually have a look at the side by side, you wouldn't even be able to tell which way we actually laid the application down. So whether you did it with the tip sharp tip that we sharpened or the unsharpened tip, it creates a fantastic lay down of that beautiful pig. We can also do is, I can quickly go through maybe just showing you a little bit of a detailed swatch. So if we look at another color. Okay. So for this one, I've got this number 15 color over here. This is effectively like a really nice, bright, reddish orange shade. So with this, what I'm going to show you is, I'm going to just show you using that sharpened tip. We can go in and create a detailed cross hatching effect. So just like this, just like you would lay down using colored pencils. You can see it produces this beautiful hatching lines. And then what you can do is go in diagonally. Like this, and you can vary the thickness of those lines that you create and create this wonderful cross hatching, effectively colored pencil effect. So again, we've got the three different angles over here with the single lines of hatching, and then we can go ahead and start doing the cross hatching overlay. So just go ahead like this. Apply that beautiful pigment so smooth and velvety, it's effectively just like using a colored pencil without the wood casing, isn't it? So you've got all that wonderful pigment. Love a bit of pigment. So just the cross lines going across to create that cross hatching effect, and you can see how beautiful that is, how fast and easy it is to produce wonderful, wonderful, little effect. And then, again, with the circular motions, just going in, just for completeness to create this kind of lovely little swatch, of textured color. Looking back at all three now, you can see, we've got some gorgeous results with the application method, and that's it for the application method for this class. We'll be using all three of these application methods in the coming lessons. So let's start moving on to the more exciting stuff. 5. Surfaces: Oh, these plants. So, I need to give them a good dusting them. Look at that. Covered in all dust. That's not good for me class. No, it isn't. Oh, might as well have a couple of sips of this gorgeous coffee. Oh, that's a good one. That is such a good coffee. That beautiful stuff. Okay, welcome back. Let's now continue with the class. I put me coffee on the side. Otherwise, I'm gonna get it spilt all over the place. By the way. That was a gorgeous cup of beautiful, aromatic, lovely chocolate bean coffee soper. Hit me right on the spot. So let's now continue with the class. And if I can bring your attention back to the screen, we've got some nice looking columns of different papers. Yes, we have. So this is all about the different surfaces that we can use our postcapastls on. And as I said, in the previous lessons, I'm only going to be concentrating on the paper type surfaces. I'm not going to go ahead and experiment on different hard materials, porous materials or any type of those funky materials that they say that these crayon pastors can work on, I'm going to let you do that by yourself. But again, let's concentrate on the standard paper for sketching. So over here on the screen, I've got four lovely little columns with the names of the papers and their paper weights on top. And I'm just going to quickly go through the four of these. So we have a nice little example illustrated to see how these pastels work on different paper surfaces. So Generally speaking, we want to be using these on a nice smooth surface, and that is the first column. This first column is the Bristol board smooth paper, and the weight of it is 240 GSM. This is the one that I actually did the previous lesson in. So if we have a quick look at the sheet that we did, so this sheet that we did, it was this way round, wasn't it? Yes, get it the right way round. So this sheet was the bristle board, that first column. And I think personally, I really like the feel of the pastors on this sheet. It works really nice. But again, you may have a different preference. You may like surfaces that have a little bit of texture on them, and we will explore that on these other columns. So let's just put this one back so it's out of the way. Okay, fantastic. Let's now have a look at our colors. So I've got three colors over here. Again, I'm going to go ahead and put the numbers on the screen of the colors as I use them. But just to quickly run through the m, I've got the number 14 here, which is a kind of brownish orange shade. Then I've got a number three, which is just an orange shade. And then I've got this one, I think it's a number 12. I've got that back paper ripped off the number, and that's just a purple shade. Should all come up on the screen. And again, you want to have a look at this after, just watch the video, and then follow along after, that's absolutely fine. Everything will be listed in the class resource step by step as we go through the lessons for you to follow along later on at your own pace. So let's have a look at the screen, and let's maybe start off with our first color, and that one is the number 14. Move them to the side. And all I'm going to do here is, I'm going to go ahead and create a nice swatch. Using those application methods that we did in the previous lesson. So I'm just going to go ahead and I'm going to do the up and down method one application that we did. So just over here like this, I'm just going to go ahead and create a swatch by moving it up and down. And as expected, this is very similar to the one that we produced in the previous lesson because we used this lovely bristle board smooth paper. Fantastic paper, this, the lay down, and the texture is super smooth, and it works really well. So just like this up and down on this one, can see nice bit of lay down. Really nice and smooth and velvety over there. Now let's move on to the second paper, and this one is the mixed media paper. Now, this paper has a kind of slight bit of texture on it. This paper is good to use maybe on light wet work and dry mediums. But again, it's just a kind of grade higher in terms of texture from the bristle board. If we go ahead and do this on here, can see immediately, I mean, I can feel it while I'm doing this, you won't be able to feel what I'm feeling, but you'll be able to see what I'm doing. But when you go ahead and test different papers, you'll be able to feel how that beautiful pigment comes off and attaches in its application onto the surface, and every surface is different. You can see just going backward and forward in that same motion like we did on the first one, we have a very different result. It's subtle, but it's different. So it all depends on your preference of what type of results you want to achieve. Now move on to the next one, and this one is my lovely watercolor paper. This is a cold pressed watercolor paper, so we're going to have a nice bit of texture on this, and this one is slightly heavier at 300 GSM. So let's go into this one. Oh, and you can see, look at that. We've got that beautiful kind of gaps coming and appearing. Effectively looks like more of a crayola crayon, so you wouldn't know whether you've used these lovely, fancy pastels, or whether you've just gone ahead and used a crayola crayon when you do this application, cause there's so much gap in between that surface, the tooth of the surface, it produces a beautiful texture just like that. We've got our third texture on our third paper, again, very different from the previous two. And then finally, I've got a kind of special type of paper called acrylic paper, and this is a mix between watercolor and the mixed media. It has a kind of canvas texture on the surface, so it will give different results. Again, you may not have these papers at home. I'm only illustrating this to you so that you can see how these pastores look on different surfaces that are fairly different from each other. So you have a bit of an idea when you come to doing them, and this will kind of guide your preference into what you like. So this is the acrylic paper that has a canvas texture on it, and you can see, look at that. Beautiful. That, isn't it? Look at that. Stops gorgeous. I love how this turns out. I mean, this is a 240 GSM paper, so it's thinner than the watercolor paper. But just look at that pattern. You've got these lines of that canvas going up. I think that looks absolutely fantastic. Beautiful. It's like an etched look, isn't it? Lovely stuff. So I'm just going to move a bit of that dust off. We've got some dust on there. Let's just get rid of that dust. And you can see, we've got our four different papers over here, so same swatch, using the same color, and we've got four beautiful results. So what I'm going to do next is I'm going to use the other color, so let's maybe use the orange, so we have a brighter color so that we can just compare it, and I'm going to do the same across there. So let's quickly do that one now. Okay, so you can see now we've got that similar swatch in a different color, and you can see it just looks absolutely fantastic. Have a play around with this with the colors that you have in your set, and with the different surfaces that you have, you may only have two or three different surfaces. That's absolutely fine. Just give this an experiment and have a look. It will just get you more familiar with this lovely lovely medium. So, what I'm going to do on the next one here is, I'm going to use that purple color, and I'm going to go ahead and do a bit of a cross hatch and then repeat that across all three. So let's just concentrate on the first one now. So I'm just going to go in and maybe just do some cross hatching lines like this, so coming down like we did in method three in the previous lesson. And then I'm just going to do some lines going across to produce that cross hatch. Then maybe just do some more lines in a diagonal way like this, just to add on to that pattern of the hatching lines, and then maybe just with my lovely pastoral, just use a circular motion like this, just to darken up the bottom left hand side, and then just sharpen it out a little bit. And then just like that, you can see we've got this lovely, effectively kind of swatch of texture cross hatching going on over there just to make it visually different from the previous swatches to see how they compare on the different surfaces. So again, all I'm going to do is, I'm just going to go ahead and do that for the other three, and then we can have a look and analyze and see what results we get. Okay, ok, now you can see that we've got the four lovely swatches of our cross hatch pattern. And you can see that the results are quite different. We've got the more smooth papers on the left hand side where the lines are more prominent, and then we've got the more highly textured surfaces where you can't really see much of that cross hatch overlay that we did. So again, these are the effects of the surfaces that we use with these lovely mediums, and you can see the results. Y. And it will be your preference which type of surface you prefer to use. So that was the surfaces part, but I do have a bonus surface, which is probably one of my favorite types of surfaces, and I think I'm going to move on to that one next. 6. Special Surface: Okay, let's now talk about the final surface, and this is the one that I get most excited about, especially with this medium, and that is the lovely toned gray surface. Yes, it is. So I've got a sheet of beautiful toned gray paper over here. And what I'm going to do is, I'm going to actually go ahead and shift the other one down. That we have more room to actually see this, you've got the toned gray paper, and this is a fantastic paper to work with, especially with these pastors, and you'll see when I come to demonstrate this later on in a class. But what I'm going to do is I'm just going to create some swatches over here so we can compare and contrast it to what it looks like with the normal white color paper. Now, this paper is 180 GSN thickness, and it's called Tone gray and it's by Strathmore. It's a very thin paper. It's very compressed and smooth. It has a nice grain to it, but it doesn't show through on the actual material and medium itself. Let's demonstrate this enough talking and more demonstrating. If we just have a look at what we did previously, we used our normal swatches. If I just do a normal swatch over here, and then maybe use the orange that we used before to just do another swatch. You can just see that the look of that swatch looks very different compared to when you have it with white paper or off white paper, this gray tone just brings out an absolute fantastic result. And it actually comes in very handy when you want to do highlights. And again, we're going to be doing that in the coming lessons where we actually use highlights, and you can add white color to this, and it just gives it that pop. So let's actually go ahead and do that after I've done this purple swatch. Let's just go find me white. So I've got me white pastel here, so if we just add the white onto this, you can see, look at that. Beautiful. That isn't it? Gorgeous stuff. Now you can imagine when we add white to do highlights or do blending, we can get some fantastic results. Now, if you use this white on the white paper or on an off white paper, you're not going to really be able to see it. It's going to be very difficult to see that advantage of having this gray tone or a kind of a muted slightly darker shade tone just gives you a more range of colors to use. So, for example, if we get a light gray color, so we've got this light gray color, this will look really nice on here as well. So if I just move this to the side, and we can just do a nice swatchi swatches. So you've got your light gray color over here, and you can see so easily that gets applied onto the surface. And then we've got this really nice kind of peach color. Look at that fantastic that against that beautiful toned gray background, that just looks absolutely beautiful. And again, as I mentioned, in the earlier lessons, that it's always a good idea to do a swatch. And if you have this toned paper, I would suggest doing a nice swatch in addition to your normal paper as well, because that'll just give you a nice range of colors to view with your beautiful, beautiful posca pastor. So maybe we're just adding a couple more colors here. I'll see which other light shades we have. I've got this green, this line green, really like that lime green. It's a bit It's a bit of one of them colors. It's like, Maite isn't it, either you love it or you don't. So it's not one of my favorite colors, but it is a useful color when it comes to blending, and you'll come to see that in the next lessons. So let's just maybe just add this lovely pinky pink color over here, just to complete our swatchy swatch. On this great own paper. And again, if we move this slightly higher, and we go ahead and do this crosshatche hatch, we can have a little bit of a contrast. We could actually do the crosshatche hatch on this side. I think that'll be good enough. So I'll just get that same purple that I did, and I'm just going to follow that pattern over here, so just going to do some lines coming down. And you can see because it's a smooth paper, the pastel runs really nicely on that paper. There's no issues of it stopping or blotching or or gathering up It's absolutely fantastic. So just like that, a nice little bit of a cross hatch swatch, and maybe just a couple more lines there to neaten it off. Look at that beautiful stuff. So you can see that on the gray one paper, it works really well. We've got no issues at all, and it's one of my favorite papers to use, especially when producing So, that's it for the surfaces. We quickly went through five different surfaces that we use these pastors on. Try out the surfaces that you have, do these little exercises, these swatches, a few cross hatching to test out these beautiful pastors and see what results you can achieve. So now let's move on. Say the next one. 7. Techniques: Oh, I do need to read this one. This series. It's such a good series that. Oh, what do we have here? Oh, do you know what? I think I could actually improve on this artwork. I don't think I've used the techniques very well. But I think this one looks rather nice. Yes, it does. Well, I think I might explore a little bit about the techniques that I've used on this one. I think that's a great idea. That's a great idea. Okay, welcome back. Let's now get back to the class and start the exciting stuff of delving in to the techniques that we're going to use with our beautiful postcapac. So, if I can bring your attention back to the screen, let's have a look. We've got a nice sheet of lovely bristle board paper. I'm going to be using this same paper now throughout the class. I may change it a little bit and bring in my special paper, and you remember which one? That was, yes, but I'm going to leave that as a surprise at the end. So let's just continue. So, as I said, we're going to be looking at three techniques. The first technique that we're going to look at is layering, and it's just going to be a basic exercise that you can follow. And we're going to do a quick little sketch demonstrating that layering technique. The second technique that we're going to look at is tonal values. We're going to look at how to build tonal values with these lovely pastors, and then we're going to do a little sketch, again, demonstrate that lovely technique. And finally, we're going to be doing a blending exercise to show you how we blend with two colors and how we add dark and light using these pastors. And again, we're going to do a little sketch at the end. So after you've done all the three techniques, you'll have three lovely little sketches that you can use as a reference for when you do your class project. So exciting stuff. Let's get back to it. So over here again, we're going to start off with technique number one, and that is the layering technique. 8. Layering: Get back to it. So over here again, we're going to start off with technique number one, and that is the layering technique. So for this one, I've got two colors here. So these two colors, the numbers will come up on the screen. And if you've got similar colors like this and you want to follow along, then go ahead. Absolutely fine. If you want to use different colors, go ahead and do that. I'm going to leave that entirely up to you. So what we're talking about here in layering is basically just an advancement of the application method that we went through in the earlier lessons. So I'm going to get my orange here, this orange shade, and I'm going to use the sharpened part for this. All I'm going to do is I'm just going to lay down a nice little swatch of orange in a decent amount of size, so maybe a nice, big rectangle like this. I'm going to apply this with just medium pressure. So I'm not pressing down too hard. Again, the pressure will depend on how much of that beautiful pigment comes onto your surface. So just like this, just going ahead and just adding this lovely little swatch backward and forward using that method one from our application methods by just using medium pressure in this upward and downward direction. So that's enough for that. Now what I want to do is, I want to go ahead, and I want to add another layer to this. So I'm going to add another layer, and I'm going to start off in the bottom area over here. So where we've got the pigment in this bottom area, I'm going to start here, and I'm just going to add in a another layer. And I'm going to bring it down a little bit just so that we have a bit of a stretch. So just like this, using medium pressure again, just to add in that second layer of pigment on top of that first, and then I'm going to go back again so we have a strip of that second layer, and it looks absolutely fantastic. Okay, ok, so again, I'm going to just add in a third layer onto that strip that I've just added in to make it a bit more prominent. Now you can see if we look back at this, you can see that we've got this lovely layered effect where we've got the first initial layer there, which is lighter and more coarse. Then we've got this more smooth layer, which is two to three layers on top. That's all it is with layering technique. It's just applying your medium pastoral onto the paper, using method one or whichever method you prefer, going in one direction, and then just going over again. Another layer in the same direction. Now, what we can do is we can change the direction, and that will fill in more of the area like we did in the previous lessons. If we go ahead and maybe just use the diagonal direction like this and start off on the first layer, and then using that same medium pressure, just keep continuing all the way down to the end, where the second and third layers are. So you can see what this does is, it effectively blends into that darker layer that we've got of color, and it looks a bit more complete. You don't have this kind of division line showing up too much. And again, if we start doing it again from the bottom left hand side, from where the heavier layers are, just like this in a diagonal fashion, going all the way to the top. To complete it. You can see we've just basically layered four different layers of that same color. And look how rich and saturated that looks. It's absolutely fantastic. So what we're going to do now is we're going to do the same again with another color just so that we can have a nice little comparison, and I've got this lovely shade over here. And then again, all I'm going to do is I'm going to go in, just like I did with the first one, do a complete swatch, similar size. And then once I've done that, we can have a look and see how they turn out. Oh kiki. Now you can see we've created this second swatch, and it looks absolutely fantastic. Four layers on that, lighter layer on top, and then we've got the darker layers at the bottom. So that was the first technique. Now, what you can also do is once you've got a light layer down, so for example, you've got this light layer over here, you can go in with your color and start doing some outlining work. And that's what we're going to do when we do our little sketch over here to demonstrate this. So what we're going to do now is, let's move on to the sketch. Let's just grab ourself a nice pencil, just grab yourself, any little pencil, just to create a small sketch. And what I'm going to do is, I'm just going to exactly do what I do in every lesson and use a simple house as an example. So just like this, simple house shape, quick and easy doesn't have to be complicated, just the outline part. We don't need details or anything like that, and maybe a little base on where that house is sitting, just like this. And then maybe throw in a little window just to see what details look like, and just a little teeny nie door over here. Lovely stuff. So if you just do a simple sketch like that, it can be similar like what I've done, or you can do something completely different. Just keep it really simple so we can demonstrate our layering technique. Firstly, what I'm going to do is, I'm going to grab hold of that orange color that I had. Now I'm going to go in into this roof area, and I'm going to do a nice layering of that swat. So I'm going to basically start off by just going in like this at the angle that I'm holding the line and the direction of the actual pastel itself, just going in and adding in that first layer, so you can see All I'm doing is just applying it just like I did over here, and then just filling in that shape, nothing too complicated. So that's our first layer done. Now what I'm going to do is I'm going to go across this way. So just like this, I'm going to go across with the pastal, so that we have our second layer. And this is building up that beautiful pigment, and you can see how lovely and smooth and rich and saturated it looks just by adding that second pigment layer. So you can see that these pastors are highly pigmented, and just with a little bit of effort, you can get so much of that beautiful color down. So there's that second layer. What I'm going to do now is, I'm going to go in and add a third layer, but I'm going to add the third layer at this area down here, so I want this area to be dark. So in a diagonal way. So I'm going in this direction. I'm just going to go in, and I'm going to add in this third layer like this. So we're not doing anything else. All we're doing is just adding our layer, and then I'm going to maybe take it up to this corner, using the same amount of pressure going backward and forward, medium pressure, not hard. We don't want to burnish this, because if we go ahead and burnish this, then we can't get much on So just like this straight like that. Now you can see there's a division. We've got this nice, more layers over here, so it makes it a bit more darker and more saturated, and there's a variance to the lighter shade. So that's the layering technique done on the roof. So what I'm going to do next is, I'm just going to quickly go ahead, and I'm just going to fill in these areas of the house, the front panel and the side panel, and I'm just going to add in a flat layer just to complete it. So I'm going to quickly do that now. Okay, so that's the first layer done. What I'm going to do now is, I'm going to add in the second layer, and I'm going to go in a diagonal direction. I'm going to do the same for this one and this one. And then we'll see how far we want to take it. So let's do that next. Okay, Dog, now, what I'm going to do is, I'm going to add in a darker area down here by adding the third layer so that we have a nice, kind of like a shadow dark area on this side like we did on the roof. So let's go ahead and just quickly do that. I'm going to go in the upward and downward direction. Again, medium pressure. I'm not pressing any harder than I did before. And you can see that that pigment just comes off so using this layering technique. So just like that, I'm just going to darken maybe up to this point or really towards the tip over here so that it looks a little bit more in sync with the roof. So just like that, just going in with that third layer, and I'm going to leave it like that. So what I'm going to do next is I'm going to go ahead and use the actual pastal itself to just outline the areas. And that's what I was talking about before when I was talking about outlining, I'm just going to outline it with the same color. So just like this, if we go over here and we use a little bit more pressure, just outline those edges. So we're effectively creating a nice clean look, and it looks like we've basically done this intentionally by doing light on the inside and then a nice dark clean edge on the outside, so it's all good. So again, just outlining, like you would normally outline, using ink. I'm just using the same color. Lovely, beautiful pastel to outline and to go ahead and effectively just color it in. So again, these work so well. They're so versatile, and they can be used in so many layers to produce beautiful, beautiful results. So, again, I'm going to go in and start outlining this window, just like this, little bit more pressure than before, but not too hard. We don't want to press too hard, that the pastel breaks on. We don't want any breakages, so just like that there, and then maybe a little door outline over here and maybe throw in a couple of them lines, those hatching lines. And then maybe with the roof, we could actually use the same color for the roof. It doesn't matter if you want to use the orange, you can use the orange. But for the outline, I want to use this kind of darker purple shade and look at that. Look how nice that looks so quick and so easy. We've just gone ahead and done a nice little sketch with the layering technique. So what I'm going to do is just to complete this off. I'm going to use the orange just to add in some lines on that roof, so you can see how nice those lines look like on the roof. Of that beautiful layered pigment. So just like that, a couple of lines going across, and maybe if you want to add in some lines coming down, just to add a bit of a pattern, just to see what it looks like on the actual layering technique. And I think we're going to leave it there, but you know what I'm like? I don't like to leave things, I like to complete them, so I'm going to jump in with that purple again and maybe throw in a couple of brick lines here just to give the overall picture a nice complete look. And if you want to add in some color on this kind of base that we're on, you can go ahead and do that. I mean if you really want to do it, do it, I'm going to leave it at that because I just want to demonstrate the layering technique. Otherwise, I'm going to spend nearly two or 3 hours just perfecting this, and we don't want to do that. We just want to move on to the next one. So let's move on to technique number two. 9. Tonal Values: Okay, Welcome back. Let's now continue with technique number two. So let's have our attention back on the screen, and we've got our regular bristle board paper as we had before. And yes, you guessed it. Technique number two is all about tonal values. So what I'm going to do is I've got two colors for this lovely exercise, and the names of the colors are going to come up on the screen like before. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to grab hold of my this bluish color, and I'm going to focus on the top left hand side of this page. So just like before, we'll do some of the swatch examples on the left, and then we'll do a nice, lovely sketch demonstrating the swatch technique exercise. Okay, so bi tonal values, what we're talking about is from dark values to light values using the same color. And all it is is a differentiation in the pressure levels. So we're going to start off with our first swatch. And all I'm going to do is, I'm just going to hold it like this. So it's a good idea to actually hold your crayon or your pastel. Should I say like this rather than pressing down like a normal pencil or a pen. That's so you don't get too much of a harsh line or harsh marks initially. So what I'm going to do is, I'm just going to hold it like this using that sharp tip, and I'm going to go in, and I'm just going to create this lovely swatch. Just like this using that side edge of my tips. You can see it's just laying down a nice little bit of a swatch over there. And then gently, what I'm going to do is, I'm going to release that pressure so that it becomes a lot lighter like this. You can see, I've got a bit of dark and I've got a bit of light, and that's just the total variance. And then I'm going to switch in, and I'm going to do the same by using the tip. So this was just using the side part of our lovely tip, and then that created this kind of rough textured look from dark light. What I'm going to do now is I'm going to do the same, but I'm going to use a sharp part of the tip. So now I'm going to be holding it like a normal pencil. I'm going to start in with medium pressure again, not going in hard, not going in too light. So just medium pressure over here to create this first swatch, and then I'm going to drag it along, and I'm going to release the pressure now. So very light pressure. I'm just releasing that pressure and moving my hand this way, so we have this beautiful swatch of tonal variants from dark. Light. That's how easy it is. So again, number one, we did it with the side. So we had this kind of rough texture here, so using the side. And then we lightly removed the pressure that we had to bring it across, and we created this really nice rough texture tonal variance, and then we did the same with the sharper parts. So that was two little examples of using the same color. Let's do another color, and I'm going to grab hold of my red now. And then what I'm going to do this time is, I'm going to go in, and I'm going to use the sharp part to do similar one like this just so that you can see a difference in both. So just like that, from dark medium pressure, and then slowly releasing it. Again, if you notice, I'm doing this upward and downward motion just like we did in application method one. So we're using that same application method up and down with medium pressure to create this tonal variance. Now what we can do is we can add onto this. Remember this is still the first layer, if you remember, the previous part where we went through different layers. This is just the first layer. If we want to intensify this, we can go in again and add in that second layer. So again, medium pressure again, we're not adding more pressure, it's the same amount of pressure, and then releasing that pressure so that we have more coverage, and it looks fantastic. Look at that. Absolutely beautiful stuff. So what I'm going to do is just get rid of that dust that's come off the lovely pastel, and then I'm going to move on to the bottom part. And with this one, I might actually go ahead and use another color. So I think I might use maybe this green. Yeah, this is a nice green over here again. The number of the green and this particular color will be coming up on the screen. With this one, what I'm going to do is, I'm going to vary it. I'm going to start off this time by using light pressure, so really light pressure by using the tip and a little bit of the side of the pastor, whichever way is comfortable for you to hold it, just do it like that. So I'm starting off light, and now I'm going to add in a bit more pressure. Just like this, you can see that it's creating a darker area down here. And then I'm going to add in more pressure. I'm going to press in quite hard with this one. Just like that, and you can see, it's added in an even darker tone. So we've got this beautiful from light, medium to dark. And then to intensify it even more, I'm going to use the sharper tip to go in over that light, not go over it too much or with too much pressure, same light pressure there, and then increase that pressure a little bit for that middle part. And then a nice bit of hard pressure over here to create this beautiful, lovely variance, and then I'm going to go back just to blend it in nicely, medium pressure there and just a bit of light pressure, using a few more circular motions this time to apply that beautiful pigment. You can see we've got a gorgeous, dark medium, light, and then again from beginning, light, medium, and dark total variance. And that's all it is for this technique. We're creating these beautiful total variances by alternating the pressure, starting off with maybe hard pressure, then easing off towards the end, or we might be adding in low pressure at the beginning and then adding more pressure towards the end to get a darker tone. So that's it for the exercise part. Let's now do a quick little sketch and apply this lovely technique so we can see what results we can get. 10. Small Sketch: Okay, Dk, let's now do a quick little sketch. So with my pencil, I'm just going to go in and do a quick little sketch, and I'm sure you've guessed what I'm going to sketch. Yes, I am. I'm going to sketch a little Huss house, again, very similar, like with the first technique, just to keep things simple. We don't need to complicate anything here. We don't need to create beautiful, complex, lovely pieces of art. We can do that in our class project. I'm sure you can't wait to do that. But again, let's just go through some of these techniques just to outline and implement what we've learned. So again, just maybe a little window here. And maybe have a door here and possibly another little teeny weeny window there, and that's about it. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to use those same colors that I used before. Okay, so I'm going to grab hold of my blue, and I'm just going to go straight into the roof area over here. And what I want here is I actually want this to be dark, so I'm going to go with a nice bit of medium pressure, and I'm just going to use the tip this time. I'm not going to use the side part, just sticking to the tip. We have a nice layer of color. Just like that, I'm going to maintain that medium pressure and go in this direction using that application method one, and then I'm going to slowly release that pressure so that we have a lighter tone. So just like this, as I'm going towards the end, I'm just going to go in and release that pressure, so we have a nice light tone. So look at that. Fantastic, that isn't it? We've just gone in and quickly filled in that beautiful roof with a nice tonal variance by reducing the pressure that we started off with fantastic stuff. So what I'm going to do now is I'm going to add in another layer and do the same, so we intensify it. So again, I'm going to go in nice medium pressure here. You can see that pigment is looking absolutely fantastic, comes off so easily. Then now I'm going to slowly start releasing that pressure now, and I don't want to press down at all too hard. Otherwise, it's going to ruin that tonal variance, and that's about it. Just like this, what I'm going to do now is, I'm going to go in with my lovely blue, and I'm going to start drawing in some of these detailed lines and you can see how fantastic that is. So again, just going across like this, not pressing too hard, just keeping everything nice and medium, and the end part there, I'm going to leave it as it is. I don't want to enclose it with a dark line. Otherwise, it kind of takes away from the effect of light hitting it. So I'm actually imagining that we've got our light source coming in this direction, so this area should be nice and light, this area should be nice and saturated and dark. So let's now maybe add in some more lines over here. So we don't have to do them later. So just a couple of these lovely tile lines. They're going to look good just to give a bit of an impression. And then maybe just a little bit of a shady shade underneath them just like that. So that they pop out, so they look quite nice. But again, we don't need to add details at this stage, and we're going to leave the details for my full sketch. So I think I better leave it at that, and let's move on to the red color. So with the red color, again, what I'm going to do is, I'm just going to go in. I want it to be nice and dark, on this kind of face of it down here. And then on this panel side over here, I want it to start off dark, but then I want it to get nice and light where that sunlight or that artificial light is coming in from. So I'm just going to quickly do this on this side, just like this, left and right or up and down, whichever direction you're in. So just like that, keeping that medium pressure. I don't want a total variance on this side because I don't want everything to have a tonal variance on it. It needs to have a bit of a change. Otherwise, everything looks the same, and we don't want everything to look same and boring. No, we don't. Okay. So let's continue. And again, just using medium pressure I'm using this part of the actual lovely pastoral. I'm not going in with the tip. I'm just using kind of this edge that's attached to the tip and kind of the side part. I find that that gives it the nicest kind of result, and it's just easier. And you can actually feel the paper's lovely texture while you're doing this. Again, you won't be able to feel what I'm feeling. All you can do is see what I'm doing. But when you come to do this, depending on the paper that you use, you'll know exactly what I'm talking about. So let's now maybe just add another layer and just kind of intensify that, so we don't have too many gaps here. We don't want it to look like a crayon, do we? We want it to be one of these fancy pastoral kind of things. We don't want anyone to say, Oh, you've just done that with a crayola crayon. But then again, there's nothing wrong with creole crayons. You can go ahead and use them as well for this class if you want, but you won't get the most out of them because they are limited, as we mentioned, in the earlier part of the class. So again, let's maximize the results that we can with our lovely, lovely pastoral. So, again, I think I'm going to just leave that as it is. Nice kind of single tone going on over there. And then I'm going to continue now with that same level of tone on this edge over here. But what we'll do is we'll add in a bit more towards the door, and then we're going to start releasing the pressure. So we're going in light now. So I'm going in really light now. I'm hardly touching the surface of the paper, but I'm trying to keep the motion of my hand in that same direction so that we don't have lines going all over the place. And just like this, you can see very gently, very nice and light, that pigment just touches that texture of the paper, and look at that. We've got this beautiful, lovely little variance from dark medium, all the way to light. And what we can do now is we can intensify it even more to make it pop. So we've got the darkest area that's going to be here. Let's go in this direction. And again, this is that layering method that we went through where we're adding in layers and creating this beautiful, complete look where it doesn't look too blotchy, it looks nicely filled in and smooth and velvety. So again, what we're doing is we're mixing part of the application method, technique one, and combining it with technique two that we're going through to really enhance the look. And that's what it's really all about. We want to not really think about these techniques in isolation. We want to be using them together to produce the best results we can that we really enjoy doing. So you can see there now I've intensified that lovely red, and I think I'm going to leave it at that. Let's add in a bit of detailed details, so I'm just going to go in, and I'm just going to go in add a bit of an edge to this like I did in the previous one. So again, nice little edgy edge there, maybe for the window, a little edge and on these window bars. Nice bit of edge. You don't have to be perfect here. Just go with the flow and see how it turns out. We're not doing perfect art. We're just enjoying ourselves and learning some new techniques. So again, with the door over here, actually, what we'll do is we'll do it on the window. So with the window, what I'm going to do is I'm going to do a nice dark frame. On the left hand side, and I'm just going to do a little bit on the inside, and I'm going to leave that edge. So it gives it the impression that the light is touching the whole thing, and it will look rather nice. So what we could do is we could actually change the color up and let's maybe do that green that we did here and do the door. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to outline that door in the green like this and then go in, maybe a little bit darker on the left hand side, and then just release it so we have a nice bit of a tonal variance within the door itself, so just that again on the second layer. Just let it be nice and light on the right hand side. And then you can just go in and throw in a couple of lines just for details, and we've got ourselves a nice little sketch. And I'm going to leave that base out again. Otherwise, I'm going to end up spending too much time doing the details, but what is kind of itching me right now is that I need to put in a couple of lines here just to complete the overall look of the picture, so I am going to do that. I just can't help meself, can I. So again, a couple of these brick lines here, and just a few over here, we don't want to go into the light area just like that, and maybe throw in some vertical ones just to add in a little bit of lovely details. So there we go. There we have it. We've just done technique number two, and now all we've got to do now is technique number three. So let's move on to that one. Next. 11. Blending: D doke. Welcome back. Let's now go through our final technique technique, number three, which is all about blending. So let's get our attention back onto the screen. So what I'm going to do is, I'm going to grab hold of my lovely color over here. I've got these two colors. Again, the numbers will come up on the screens if you want to follow along. And what I'm going to do here basically is just go ahead with the yellow shade. I'm going to go in, and I'm going to go and start adding a lovely swatch of color using application method one, just like we've been doing all this time. And I'm using medium pressure, and I'm going to stretch it along right to about this point. And then I'm going to go back again and ensure that I've got a nice, even coverage. I'm not looking for any tonal variances here. All I'm doing is a beautiful little swatch in one direction. And once that is done, this will enable me to show you the first type of blending that you can do with these pastors. So that's the yellow part out of the way. Let's now get the red. So with the red, what I'm going to do is, I'm going to start by adding in a layer on the corner edge of the yellow using similar amount of pressure. Now what I'm going to do is I'm going to let go of that pressure and release it, so there's just a little bit of that pigment coming, and I'm going to stop at that midpoint over there. Then what I'm going to do is I'm going to grab hold of my yellow again and then with the yellow, I'm going to go over that middle area with medium pressure in circular motions now. I'm using circular motions to get this overlap blending that's going on, and I'm going to take it all the way to the edge. Again, circular motions, all the way to the edge. We've got effectively a two layer blend going on over there. Then I'm going to switch back to the red and I'm going to go in again, from the left side, where I started off from using circular motions and medium pressure. If you notice I'm using the tip. I'm not using the side over here, so I'm maintaining a nice sharp lay down of color with the tip, just like this medium pressure in this circular motion, taking it to that middle part, and now slowly releasing that pressure so that we have less pressure here and we have more pigment on that side. This is all we're going to do. We're just going to keep going backward and forward with the colors now with the yellow. I'm going to start off in that middle, and I'm just going to blend by pressing down with medium pressure using this circular motion, and then switching it to the up and down application method like this, then bringing it all the way back up to the edge of that yellow, and you can see we're getting a really nice blend going on over there. Now, you can do this in as many stages as you like. You can go in three or four times or even five or six depending on what paper you're using. Or what type of result you're after. But this is just one way of doing the blend where you lay out the first color, preferably the lighter shade, and then go over with the darker shade from whichever side you want the blend to start with, and then you gradually merge it in, effectively using the layers method, and then just go in a circular motion, start off on one end, and then just use medium pressure to bring in that color so that it melts and joins with the other color seamlessly. And then we've got this beautiful blend going on now. Final stage of this is to really go in heavy, so use as much pressure as you can to effectively burnish the remainder, so we don't have too many harsh lines. So I'm happy with the red part over there. We've got a nice bit of red going there, I'm going to use my yellow to burnish. I'm going to use the lighter shade to burnish. For this, I'm going to start off at the end of the yellow here. I'm going to go in nice and hard again, using those circular motions. As we start affecting this area here, where we've got the melting of colors together. You can see it's melting away those harsh lines, and I'm just going to carry on using this circular motion with nice firm pressure and taking it all the way to the edge. Look at that fantastic stuff, isn't it beautiful blend of gorgeous color now. You can go in with your red, so you can go in with your red as well and go in as dark as you want, so a bit more pressure, firm pressure, circular motions. And then again, releasing that pressure as I'm going towards that mixing area where the colors are mixing together and maybe bringing it on the edge so that we have more red on top. But again, this is just an illustration, an example of some of these blending techniques. Again, just letting a bit more of that pigment attach itself to the yellow, and that's about it for that. And then finally, just giving it a little dust off, going in with the yellow nice and hard to get rid of those harsh lines up and down. Rounds in circular motions, whatever way you feel comfortable with will work. And again, just making sure that we don't have too many of these harsh areas and we get a nice smooth blend going on over there. And I think that's looking rather fantastic. So just finishing off this area here. Again, pressing nice and firm so that it blends in, so it doesn't look too separated, just going in these round circular motions. And it's looking great. So I'm going to leave it at that so you can see we've got this beautiful little blend of color. So that was the first method of blending. The second method of blending, let's use two other colors. So I've got these two colors here. They'll come up on the screen. Again. What I'm going to do is, this time, I'm going to go in with this purple shade over here, and I'm going to just add in a nice medium swatch of purple up to that halfway point line. So we've got a nice, beautiful medium swatch of purple going there. Fantastic. Then I'm going to go in with my blue, and I'm going to this time. Instead of going over it, I'm just going to add the swatch in on the right hand side. Effectively, we've got two swatches of color that are right next to each other, literally touching each other on the edge before we do the blend. And then we're going to swap and go back to the purple color. And then we're going to start doing the blend in this middle section with these circular motions. You can see, I started creating this beautiful third color in the middle, circular motions up and down, and then I'm going to bring them back this way into that purple with medium pressure and look at that fantastic. So we're going to finish it off with the blue. With the blue in the middle area, I'm just going to bring it in, add a little bit more pressure on this side so that we have a complete look, bring it back in, take it over, where we've got the blend and look at that fantastic result there. We've got this gorgeous blend of color using our wax pad. So next, I'm just going to use a couple more colors. So I'm going to find some colors from my set, and I quite like these two colors. They're quite odd. They don't tend to look very nice together, but it's just a nice way of testing out your pastors and having a look firsthand to see how your colors blend. So I'm going to start off with this odd looking kind of misty bage color over here. Again, the numbers will come up on the screen so you can test this out. So just like this, I'm going to go in, and I'm going to go and add in that first layer of color. And then this time what I'm going to do is I'm going to bring less pressure onto this right hand side, about up to this point. So we have less pressure and more, so effectively, we've got this total variance. And then I'm going to bring in that green color, and I'm going to start in from the right side with medium pressure. And then I'm just going to use these circular motion lines. And lighten up that pressure, and you can see it's merging in really, really nicely. So again, I'm going to go back to the start of it, maybe add in some more pressure to give it more saturation, and then release the pressure when we reach this middle part, then bring in that first color again. And then again, go in dark and heavy on the edge. And then we can go in medium to heavy in the middle. To start doing this beautiful burnish. You can see circular motions. They look absolutely fantastic, and the colors just blend beautifully. Look at that, melting into each other, aren't they? So we've got a bit more of the green. Maybe just finish it off over here. And I think that one is a good one. So just like that, just blending in those colors, and I think that's looking rather nice. So I'm just going to finish off by selecting a few more of colors. Let's see what we've got in our lovely set. Oh, I've got these nice pink and purple colors here. I think these look rather nice, so maybe start off with the purple on this side. And I'm going to go in light this time. I'm not going to press down too hard. I'm going to keep the blending very nice and light, just to show you that you don't have to go in too hard. So just like this, circular motions up to the middle point, nice and light, and then we're going to continue with the pink. Really, really nice and light. Again, this is just to give you an idea of the different types of blending we can do to produce different types of results. And then you can see everything is nice, area and light. We're not going in with too much harsh color. All I'm going to do is with the pink, same amount of pressure, same circular motion. Go over that. Purple area. So we have an overlap, and then again, bring it back to the end so that it looks a little bit more complete, not pressing hard at all on this one, very light to medium pressure. And then I'm just going to go in with that purple from that side going round and round, and it works fantastic. So just in the middle, very nice and light. Keeping it nice and airy and light. Look at that fantastic stuff. We've done no burnishing there. We've not pressed down hard. We've just blended the colors and overlap them in a single tone, and look how nice and airy that looks. There we go, we've got four different kind of swatches of blending, and that's all it is. We've just got to mix and match however we like and prefer our colors to look on the sheet. So, what we're going to do next is, we're going to go ahead and do a small, little sketch to demonstrate how easy it is to create these beautiful blends in our lovely artwork. 12. Blending Sketch: Okay, OK, welcome back. Let's now continue and do our nice little sketch demonstrating our blending methods. So for this one, I've got three colors here, I've got two blues, and I've got this purply shade. The numbers will be on your screen. Let's now start off by doing a quick sketch using the actual pastel itself. And no, I know what you're thinking. He's going to do another little Husey house, but no, not for this example, I'm just going to do some little elements that you can have around your Husey house. So let's go ahead and quickly sketch these in. So I'm just going to go ahead and draw in these nice, little curvy roundy shapes like this. They don't have to be perfect. These are just kind of like wonky roundish shapes that form some elements to go in the foreground or in the background of your house the house scene. So just like that, nice and simple, maybe just finish them off over here. These could be little rocks, or they could be little jelly beans that are waiting to be eaten, whatever you want them to be. So there we go three little things that are kind of next to each other. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to move on to my purple color. So with the purple color and what I'm going to do is, I'm going to go in on the bottom area here, You can see I'm just going to add in a nice layer of that color bottom left hand side. Again, just follow along as you can best, otherwise, just have a look at what I'm doing, and then go ahead and try it out for yourself. All the outlines for all these sketches will be available in the resource packs, so do check that out if you're struggling to come up with little sketches, and then that'll just make it easy for you to follow along. I'm just going to keep adding in more purple on this bottom left hand side over here. I'm going to drag it on maybe one third of the way up. Then I'm going to move on to my second shape here and I'm going to do the same. Just going to keep adding on that purple just on this kind of one third way down on this particular shape, this funny looking shape, just like that, using circular motions, very light to medium pressure. Don't need to press hard at this stage, creating this effective kind of shape building it out, fleshing it out with our colors. So the last one now, just taking it from the top just to create a little bit of a distance between each one of these shapes so that they look like they are just resting on an ice, a little island, enjoying the lovely sunshine, and we can create whatever we like that comes into our head. So let's just continue. So I've done the purple part. So let's just move that on the side. Next, what I'm going to do is, I'm going to go in with my darker blue shade. So with the darker blue shade now, I'm going to start at this level. So I'm going to effectively create the blend that we created in this one over here with light medium pressure and not doing any hard burnishing. So just like this over here, I'm just going to go ahead and I'm going to overlap it on the edge of that purple and then take it a little bit higher so that we have effectively two layers of color. And just like this in that circular motion, you can see that we're getting a nice feel of beautiful blue. So just like You can see we have overlap, and then we've got the blue. So again, I'm just going to continue doing that on the next one in this circular motion here. So you can see it's looking really good. So just bring it in over here and then bring it a little bit down. And that way, we've got this lovely light blend going on on the bottom half of this shape. And I'm just leaving that top part white for now. And then I'm just going to repeat that on the third one, so let's quickly go do that now. Okay, now you can see we've got our two colors laid down with this overlap area between the two on all three elements. Now, what I'm going to do is, I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to use my lighter blue now to add effectively another layer of color on top, just like I did with the previous one. So just like this, just going to add that lighter blue on top of that area, leaving the top end of it white. We're not going to cover it all the way. And then I'm just going to bring in that blue on the edge just to create that overlap blend on the darker blue. And I'm just going to repeat this now for the other two, so let's quickly do that now. Okey doke, now, we've got this lovely first layer effect of these overlapping colors, three of them that forms the basis of our blending. So what we're going to do now is have a little bit of fun. Let's now grab hold of the purple. And now with the purple, I'm going to start on the left hand side here. I'm going to go in, and I'm going to press with medium pressure. In a light circular motion going up and down and keeping it circular to effectively add this second burnishing layer. I'm going to take it about up to this area here. And then I'm going to go in where the actual blue meets the purple and go ahead and do my lovely blend in a circular fashion. Now I'm going backward and forward to make sure all of the areas are nice and covered. And just like this, I'm going to build the second layer with a nice layer of saturated color in circular motion like this. And up to that point, I think that's looking great. You can see now we're getting that beautiful blend of color going on. Next, we're going to go ahead and do the same now with the blue. With that darker blue color, I'm going to start adding in more pigment, bit more pressure, taking it in like this circular motions, and then I'm just going to leave this edge over here light. I don't want it to be flat all the way. So I'm just going to leave that end a bit light there, and then I'm going to go back again, and then take it into that light blue a little bit. So we've got a bit more of an interesting colored blend and variance going on. So just like that, and I'm going to bring it a bit more down into the purple so that you can see, we have a nice merging of colors together. So look at that. Fantastic, that isn't it? So what I'm going to do next is, I'm just going to go ahead and do the same with a light blue. Gonna press down with some nice amount of pressure. I'm going to blend in that light blue now. Into the darker blue area, and you can see that just by pressing a little bit harder and just using these circular motions to effectively blend and smooth out the color, it just looks fantastic. So I'm just going to go into this kind of white area now with the blue, the light blue, and just with a light amount of pressure, just fill it in, keep it nice and air. So that it looks complete and just leave maybe the tip of it white. So just like that, we've just created a gorgeous, lovely little blend, and it looks fantastic. So what I'm gonna do now is, I'm just going to go ahead and repeat that for the other two, and we'll have a look and see what it looks like. Okay, Dk, now, you can see that we've got some beautiful blending going on over there. It just completely transforms the shape of the outline into something super interesting, and it looks quite nice. So what I can do here is, I can just go ahead and just maybe with a dark blue, just adding a little bit of an outline to the edge. But again, you don't need to do this if you don't want. It's just nice to have a complete kind of mini sketch, if you like, just to make it look a bit neater. Again, I'm not going to outline this area because it's where the light is coming. Again, maybe I want to darken some of the areas over here where we might have a cast shadow from one object onto the other and maybe fill in this gap. But again, it's entirely up to you. We're not creating perfect perspective or brilliant, perfect shadows or realism at all. All we're doing is having a bit of fun with our pastors and this blending method, and you can go ahead and explore as much as you want when you do your class project. So That's it for this kind of blending exercise. What I might do is, I might just throw in a little bit of a kind of shadow on the base here. You know what I'm like. I like to always add in a few details wherever I can to just using the side of that blue, just add in a little bit more detail, so it may be that these things are on maybe on a kind of like a river somewhere, and that could be like water. Floating around on the floor, just relaxing and maybe adding a little bit of blue for reflection of our shapes. Again, you don't need to do this, and you know I'm going to start getting carried away. So I think I'll just do a little bit more just with the purple. So again, just adding a little bit more of that purple, just to make this look a little bit realistic in this weird and wonderful kind of world that I've just put together, like that, I think we're going to leave it at that. So let's just give this a little wipe away of the dust. And look back at tea, and it's fantastic. So that was the third technique, and yes, we've completed all three techniques that we were talking about. So you know what that means? It actually means we need to go for a little break. I do quite fancy a nice dandelion tea. Yes, tea. That's what you heard. You heard me write. I've started drinking teas these days, but I haven't forgotten about my coffee. No I haven't. So let's broaden our horizon and go ahead and have a nice, refreshing drink, and I'll see you on the next one. 13. Other Mediums: Oh, that's so good that is that Dandelion goodness absolutely fantastic. I don't want it to end. No, I don't want it to end. Okay, let's get back to the class. I was just enjoying my Dandelion beautiful infused tea. It's just so good that I don't want it to end. And what I'm going to do is going to actually put it on the side, and I'm going to have it while I do the class. So there we go. Lovely bit of Dandelion, to give me that boost, to continue the awesomeness of these fantastic pastors. Right? Let's get our attention back to the screen. What we're going to do on this section now is, we're going to go through The other types of mediums that you can use that interact with this lovely wax pastor well, whether it interacts or not, that's what we're going to find out because sometimes you just want to use a little bit of multimedia mediums and different types of materials together just to give an extra dimension to your So let's now have a look at the screen. We've got three columns over here. I've got ink on the first ones, markers on the second, and colored pencils on the third. And that's what I'm going to be focusing on. So before we start, let's just grab hold of a color. I've got this lovely blue here. The color will be coming up on the screen if you want to use the same color. But it doesn't really matter what color you use for this little exercise because it's just a kind of testing exercise of the different mediums that you have. Now, I'm going to be using quite a few different mediums within these three categories, whichever mediums you have at your disposal, give them a try and follow along with this exercise, and let's see what results we get. So what I'm going to do is, I'm going to firstly in each one of these columns. I'm just going to do a simple little swatch that we can work with. So I'll quickly go ahead and do that. Now, Oh O kiki, we've got nine beautiful little swatches that I just did with the same color using medium pressure, just using the up and down method, like we did in application number one. So just go ahead and do a couple of swatches with your color that you want to use. And let's now start off by looking at the ink column. So for the ink column, let's maybe start off with just using a normal biro pen, so I've just got a normal bi biro pen over here. And what I'm going to do is, I'm just going to go in and do a little cross hatch over that swatch to see whether it actually applies and works over the swatch of wax, and you can see it works fantastic. So just like that, it comes on really well and maybe do a little kind of scribble or a small swatch over it just to see whether we have any gaps or adhering issues, and you can see Biro is brilliant. So if you want to use Biro to maybe do some outlining work or just build in some details, you can absolutely go ahead and do that. So let's move on to the second one. And for the second one, I'm going to go ahead and use my fountain pen, so I've just got my normal fountain pen here. You can use any fountain pen that you have. And with this, I've got my waterproof ink inside here. So let's go ahead and do the same. Can see there, we've got a beautiful flow of that ink that works lovely over our beautiful wax pastel. So again, a little switchy swatch over here of that ink, and you can see the ink flows really nicely on there. But do be aware that if you've got a nice, broad nib like I have, the flowing ink is going to come out pretty fast, and you're going to get this puddle of ink on top of your wax because the wax doesn't have much friction with the nib of a metal pen. So it kind of glides on really easily. So do bear that in mind that you're going to have to let your dry before you start using other mediums. Otherwise, you're going to get smudgy smudges everywhere, and we don't want to do that. No, we don't. Okay, so that's the fountain pen done. And now the final one, I've just got my fine liner over here. So just with this fine liner, this is a u 0.8. Let's just do a crizy cross hatch over here, so the lines coming down. And look at that. It works fantastically well. Little bit of a switchy swatch over there, and I expected it to work. And it worked. So let's just move away from this and have a look. You can see we've got three beautiful results with our ink. Now we can move on to the second column, and this is the column where we're going to be focusing on markers. So with the markers, let's see what shall we go for? Should we maybe do a nice alcohol marker over here. So an alcohol marker just like this, doing the same thing. This is a brush marker tip, so just going in like that. And you can see the alcohol marker works brilliantly. And if I just want to put in a little swatch over it, go ahead and do that. So with the alcohol marker, we've got no issues at all. Then maybe use a water based market. So I've got a water based brush pen over here. You're just going to open this one up, see how this works, and you can see the water based brush pen. You can see it's coming on, but it's kind of leaving a slight gradation and creating a bit of a texture. So let's just continue. There you go, you can see it's working fine. Again, with these markers, you do need to make sure that you've got enough ink in them or paint in them or whichever type of medium is inside them. So let's just do a nice little swatch over there. You can see the flow of that lovely water based ink is coming out, and it looks rather nice actually. I love that textured look that you get over the wax pastal, compared to the one where we have the alcohol marker where it's just completely flat, you get a bit more of a texture with watercolor markers. So that's a bonus as far as I'm concerned. Let's move on to the final one. We can't do any test if we're not going to use Poscas, cause these posca pastors, we're going to be using a Posca pen over it. So give it a shaky shake. So there we go, Posca pastors, so it's befitting that we use a Posca pastal paint marker, just like this over there. So it's going to work brilliantly. So again, that paint just goes on straightaway a heres, dries up really fast. So these are absolutely fantastic and brilliant to use with pastor counterparts. So let's just move that one to the side. And finally, we're on to our colored pencils. And I've got to tell you colored pencils are my kind of go to where I work with mixed media with these pastors because they just work fantastic, and you'll come to see this right now. So let's move on to the first one. This is the prisma color, so this is a wax based colored pencils. So this should work brilliantly over our pastor work, and you can see, Oh, it feels so good. It just glides on, and that lovely color just appears beautifully. Look at that. Look at that detail over wax pastel with a wax pencil crayon, so it looks fantastic. So just like this. Little bit of pressure, you can see it adheres on, bit more pressure. We can darken. And that's why I think these are just brilliant to use with our wax pastels. Moving on to the second one now, I've got my polychromos, by Fabricstel. Now, these are oil based colored pencils. So let's see how these work on this, and you can see they work fantastic. So I've got this beautiful. Cross hatch with this gorgeous turquoise color that I've got here. And I'm just going to do a swatchy swatch. And you can see it adheres lovely on top of that wax, and it's going to just work fantastic. So that one worked really well. And then finally, I've got my lovely premium arndash luminous pencil here, and this one is mainly wax based. So there is a bit of a kind of discussion, whether it's all wax or there's a little bit of oil, but I'm kind of edging towards that this is a wax based pencil. It just has premium pigment in it. So let's just test and see how this works, and as expected, wax working on wax, wax on, wax on. So that looks great. So wax on another bit of wax will create lovely colors and effect. So just like this, giving it a switchy swatch over here, fantastic stuff. So if we stand back and have a look at this, we can see that inks, markers, and colored pencils work really well on top of these beautiful, beautiful post capasto. So you can do some lovely, mixed media art, and maybe that's what you want to do in your class project. But again, I'll leave that adventure in your hands and you can produce whatever wonderful, marvelous pieces of mixed media artwork that you want so. That's it for this little section over here. I think I'm going to take a few more sips of my lovely lovely T. I've got a little bit left in there, so I'm going to enjoy a few sips of this Sit back, have a look at this exercise, give it to go, and let's now move on to the next one. 14. Full Sketch: You welcome back. Let's now start our full sketch. Yep, it's time to apply all those lovely techniques that we learnt in the previous lessons and create a nice step by step, full sketch. Okay, so on the screen now I've got my lovely A five bristle board paper, so just grab hold of any paper that you like. And I've got myself a pencil. What I'm going to do is, I'm going to do a quick little outline of a sketch really lightly. So we'll quickly do that for the first step. And then once it's done, we can start building our lovely pastor work on top of it. So sit back and watch me do a quick little sketch. Okay, fantastic stuff. We've got our lovely little sketch of our house house and a few elements at the front, little boati boat. Of course, can't forget the bote boat, and a few little elements on the side, bit of a chimney and some smoky smoke coming out of it. So have a look at the resource sheet to see a quick outline version of this for you to just so that you can follow step by step in this sketch, or alternatively, just pause the video where you can see this outline and just do a quick little rendering of it, so you're ready to move on to the main parts of getting those pastors laid onto this gorgeous little sketch. So let's move on to selecting our pastors. Okay, so the first stage now is to actually lay down the first layer of color using that very light technique that we did in the blending part of the class. So if you remember, over here on the screen, we had these four blending methods. What I'm going to do is, I'm going to use this technique and this method just to lay down few of those colors in a very light fashion using very light to medium pressure and just basically coloring the shapes, flat, not doing any hard blending or anything like that in a single layer form, and I'll do this step by step. So I'm going to go and focus on this technique over here, and then we can carry on and build as we go along. So firstly, I'm going to grab hold of maybe that line colors. So the colors again, the ones that I use are going to come up on the screen, the color codes, if you want to use the same colors as myself. So again, if you want to just watch me do this until it's completely done, and then give it a go yourself, you can go ahead and do that, or if you want to follow along step by step as I do this, then that's entirely up to you. So I'm starting off with this light green color, and all I'm going to do is fill in these kind of triangular shapes that I've got here. So I'm just going to basically add in this lovely light color, which I don't really like, but it works very useful to add as a base color. And again, just adding in light pressure there, as you can see, up and down motion, and I'm going to leave the top of it white to that right hand side, that kind of pointy bit. I'm going to leave that and not color that in. So just going to do it up to this point over here, just like that. A nice light layer of color. And then what I'm going to do is, I'm going to go in, and I'm going to use this wonderful green. One of my favorite greens, this one. Again, the number will come up at this one. I can see here it says number 18. Beautiful color. What it's called? It's called dark olive. What a fantastic color that. So again, that color now, I'm going to use to overlap very lightly and gently to create that two tone blend color. Using that fourth method that we did in our blending technique, just like this, just to build these color values to give me a bit of an idea of what I want to achieve. It's just as easy as that. So you can see here, I've just gone ahead and added in that color very nice and lightly. Now I'm just using circular motions to make sure that pigment actually goes on. Again, it looks fantastic. So just that much amounts, I'm going to repeat for this, this, and this, and I'll see you when that's done. Okay, ok, now that's done. All four of them are done. We can move on to these elements over here. So for these elements, I think the color that I'm going to use is probably a nice kind of brownish gray tone. So let's go for a nice dark brown color, so I've got a brown here, and then maybe for the lighter tone of it, might use bit of this reddish brown color. So again, both these colors, the numbers will come up on the screen. Let's now start off with a lighter tone first. And again, I'm just going to do these k Elements that I've got these kind of roundy bumpy elements at the front. So start off maybe with this one, so you can see this a bit easier. So just that kind of reddish brown shade, just like I did with that one. I'm going to go in, and I'm going to go and get it done into kind of the three quarters way down of that shape, and it's just following the angles that I've got the drawing in. So just do that for this first sketch that we're doing together. And it looks fantastic. Look at that beautifully smooth, beautiful pastel colors, gorgeous stuff, right? So that's the first layer done. Now I'm going to move on to that darker brown shade. And again, I'm just going to use that to overlap very gently here. We're not pressing down hard. It's not even medium pressure. It's very, very light pressure just to get that pigment off on this initial layer on this first part of getting that color lay down. So like this, I've got this down here, and that's it. I'm going to leave the top part of it white. And again, I'm going to repeat this now for all of these elements over here, and then I'll see you once that's done. Kiki. Now, these elements are done, and you can see, they're looking very nice and uniform. So, again, just this first layer. Let's now maybe move on to the House house, and both of these little house houses. Let's probably just use a single color on them. And the color that I've chosen to use is this one over here. Again, the number will come up on the screen, a nice light color. So with this one, all I'm going to do is, I'm just going to go in into the house panels over here, just like this up and down motion, just like we did in application method number one. Nice and easy, just laying down that first layer of color, just making sure that it covers up most of the kind of gaps of that panel house part that we've got right here. And then again, just bringing it forward over here like this. And I think that's looking great. So just following the lines of the house just to make it easier, using circular motions, to keep a nice smooth lay down of color. And then just filling it up really nicely over here. And maybe this chimney area over here, where we've got the kind of the flat parts of the chimney area and these little chutes that come out from the top, they can have that same color. I'm just going to repeat the same on these two panels of this part of this house. Ky D key. Now, that's all done, looking fantastic. I'm just going to keep that color to the side. And then what I'm going to do is with my gray color here, so I've got this gray color over here. I'm just going to add in a little bit of dark on the left hand side of the house. So just like this, I'm just going to overlap it with a little bit of this light gray. Just to give it a bit of a variance to show that this part of the house is in kind of shadow, kind of like a cast shadow really of that element that we've got there, and maybe this side as well, just a bit of gray on there, just to show a visual interest so that it doesn't look flat. So just like that there. And then again, very lightly over here, just not pressing down hard at all. Just remember, these first layers that we're doing are just very light layers, very light very, very light tone color on top of the layers, the pressing down and the burning shing part will come at the end. So just like that, I've just added this gray, maybe a bit more over here to make it a bit more prominent just on this kind of bottom half area, just like that. And I think that's looking good. Okay, so let's now move on to maybe the roof parts of the house. So for the roof, I want to have a nice bright kind of orangish color, so maybe this color over here. The reddy orange color down here. I think this will look nice. So again, just going to add in that color, follow the lines of that roof, and that's all we need to do. So just like this, just adding in that one layer like this, and then going across like this, just to add that second layer like we did in the application methods to have a more saturated, more even distributed form of color onto our house element there, and it's looking fantastic again, only pressing very gently and lightly up and down motion. Like that, just to fill in all the gaps, and then just a little bit of color on this kind of edge part of the chimney here so that it looks great. So I'm just going to do the same now onto this roof on this house, and then we'll have a look at what we need to look at next. 15. Smoke & Sky: Now add a bit of gray to this kind of smoky smoke area over here. So just with that gray color that I had before, I'm just going to add in a little bit of light a smoky smoke color and just kind of have it just in this bottom area of the edge of this kind of indication of kind of smoke that we have leaving the top white and then on this kind of puff of smoke, this cloudy smoke that we get down here, just onto this side, just to give it a bit more dimension. Can see that looks quite nice not to fill the whole thing up, otherwise again. We don't want it to look flat and boring. We just want it to look a little bit more interesting now, don't we? That's what it's all about creating some visual interest. So I think that's enough for the smoky smoke. Maybe just have a little bit more here, just that we have a bit of a separation from the white of the paper to the color of that smoky smoke. Okay, doke. So that's done now. Let's now do maybe the sky area, and for the sky area, I think I'm going to do a nice light blue color. So I've got this nice light blue color here. And what I'm going to do is I'm going to try using the side part of the tip so that I can have a nice kind of like uneven distribution, which will make it look a bit more interesting. So let's just go ahead and maybe start off in this area. So just like that, nice bit of side part there. I don't want it to be perfect. Again, we're not here creating perfect artwork. If you make a little mistake or if a bit of the color spills over into another element. Don't worry about it, don't stress, relax, enjoy the experience of using these wonderful pastors. That's what it's all about. Yes, it is. Okay. So let's continue. So what I'm going to do is, I'm just going to use that side part to quickly cover in this area. And you can see what I'm doing now is, I'm just going to release some of that pressure so that we have a lighter kind of tone over here. So we effectively get this total variance, just a lighter tone on the bottom part here, and then maybe going a little bit hard on the top, just to create that total visual interest. And you can see I'm getting this bit of a patch over here and do you know what the reason for that is? I wonder if you can guess, but I've got a little bit of blue tack stuck underneath here, which is holding the page so that it doesn't go all over the place. I'll remove that. Otherwise, we're going to get this big horrible little mark. That's just going to stay on that paper. So I'm just going to carry on now a little bit more dark on the top corner and where the kind of edgelne of the smoke is a bit more dark with that blue, and then slowly release it to keep it nice, light and airy at the bottom to create that beautiful tonal variance, and it just looks so nice, that doesn't it all created with the side of that lovely lovely pastor. So, again, we're going to go in, maybe a bit more over here, just to really highlight that we have this edge of this smoke. And again, it's looking great. So maybe just press down a little bit more hard here. And I think I'm going to leave it at that. So I'm just going to repeat the same pattern of movement over here, so darker on the top area, and then lighter on the bottom, and I'll see you when that's done. Okay, Dokey, that's about it for that first layer. You can see we've got a nice bit of coverage of pastal work all over the sketch. We've only got this remainder part to do, and the boating boat. So let's move on to them one next. 16. Boaty Boat: K, welcome back. Let's now continue and start adding in a little bit of blue for this water area here. So for this one, I'm going to probably use maybe this nice dark type blue color that I've got over here. Again, the numbers will come up on the screen. And all I'm going to do for this is, I'm going to again use that side part just like I did for the sky area, just to start laying down that color. So just like this, I'm just going to use a side part of that pastoral just to lay down a nice light kind of layer of pigment so that we have a nice bit of coverage, making sure that I don't cover up that little boaty boat, so just going around it nicely. No need to be perfect again. Maybe leave a few of these white gaps in between the elements in the foreground that we have here, and again, just wavy wavy kind of lines going all the way across. Doesn't have to be perfect. This can represent movement of water, and it looks quite nice. It's quite effective. So just like this, left and right with my lovely pastal. And I think that's great for this part, and let's leave it at that So what we're going to do is we're just going to go ahead and do the boti boat. For the boati boat, I've got this nice little color here. I think this color is quite nice. For the boati boat, I'm actually going to go in and just do a flat layer of color using the sharp tip of the actual pastor, just like this, backward and forward, I'm just going to do like a solid fill in color for that. I'm not going to do any tonal variances or any of main blending or layering at this stage. Going to fill it in so that we know we have the boati boat over here. And I think we'll just leave the sails white of the paper. That's fine as it is. Maybe just use the gray to just give it a bit of an outline and maybe just a little bit of a shadow on the front part here so that it looks a little bit more distinct. Dak, now, we can have some fun and start adding in our kind of second layer of color to bring in some nice bit of saturation. Let's start off maybe with what we started off initially with, and that was these green little triangular shapes that we've got here. For this one, what I'm going to do is, I'm going to use my lovely yellow color that I've got over here, this lovely yellow. And let's focus on this one on the left hand side. What I'm going to do is, I'm just going to go in from the top part here, and I'm just going to add in with medium pressure using these up and down motions and then making them into circular motions as I come down to effectively just blend all that green that's underneath it and merge it all up, so we've got this beautiful, lovely, vibrant color that's kind of occupying this beautiful shape that we have here. And just like that, medium pressure, remember. So we're just doing medium pressure, going backward and forward. Adding in this kind of effective gloss layer to bring out that lovely vibrancy and saturation. And look at that, just a little bit of pressure, bit of medium pressure with the yellow, and it's just completely enhanced the look of that beautiful little shape. Okay, Doke, I'm going to go ahead now and repeat that for the other shapes, so let's come back to it when that's done. Okay, Dk, that's now done. Let's now move on to these elements. And for this, what I'm going to do is, I'm going to go ahead and use this lovely orange color that I've got. So again, using this orange color to just do exactly what we did before, and just going over that color that we've got down as kind of the underpainting color and just using light circular motions just to create this beautiful blend that covers up that undertone. And look at that. It's just merging together, just like watercolor merges together, doesn't it? So it's just using this beautiful blending technique and using layers and a little bit more pressure to bring it all together and make it look lovely. So just like that, I'm going in round circular motions, and then maybe up and down a bit more with medium pressure this time, remember, just a bit more pressure than we had before because these are so vibrant and saturated and highly pigmented. You don't have to work too hard with them to receive beautiful results. So just like that, you can see how that's transformed to what it looked like before. So what I'm going to do is, I'm just going to make sure that I've got a little bit of that orange that's going into the white. And the best way to do this without having too many harsh lines is just use the side of it like we did with the tonal variances. So we're just going to lightly Use the side of it and just touch that p. So just touch the very gently so we get a little bit of pigment, just basically giving it a light light every feel and look, and you can see it just blends seamlessly into the white edge of that shape. So let's now continue and do this for the rest of them and see what it looks like. Okay, k, we're done, and you can see how beautiful that looks. So give that a try. And we can move on now to maybe adding in a little bit more reflections in the water area. So using that same orange that I had before. All I'm going to use is the side of the actual pastor like I did before. And then just in a few lines and kind of little shapes and contours here just to represent a bit of a reflection, and that just gives it another dimension. It makes it look a little bit more real, but not real in this fantasy world that we've got, so just like that it enhances the overall look of the actual image itself, this little illustration. And I think it looks rather nice. So again, I'm just going to go in like this and really just add in that extra layer of detail right at this stage rather than doing it at the end, it just makes it so much easier. What we can also do is we can go in and use the green color that we had for these elements to add in a little bit of a reflection as well. Just using that dark olive green. Just a little bit of a kind of reflection going in here. Doesn't have to be accurate. These are just little impressions that we have so that you can kind of have an idea that we are floating around in this little world on water, and we have some elements that are just reflecting into this beautiful sunset day, and we can all enjoy ourselves. So let's just move on And I think we should now focus maybe onto the Husey houses. So let's grab hold of maybe a nice dark red. So I've got this lovely dark red color over here. And what I'm going to do is, I want a nice sharp point now. So to get a sharp point, like we said, earlier on, right at the beginning part of the class, we need to do a bit of a sharp and sharp. So I'm just going to sharpen my pastol and give this a nice little sharpen now to make sure that I've got a good point. And remember, you want to sharpen these really carefully because they will break if you press too hard while you're sharpening them, to just keep it nice and smooth rotate that as the direction just goes within the sharpener that you're using, and you should have a nice, sharpie sharp point. So that's looking good, but that point is rather sharp. So I think it's just going to break off as soon as they use it. But we'll see. So what we're going to do is we're going to go in into this roof area over here and start doing some outlining work. So what I'm gonna do is I'm just gonna go in. And if, there you go. You see? I said it was gonna break, and it broke. Predicted perfectly Again, I'm just going to go in. I'm just going to do a bit of outlining work here so that we can make this shape a little bit more neater, and it can be a bit more prominent within the overall look of the picture. And just like that, a little bit of line work. But again, you don't need to do this. If you don't want to, you can use a different color or you can outline if you like, I am going to use a few of my other mediums right towards the end, and I might end up doing some outlining. But it's just nice to actually use the pastor itself to produce some details. So just like this, I'm going to go in, and I'm going to add these lovely lines that go across. If you remember, we did something similar with the exercises in the previous lesson, and we're just repeating that here so that you can see what it's like when you implement it in a full drawing. So just like this, a bit of a line over there, that's looking good. And then maybe with the side part of the tip over here, I'm just going to go in with these circular motions to add a bit of a shadow. It's very, very subtle. You might be thinking, what's the point? It doesn't even make a difference, but it's these subtle little things that you do in art that just give it that next level, that step of enhancement, and it just makes it look nice, doesn't it? You don't want everything to look flat. Otherwise, it just looks like a cartoon. But then again, that's what these worlds are all about. It's just about creating whatever comes in your imagination, and then really just laying down the color of whatever medium you're using in however way you like. So there's no right and wrong. There's only joy. So just enjoy the process and you can see I've added in those lovely lines of detail, and it's just lifted it up, hasn't it? So I'm going to do that same one now on this one over here, and then we'll have a look and see what we're going to work on next. Oh. 17. Details: Okay, okay. So with that same color now, what I'm going to do is, maybe just throw in a little bit of reflection lines here, where I think that the reflection might hit. So just like this, just a bit of a reflection line, you don't need to do this if you don't want, I'm just doing this for completeness. And I think that's looking rather nice. So with that red again, I might just go in and just add a bit more detail onto this end here, and then maybe onto the shots over here, where the smoke's coming out from, just a little bit of an indication that we've got some red up there. And I think I'm going to leave it at that. What we're going to do next is we're going to do some outlining work with the actual pastel itself. So I've got that nice dark brown color that I had before where I used on these elements. And I'm going to start outlining a little bit of detail within each element. So I've made sure that meat tip is nice and sharp. So what we're going to do here is we're just going to use that tip effectively like a colored pencil just to do some outlining work. So just like this, I'm just going to throw in some of these lines and then just create this kind of direction that's all going towards the center part over here. Letting it go in nicely free form, and then that's just giving a little bit more interest to the shape. And then I'm going to use kind of like a cross hatch pattern within it just like this from left to right, just so it indicates that we have something else going on. And then I'm just going to drop in maybe a few little dots with this brown just to give it a bit more texture, and I think we'll leave it at that. And you can see that's just added that extra depth of interest. So I'm going to repeat this now on all of these shapes, and then we'll have a look back and see what it looks like. O, you can see now it's really brought out that extra dimension and another layer of interest to the overall shape by just adding this beautiful cross hatch pattern on top of the blending and the layers that we've got. So give that on the elements that you've got of your sketch, adding a couple of dots here and there. Maybe just adding a couple of lines underneath them for the reflection part. Again, just have a play around with it. You don't need to follow the steps perfectly. Have an experiment while you're doing this that you might be able to see other things in your drawing. You may have different elements here and there. Just give it a go. That's what it's all about. That's what this k step by step sketch really is. It's kind of open up the doors to all the different elements using this beautiful, lovely pastor. Now, you can see we've not used any other medium apart from the pencil for the outline. We've just done all of this with the pastor, and you can see that it produces some fantastic results. You can get so much detail work in this that you don't even have to use a fine liner or ink or anything else to add onto it. But again, that's entirely up to you. So let's move on to these elements here and do something similar. Okay, so for this one, I'm going to use that lovely dark olivey green color now, and I'm just going to go ahead and do exactly what I did for this using this green, so it looks a lot more neater, and it kind of combines well with each other and doesn't look too distinct or separate from all the other elements. So let's work on this one here, so again, with that green, keeping that tip nice and sharp, just going in and just outlining the edge, and then just throwing in some of these hatching lines just like this, going upwards in the direction of that shape. Then maybe just add a couple of dots over here, just add a bit more texture, a few light dots in the white area on that point over there, and then maybe go the other direction to create the hatching lines and then this cross hatching pattern emerges, and then maybe just darkening up just with the actual pastoral itself in circular motions here in the bottom left hand corner to create a bit of a separation between the elements. So that will give it another kind of level of detail just into this bottom left hand corner over here. So you can see that it merges together really nice, and then just by finishing it off by just adding in maybe some of these dots in areas where you don't see some texture. And I think that's it. That's all we need to do for that, and that looks great, that, doesn't it? So I'm just going to repeat that now for the other four, and then we can move on to the next element. So let's do that now. Okay, that's now done, you can see that the illustration is looking really nice. It's got this kind of storybook illustration feel to it, hasn't it? I love that style. So Another tip for you is that if you're doing this detail work and you find that the tip is wearing down, just stop and just do a little sharpen of your past door just to maintain a nice clean line instead of just carrying on with a blunt line, because the blunter the line, the more thicker and less details it's going to be able to produce. So do bear that in mind. As you're building your class project or following this sketch step by step, keep the tips nice and sharp. Throughout the process right. Let's now move on to maybe adding in some nice, finer details onto the Husey houses. 18. Housey House: Okay, okay, now, what we're going to do is, we're going to use this nice little light brown color over here to start working in some details on the panels of the house. So what we can start off with is actually doing the window so that it kind of establishes where we want the other details to go. So what I'm going to do is, I'm just going to start off by just outlining this window first. Just like this, keeping it nice and uniform. And then maybe just throwing in a couple of those window bars, going up like this, maybe one on top, and maybe one at the bottoms, we have a nice criss cross design, and then maybe just adding in a little bit of a shadow with that same color on the right hand side. And I think that's it for the actual window. Don't need to do too much with that, so what I'm going to do is repeat that process for all of the other windows, and then we'll continue with the detail work. Kido ki, that's the windows done with a little bit of a kind of tone on the right hand side on here and on the left hand side on the other side. So just give that to go, quick, little detail work for the windows. And then what I'm going to do is, I'm going to actually start off on the chimney. With the chimney, I'm just going to go ahead and outline this edge on the left hand side. I'm not going to do the right. I'm just going to do the left, and then I'm just going to add in a few brick lines. So just like this from left to right, and then few on this side, but not all the way to the end. And then on these little shot things on the top, from left to right on that one, and maybe a few light ones on there. And then maybe do the pattern of the bricks on this one here and on the shot, and just a few light ones going in over there. So that's it for the chimney work. Let's now maybe start doing the brick lines for the face of the actual house. So just like this, nice and light, from left to right, don't want them to be too prominent because then it'll take away from the kind of attention that you want the viewer for looking at your actual artwork. You don't want them to just stare at the brickwork lines and get all confused and dizzy, you want them to look at the overall picture, and that's the psychology of artwork. But that's for another class and another lesson. So let's just carry on and do left to right over here. And I think that's looking nice and subtle. So again, just dropping in some of these brick lines like this. Go to continue doing them. I'm not going to do them all the way to the end. I'm just going to have them mainly on the left hand side. So just like this, just throw in a few of them just for an impression. And then maybe just outline this edge here. And that's it for that. So what I'm going to do is, I'm going to go ahead and repeat that now on all the other panels, and then see what we're going to work on next. Kiki, so we've put in a nice bit of subtle details on that house to make it look a little bit nicer. So what I'm going to do is I'm actually going to use this same color and focus on the boati boat quickly to finish that off, then we can do a bit more work on the roofs. So let's just go using that same color, do a nice little outline over here of the boat boat, just to make sure that it doesn't get lot in that colorful river that we've just designed, and then maybe just throw few lines that go across just to indicate that it's made of some wood panels. And then what I'm going to do is, I'm going to just grab hold of my gray color, and I'm just going to go ahead and just add in a little bit more color in the middle where we've got the sail part here, and then maybe just a little bit more distinct color on the left hand side. And I think that's enough for the impression. And then I'm going back to that brown color again, that light brown color that I did for this, and then just throwing in a few kind of like lines here just to add the effect of a reflection. And I think that's looking quite nice. So what should we do next? Let's now maybe adding some more details on the roof. So for that, I'm going to go in with maybe a darker color. Let's find a nice dark color that we can use. I think we can actually go ahead and maybe use a nice purplish shade. So I've got this purplish shade over here. This is that one kind of purple plum type color that we've got. And with this, what I'm going to do is I'm actually going to sharpen this because I want a nice sharp point. And because this is a different color, we want to make sure that we don't go in too hard, otherwise it will take away from the red of the actual roof. This is just to vary it a little bit. So it depends on how many colors you have in your set, whichever colors you have, just work with them. Again, this is just to illustrate to you that we can use colors together in cohesion. So just do a little clean off on that. And now I've got this plum purplish shade. All I'm going to do is, I'm just going to go in, and I'm just going to drop in a couple of these kind of roof tiles. So just like this, using that sharp point, throwing in a couple of them roof tiles, making them go the opposite direction. And you can see that that other color just blends in so nicely with the red, and it makes it a little bit more distinct. So just like that adding in beautiful details with this beautiful color. Look at that. Beautiful, isn't it? So I'm going to do a bit more over here. Maybe just adding a nice kind of like line over here to separate it, and then on the edge, maybe just another outline line. So it looks a bit more separated from the rest of the details, give it a wipe, and then I'm just going to repeat that over here on that chimney part, just like that, maybe give it a little bit of a color on this side here. And then maybe do the lines that go across just to enhance that detail of those tires. You can see by just adding that extra line, it's just bringing out a little bit more detail. You can see now the wear down is going quite heavily on this because I'm pressing with medium pressure. All I'm doing to counter it is I'm turning the pastor. I'm just turning it so it turns onto the sharper end, and that's another tip. If you don't want to keep sharpening, or you don't have enough time to sharpen, then just keep twisting your actual crayon or should I say pastor, and it'll keep going towards the sharpest part of the tip. You can only do that for a certain amount of time before you've got to take the sharpener out. So do bear that in mind. So I'm just given it a little twisted twist, and I can still use it just like that. So look at this beautiful stuff that isn't it. It just glides on and attaches to the paper. Fantastic stuff. I'm really happy with that. What I'm going to do is, I'm going to go ahead and do the outline of this part just with that color so that it blends in nicely and shows the impression that we have the roof edge here. And again, on this side, just adding in this color just to make it a bit more interesting. So let's repeat that now onto this one, and then we can have a look and see what we're going to do next. Okay, ok, we're done on that. I just added some extra lines with the brown on the edge of that house because I forgot to do it, and then maybe on this one, just adding the edge lines of the house. And I think we're nearly done on this one. So all we're going to do now is we're going to just have a look and see where else we can add in some more details, and then we can actually move on to the burnishing part where we need to do some burnishing. So what I'm going to do now is, I'm just going to grab hold of maybe this blue color over here. So with this blue color, I'm going to focus on the water areas. I'm just going to drop in these lines like this. Just to give more of an impression that we have this movement of water area, just dropping in these lines from left to right, just using the blunt tip that we have over here. So just like this, just adding in these lines randomly, just following the flow of where that water is going, just to complete the kind of overall look of this. And you can see it's looking really nice. So just like that, Just going to keep adding in these lines, and then just under the boat, just going to intensify that color a bit so that it looks a bit more real in terms of improving the overall look of it, not realistic, of course, we're not doing realism because that's not what this class is all about. We're just doing lovely whimsical fantasy worlds, because that's what do. But then again, if you want to do realism, then give it to go in your class project with these pastors. I personally, I am not into the whole realism stuff. It never has been kind of one of the things that I enjoy doing, but you may like to do realism. So go for it. I'll support you in it as long as you're happy. So let's just continue just like this, just dropping in these lines, adding in this lovely kind of pattern effect, and it's looking fantastic. So what we're going to do now is we're going to maybe do a little bit of burnishing. 19. Light Burnishing: Feel that it's missing something, so I might end up adding a little bit of red. Let's go for red. So with the corners over here, what I'm going to do is, I'm just going to add in a little bit of pressure and just add this kind of like shadow that we did on this kind of green element here. So just with the red, I'm just going to do this, just very, very lightly on this edge, but again, with medium pressure, not doing it too much. And then just like this, going to continue. I think that's just going to add a little bit more depth to it. So let's just continue doing that on all of them, and I'll see you when we're done. Okay, Dk, I think that's it for now. And then what I'm going to do is, I'm just going to basically just throw in a little bit of those kind of reflection lines that just go at the bottom over here, just like this, just to add a bit more interest into that water area, and maybe a few under the boat, just like that n and lovely and beautiful. Okay, so the final step of this, I'm actually happy with the laydown of color on this one. I might go ahead and maybe adding another layer on the sky. Actually, let's go ahead and do that. So I think I might add in maybe this blue, so we've got this blue over here, this lovely blue. It's number 33. What I might do is I might intensify this sky. So using the side, I might go ahead and just on the left hand side, do that overlapping method where I've got this color just coming in. And it's just really to add a little bit more interest to the sky because I think it flus a little bit flat for my liking. But again, I could go on and on and on for hours, just keep fine tuning it and adding more and more details. I'm going to leave that for your class project and my class project. Can't wait to do my own class project on this, and then I can go in as much detail as I want. Spend as many hours on it as I want. So again, I'm just going to keep adding a little bit of this darker blue all on top of this. And I think that might just give it a little bit of an interesting kind of angle. Just to kind of mix it up a little bit, really. It's not about finding the perfect, kind of, like, you know, color or, you know, whatever you try to intend to draw and you can't draw. It's not about getting it perfect or right. It's about what just makes you feel content and happy with the artwork that you produce. But just make sure that you don't stress. It's about distressing and relaxing. We don't want to stress. There's 1 million things that we stress about in this world, in this life. Art should not be one of them. Art should be a solution. So let's just carry on before I get too philosophical on you all. So just carrying on with this, just adding in that blue really. And I'm actually going to go in a little bit more deeper with this blue. So just like that, just varying it, it could be that there might be kind of a back light to this scene or image that we're drawing. There may be some kind of like party going on at the back, and we've got this blue kind of glare coming in from the back, and maybe from the front. And I think I'm going to leave it nice and raw. Just like that. So I think I'm going to leave it at that. I don't want to do too much burnishing at this point. So what I'm going to do next is I'm just going to do some outlining, basic bit of outlining with maybe ink or colored pencil. But I think I'm going to take a break. Have another tea or maybe a coffee, might get myself a cake, and ice cream cake. So after I have my little break and treat, I'm going to come back to this, and we're going to do a little bit of the finer outlines with maybe ink or colored pencil. So I'll see you once I've had my break. 20. Final Details: Oh, look at that. The last quarter left of my lovely Oreo filled cream batched donut. Oh. Do you think I should have it all? It's actually not even mine. That's my daughter's. She's not known, but I've just sneaked it away from the dining table without her noticing, Shall I do it? Shall I do it? Oh, I better not. I better not. Otherwise, I'm going to get in trouble. So let's put that dout away. I've had mine, and I'm just being greedy. So let's not be greedy, and let's just get back to the class. Clean me fingers. I've got all the evidence all over me now, that beautiful beautiful aio donut. Okay. Let's now have a look at our lovely little illustration. And you know what, I'm not going to take this any further. All I'm going to do is two things. I'm just going to grab hold of my light blue color. I'm going to do a slight burnish over this water area, just like this using the side. I just want to add a bit more of that vibrant color over it. So it kind of blends in nicely altogether. So it doesn't look too raw or rough. So just like this, I'm going to just use this to add a nice bit of layer of color. So just like this, I'm just going to go in, and I'm just going to lightly with medium pressure just covering those kind of white areas. I don't want any of the kind of rough paper part to show. I just want to blend it together, so it looks quite nice and smooth. And I think that's about it. So finally, I'm just going to use my fountain pen now, just to add in some little details to the boati boat over here, just to make it pop a little bit, so just like this. Just going to add in a couple of these beautiful fountain pen lines. So remember with fountain pens and flowy It's going to have quite a lot of a flow on it. So do be careful if you decide to use your own fountain pens on this stage of this illustration. So just like that, a nice little outline in black. And then maybe just the bottom areas of this with that ink so that we have a bit of a mixed media look over here. And then just here, just on the bottom edges. I'm just going to do a little outline like this, just to make them look a little bit more distinct. And then, again, just like this, just with the ink, and then maybe just throw in a couple of those inlines that just go over the water area. Nice little scribbles just to kind of add to the texture and the completeness of the style of the sketch, just like that. And then I think I might just leave it at that, or I might just add in maybe a couple of kind of lines here where we've got the smoky smoke, just to give it a bit of an inky effect. So just like this on the edge, just maybe go in with the ink and just to outline these areas very randomly. They don't need to be perfect. We don't want to make perfect line art. That's not what we're doing. So maybe on the edge over here and over here and just on this kind of like left hand side, might just add in some black, really rough scribbling it in, and then maybe a little bit here on this edge of this roof, and then I might have a little bit on the edge of this part of the roof as well. And maybe a couple of lines that are just going in random directions, just like that. It just adds a little bit more interest and texture to the overall effect. And again, you don't have to do this. You can just keep it purely to the pastor It's entirely up to you. I just like to add a little bit of mixed mediums to my artwork, just to have a bit more fun, really. So just have a bit more fun with ink. And then maybe just a couple of black little stipples on these areas here, just to add a bit more of depth and color to the kind of overall effect of the drawing. And then just like that, a little bit more there. And a little bit more there, and let's call it a day on that one. Otherwise, I'm just going to keep going on and on, and I'm just going to make it into a criss cross detailed work of imagination. So let's leave it at that. I hope you followed it step by step, and I hope that you learned a few of those techniques that we did in the previous lessons and applied them to this little step by step class that just merges it together, and now you're going to be ready for your class project. So here comes the real fun. But before we do the class project, let's just have a at some of the different styles of drawings and illustrations that you can do with these techniques and with these brilliant pastols, and with mixed media to inspire you for your own artwork and get you all geared up for your class project. So let's have a look at a few samples next. 21. Inspiration: Ki Dk, welcome back. Let's now have a look at a few samples of artworks and little sketches that I've done with these lovely Posca pastls so that you can get inspired and see what type of results you can get, and all of them use the techniques that we've gone through in this class. Let's have a look at the first piece over here on the main screen, so you can see on this one, I've got a nice little sketch, very similar to the one that we did in the previous lesson. But all I've done here is I've added more cross hatching with those pastors, and I've gone in with colored pencils. So colored pencil work, and I've got ink outlining, and it's using that same style of sketching. You can see over here, we've got a nice bit of blending going on. And then we've got cross hatching with colored pencils on top of the pastor work. And then we've got that similar kind of whimsically scene that, you know, I love to do. So that was one example. And then let's move on to the next one. So over here, we've got a similar scene again. You know, what the theme is with me. It's always house houses with a little river and some lovely little colors, and maybe a boati bat here and there, but not on this one. So again, similar kind of textured effect with cross hatching on the element, a little bit of line work, and it just looks so good. And then let's move on to this one over here. This one's a little bit more in your face, a bit more vibrant. So I kind of added in details with a white marker pen, with some dots over here. The kind of overall look is the same as the previous ones. I've just gone for very vibrant saturated colors, so you can see You can have a look at all of these kind of lines and details and then be inspired by them. So remember, a lot of these images are going to be available in the class resource sheet for you to get inspired on and you can try doing them if you want. It's entirely up to you. But it just gives you a kind of different kind of look and perspective into what you can actually achieve by using these So let's move on to the next one. And I think the next one I've got over here, this one is quite a loose sketch. So if you have a look here on the screen, this was one that I did really quickly. So again, you don't have to spend a lot of time with these pastors, if you've just got maybe a five, 10 minutes where you just want to relax and just not want to think about anything. Just grab hold of your pastors, do a quick little sketch, color it in effectively, and the entire method and approach of coloring in using this kind of very tile medium. It's just a very nice and relaxing feeling. It's just so therapeutic and art in general. You know, I'm an absolute advocate of using art as a therapeutic exercise for mindfulness and to relax and just escape away and enjoy the actual medium, the tactile feel of it. So, you know, I love to use this type of medium, and I want you to try really exploring with it so that it really becomes part of your daily sketching habit and using these beautiful tactile real traditional mediums. So let's move on to the next one. This was again, very rough, very quick and easy. And then maybe this one over here, so you can see this one's a little bit more different. We've got a white background. A lot of kind of focus is on the details within the elements. And it actually looks quite nice. We've got just a few colors here, not too many colors. So again, whatever color palette that you have, how many other colors you have in your set, just use them the best you can and put a couple of sketches together, just like this. This didn't take me more than 10 minutes to do. It was just a quick little sketch. Jotted it down. I don't even think I used pencil for this one, so I just went straight in with the pastors, and you can see you can achieve a beautiful, beautiful result. And then I've got this one, which there is a lot of texture work on this. You can see lows of little texture lines, lows of little details going on all over the place. But again, it's just that kind of process of using the pastor, using the sharp tip of it, and then maybe using kind of the blunt part of it or the other side. Just to flow it onto that beautiful paper, and it just looks great. So that's another example. And then I've got this example here. This one is very symmetrical, very linear. So you've got a lot of straight lines, and I've got these little circle circle lines here on these elements here. I've even got lines, hatching lines on the background. So maybe try this type of a style out. You can try whatever you want. And then on the middle for these windows, all I've done is I've just done the little marks with the pastel in that lovely blue, whatever work. Go for that and whatever you enjoy doing, just go and stick to that style. So I've got another sketch here. I've got a nice big one over here, again, similar style in this one, on the bricks, I've got a little bit of layering work going on over here. You can see with the brown. I've done the lines first, and then I've just added that kind of layering of the second and third layers of color on top. And then I've got the Cris cross, again, similar techniques that we did in the class, but just spent a bit more time on the Lot more free flowing marks over here on these elements at the front rather than straight lines, to just random lines, to just give it a bit of a nice pattern and kind of like a contrast between straight and random lines. It just looks fantastic, and it's so much fun. So this Oh, this one was a quick little sketch of my car. So I decided to just sit down and do a quick little doodle of my car, just using those pastors. And I really enjoyed the process. It's not perfect. It's not accurate. I didn't come out to sketch a perfect version of the car that I've got. I just went ahead, grabbed hold of those pastors, open up my sketchbook, and then I just went ahead and sketched it. So do that, try it. Just whatever you want to draw, what it may be your car, it might be like your dinner or your breakfast, or even maybe your living room. It could be anything. Just sketch it out with the pastors and see what type of results you get. I promise you it's a lot of fun. So Let's move on to maybe the last few pieces here. I've got so many. You could take me all day going through them. So this one, again, over here, we've got the House house look, and we've got a lot of houses all clustered, using a lot of the texture of the pastor and then just adding in a few more details. And then on this one, I've got a bit more ink work on this one, so you can see. I've got a lot of kind of like texture detail work with the ink. And that looks quite nice as well, if that's what you want to focus on, the other medium. Use the pastel to lay down the base color, get a nice bit of blend going on, and then go over with maybe a marker or a black marker or a fine liner to just bring out that kind of distinct artwork style. So that was that example there. And then a couple more examples left, just this one over here, again, very similar to the previous one, just pure pastel work, not using any other medium here, just pastel work, Cris cross cross hatching, lots of different textures and layers, bit of blending, and then some random lines. It's all Good. So let's have a look at this. Oh, and this is my favorite paper. One of my favorite papers. Anyway, let's maybe get a zoom back on this if we can. This is done on my favorite great own papers. You can see with the great own paper. It just adds a different look to the entire artwork. So I've got a little bit of this white smoke. You can add in white crayon pastel work over here for highlights. It gives you that advantage. And it's just a different feel from the traditional bristle board or cartridge paper that you use. If you have great own paper, use it and try these pastels on it. It works great. So let's have a look at this kind of last piece that I've got here. So for this piece, let's get a zoom back again. So this piece was very loose, very scribbly, kind of light minded without thinking about anything, just going ahead and just doing a quick little scribble. And I just liked how it turned out because it was just a quick laydown of the pastel on the background, few little elements, a few little kind of round circle lines, squiggly lines. And I just liked how it looked. It took less than five, 6 minutes to do. It's such a great stress relief, just getting that beautiful x crayon pigment onto the paper. And then after that, you have a cup of tea, and you're like, Oh, that just felt so good. Okay? Let's see what else I've got. I don't think I've got anything else. I think I've got one on the wall, actually. So this one over here, I'm pointing to that one, that middle one over there. I'll actually take it off. Shall I take it off and show you? I think I'll do that. Let's take it off. Show you lovely students, what I did on this one. You can see, I'll bring this over now and look at that A, spent a long time on this one. I actually really enjoyed ding this one. Let's get a Zoom me Zoom back on this. I'll move me light back. Look at that A, Beautiful stuff. I really enjoyed diming this one. I did the drawing out in pencil first. And then on each one of these elements, I did the lay down of color, a bit of blending, a little bit of tonal values over there. And then I went in heavily with the cross hatching, and I just really liked how this turned out. And so put it on the walls. So I think we better put this one back before I lose it or drop something on it because there's no glass covering on it. It's just raw pastel work on this. Let's quickly put this one back. Oh, we've got to put things back, A. If you take something off, you should always put it back. Don't just leave it there. You can't have an empty wall. So again, let's get that one back on the wall. Make sure that it's in line with the other ones, give it a little whack. Good stuff. Okay, that one's back on the wall. I've got this one here. Let's just have a look at our previous one. I've actually got one that I'm working on. I think I'll show you that right now, actually. Let's go find it. Where is it? Where's it gone? Where's it gone? Oh, and I've just and me frames just fallen on the floor. Look at that me frame's fallen on the floor. I'm going to have to sort it out later, but I don't want it to get damaged. I'm going to pick it up. Oh, I've got a bad back as well. Oh, dear. There we go. Good stuff, right? Let's put this one on the side, and I'll have to get it framed up later on. And we can concentrate on this one that I'm working on. So you can see on the screen, I've got my favorite paper, my lovely great owned paper sketchbook over here. Great stuff, that one. Let's just get a Zoom back to see. And let's just open it up on what I'm working on currently. So let's get that one opened up. And there we have it. You can see I'm working in that total variance that we did in our technique. It was a second technique of the kind of technique lessons that we went through. So I've got total variance going on over here. You can see the entire sketch using just one color, and I intend to complete the sketch just using one color, and I might just do that for my class project, actually. I might go ahead and complete this, and then I'll post it on the class project where we can all have a look and be inspired from each other. So that was it for this quick little kind of like inspiration kind of lesson where you inspired by looking at the type of things that I do with these pastors and the techniques, coupling it up and really getting you geared up for your class project. So let's now talk about your class project. 22. Class Project: Kiki, welcome back. Let's now talk about your class project. So for your class project, all you need to do is just go through the lessons that we went through in the class. Remember, if you have a look on the screen, we went through testing out our lovely pastors on different pieces of paper. Whatever paper you have, give it a little test and have a go at it just to see how the pastors work. And then we went through little application techniques about using the direction of the flow of the pastors, going up and down, using the sharp points and coming up with these lines and hatching lines. So give that a go. And then we did the lovely exercises where we had different application methods. And then we looked at total values and total variances, and did a little sketch, and then we looked at blending technique of blending different colors in four different methods to produce lovely results like this. And then we went ahead and just tested mediums onto our colored pastors, these beautiful wax pastels that we've got, and had a look at the results that we got, so it gives us a bit of an indication on what we can and can't use. And then finally, we did the step by step So it would be great if you can complete all those lessons and then do the step by step sketch. And then once you've done all that, you'll then be ready to delve into the world and adventure of creating your own beautiful artwork, from inspiration, from the type of things that you've learned in the class for using the techniques, and also the type of work that I've done that you saw falling off my wall over there. So T ever inspires you from your own personal life or other artists, se that as inspiration to come up with a beautiful piece of artwork that you can go ahead and implement what you've learned in this class, and once you've done, once you've done all the lesson work, the little exercises, once you've done the step by step sketch, and then once you've completed your own personal artwork using these posca pastors, then all you need to do is upload your beautiful artwork onto the class gallery. Make sure you do that once you've completed so that we can all see the journey that you've been on and be inspired by your beautiful artwork. So Ensure you've done all those steps. Click on the class project and upload your gallery. Take as many pictures as you want of all the exercises that you've done, the step by step sketch, and your own personal sketch and share the enjoyment of this wonderful medium. That's all it is, four steps for your class project. And you're all done, and then you can reward yourself with a beautiful warm drink and a little treat, maybe even a donut. So I'm going to let you enjoy the lessons, go back to them if there's parts of them that you want to recap on, and I can't wait to see the results that you produce. Remember, ask me any questions you want in the class discussion about anything about this class. Do check out the resource sheet as well because all the information and the steps are going to be available in the resource sheet, including all the materials that I've used for the class. It'll just be a nice little reference for you to have a look at. And I'll hopefully see some beautiful work that you produce, and I can't wait. So let's move on now to some final thoughts and finish up this class. 23. Final Thoughts: Okay, that's it now. So just a couple of final thoughts on the class. I really enjoyed this experience with these beautiful postcapastors doing my little artworks, and especially when my frame fell down. That was a funny one. Wasn't it? I watched it back and I actually ended up laughing myself, laughing at myself. That's what I do all the time. So I really enjoyed the steps. I hope you enjoyed the steps and the process. It's a little adventure, isn't it into a new type of medium. So, I hope you went through the lessons and did the lovely little step by step sketch. Remember, it's not about creating perfect art. It's about relaxing and just enjoying that process and really gaining that tactile, beautiful kind of experience so that you can start using it on a daily basis in maybe your sketch book. Or just on random pieces of paper. And it just helps with well being, and it kind of generally just gives good vibes, so that's what it's all about. So do check out my other classes. I've done a whole range of classes. I think this class may be number 22 or even 23, I've lost count of how many classes have done, and they're all on traditional media. Most of them, some of them are on digital art, and some are just some DIY, craft style classes. So do check them out, see what you like, and do post the work that you do and make sure that you leave a review on the class. So other fantastic students like yourself, can see your experience and learn from your experience, and we can all enjoy this journey together. So do follow me also on my social media channels, especially on Instagram where I post daily. You'll see what I'll be doing on my day to day life as a graphic designer and illustrator. I sketch every single day. And there's always something on there that I post throughout the day so that you can keep in tune with what I'm doing, and then maybe leave me a little message or send me a little thumbs up if you like, just that we can maintain this lovely connection and communication in this world of art. So I think I'm gonna leave it at that. I think I might end up finishing the day now by tidying up and having a nice cup of coffee this time. I'm a fancy a nice coffee and a nice cake, but I think I'm gonna go out. Let's go to the local cafe and enjoy a nice coffee and a cake and maybe do a little sketch with our pasta pastels in our sketch book. So I'm after that. I hope you had a good one. Take care of yourself. Don't stress, enjoy your life, and I will see you on the next one.