Develop a Daily Creative Habit with Zen Doodle & Zentangle Inspired Art - 45 Exercises Included! | Ridhi Rajpal | Skillshare
Drawer
Search

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

Develop a Daily Creative Habit with Zen Doodle & Zentangle Inspired Art - 45 Exercises Included!

teacher avatar Ridhi Rajpal, Artist + Film-Maker + Educator

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Hello!

      3:48

    • 2.

      Supplies

      5:42

    • 3.

      Day 1 - Let's Warm Up!

      6:39

    • 4.

      Day 2 - Fluxecho Blooms

      14:40

    • 5.

      Day 3 - Aquafleur meets Akoya

      13:19

    • 6.

      Day 4 - Drawings & Toodles

      17:19

    • 7.

      Day 5 - Noodle & Springkle

      10:34

    • 8.

      Day 6 -Borbz & Diva Dance

      9:27

    • 9.

      Day 7 - Balldox & You!

      3:12

    • 10.

      Day 8 - Oh well!

      6:41

    • 11.

      Day 9 - Shapes Around You!

      4:11

    • 12.

      Day 9 - Reveal

      1:44

    • 13.

      Day 10 - Pepper in Pepper!

      5:47

    • 14.

      Day 11 - Garlic Cloves

      4:36

    • 15.

      Day 12 - Sparkle Sparkle!

      3:47

    • 16.

      Day 12 - Reveal

      1:52

    • 17.

      Day 13 - Fun with Mooka!

      7:30

    • 18.

      Day 14 - Mooka & YOU!

      2:16

    • 19.

      Day 14 - Reveal

      2:49

    • 20.

      Day 15 - A web of Betweed

      15:01

    • 21.

      Day 16 - Fun with Firecracker

      9:13

    • 22.

      Day 17 - Crescent Moon

      6:59

    • 23.

      Day 18 - Marasu & More

      5:07

    • 24.

      Day 18 - Reveal

      1:15

    • 25.

      Day 19 - Nanalee Improvisation

      4:11

    • 26.

      Day 20 - Mystery Eggs & Tearce

      6:18

    • 27.

      Day 21 - Phone Cord Improvisation

      3:48

    • 28.

      Day 21 - Reveal

      3:44

    • 29.

      Day 22 - Gra-vee Bubbles

      6:39

    • 30.

      Day 23 -Fun with Doodah!

      4:50

    • 31.

      Day 23 - Reveal

      2:10

    • 32.

      Day 24 - Tunnelvizion + Emo Ball

      6:49

    • 33.

      Day 25 - Take a Chill Pill!

      3:27

    • 34.

      Day 26 - Clob and YOU!

      2:07

    • 35.

      Day 26 - Reveal

      2:02

    • 36.

      Day 27 - Spoolies

      4:21

    • 37.

      Day 28 - A Freehand Page

      11:19

    • 38.

      Day 29 - Another Freehand Page

      10:42

    • 39.

      Day 30 - S Curves with Undling

      5:55

    • 40.

      Day 31 - Lines & Orbs

      2:56

    • 41.

      Day 31 - Reveal

      1:02

    • 42.

      Day 32 - Zen with Bricks

      4:46

    • 43.

      Day 33 - Lines with B Twixt

      6:03

    • 44.

      Day 34 - Heart Plant

      3:23

    • 45.

      Day 35 - Coffee Beans

      3:15

    • 46.

      Day 36 - Baton & Straight Lines

      3:19

    • 47.

      Day 37 - Ribbons & YOU

      2:31

    • 48.

      Day 37 - Reveal

      1:34

    • 49.

      Day 38 - Cadent and YOU!

      4:09

    • 50.

      Day 38 - Reveal

      1:51

    • 51.

      Day 39 - Relax with Gingo!

      3:01

    • 52.

      Day 40 - String & ICSO

      4:58

    • 53.

      Day 41 - Cloves, Contrast & Detail

      5:35

    • 54.

      Day 42 - Zentangle Inspired Project I

      7:08

    • 55.

      Day 42 - Reveal

      1:21

    • 56.

      Day 43 - Zentangle Inspired Project II

      4:27

    • 57.

      Day 44 - Composition Hacks

      8:27

    • 58.

      Day 45 - Mooka Garden

      2:59

  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

1,530

Students

46

Projects

About This Class

Drawing repeat patterns that put you in a zen state of mind is one of the most addictive activities in the world! It gives you an immense amount of happiness to put strokes on a blank paper and then see a marvelous result in the end!

There are a lot of techniques and effects that you can create with just simple pens and basic paper. However, I know that it might be a little overwhelming for someone who is just starting out. So I decided to come up with this challenge where I can help you to overcome your fears and enjoy the process of making Zen Doodles and Zentangle Inspired Art. 

With practice, anyone can be perfect! And if you do this for 43 days straight, you’ll definitely start looking at everything around you with a fresh perspective! You’ll literally start seeing doodle patterns and design inspiration every day… and I promise you that it will become a lifetime hobby that you won’t regret!

In this class, we will be exploring a lot of topics, ranging from tangles from the original Zentangle method to taking inspiration from everyday objects and turning them into patterns. We will also be discussing how to create balance, contrast, and harmony in your designs. And finally, we will also explore ideas and a lot of details on how to bring variations in your designs.

Remember that the class is best enjoyed when you work at your own pace. So you can take as many breaks as you want and you can always come back to the point where you left off. Whether you choose to do this for 43 days continuously or with breaks, the class will always be here for you! :)

And the best part? The class is perfectly suited for beginners and experts alike to get a creative boost on a daily basis. You will especially find this class fun if you have a full-time job and are looking for a creative outlet for a few minutes every day... or if you have a creative block and need some time off to indulge in newer techniques! This is one of the most relaxing art forms ever and it's perfect to develop a self-care and mindfulness habit or ritual for yourself. 

So let’s dive in and kickstart this wonderful adventure together!

See you in class! :)

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Ridhi Rajpal

Artist + Film-Maker + Educator

Top Teacher

Hi there! Thank you so much for stopping by!

It gives me immense pleasure to be here and share my creativity, passion, and knowledge with all of you! My name is Ridhi Rajpal and I'm popularly known as TheColorBirdie on the Internet.

I am a TVC Director, Multidisciplinary Artist, Content Creator and Creative Entrepreneur.

I am the Owner & Creative Director at TheColorBirdie (an art and design brand focused on creating products for an art-integrated, vibrant lifestyle) and RaRiRo (a brand focused on creating handmade art jewellery with unconventional materials).

See full profile

Level: All Levels

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
    Exceeded!
  • 0%
  • Yes
  • 0%
  • Somewhat
  • 0%
  • Not really
  • 0%

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Hello!: [MUSIC] Hello, welcome to this course on creatives Zen Doodles and Zentangle-inspired art. Drawing repeat patterns that put you in a Zen state of mind is one of the most addictive activities in the world. It gives you an immense amount of happiness to put strokes on a blank piece of paper and then see a marvelous result in the end. There are a lot of techniques and effects that you can create with just simple pens and basic paper. However, I know that it might be a little overwhelming for someone who is just starting out. I decided to come up with this challenge where I can help you to overcome your fears and enjoy the process of making Zen Doodles and Zentangle-inspired art. With practice, anyone can be perfect. If you make this a daily habit, then you will definitely start looking at everything around you with a fresh perspective. You literally start seeing doodle patterns and design inspiration every day and everywhere. I promise you that it will become a lifetime hobby that you will always cherish. In this class, we will be exploring a lot of topics ranging from tangles, from the original entangle method to taking inspiration from everyday objects and turning them into patterns. We will also be discussing how to create balance, contrast, and harmony in all your designs. Finally, we will also explore ideas on how to bring variations in your designs. Remember that the class is best enjoyed when you work at your own pace. You can take as many breaks as you like in the middle and can always come back and pick up from the point where you left off. The best part is that the class is perfectly suited for beginners as well as experienced artists so that you can get a creative boost on a daily basis. You will especially find this class useful if you been looking for a creative way of engaging in self-care and mindfulness or if you have a creative block and need some time off to indulge in newer techniques. I promise you it's going to be a lot of fun. Now for those of you who are attending my class for the first time, my name is Ridhi, and this is my seventh skillshare class. I'm a filmmaker, a multi-disciplinary artist, an art educator, and a creative entrepreneur. I ran two creative brands, The Color Birdie and Rariro, and with both of my brands, I sell jewelry, home decor products, surface design frames, stationary, wall art, and different lifestyle and gifting essentials. I have been drawing and working with Zen art for over a decade now and today in this skillshare course, I'm going to be sharing some of my most trusted ideas and techniques. If you've been around over here on skillshare for some time and have been following my classes, then you probably know that I had also done a 30-day challenge similar to this one earlier. That challenge turned out to be a huge success. Students were posting their work on a dedicated hashtag on social media and I was so happy to look at the pictures and the amount of progress that they've made over those 30 days. This challenge goes one step further. In the previous 30-day challenge, we had focused more on basic strokes, but it is 45-day challenge, I'm going to be adding a lot more complex compositions, as well as details on how to mix and match tangles from the originals entangle method. All in all, this course is aimed to make you absolutely confident and comfortable with Zen Doodles and Zentangle inspired art. Let's dive in and kick start this wonderful adventure together. See you in class. 2. Supplies : [MUSIC] Let's talk supplies. Now, to be perfectly honest with you, creating beautiful Zen doodle or Zentangle-inspired art work does not require a lot of fancy supplies. You need something to draw with and something to draw on. I'm basically talking about pencils and pens and paper. Now when I first started out, I used to draw with regular ballpoint pens or HB pencils and I used to use printer paper to draw on. If you're a beginner and you have these basic supplies available with you, then you're ready to begin the challenge. But let's say you are a serious hobbyist or you're an art enthusiast who is interested in professional supplies and you want to level up your inventory, then here are some of my recommendations. For the papers, I highly recommend that you use acid-free paper that's at least 120 GSM thick so that the ink from your artworks doesn't cause the papers to crinkle up or buckle up. We're going to be drawing a lot of complex compositions which have heavy inky areas and we're looking for thicker paper so that the paper does not get soggy. Now, standard zentangle square tiles are usually around 3.5 inches in size. But you will a find artist tiles from other brands as well that are anywhere between four inches to eight inches in width and height. Now you don't have to work on a square format. You can, of course, create your drawings in a sketch book, or in a drawing book of literally any shape or size, just as long as you're comfortable with it. Just keep in mind that when you have a really large size of paper, then it might take you longer to complete your artwork on a daily basis and so you might feel tired on some days because of the complexity of the compositions, so try to stick to a size that's comfortable enough for you and it also fits into the time that's available with you on a daily basis. Now for the purpose of demonstration in this course, I'm going to be working with this sketchbook from a brand called, Menorah, which is easily available to me over here in India. This is a six by six inches square sketchbook and it's a comfortable size for me to work on every day. It also has acid-free paper, which means that my art work won't gets spoiled in the long run and I can keep these designs safe for a really, really long time. Now coming to the pens. I usually use these Sakura Micron pens, which are quite popular with illustration artists around the world. These are also the same pens that the zentangle headquarters recommends and they include it as a part of their training gifts. But if this brand is not available to you, then you can look for fine liner pens or technical pens from other brands, such as Snowman, or Brustro, or, Fable Castell. Now here's my pro tip. Regardless of the brand, just make sure that the pens that you're buying have archival ink. Archival ink is a very important feature, especially if you're looking to maintain your artwork for a long period of time. Now all of these pens come in various nib sizes. For example, I have the 08 pen with me. The number says 08, but the thickness of this pen is 0.50 mm. Similarly, this Sakura Micron pen say 01 and the actual thickness of the nib is 0.25 mm. Basically, the numbers that you see on the pen body are not really reflective of the mm size. You have to look a little closer to find the exact mm size, which is going to give you an idea of how thick the strokes are going to be. I usually use the 01 pen to draw my designs and then I use 08 for any large areas that require coloring. It's just faster to work with a thicker nib when it comes to coloring. However, like I said, if you don't want to invest in technical pens or fine liner pens right now, that's completely fine and you can follow along in this class with regular ballpoint pens as well. Now, let's say you want to color your drawings later on, then you can use color pencils, sketch pens, markers, crayons, or any other coloring media that you're comfortable with. However, just a word of caution, that if you plan to use watercolors later on on your drawings, then make sure that your paper is at least 300 GSM thick. Because when we apply watercolors on paper, the paper tends to buckle up a little bit. It's important to have 300 GSM as the people width, because then it'll hold onto that water and the pigment really well and then your people won't crinkle up. Now here is one more pro tip. When you buy watercolor paper that is cold pressed, then you will not be able to draw very smoothly on it and the nib of your pen might get ruined. That is because cold pressed paper has texture on it and so when you try to draw on it, it's a little hard for you to control the pressure because the ink does not come out consistently. Consequently, it causes the nib of your pen to get spoiled. My recommendation is to work on hot pressed paper. It's smoother and the pen glides over it easily. Even if you're using a really thin nib, it won't get damaged because the paper surface will be smooth for you to work on. Now for all the supplies and the tips and tricks that I have mentioned in this video, I have also created a handy checklist that I have included as part of the projects in the resources section, which is right below this video. That's it for the supplies and now we're ready to start our creative challenge. 3. Day 1 - Let's Warm Up!: [MUSIC] Hello, everyone, and a very warm welcome to our 45-day creative challenge, where we are exploring lots and lots of different patterns and drawing exercises to level up your Zendoodle and Zentangle-inspired art. Today is day 1, and I thought we'd begin with a small warm-up exercise just to help you get in the rhythm of things and to help you get started and put yourself in the right frame of mind. I'm all set over here with my sketchbook and my micron pen, and I'm going to be using 01 size today. You're free to choose any other size that you have available with you. Now to begin the exercise, I'm going to pick a random point on the paper and I'm just going to draw an abstract doodly shape. It doesn't need to be too big. This is about two centimeters or about an inch wide. Then we just go in it with another little line inside, just imitating or shadowing the outline of the one that's on the outside. Then we're going to add some straight lines inside of this. These can be in any direction, but try to focus on the lines to make them as evenly spaced out as possible. When you're done, we're going to do another blob right next to it. If you notice, this abstract blob is basically trying to imitate the boundary or the outline of the previous one. Then again, I'm going to do another one over here, and I try to imitate those little crevices and curves. I play around with the sizes of these blobs and I keep on creating lots and lots of these all over the page. Every time you create a new blob, just look at the outlines of the previous ones or the surrounding ones and try to match it accordingly, almost like puzzle pieces which are fitting right into each other or they're placed right next to each other but there's a little bit of empty space between them. Work at your own pace, there's no hurry at all, and just enjoy the process. Then we go ahead and we're going to start filling the lines. Every time you fill the lines, make sure that you change the direction so that it looks a little more interesting. It will also help you to get a proper warm-up. You're free to rotate your notebook and your paper as many times as you like. If you have a preferred direction for your strokes, for example, left to right or top to bottom, then rotating your sketchbook frequently is going to allow you to work in your desired direction. Now, the decision is up to you on how you want to go about filling the page. You can either do all the blobs first and then come back and do the lines later or you can just complete each blob individually as you go along, so do the outlines and then the inner lines and then move on to the next one. You decide how you want to go about this. Basically, just work on building up your concentration and focus and just enjoy each stroke individually. Just breathe and enjoy the process. Now I'm going to speed up the video a little bit to show you what your page is going to look like once all your blobs are done. Remember that every time you draw a new blog, you're basically just imitating the outline of the surrounding ones. Once your page is completely filled up, it's time to add in some details. Now, there are two different variations that we can do for the details and I'm going to show these to you on a scrap piece of paper. One of the variations can be to cover those borders in black ink and basically have a thicker outline and then the other variation can be to play with stripes inside the blobs, so you basically color them alternate. You're free to do any of these variations in your design to bring in a little sense of contrast. As for me, I want to go with the thicker borders. You can definitely switch up to a thicker pen, for example, a 08 nib or even a brush pen, if that's what you have available with you. You can use that to color up the large areas. I am, however, going to continue working with the 01 nib because I like to color at my own pace and I quite enjoy the process of working with a thin nib. Again, these are just personal choices. You're free to improvise any way that you like. There are some days when even I have to switch to a bigger nib size, especially when I have large artworks and large chunks of color that I need to place or if I have a deadline and I need to finish up the coloring quickly. It all depends on my mood and the pace that I'm willing to work at and of course, it also depends on the time that's available with me. Now, once we are done adding the contrast to the outer lines or the inner lines, whatever you have chosen, we are basically done. This is an easy warm-up exercise for day 1, where we are basically indulging in line practice and also playing a little bit with contrast to try and build up your focus and concentration for the next 44 days. I hope you enjoyed this simple, carefree, relaxing exercise that we have done today. I look forward to seeing your work in the project section. Tomorrow we're going to start working on some complex compositions and I will be introducing more patterns and designs to you as we progress further. I look forward to meeting you real soon. Bye bye. 4. Day 2 - Fluxecho Blooms: [MUSIC] Hi everyone and welcome back to our creative challenge. Today we are on day two of creating interesting, intricate Zen art. I'm super excited for today's exercise because I'm going to be introducing some of my most favorite tangles today. To start off today's exercise, we're going to be picking literally any point on our sketchbook and making a tiny little circle over there. The next thing that we do is basically create a teardrop shape on top of it. Then we are basically creating some echoes. The teardrop shape on the top is actually known as the flux element and what we're basically creating on the sides is basically an echo effect. As you can see, we're basically going smaller and smaller and narrower on each of the sides, creating a blooming effect. This is how we basically build this one tiny element which is called flux echo. Like I said, the teardrop in the center is called flux and then since we are creating an echo effect, it basically becomes flux echo. This is a beautiful tangled design by Lynn Made. I'm going to be adding the details of all the tangles that we use along with the people who've created these tangles in the projects and resources section. In case you want to check out the tangles for future reference, you'll have a handy list with you. Now basically, I'm going to be creating more of these flux echoes in and around the one that we've just created, so some are going to be bigger and some are going to be smaller. The starting point is always the little circle and then we create a teardrop shape and then we keep blooming outwards. You can see that as you're going out, you're basically just hugging the previous element and then just going narrower and shorter on each of the sides. We're also going to be overlapping these a little bit. You can see that every time that I want to take something under the previous one, I basically lift up my pen just ever so slightly to pretend that I'm still drawing and then I bring my pen back in contact with the paper and then it creates a smooth transition to make it look as if the elements are overlapping each other. Keep rotating your sketchbook and keep drawing a few of these flux echo elements. We are going to be making a bunch of these. Let's say about eight or nine of these and all of them are going to be facing different directions and they're going to be of different sizes. Make some of them bigger, some of them smaller and basically by the end of it, they're going to end up looking like a pretty little bunch of flowers all facing in different directions and also overlapping each other slightly. Now it's absolutely okay if you don't get the exact number of echoes on each of the sides. So if you have the teardrop in the center or the flux in the center and you have four echoes on one side and five echoes on the other, that's perfectly fine. Just as long as you're going narrower and shorter on each of the sides, you're doing perfectly fine. The whole point of using the flux echo in this manner right now is to basically pretend that they are like these little blooming flowers. It shares a lot of characteristics with floral tangles or floral designs and gentle because flowers also have a radial pattern. That's one of the reasons why I like to use this tangle, imagining it to be like a little flower. Now, we're basically looking at a composition where these flowers occupy, let's say about 40-50 percent of your page. But they're not going to be placed in exactly the middle of it, so they're slightly off-center. You can see that mine are more on the left side of the paper and they're not exactly in the middle. But yours could be more in the south direction or more up or more right and that's completely fine too. Just as long as you have about eight or nine or maybe 10 of these and a nice bunch of these. Now once I'm happy with the number of flux echos that I've created, I'm going to start coloring the centers and this is just so that we can start adding some details and contrast into our design. After I fill up the centers, I'll come back to the petals and I will start adding some details. I'm going to start with the center petal or the flux itself and I'm going to basically create a small triangle over there using curvy lines. It's almost like writing the alphabet we but in a curvy manner and I'm going to color that black. Then I'm going to create a little line going towards the center so it's going to be like a dot, a tiny line, then a dot and a tiny line again. This is just my way of adding little details. You can choose to do an exact straight line towards the center. Almost how flower petals have veins in them. If you want to do that, that's perfectly fine too. But what I'm going to do is just play a little mix-and-match game here. I'm going to do dots and lines in my center, three petals. As the petals bloom outwards or as they're getting smaller and narrower, in those outer ones, I'm going to do just lines. I'm going to curve them slightly just so that they match the curve of the echo itself. Basically, I'm just adding some details here and there to make sure that the centers don't look boring and that the flowers or the flux echoes over here have a sense of detail to them. Once you're happy with the detailing of the flux echos, we're going to move on to our next tangle, which is called Hollibaugh. Hollibaugh is basically a slightly more structured tangle because it involves creating crisscrossing lines which give the appearance of being overlapped and they give the appearance of layering. We start off by creating a straight line and then I'm going to pretend that this line goes under that floral bunch and comes out on the other side. Again, I'm going to try to move my hand in such a way that I lift it up just ever so slightly once I reach the floral bunch and then I touch it back onto the paper once I reach the other end. I'm basically pretending that it goes under it. [MUSIC] We basically create these little sticks which are crisscrossing each other. The best way to do this is to keep rotating your sketchbook so that you can play with the different directions. One of the things that I'm consciously doing right now is keeping the top left of my design empty or leaving that as negative space because we're going to be adding another diagonal tangle over there. I'm basically creating these crisscross lines more towards the bottom right. You can see that some of these are not coming out to be like perfect straight lines, which is okay, because then they just tend to look a little natural. Now once we have these lines, they are giving the appearance of almost like having a little trellis at the back of these flowers, or like these flux echoes or almost like a creeper plant, which is growing on top of a trellis or one of those bamboo or wooden partitions that we often see in gardens and balconies. So that's exactly the idea that I was going for, and I'm glad that it's shaping up quite nicely. So now once we're basically done with the holly Bow lines, I am adding these little orbs over here, which is basically a tangle called tipple. Tipple is all about adding little orbs of different sizes. So big ones and small ones next to each other, and whatever little space that I have between these little orbs, I'm coloring it black. Just so that, again, there is a little bit of contrast and detail. From these orbs, I'm basically creating these wavy lines, which are going to be looped at the end. And this is yet another tangle, a beautiful flare tangled called fescue. Now you can add as many of these as you like. It all depends on how heavy you want your design to look and how detailed you want it to look, plus the size of your paper of course. Now we're going to be creating these tipples and fescues on most of the meeting points. So I'm basically trying to look for these little corners in these octagonal and polygonal, triangular squarish shapes that are formed between the crisscrossing holly bar lines, and I'm looking for these little corners and filling them up with tipple and creating fescues out of them, and the fescues are going in different directions. I'm not doing it literally all of the corners, because then it would end up looking like too cluttered. So I'm probably doing it in like two or three corners of each of those shapes that are formed inside of those holly bar sections. Again, these are personal choices, and it totally depends on what your paper size is, and how detailed you want your design to look. I'm also adding a few of these details on the outer edge of the holly bar partition. Just so that they don't look as if they're trapped only on the side of the paper and that some of them are also going on the other side. Once we're done with this, we are going to move now to the top-left corner of the page, where we're basically going to introduce another tangle called poke leaf. Poke leaf is a beautiful little tangle, where we start off with two tiny little sticks and add a little cap on them, and then create a leaf around it. Now, your leaf might look completely different to mine, and that's completely okay. Because every person's drawing technique is different, and everyone's stroke is different. But the only thing to keep in mind is that poke leaf is an organic tangle, which means that these leaves can basically be drawn in any direction. So you basically keep rotating your sketchbook, and you keep overlapping these leaves, some smaller and some bigger, and they basically come from behind each other, on top of each other in different directions. Think of it like a money plant, which has leaves growing in all different directions or something like that. Now one of the things that I like to do in my poke leaves is to add these little curved lines at the edges, or only on one of the edges, to make it seem as if the leaf is calling up. This is just a small little detail that I like to add. You can skip it if this is something that you don't want to do. But I think that little element of adding a curve line somewhere on the edge of the leaf creates a nice cooling effect, which brings a sense of detail and again, of course, contrast because we're adding more saturated black inky areas and the design. To create a sense of balance, I'm adding a few little fescues here as well. Because we have a lot of fescues happening on the bottom right of the design, but we don't have any of that on the top left. So just to create a sense of balance, I'm adding a few of these on the top left as well. And that's it. That's our design for today. So we played with some lovely organic tangles to create this beautiful little floral bunch that looks as if it's sort of trapped on a trellis or is hanging from a beautiful trellis. So I quite like this composition, and it's actually a lovely little composition to do on greeting cards, or any DIY project that you're working on. So I hope that you enjoyed this and that you will give this a try. And I look forward to seeing your work in the Projects and Resources section. And if you have any questions, feel free to put those in the discussions tab, and I'd be happy to answer them for you. So that's it for today, and I will see you tomorrow with another interesting composition that I have planned. Till then, keep creating. Bye-bye. 5. Day 3 - Aquafleur meets Akoya: [MUSIC] Hi there, and welcome back to the course. Today we are on Day 3 of our challenge where we're learning how to create zentangle inspired art and creatives zen doodles. For today's exercise, we're going to be working on an abstract composition with one big focal element in the center and then some random flowing lines around that focal object. To begin with, I'm going to draw an abstract doodle like shape in the center of my paper with a pencil. We're going to be erasing this later on, so make sure that you do this with a pencil and not a pen. Now grab a thin micron pen, preferably in of size 01, and make a dot somewhere towards the left side of this shape that we have drawn. Once you have the dot in place, we start making lines. For the first one, I'm going to go slightly above the boundary that we have created and make a small mountain like bump and then bring it down and connect it to the dot. Then I make a small wavy line. Again, this is outside of the border and then connected with a curving line back to the dot that we had placed. Then again I'm going to be making a little bump outside, bringing it like so, and then connecting it with a line and bringing it down. Now those little bumps that we had made we're going to be coloring those off to make it appear as if they're coming from behind the boundary. Then the gap between the two elements is going to be connected by retracing the original boundary line. Once again, we make the original boundary line, then go a little higher, and then color up that bump. Every time that you color up that little bump, it's basically giving the impression that it's like a curvy fold which is coming from behind that original boundary. We continue going further, creating more and more of these curvy triangular like elements, connecting them to the tail of the previous one. As you can see, I'm always connecting the front of the new element to the tail of the previous element. After I've done a few of these elements, I vary the height and then I start to go shorter, purposely making them thinner and narrower, and then connecting them almost as if changing the center point of these new elements that I'm creating, and then they start to give this appearance of being tucked beneath the previous ones. Then once you reach almost to the center, you are left with this little orb like abstract doodle shape in the middle. You have a couple of choices on how to do this. You can either go about creating these little triangular fragments and keep on building it inside, almost creating a spiral, or you could just connect the tail of the last one to the tail of the first one, making this little hollow space in the center that can be filled with another design later on. We're going to be following the second approach, but first I'm going to finish up coloring all these little toxin folds and also connecting each of these elements. Now depending on the pencil outline that you had drawn, there's a possibility that your toxin poles might be looking slightly different than mine and that's completely okay too. As long as you have these alternate fragments where it appears as if one of them is coming from behind the boundary line and then the other one is retrace on the boundary line itself, you will have a decent looking shape, and that's all that we're looking for. Then now again, before we come back to the center, we'll just add a few details on these little triangular fragments that we have created. On each of the fragments where there is a mountain bump, where it appears as if the fragment is coming from behind the shape, we're going to be adding these small little ovals, and you don't need to be very perfect with these, it's okay if they're a little doodly shaped and if they are slightly asymmetrical, that's fine. Just try to be as neat as you can. All that we're looking for is that we go smaller and smaller as we reach the tail of each of these sections. Work at your own pace and take as much time as you need to finish this off. You can pause the video or even slow it down if you want to take some more time to finish up the details. Once you're done adding the ovals, we'll come to the center where we are basically adding small circles or tipple, as you remember from yesterday's exercise. I'm basically making some circles which are of varying sizes. Some are small, some are big. I'm also coloring some of these black and leaving the others white just to create some interest and build contrast within that little hollow space. Once you're done with the center, we'll come back to the empty spaces that we left out, and we're going to be filling this up with lines. Now try to keep these lines as close to each other as possible. Basically I'm just following the curve of the next fragment. That's all that I'm doing. It's almost like creating repeated waves which are imitating each other, and so every new line that you draw is going to follow the direction and the shape of the previous one, just like shadowing the effect of the previous one. You've probably noticed that as I'm going along I'm also re-looking at some of my previous lines and redressing them and drawing over them just to make them a little neater and sharper, so you're definitely free to do that as well. Now at this point even though this design that we've drawn has good amount of detailing, what it lacks is depth. Now to bring depth in this design, I'm basically going to pick the hump side or the curvy side of each of these fragments where we had done the ovals and I'm going to go in with a thicker pen. I'm going to start to make that edge bolder. It will basically add almost like an angle to those fragments, and it'll connect that hollow black mountain bump that we had created on the top to the edge, giving it like a paper fold effect or a paper calling effect and adding dimension and depth to the shape. As you go towards the center of this composition, or basically when you reach the tail end, start to narrow it down. You start taking the top and then you go narrow towards the middle. Take your time with this step because it also acts as an opportunity for you to fix the outer shape or the outer boundary in case it wasn't needed before. It's your chance to really observe the shape and give it all the love and attention that you want to give it to make all of those little fragments stand out. Now here, thanks to the power of video editing, I can show you the before and after pictures. You can see how much of a difference the rounding basically brings to the entire shape. Adding roundings that almost appear like shadows to one side of your fragments or to one side of your design helps to bring in contrast and it also brings in depth. Now going back to our composition, the next step that we are basically going to do is add in a few curvy lines with pencil again, and again we are going to be erasing these later on, so make sure that you do this with pencil and not pen. I've created three of these, and each of them is partially hidden under the main focal aquifer that we have drawn. Now on these pencil lines, we're going to be working with another tangle which is called akoya, which to me almost looks like a beautiful pearl necklace as if like a princess had a pearl necklace and this tangle looks exactly like that to me. To begin this tangle, we are going to be drawing some small circles along that pencil line. Then we connect each of these circles with a curvy line like so. You go from the bottom of the previous one and connect it to the top of the next one. Once you're done with this, then you come back to the first one, take another curvy line, but this time you give it a slight more bend and then once you connect it to the next one it basically starts to look like a little curly leaf or almost like a jelly bean, I think. Then we again come back to the first one and this time we start with circles on the top edge. These are going to go smaller and smaller as you reach the next circle. Then again, you start with the big circle that's already there and you start to go narrower and narrower and all the way to the edge, and then you repeat the process. Basically it starts to look like a string of pearls already. Once you're done adding these circles, you again come back to the first one, and this time you start to add circles the other way round, but the process remains the same. You still go smaller and smaller as you reach the edge. Now when you're drawing these circles you probably noticed that there's a little bit of gap between the circles and the edge of those curvy lines that you had drawn, so we're going to go back and color those in with our black pen, and you can see that it brings a lot of difference already because it starts to add some more contrast into the design and it helps to make sure that those circles or those little pearls stand out more. Now the original akoya step out has circles inside these little jelly bean like shapes as well, but I'm going to be improvising over here a little bit because I want this akoya tangle to be in harmony with the aqua flower tangle that we have drawn. Just like we had done lines in the aqua flower, we're going to be adding lines in the akoya jelly beans as well. Then once you do the akoya tangles on the other two pencil strings that we had drawn, it's going to end up looking something like this. You can see that because of the use of tipple inside the aqua flower, as well as the use of lines inside the akoya, both the tangles are now in harmony with each other and they have similar visual elements. One more little detail that I'm adding as I'm going along is that I'm coloring the original circles black. The original circles that we had created to build the akoya framework, I'm just inking them black so that those anchor poles are darker as compared to the other poles and that helps to add a little more contrast to the overall design. Now in designs like these where there is a really big focal element in the center that's filled with details and is quite overpowering, I like to have a lot of negative space around so that it just creates a sense of balance and that there is a little breathing area around. But if you feel that your design is looking a little empty which is totally possible if your sketchbook is bigger than mine, then you're definitely free to add more of these akoya strings around the aqua flower. Feel free to personalize the design and you're free to alter a few things here in there. It doesn't need to be exactly the same as mine, and you're definitely free to improvise and do your own little touches here and there, and don't forget to erase the pencil lines later on. That's it for today's exercise, and I'm super excited to meet you guys tomorrow with one more interesting idea that I have planned. See you, bye, bye. 6. Day 4 - Drawings & Toodles: [MUSIC] Hi everyone, and welcome back to the challenge. Today we are on Day 4, and for today's exercise, I'm going to be helping you design a cute little floral bouquet using a couple of organic tangles from this entangled method. For the first one, we're going to be working with this tangle called drawings, which is a beautiful, flowery, flowy, feather-like tangle. For this, we basically begin with a tiny little circle and then make a weaving line coming out like so. Then we twist it around and we work in a radial manner to create a few more of these wavy lines. Almost like a windmill, but like a little more flowy version of that. It's almost acting like the center of maybe leaves or petals of a flower. Eventually you're going to be left with a flower like shape. You can do as many of these as you like. I've done five, but you can definitely do four or six or even seven if that's what you prefer. Now, we come back to any one of these lines, and we pick a point somewhere in the middle of that wave. From there, we basically make these little tiny Coby, scallop shapes connecting it to the tip of the next one. Then we repeat the process for the next one. We start with a couple of these semicircular bumps. Then as you go to the last one, it just almost becomes like a little feather, reminds me an angel wing and it becomes this pretty little tip in the end. Now, some of these are going to be bigger and some of these are going to be smaller, and not all of your petals are going to be equally sized, and that's fine because that's what we're looking for as this is a very organic tangle. Now we're going to repeat the process once more and create another drawings of flower under the one that's already existent. Just be a little careful when you reach the point of the previous one. Just as soon as your pen touches that point, lift it up so that it gives the appearance that your petals are going underneath the previous one. Then we basically just pretend that there is a hump that's coming from there. Then we connect it like so. Without really touching your pen on the paper, mimic the action. It's like you're drawing, but you're drawing like maybe a millimeter above the paper. The nib of your pen is not really touching the paper. That's how you can retrace your actions or retrace your hand movements and then touch it at that point where you feel the ink needs to now be put on the paper. That's how we can achieve this effect where it appears as if one flower is under the other. Anytime you're doing any of the tangles when you're trying to create this effect where one is on top and the other is underneath, just lift up your pen slightly, retrace your movements, and then bring it back in contact with the paper the second you feel that the layering is done. Now, what we're going to do next is that we're going to add a few details. There are a couple of ways that you can do this. You can either bring about a couple of curving lines like so and then leave them midway or you could connect it all the way to the bottom. Again, you can either wrinkle the lines or connect them to the bottom all the way. Both of them have their own effect and both of these techniques look really pretty and you can choose whichever one you like more. I tend to like the effect when it goes all the way to the bottom, almost like creating small little sections within the given sections. I like to have these little teardrop shapes, but you're definitely free to do the other approach. Then again, we come to the next one. Either you take the curve and leave it midway, or you bring it all the way down to the center. Then again over here, since there's a little bit of an overlap, I'm going to pretend that there's a hump there and that there's a connecting line. Similarly, I'm going to pretend that there's a hump and then there's a connecting line and bring it down like so. We continue the process for the other two petals as well. Now once you're done creating the lines inside the petals, the next thing that we're going to do is color the centers of each of these tangles. The center circles that we had created are going to be inked black. We'll come back to add a few more details inside the petals, but we're going to do that a little bit later. First, we are going to surround these two flowers with a few leaf-like patterns. For that, I have chosen this tangle called toodles, which is a beautiful little triangle, that looks like a pretty heart-shaped leaf. It starts with a wavy line, and then we go to the tip of that wavy line and bring it down like so, almost like retracing it. Then we basically create a small fescue-like element on the right side. You probably remember fescue from the exercise that we did on Day 2. Then we repeat that same process on the left side as well. It's okay if your fescue is a little more close to the wavy line or far away from the wavy line, that's fine. Now pick a point somewhere on that fescue and take it upwards like so and then bring it down and connect it to the other fescue. It's almost like an inverted heart. You're definitely free to rotate your notebook or your paper in order to get the desired outcome. If you feel that you're more comfortable drawing your heart in the actual direction, like you want to have the curves up and the tip down, you're definitely free to do that. Whatever makes it easy and comfortable for you. Now, for the second toodle leaf, I'm going to overlap it slightly. I'm basically borrowing from the border of the drawings flower petal itself. I'm basically continuing from that same border, almost like both of these tangles are sharing that line and then I create my fescues. Since this is going to be overlapped, there's a high chance that the other fescue might just get hidden behind and I might not really see it, so that's fine. Then we again, create that heart-shaped leaf-like effect. I'm going to pretend that it goes under the previous one, and then comes out from behind it, and comes and touches the tip like so. Now you can always revisit your design. Now after looking at this, I feel like I'm missing the other fescue a little bit, so I will come back and I will add it, just like a hint of it, so that it appears as if that entire toodles leaf is behind the previous one. You can definitely do these little changes in your design. Now we're going to be adding a lot more toodles around the bouquet, but we're not going to go all the way till the edge. I'm just going to speed this up and show you how I've added mine. Depending on the framework and the size of the paper that you have, you can definitely add more or less. Yours don't need to look exactly like mine. You can even make them narrower and shorter. Once you are satisfied with the number of toodle leaves that you have created around your drawing flowers, we'll come back to the centers of these flowers itself. Now as you noticed, we had a little bit of a fescue element inside the toodle leaf. We're going to borrow that idea or take design inspiration from that and use that exact element to fill in the details inside the drawings flower. We're going to basically make it look as if there are a little fragments of pollen coming out of the center. The reason why I'm doing this in this particular order is because I wanted to show you how my process really works. Sometimes when I'm working on a particular tangle or a particular design, and I don't know what else I can do inside of it in terms of details or I don't know how to fill it up, then I move on to the next tangle. When the other triangle is done, I basically look for a particular element that can be added in the previous one so that both of them look in harmony. It's like going a little back and forth in terms of the design. But it definitely works because this way even if you have two completely different looking tangles, you can still make them work together or you can still connect them well together and make it appear as if they are from the same family by just creating some visual similarity between the two. Now here, as you can notice, I'm basically playing with the length of each of these fescue pollen-like details inside the flowers. Some are short and some are long, and some are facing clockwise, some are anticlockwise. You can definitely play around in terms of the variations with this and do your own personal touches. [MUSIC] Now for the next step, we're going to start coloring that center, vein-like element inside the doodles. I think I will have to keep both my pens handy at the same time. I'm going to use 08 for coloring and I'm going to come back with my 01 to neaten out the tips of each of these veins, just to make them look a little more pointy and sharp. Again, at this point, you can decide whether you want the wave or the central vein to touch all the way to the tip of the leaf or you want it left in limbo, somewhere in the middle. You can take these aesthetic decisions even at this stage. As for my design, you can see that I've created a variety. Some of the stems or these middle veins are going all the way to the top of the leaf, while some of them are just left in the middle. [MUSIC] Once you're done with the center lines inside the doodle leaves, we come back with our bold pen 08 or 05, whatever you have handy with you. We start to basically add some dimension and depth to the drawing's flower. I'm basically going to make the outlines thicker. But as we reach the edge of the petal, I'm going to make the corner even more bold and even more thicker, and that's because it makes it look as if the petal is curling. Very similar to what we had done in yesterday's exercise where we created an almost 3D effect by just adding a little bit of an angle to the design. By doing this, the flower now stands out a little bit more. It appears as if the flower is in the foreground and the leaves are slightly behind it. Again, these little details and adding a little bit of contrast help to build depth in your design, because now there is a sense of layering to it and the flowers definitely stand out more as compared to the leaves. Now I'm going to skip a little bit ahead to show you what the next step is going to be like so that you can plan a little bit in terms of how you want to structure your design. Now, once we are done with the flowers, we're going to move on to the next step, which is to basically add these little branches around. This is yet another tangle called Verdigogh. Now, Verdigogh is a beautiful tangle where we basically start off by creating small little stems like so. Then from each of the stems, we basically have more stems coming out. These can be pointy edged or these can be almost like a rectangular or curvy rectangle kind of an edge. You can even have them overlapping each other. You can have some going up, some going down. Basically, once you have the center stem and then some few other branches coming out of it, you can add more branches further and further and make it bigger and bigger. It almost looks like a close-up of a Christmas tree branch to me. When you look at it, it almost has those really thin needles. But it's up to you whether you want to keep them pointy or you want to keep the edge a little more blunt. We basically create a few of these around. You can have some bigger, some smaller, just play around with the sizes, play around with the orientation a little bit. When you're done adding these, it's going to look almost like a top angle view of a pretty bouquet [MUSIC]. Then I'm just going to add a few of these tiny little circles on the branches, almost as if they're like little wild berries or little seeds, or pollen coming out of these little branches. You can just go about placing these randomly anywhere along the edges of those little branches. Since we are basically coloring these circles black, they help to add in a little more contrast. Then that brings us to the next step. For the next step we're going to be adding a few more veins inside the doodle leaves. For this, take the thinnest pen available with you and draw the veins very similar to how they are in real leaves. But when you reach the tip, just flick your pen almost as if just creating a fading out effect. Basically, every time you reach the tip, just try to release the pressure. It's like an airplane taking off the runway, so you just basically have liftoff the minute you feel that you want it to fade out. Basically what I'm doing is that I'm starting close to that center dark vein but I'm branching out as we go further out. I'm just making those strokes lighter and lighter. This is actually one of the things that I really love about Zentangle art. Even though everything starts off in an abstract manner, you can bring in a sense of reality to it and you can borrow from real-life elements and add them onto your existing framework. It's almost like that meeting point or that sweet spot between reality and abstraction. These are very personal pieces of expression because the way I draw something is not going to be the same way that you do it, and so each of us are going to have our own strokes, our own imagination, and so each artwork really becomes very unique in that sense. All right, now for one final step, I'm going to just add in a few more of these wavy, almost tentacle-like branches coming out from behind the center flowers. Now I'm just going to go back to those two leaves and add a little bit of those dark curves that I like to add on my leaves, something that we did with our book leaves on Day 2 as well. This is completely optional, if you don't want to add more inky details in your design, that's completely fine. I personally like to do my leaves this way and this has actually become one of my signature little details in every design that I make. You will always find coiling leaves in my design and not flat ones, but this is purely optional. These are just little ornamental details that you can add if you feel like adding them or you can avoid if you feel that your design is good the way it is right now. With this, we come to an end to today's exercise. I look forward to seeing your beautiful versions and variations of this wonderful, lovely floral bouquet that we have done today. See you tomorrow. 7. Day 5 - Noodle & Springkle: [MUSIC] Hi everyone and welcome back to our creative challenge. Today we are on Day 5 and I have a very pretty design to share with you all today. We're going to be working with a tangle called noodle and then we're going to be combining it with another tangle called springkle. Both of these tangles are very organic and very flowy and they have a pretty garden-like wipe to them. To begin the exercise, we're going to lay out some circles in a vertical line. They don't need to be very perfect and you're certainly free to rotate your notebook around to draw them in the opposite direction if that's easier for you. Now, once you're done with the first line, we're going to repeat that process somewhere in the center of the page. So you can see I've actually managed to put seven circles or seven of these orbs based on the length of the sketchbook that I'm using. You probably might have more or less depending on the length of your sketchbook so that's completely fine. I'm just trying to keep them as evenly spaced out as possible. Now the next thing that we're going to do is that we're going to start working on some S-shaped lines. I basically start with the first one, touch the second one, and then crossover and bring it beneath the third one. Then I again go to the third one, curve it like so, touch the fourth one, bring it back in the opposite direction, and touch the fifth one. Then I start from the fifth one, touch the sixth one, bring it down and connect it to the seventh one. Then we basically repeat this process for the other two lines as well. Now once you're done with all the three rows, the next thing that we're going to do is begin counting the next set of circles so earlier we did 1,2,3, and then 3,4,5, and 5,6,7. But this time we're basically going to do 2,3,4, then 4,5,6, and so on and so forth. Basically, we skip the top one and start from the second one. I'm just going to show you how this works. We basically go to this second circle. Make a curve like so, bring it and touch it down to the third one and then reverse the curve and touch it to the fourth one. Then again we start from the fourth one, bring down the curve, touch it like so, and connect it to the sixth one. Then for the next one we just wrap it around and leave it like so. Now it's okay if the shapes are not to your liking right now and it's also okay if the shapes are looking a little different from each other. They don't need to be exact mirror images of each other so that's fine. [MUSIC] Now we'll just come back to their tops and we'll just close them like so and then the next thing that we're going to do is that we're going to start building out some echoes. Now, this step is very similar to the flux circles that we had done on Day 2, so you're basically creating almost like a teardrop shape coming from behind that center element and then you add another echo and we do two of these on each of these curvy fragments that we have. Then we do it all the way to the bottom. Now once we are done adding two of these echoes on each of the sides, we come back to the first one and this time we start to add more echoes but we start to tuck them inside the bottom one. Again, very similar to the flux echo effect. We basically start to go in a circular, radial manner and we go narrower and narrower and we tuck them under the next one. [MUSIC] Once you're done placing all your echoes all the way till the bottom, the next step is going to be to add some details in the center, for others, we come back to this little curvy shape that we have in the center and start to add some circles and color all the empty space black. Again, the circles are going to go down in a descending manner. Then we come back to the outer petals that we had created and I'm going to just retrace the first two or first three petals to make them stand out a little bit more. The first two or three are going to be slightly bold as compared to the rest of the petals. Then I'm just going to add a curvy line and put in a couple of dots in there. These are small little details that will just add a lot of value to your entire design. Again, we come back to the next one and we start to add circles in a descending size so they go smaller and smaller and then I color the sections black. Then again, I retrace the outer petals. I make the first two or the first three petals slightly thicker and slightly bold and then the other petals stay thin, almost creating a fading-out-like effect. Then once you're done adding the details, we basically repeat this exact same process for the whole row, and then we do the same thing for the other two rows as well. Now this is a fairly repetitive process and it's going to take you a little bit of time to finish up the detailing so if you feel like you want to pause the video at this point and come back once you're ready, you can do that. In the interest of keeping these videos crisp and productive, what I'm going to do is that I'm going to skip ahead a little further and this is what your design is going to look like once you have finished with all the detailing on each of these three rows that we have created. Once you're at this stage, we will be ready to start with our next step. Now the original step out for the noodle tangle is slightly more compact as compared to the version that we have done today. The reason why I have decided to do a more spaced-out version is because I actually want to introduce another tangle in the middle of these empty spaces. This tangle that we're going to work with right now is called springkle and springkle is a beautiful organic tangle which is perfect to add to any floral designs and it's a great filler tangle as well. Now the way this tangle works is that we basically create a curvy line and then we loop it in the end like so, very similar to creating a fescue. Then we basically make a small curve from beneath that teardrop shape. Take it around and bring it down like so. It almost starts to look like a little curling stem. Now once you have this basic shape ready with you, we're going to add a few caps on top of it and these are going to be small, little semicircular or rounded caps, which are going to go narrower and narrower as you reach the tip. You can add as many as you like. There is no fixed number over here and so what I like to do is that I color them alternate, black and white and then I also add these little dots on top of it. [MUSIC] Then again, we are going to look for another empty space somewhere in our design and create another little fescue and it's okay if the bulb or that little teardrop shape on the top is not exactly teardrop shape, that's completely fine. Yours can be narrower, more circular, more bulky bigger smaller, there are no rules to it. Now, you don't always have to use the top side. You can also make the caps facing in the bottom direction. For example, over here, I'm going to take it down like so. Basically, the gist of this is that once you have that semicircular head on the top, you can use pretty much any side of that semicircular ahead and create your caps on top of it. The gaps can be facing in literally any direction, just as long as they are connected to that head on top. Keep rotating your notebook and keep finding interesting areas where you can add these little springkles. We don't want to add a lot of them. We just want to add a few so that they look like they're coming out of these floral stems. You can have some coming from the edges of the design, almost making it look as if the design is continuous and it's continuing even beyond the paper and you can have them facing any direction that you like. [MUSIC] Then once you're done adding all of these little springkles, the next thing that we're going to do is add a few fescues, and the fescues can be again put in any direction. That's it for today's exercise. This is a beautiful little floral wine design that can be used as a border to any other composition. Or you can simply multiply these wines and create a beautiful pattern the way we have done it today. You can use it for many DIY projects, like greeting cards, or even pin them on top of cushion covers or put them on top of your notebooks or make stickers out of it and put it on top of your laptops. There are many different applications to this design. I hope you loved creating it as much as I love teaching it, and I look forward to seeing your versions and variations of this beautiful little design that we've done today. See you tomorrow. 8. Day 6 -Borbz & Diva Dance: [MUSIC] Hello, and welcome back. In today's exercise, we're going to be working with this tangle called Borbz. The creator of this tangle is Rita. This is a lovely, beautiful bordered tangle. She decided to call it Borbz because she says that it's a border of squished orbs. She basically came up with this wonderful little acronym. I think it suits the nature and the characteristic of the tangle very well. To begin this tangle, we basically start by making some orbs. All of these orbs are stacked one on top of each other, or they are connected to each other in one single row. It's okay if the orbs are not all equally sized, and if they don't look similar to each other, that's fine. We repeat the process two more times, and then we reach the end of the page. Now if you're using a rectangle notebook and you're using it in the landscape mode, then you probably might have to make a few more rows, and that's fine. Just make the number of rows depending on the orientation of your sketchbook and the size of the paper. Now for the next step, we come back inside these orbs, and we start to place smaller orbs. But these are going to be colored black. I've basically taken my 0.8 pen so that it's easier to color, and it's faster that way. As you can see, the inner orbs don't really have a fixed position. You can place them anywhere inside the big orb and you can keep them left, right, bottom, top, just as long as they're inside the big orb. Now step number 3 is going to be to make an outer boundary or an aura around the inner orb. Once you're done with the aura, we basically start to create these lines coming out of it, almost like sun rays. You can go clockwise or anticlockwise, whatever's easier for you. These can be curvy or straight. Both of the variations have their own appeal. They both look interesting. If yours are turning out to be slightly more curvy than mine, that's fine. Now before I finish off the rest of the orbs, I'm going to show you the next step so that you can pause the video and finish it up until this point. For the next step, we basically pick one side of those lines that we had drawn, it can be left or right, and then we start to create a curvy line and color that in. It's almost like creating a curvy tangle on top of those lines that you had drawn. It's like adding a little bit to the edges of these lines. It's going to start to look like this. Now in this particular orb, I have decided to add the weight on the right side of the lines, but you can add it on the left side of the lines as well. You can also mix and match it for the rest of the orbs. You can do some with the weight on the right side and some with the weight on the left side. If at any point you feel like you want to retrace the boundaries of those orbs and make them neater, you're free to do so. Now again, for the next orb, I've picked the right side. I'm just adding a little curvy line and then coloring it in. Now, depending on the distance between each of these lines that you have drawn radiating out from the center orb, you might have a couple of places where there might be overlaps. If the lines are very close together and you're trying to add weight on them, they might overlap and run into the next one. That's fine. This is a very abstract pattern and so there is room for some inconsistencies over here because that's the nature and the characteristic of this particular tangle. It almost has a very futuristic vibe to it. Almost like these are going to be plants in outer space or probably people in the future might wear jewelry which looks like this. This pattern is quite abstract in that sense. Now once you're done with these steps, we basically do the exact same thing on the rest of the orbs. Just to recap, as I'm drawing along, Step 1 was to draw all the orbs. Step 2 was to create the inner orbs, which were colored black. Step 3 was to give each of them an aura. Step 4 was to create all of those radiating lines coming out of those auras. Then Step 5 was to add weight. Now, this is a fairly repetitive process, so I'm going to speed up the video a little bit to show you what it's going to look like once all your rows are done. I'm actually just going to finish the first row entirely and show you what it's going to look like. Here, the first row is completely done. I'm still going to work on the other two rows, but I wanted to show you the next step so that you have a complete picture of what the design is going to look like. Now once your rows are done, the next thing that we're going to do is connect these orbs by adding these semicircular curvy lines and coloring them black. This is going to happen all the way from the top. We basically draw a small curvy line and connect it somewhere to the edge of the next orb. Then we do this on both the sides. Eventually, it's going to start looking like there is a big thick black border and the orbs are stuck on top of it. That is why this tangle works very well as a border tangle. Now you can pause the video at this point and come back once you're ready. Once you're done with all of the steps on each of these little strips or borders that you have drawn, your paper is going to look something like this. Then we'll be ready to work on the next step. For the next step, we're going to be drawing lines which are going to be mimicking each other. This tangle is basically called diva dance. I basically start by tracing the outline of the tangle that's already drawn. I'm basically trying to copy the shape and the curves of the tangle that's already there. Then I do it one more time. Now in the second line, I basically come back and I start to add some black roundings like so. It's almost like creating little bumps filled with color. Then the third line is now going to follow the shape of the second line. Since we added the curves on the second line, the shape of the second line has changed a little bit. Now the following line is going to mimic the effect of the previous line. Then again, I do the fourth line, which is going to mimic the effect of the third line. Fourth line is again going to have bumps in it. Now it's not necessarily that you have to do one without bumps and the other with bumps, so you don't have to go alternate the way I have done these two. You can also have two without bumps and then one with bumps. Or you could have one with bumps, and then you could have three without bumps. Or you could do even do with bumps together. Basically, you can play around with the variations in these lines. You can mix and match. Then we basically use this tangle to fill up the entire empty space on the page. That's it for today's exercise. Today we have actually combined two very interesting abstract tangles. One is Borbz and the other is diva dance. Both of them have a very characteristic to them, which is why they complement each other perfectly. For the Borbz, you can even improvise and not use it as a border tangle. You can just use the orbs separately, not connected to each other, and you can have them floating around in different directions and fill up a space that you have in a larger composition. That's totally possible as well. I hope you enjoyed making this lovely fluid abstract composition that we have done today. I'm super excited to see all your versions and variations of this design. I look forward to meeting all of you tomorrow with yet another interesting exercise. See you. 9. Day 7 - Balldox & You!: [MUSIC] Hi everyone. Welcome back to the course. Today we are on Day 7 of our creative challenge, which means we're about to finish the first week of our creative journey together. I thought that since today we're about to finish the first week of our challenge, this is the perfect opportunity to level things up. Today I'm going to be reaching your only one tangle. Then I'm going to be leaving the rest of the space empty for you to fill it up with your own imagination. The tangle that we're going to work today is called Balldox, and it is created by Karen Frank. To begin this tangle, we start with three dots and then we connect these with these curvy lines, very similar to how we attack the Akoya tangle. Then we again come back at the bottom and connect it to the top. Again, exactly the same process as we had done with the Akoya tangle. Once you have these curvy lines in place, the next thing that we do is to build some teardrop shapes, also known as flux and then we basically just echo them out. Then as you are building more of these echoes, they will start to give an impression that they're getting tucked beneath that circle that we had drawn initially. We can also refer to these circles as anchor points because they're holding the entire design together. Depending on how you spaced out the three dots, you might either have more echoes than me or less echoes than me. That's it. That's how Balldox is created. Now you have absolute freedom to do anything that you like in the center as well as outside. Since we're about to finish the first week of our creative challenge, this is a great opportunity for you to go back and look at all your previous designs and pick up some of the tangles that you either find very interesting or the ones that you want to practice a little more. Now use those tangles in this particular design and build your own composition. Remember, there are no mistakes. Everybody's composition is going to look different and each of you are going to end up creating it with your own personal preferences so there is generally no right or wrong over here. Fill up the page literally any way that you like. During the process, if you face any difficulties or encounter any problems, make sure that you write about it in the Discussions tab where I'd be more than happy to look at your work in progress design and help you carry it forward. As for me, I'm going to show you my complete composition tomorrow so that you don't get influenced by my choices, and are able to make a page which is completely uniquely truly yours. I look forward to seeing you tomorrow. Bye-bye. 10. Day 8 - Oh well!: [MUSIC]. Hi everyone and welcome to Day 8 of our creative challenge. Before we begin today's exercise, let's have a quick look at what I ended up doing with yesterday's project. I basically kept the wall docs in the center and then I added a few little orbs in the center to just give it some contrast. I also added a little bit of lines and dots. Then I proceeded to adding dividends almost like three sections or three ribbons which are coming out. Then I added some doodles. Now for the doodles, I decided to add in some details by putting in these curvy lines inside and giving them some weight at the end. For all the negative space on the left side, I decided to add pork leaf and decided to color the background black. But I did want to maintain an abstract field overall. I decided to keep the right side of my page as white and just added some fescue over there. Then finally I added some random dots around the fescue just to make that whole thing look a little more full, and that was it. This was my version from yesterday's exercise where I picked up a few patterns from everything that we've done in the last week. Overall, I'm quite happy with the way this whole thing turned out. It was quite a relaxing experience for me and I'm sure it was the same for you. Now that brings us to today's exercise. Today we're going to be working on a mono tangle. A mono tangle basically is the terminology which is used in the zentangle method whenever we work with only one tangle. Today the tangle that we're going to be focusing on is called Oh Well. It's a beautiful tangle by Melinda Barlow. It has curvy lines and straight lines. It's quite an interesting exercise to do as a mono tangle because it really builds your power of association when it comes to shapes on your paper. Now, the way this tangle works is that we start by making a tiny little circle and color it black. Then somewhere under that circle, we create another tiny circle of almost the same size, just a tiny little orb. Now we connect these two by making a curvy line like so. Then we again make two dots. These are somewhere on the right side of the previous two. Now this time when we're connecting these dots, we touch the previous curve just a little bit. Once you have these two curves, we close the top and the bottom by adding another curvy line, like so. Almost like adding a cap on top of it. Then the inside is filled with lines which are parallel to both the sides of the curves. The easiest way to do this is to start with the center line and then just go parallel and parallel to match the shape of each of the edges. Now this tangle almost works like a constellation in the sky. You can just keep connecting and building more and more of these dots and more and more of these patterns by just adding those curvy lines. For example, for this one, I'm using the preexisting curve and I'm just adding another curve and just putting in the dots and connecting it like so. The beauty of this tangle is that you can use the pre-existing curves and just keep on building in any direction that you like. There are no rules as to which direction you should follow. I'm sure you've noticed that both the curves don't need to be of the same size. Of course, if you end up having two curves of the same size, there's nothing wrong in that. But I personally feel that the tangle looks a lot more interesting when one curve is smaller and the other is slightly bigger. Now we just keep building in the same manner by looking for pre-existing curves or looking for dots which are already there in our design and connect them to more dots that we keep on adding or we connect them to more curves that we keep on adding and we keep on building step-by-step. Sometimes you might even find yourself in a position where there's already a dot nearby, probably as a result of the fragment that you have drawn earlier and so you can always connect that existing dot to create a new shape. The reason why I thought that this would be an interesting exercise for today is because by placing these dots and lines, we're actually really building our skills for association. Our mind and our eye really opens up to what's nearby on our paper when we look at our tangle. Especially when we're focusing on one particular design, sometimes we get really absorbed in it and we forget what's around. This is a good exercise almost like a peripheral vision alive inside you so that you can look for more shapes and build more associations as you go forward. Of course, this is a great exercise for line practice because the more you draw these lines, you will build control in terms of your wrist movement and you will have a lot more control in terms of where to end the strokes because you don't want them crossing over the gaps. This is definitely good for that as well. Now I'm going to speed this up to show you what it looks like once you've filled up the whole paper. Of course, depending on the paper that you're using and the size that you are working with, yours might look slightly different than mine, which is completely okay. Now once the whole paper is done, what I like to do is go back to some of these curves, especially the ones that are overlapping. I like to accentuate some of those lines by just going in with a thicker pen and I'm using a 03 this time. This is very similar to us adding the curling edges on Berkeley for the doodles for example, that we've done in exercises earlier. I just basically build contrast by adding some dimension to it. That's it for today's exercise. I hope you found it relaxing and fun. This is definitely a good pattern to use in a lot of complex compositions. Especially when you have odd areas and you don't know what to do with them. This is a good filler pattern to rely upon. I hope that you can also use this in some of your future projects. That's it for today and I will see you tomorrow with another interesting exercise. Bye bye. 11. Day 9 - Shapes Around You!: [MUSIC] Hi, everyone, and welcome back to the challenge. Today, we are on day 8, and I thought that today, we are going to do an exercise in improvisation once again, very similar to what you had done on day 7. But this time, there's a little bit of a trick in wall, and that is that we're going to play with alternate black and white segments in our design. So to begin the exercise, we're going to start by making some wavy lines and you can make them in any direction that you like. I'm currently drawing these from left to right and you can see that most of these are diagonal, but you can choose to do this the other way around as well. Get your sketchbook in a comfortable enough position and draw a few of these wavy lines. As you can see, not all of them are going all the way till the end. Some of them are merging with the previous curve. That's how we're getting good variety in terms of the sizes as well as the thickness of each of these waves. Once you have the entire paper filled up with these waves, we'll come back to the first one, and this time we'll start filling it out with small patterns. Now for today's exercise, I want you to look around you and try and gather some inspiration for basic shapes. Everybody usually know some basic shapes, such as circles, squares, triangles, and even ovals and basic geometric shapes. But I want you to try and go beyond that and look for certain motives or certain patterns in and around your house. They can be on your clothing, they can be on your upholstery, and just try to understand and decode those patterns and use them in your design. As an example over here, I have started with basic circles. What I've done is that I've taken the first wave and color that entirely black, but I've just left the circle inside as white. Then on the second wave, I did the exact opposite. I fill up the circles as black and then I left the background as white. Then in the third wave again, I have kept the background as black and I'm just adding some tiny little ovals which are white. Now similarly when I move on to the fourth wave, that one is going to have white background and then again a black pattern. Basically, we're just going alternate. That's the only rule or guideline for today's exercise. Apart from this, you're free to use any shapes or designs to fill up all the waves. Now if you feel that you're stuck in terms of creative inspiration, you can even borrow some ideas from alphabets and numbers. You can use those to break down into simple shapes and fill them up over here. You can even use some playful shapes like clouds and stars, or you could use more complex shapes, such as drawing [inaudible] or maybe doing some intricate flowers. The choice is totally up to you but the idea today is to basically open our eye, to patterns around us and to gather inspiration from things around us and break them down into simple shapes and use them to fill up our page. I'm not going to show you the complete outcome of my design just as yet, I'm going to show that to you tomorrow. But you can see that I have basically stuck to the black and white alternate waves and I have used simple designs and simple shapes over here to just fill up my paper. That's what we're looking at for today. I hope you'll have fun in doing this exercise where you get to explore design inspiration. I look forward to seeing what you will come up with. Tomorrow, I'm going to meet you with yet another interesting exercise. See you. 12. Day 9 - Reveal: [MUSIC] Hi, everyone. Before we continue with the challenge further, I just wanted to show you my output from the exercise that we did yesterday. As you can see, I continued filling up my page with various patterns. I filled it out with some lines and then I took inspiration from alphabets and did some U-shaped curves, and then I also added some ovals. I also took inspiration from the drawings flower and imagine what the petals would look like if they were plucked individually and added those. Then, I also added some fescue along with some dots, and I also ended up adding a few spirals. All of these elements that I had chosen were basically inspired from objects around me, as well as from some patterns that we have already drawn over the last few days. I basically just played with contrast and went with the flow and just put on paper whatever came to my mind, and that's how I ended up filling up the page. Every few days I like to do an exercise like this because it really makes me aware of patterns around me, it really opens up my mind, and it really opens up my vision to things around me, to design inspiration around me. I would highly recommend for you to also try this every few days. Now if you're done with your exercises from yesterday, I definitely love to have a look at it once you put it in the projects and resources section. But if you feel that you're stuck for design inspiration, maybe you can borrow some ideas from here and hopefully, this will give you an opportunity to finish up your design. With that, we move on to day 10 of our challenge. 13. Day 10 - Pepper in Pepper!: [MUSIC] Hi everyone and welcome to day 10 of our creative challenge. Today, we're going to be working with this beautiful tangle called pepper, which is actually one of my go to tangles whenever I'm out of ideas on what to use next in a complex design. I've already done a little bit of this over here as you can see. It's basically a tangle which is quite fluid in the sense that there is no defined shape to the boundary. You basically have fluid-like shapes inside which we add these thin lines and then each of the lines are basically given a certain amount of weight towards the edges. The way I have placed these is that I've tried to make them almost look like cells, like microscopic cells, which are sort the boundary of the other cells around them. Each cell is fitting in the space which is left out in the middle by the cells around it. So it's almost like fluid puzzle pieces which are morphing into the space, that's how I've placed them. I'm just going to show you a step by step process as to how this tangle works. As you can see over here, I've basically drawn this almost like a dotted dashed line with tiny hyphens are tiny dashes over here. This is the outline of the shape. Now, once you have the outline of the shape, you have to imagine a center, which is going to be hollow, very similar to the centers that I have over here. Now, this center is imaginary, which means that you have to be a little mindful of where your lines are going to come and stop. For example, let's take this particular shape right now. Now, over here, I'm going to start by placing some lines, and I'm going to consciously try to stop at a particular point, such that eventually what is left inside or at the edge of those lines becomes a hollow space. As you can see, what I've basically done is that I have chosen the right edge of each of these dashes, and I'm extending the line from the right side to the center. Once I have all of them placed together nicely, I can just go back to each of the lines and add the width; very similar to how we've been adding the surroundings so far in quite a few of the designs earlier. It almost becomes like a little curvy triangle at the top. Now, if you think this is turning out to be a little tricky for you, then I do have a tiny hack that can help you out. You can always use a pencil to draw an imaginary fluid shape anywhere in the center, it can even be off center, and then now this becomes your boundary or your guideline where the lines need to come and stop. As soon as they touch the pencil mark, I know that that's exactly where I have to stop and then I don't take the lines inside that hollow space. Then that way, later on when I erase this pencil line, I'll get a clean, nice-looking shape over there. This inside orb can be as small or as big as you'd like, there are no rules to it and each of the pepper shapes that you draw can have different sizes of the inner orbs, so that's completely fine as well. Now I'm going to do a couple more over here, I'm going to start by adding these dotted line shapes, then I'm going to pretend that this is my boundary and I'm going to add another one, almost imitating the boundary of the ones nearby. Then I'm just going to repeat the steps. Now, once you have a few of these in the center of your page, then we're going to pretend that all of these collectively together are one shape. We're going to think that all of these together are one giant pepper tangle, or that they're altogether grouped, and that they are basically inside the hollow space or another giant pepper tangle which is outside. To make this idea come to life, we basically need to leave some negative space around these. Again, we can use a pencil to just draw an imaginary boundary around this, and then once you have that negative space, we're going to start drawing some lines which are going to go out like this. Now, this time we're going to treat the edge of the pepper as the edge of the shape. The outer shape is not going to be as fluid as the shapes that were inside, we're going to start adding the weight on the outer boundaries itself. Just like that, we have a beautiful abstract pattern with us. That's it for today's exercise, I hope you enjoyed creating all of these lovely fluid pepper blobs inside another giant pepper. I look forward to meeting you tomorrow, with another interesting Zen art exercise. See you soon. 14. Day 11 - Garlic Cloves: [MUSIC] Hi, everyone, and welcome back to the challenge. Today we're going to be working with a simple and easy pattern called garlic cloves. It's a highly relaxing pattern. Most of the times when people see it in the beginning, they find it to be a little complicated because it appears complex, but once you start doing it you realize it's actually just really simple and once you break it down into steps, it becomes really easy to follow along. There are a couple of different approaches that you can use to make this pattern, but here's the approach that I find to be the easiest. I usually start by placing around dots on my paper. Your dots don't have to be this thick. I'm purposely making mine a little thicker and bolder so that it's visible on the camera, but yours can definitely be lighter and they can just be tiny little points on the paper. Once you have a lot of these around, the next thing that we're going to do is pick any two points or dots and connect them with a straight line. Then once you have the straight line in the center, we basically just start to add curves on each of the sides. These can be as many as you like. You can have three curves or four curves or even five curves depending on how plump you want the shape to look like. Then once you're done with one section, then we basically look for another nearby dot. Again, at the center straight line and start to build the curves. Now again, over here we are looking for interesting areas where we can form associations. We want to try to spread out the cloves in as many directions as possible, so try to look for dots that are at interesting angles so that you can have a good variety. As you progress further, you will also notice that sometimes there's a dot nearby, and if you try to connect another clove to it then it appears as if the clove is getting tucked beneath some other cloves that you've probably designed already. It adds to the depth of the design when you make it appear as if some of these cloves are hiding behind the ones on the top. Don't be afraid in case you feel that some of your cloves are getting partially hidden behind the previous ones. Just keep connecting the lines and try to focus on each line to make it as smooth as possible. This is again, a wonderful exercise to develop control and to build up your drawing skills so that you're able to work with your hands and your wrist in general in a smooth and comfortable manner. As you keep rotating the sketchbook and build the design in different directions, you'll notice that it starts to appear like a complex design. But really even though it looks very complicated, it's actually pretty simple as you just saw. That's it for today. We have a simple, easy pattern for today that helps you to develop line practice and build control and it's a highly satisfying and relaxing exercise. It's really a go-to pattern for days when you're really tired after a long day at work, or if you're feeling uninspired, then this pattern will definitely come to your rescue and it'll help you relax and have fun at the same time. Also, if you're interested in trying another version of this tangle, you might enjoy doing this with a thick pen and a thin pen alternately. Try doing one clove with a thin pen and then move on to another clove with a thick pen and that'll help to bring in some interest and drama into your design. In case you end up practicing both the versions, do let me know which version you like better. I look forward to seeing what you do with this pattern. That's it for today. I will see you tomorrow to continue our challenge. Have a good day. 15. Day 12 - Sparkle Sparkle!: Hi everyone, and welcome back to the challenge. Today we're going be working with a tangle called sparkle, it's a beautiful tangle that can be used as individual fragments or it can even be stacked together. Today we're going to use an approach where we use several sparkle fragments scattered all around that page. The way we begin this tangle is by drawing a curvy line like so, and then we connect it with another curvy line in the opposite direction, so it almost looks like a little eye or like a leaf with a slightly pointy edge. Then once you have this shape, we basically go inside to put a small o or a circle, and from the circle we get a curvy line like so. Then we rotate it and get another one like so, then a third one like so, and the fourth one like this. Basically we're just using the existing curve of the circle and then continuing and drawing four lines from it. Now, once you have these four lines, we go inside each of these sections and start to fill in more curvy lines inside, almost like they're fanning out or they're radiating out. Once you have these lines, we go to the edges and start to add a little bit of it alroundings. Very similar to how we have done in our previous exercises with pepper and doodles. Once you're done with the roundings, we come back to the center, and over here we leave just a little bit of white space in a semicircular manner almost like a little Smiley, and color the rest of it black. So that little white spot that we have left basically acts like a little highlight and it makes it appear as if the whole thing is sparkling, almost like a little gem, and that's how we finish this tangle. Now we're going to draw multiple such sparkle fragments scattered all around our page. You can even have some of them towards the edges where they're only partially visible, and basically we just scatter them around in different directions like so. Finally, once you're happy with the number of sparkles that you have scattered around the paper, we start to connect them with these curvy lines, almost as if they like ribbons connecting each of these fragments together, and we basically just keep building it as if it's some kind of a constellation or almost like a web where these sparkles are caught in the center. Now there are a couple of different things that you can do with the background, so you can either color the entire background black and keep these ribbons white, or you could even color the ribbons black and let the background to be white. You could even add some extra patterns or designs inside these empty spaces, so there are a lot of different variations that you can try to make this design look full. As for me, I haven't really decided what I'm going to do with this, so I think I will have a cup of coffee and then hopefully inspiration will come to me after that and whatever I choose to do with this, I'm going to show this to you tomorrow. I do look forward to seeing all your variations and versions of this design. I will meet you again tomorrow with another interesting exercise. See you bye-bye. 16. Day 12 - Reveal: [MUSIC] Hi everyone and welcome back. Before we move on to the next exercise, as promised, I want to show you what I ended up doing with yesterday's project. If you remember while drawing this composition yesterday, I was talking a little bit about how this reminded me of a little constellation and how these sparkle elements reminded me of gems. It just so coincidentally happened that after I finished drawing this, I was taking a little break and I found some stickers with me, journaling stickers, which were basically filled with astral patterns and they had these beautiful constellations on them. Then I just noticed how spaced out they are and how they are very airy with a lot of negative space around. It was actually these little gems which were the vocal elements where everything else was just left empty and these vocal elements were stealing the show. I decided to take inspiration from that, and I also decided to leave a lot of empty space. I did end up coloring the ribbons black. But then apart from that, the only other additions that I did was to add these little floating orbs very similar to the black balls that we had done in the centers of this backlit angle. Then I just added tiny little circles here and there, and then I decided to leave the rest of the composition empty. It's definitely a good change for me because I usually end up doing a lot of design-heavy compositions, and I end up using a lot of inky black areas. This was definitely a change for me and it's good to have this idea in one's portfolio. I think I'm quite happy with this and if you've done any other version or variation of yesterday's exercise, I'd love to have a look at it. Make sure that you put it up in the project section. With that, we are ready to move on to our next exercise. 17. Day 13 - Fun with Mooka!: [MUSIC] Hi, everyone, and welcome back to the creative challenge. Today we are on day 13 of our challenge, and today we're going to do an exercise with one of my favorite tangles called Mooka. Now, Mooka has a couple of different variations, and I've already drawn one of the variations over here for you to see as an example, but I'm going to show you a step-by-step version of this. We're actually going to be playing with both the variations of Mooka in the same composition today. First, we're going to be developing a few different Mooka flowers based on the version that the CCT Stephanie Jennifer had introduced. The way this works is that we basically take a curvy line and we loop it at the end, almost forming a board, and then bring it back all the way to the bottom. Then if you wanted to face the other way, then we repeat this exercise to the exact same steps, but make the board or the top loop facing the other direction. Similarly, now I can rotate my sketchbook and I create one more curvy line. Form a pole at the end and bring it back down. Now, every time two of these Mookas come and meet, they form this little shape, almost a heart shape, and they form a petal of the flower. Now, depending on the size of the Mooka that you are drawing as well as how you space them out, you can create a four-petaled flower or five-petaled flower or even a six-petaled flower, so it totally depends on you how big you want your flower to be. You can also have your Mookas tucked under each other. You can have one on the top and one on the bottom or you could have them both at the same height. Now, for example, the flower on the left over here that I have done, this is with four petals, and as you can see, each of the petals is different in terms of thickness. They're not all consistent. If you end up with a flower like this, that's fine too. One of the things that I did in this flower is that I used another Mooka inside to act as a filler. But if you don't want to do that and use a different filler instead, that's completely okay too. Another filler that we can explore over here is to basically draw some curvy lines and put dots at the end of them, very similar to how the pollen is on real flowers. We're just basically putting in these little stems and then just adding a dot at the end of each of them. One of the things that I really like about Mooka as a tangle is that it has a very lovely ornamental wipe to it. Once you add these little stems inside, the whole flower blooms really beautifully and it starts to look very pretty. Now, I am going to add one more tiny flower over here, somewhere on the top. You're free to add more flowers depending on the size of your paper and you're free to change the sizes and create variations in terms of the number of petals as well. We're just looking to fill up the central space of the people with a few of these flowers. With this one, you can also see that this is partially getting hidden behind the large flower. This layering helps to add depth in the design. If you also end up having overlapping flowers, that'll be really good. Now, once you're done forming a few of these flowers, the next thing that we're going to do is have a few stems coming out of these. These are going to be the other version of Mooka. In this one too, we start with a curve, but we don't really form the pod at the end of it. We skip the pod and we basically just sort the line. We put a little curve and we trace the line parallel to the original stem and bring it back all the way to the bottom. Then again, these can be in any direction. You can have multiple such stems coming out of your flowers, Some can be overlapping, some can be partially hidden. We're basically just going to keep rotating our sketchbook in order to get maximum comfort while drawing these. We basically just branch them out from each other as well as have them coming out of the flowers. Now, from my experience, I have generally noticed that drawing this version of Mooka requires a little more patience and hand control as compared to the previous one. Because with the previous version, if you end up having a slightly thicker stem it doesn't really matter because it eventually looks nice when you put all the petals together of the flower, but with this version of Mooka that we're currently drawing, where we're trying to make them look as if they are winds or creep up lines coming out from behind the flowers, we want to try to be as thin as possible so that they look delicate and dainty as compared to the large flowers that we have drawn in the center. Of course, if these stems are thinner, that also means that the focus stays on your main flowers and the stems don't really steal the attention away from your focal flowers. Once you are satisfied with the number of these Mooka stems that you have created, the next thing that we're going to do is come back to all these empty spaces that we have in the background and we're going to add these tiny teardrop shapes or almost these mini Mookas or flourish elements to just add some drama into the composition and fill it up a little bit more. These are not exactly teardrops, they're slightly curvy and slightly bent, almost like flourish lines. We're just adding them to increase the ornamental value or the visual value of this composition. Finally, as the last step for this composition, we're going to be coloring the entire background black. Now, you can definitely switch to a thicker marker pen if you have that handy and use that to color the background so that it happens faster, or you could even use black acrylic paint or gouache or any other material that you have handy with you to color up the background. This is completely optional, but the reason why I like to do it in a composition like this is so that the flowers stand out a little more and so that they shine bright against the dark background. You can also see that I made a tiny mistake over here while coloring and I, by mistake, ended up going inside the Mooka flower. But that's completely fine because I can always go back in there with a little bit of white paint or even a white Jelly Roll pen and just color that section white and it'll get hidden. With that, we come to an end to today's exercise with Mooka flowers. 18. Day 14 - Mooka & YOU!: [MUSIC] Hi everyone and welcome back to the course. Today we'll be completing two full weeks of our lovely challenge and since this is Day 14 I again decided to challenge you guys with a partially done pattern and I essentially want you guys to start getting comfortable with the concept of strings and outlines as we will be going forward. As a warm-up exercise today I'm going to be showing you a tiny template and then you're going to be filling that template up with any of the patterns that we have learned over the last two weeks. Also fun fact I realized that I have not been using the left side of my sketchbook at all and I think this happened subconsciously because earlier when I used to fill up my sketchbooks I used to write notes on the left side and I used to draw the pattern on the right side and without me even realizing this I ended up doing the previous 30-day challenge over here on Skillshare with all my drawings on the right side and with no notes on the left side. Essentially the left side stayed blank and that's exactly how I've been doing the last two weeks of this challenge as well but today I thought that I should start drawing on the left side as well. For a change I'm drawing over here on this side. Now coming to today's template I'm going to be drawing a couple of really large mucus over here which are almost going to divide the paper into two sections and these are not exactly halves so they are unequal sections one on top of the mucus and then one on the bottom. Then of course you have an entire section within these mucus as well. Now your job for today is to fill up all of these sections and basically form a composition of your own using any of the tangles and the patterns that we have used over the last two weeks or if you want to experiment and you want to try some new patterns all by yourself you're welcomed to do so but basically this is the exercise for today and I look forward to seeing all your versions and variations of this. I'm going to be showing you my version of this template tomorrow when we meet for our next lesson. 19. Day 14 - Reveal: [MUSIC] Hi everyone and welcome back. I hope all of you are doing well and are excited to continue this challenge. Before we move on to our next exercise, as I promised, I'm going to show you how I finished up my page from yesterday. We basically started off with a couple of mookas that helped us to create sections on our page. For my first step, I decided to go inside the mookas and I filled up the entire section with flux and since fluxes and organic tangle, I basically filled it up one on top of the other going in random directions, but mostly facing the top-right corner so that they're aligned with the mooka. The next thing that I did was that I added some dots or orbs on the mooka stem so that it doesn't look so plain. I also covered up the entire background behind the flux with black ink to increase the contrast and the design. Of course, I added the tiny circles on the second mooka as well to match with the first mooka. Then I basically sectioned out the paper, and decided to fill up the bottom half with dividends. Then on the top-right, I decided to add doodles. I graded only one leaf because I wonder if they're designed to look slightly asymmetrical. I did not want to use too much of the doodles tangle over here. For the rest of the empty space, I sectioned it off further by adding some holly bow lines. Then I went inside those holly bow lines and I created some rounding at the edges. Doing this step also helped me to increase the contrast and the design because there was more black ink going on the paper and so it basically started to look a lot more interesting. Finally, I decided to add some fescue very similar to the way we had done it on day 2. I basically put it at random angles coming out from the corners of each of these holly bow sections. That was it. That's how I finished yesterday's exercise. Hopefully you've also finished up your exercise from yesterday, and I would love to see it in the project section. In case you haven't finished it or if you're feeling stuck, hopefully looking at my work has provided you with some ideas or some techniques that you can use. If you're still feeling stuck and you want to discuss it further, you can always put a work in progress picture in the discussions tab, and I'd be happy to help you out. With that, we're ready to move on with our challenge. See you in the next lesson. 20. Day 15 - A web of Betweed: Hi everyone, and welcome back to the challenge. Today, we are going to continue our journey further, and we are going to explore a wonderful tangle called betweed, and we're going to use that tangle to convert it into a wonderful web. Again, I'm going to be drawing on the left side of my sketchbook today. Because, as you can see, I have used my entire sketch book while almost all of it by filling it out, but with patterns from the 30-day challenge as well as some patterns from 100-day challenge, and I have never used the left side at all. Today, I'm going to again draw on the left side just so that I can keep my artworks all compact in one place together. Now, coming to the tangle that we're going to explore today, it is betweed, and I'm going to do a fun twist to this tangle. The first thing that we're going to do is basically draw five Cs and convert them into this star-like shape. It's okay if some of the Cs or those rounded edges are longer or wider than the others. It's completely fine. I'm just basically using a thicker nib to just darken out this edge because this is going to be the starting point of the composition that we are going to build today. Now, the next thing that we're going to do is create some straight lines coming out of these pointy edges of this little five-C star that we have created, and these are going to be radiating out just like sun rays. It's okay. They're a little bit wobbly. Just try to be patient with it and try to be as smooth as you can. It helps to hold your pen from a distance and not hold it too close to the nib, so then you will have a lot more control over your pen and you'll be able to draw the lines with a lot more comfort. Now, once you have all of these lines placed, your page is going to be divided into five sections basically. The reason why I chose to keep that five C shape slightly off-center is just so that the composition looks a little bit more interesting. We can, of course, do the exact same thing with that star in the center as well. But just to keep things interesting, I thought it'd be nice to keep it off-center. Now, the next thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to go inside each of these little sections, and divide them further by making triangles inside of them. Again, these are not exactly equilateral triangles. As you can see, I am basically just placing them anywhere that I like and creating these extra sections within the given section already, and so some are narrow and some are wide, and I'm basically just having fun by placing these triangles randomly. Now, once the triangles are in place, you will notice that you will have some sections which are again triangles, and then some sections will become like this rhombus or squarish shapes, basically four-sided shapes, and we'll have a variety of shapes within the composition. We're going to be working with the triangular shapes first, and then we're going to deal with the four-edged or four-sided shapes later on. Now coming to the triangle sections, let's take this biggest one, and we're going to fill this up with betweed. The way it works is that we basically take the bottom two edges of the triangle, and we start by adding these curvy lines that land somewhere at the edge of the opposite one. Then we basically just keep going, alternate all the way to the bottom. Now, you can of course make this thinner and narrower as well. I'm doing them pretty wide right now, but you can achieve more such lines by making them thinner and narrower. Once you have all the lines done all the way to the bottom, the next thing that we do, is go to the curvy edge, and as you can see, I'm skipping the top edge of the triangle, which is the outer boundary, so I'm not coloring that. But I basically come to the first line or that first curvy line that I had drawn. From there, my betweed actually starts. That's where I'm adding a little bit of this weight or this peppering technique basically that we had learned while we were developing the tangle called pepper, and so now this technique is also called peppering. It's become quite popular in this entangle method over the last few years. I'm basically just going into those curves, adding the surroundings, and coloring them in. Then we do the exact same thing on the opposite side as well. Now, today, since I have a thicker nib size, I'm able to color this faster. But if you feel that you're going to take a little bit more time to finish this step, feel free to pause the video and then come back once you're ready. Now what I'm going to do is, I'm going to take another shape, and this is where things basically start to get interesting because we're now going to change the angle. We're going to take this thin triangle now that we have. But this time, we are going to consider the top of the triangle to be in a different direction, which means that the bottom two edges are going to be these two. My betweed lines are going to crisscross at this angle now. I'm just going to retrace this one because that didn't come out as neat as I had expected it to be. Then I think I'm only going to be able to fit in two such crisscrossing lines over here because it's a pretty narrow shape. Then I'm just going to add these surroundings or the peppering, then I'm going to come to this shape, and so this triangle is already facing in a slightly different direction than the previous ones. I'm just going to take these two edges and keep adding the crisscrossing lines, and just by filling up the three shapes till now, we can see that the entire composition starts to look like a nice complex web. The interesting part about this composition is that when you look at it at the end, or if you show it to somebody who has not seen the process of this composition, you generally feel that it's very complicated and that there is no beginning or end to it. Because it just looks like a whole mesh or a web of interconnected lines. But once you actually start making it, you realize that it was just a simple step-by-step process that led to a complex result. Funny story, I ended up developing this composition as the result of a mistake, so I was working on this entangled composition where I had lots and lots of triangles. My plan was to fill them up with betweed. But then I ended up drawing a couple of the triangles wrong because I lost control over my pen, and I think I just basically ended up messing up a couple of the shapes. Then I realized that they turn into these squarish shapes, which could further be divided into more triangles if I just played with some lines over there. The next thing I knew, I got so engrossed in that mistake of mine that it ended up leading to this step-by-step web pattern, which now I use in a lot of my artworks. It's funny how things just happen and then they lead to such wonderful results. Now this edge that I have on the right side, I'm just going to leave that as is because I can come back and needing that up later once I'm done with the rest of the design. But I'm going to now come to this particular triangle over here. As you can see now, in this triangle, I don't really have a bottom edge at the corner of the paper. I'm basically going to draw two lines, and now my edges are going to be these two corner dots that I have just established as the start of my betweed lines. Technically, this shape is almost like a rectangle or a square, and it doesn't really have a triangular edge to it. But I've purposely chosen to work with these two dots, one which is already existent and another one which is imaginary or created because of that line that I drew from the right side. Now using those two lines, I'm going to build up my triangle, and within that triangle, I'm going to fill up my betweed. Every time you land up with a shape that looks almost like a square or a rhombus or a rectangle, basically any four-sided shape, you can still use betweed inside of it. If you just choose to work with three points instead of four points, you just have to identify what those three points are going to be. Now again, I'm just going to add the weight over here. Then once I reach the bottom of the betweed, I'm just going to leave that extra space empty for now. That's going to remain as my negative space and I'm going to come back to it later. Now again, I have this squarish shape over here. Again, I'm going to pick these two points as the bottom of my triangle, and so this becomes like my three-point shape that I'm going to work with. I'm going to pretend that my triangle is facing this way with the top being like so, and I'm just going to draw a couple of lines over here. Again, I have that little odd space at the bottom, which is getting left out, so I'm just going to leave that as is for now. Then I have this other shape, which looks like a pretty good triangle, so I don't really have to imagine my three points over here, they're quite easily visible. I can just create my betweed easily. Similarly, I have now this tiny section over here which is getting left out near the center, and there's also a similar one at the opposite side. I'm going to deal with those later. I'm just going to try to finish up all the triangle work first. Now again, I have this large triangle where I can choose the direction, and this direction as the top looks nice. I'm going to use this to create my betweed. This is also completely opposite to the triangle which is right next to it, so it's definitely going to add to the complexity of the design. Now sometimes if you feel that a particular area is very, very large you might feel tempted to probably add another triangle over there to create smaller sections and then add your betweed further indoors, and that is also definitely an approach that you can try. If you have a large piece of paper, especially, and you feel that the number of triangles that you have right now are not doing justice to the composition and it's not looking complex enough, you can definitely feel free to add more triangles and create even more smaller sections and build your betweed web inside of that. Really just feel free to customize the process to your liking. Now I've got two of these shapes over here. I'm going to take this triangle first. Then again, I have almost like a four-sided shape over here, so I need to pick my key points for the triangle and the direction in which the triangle is going to be facing North. For some reason, every time that I'm working with betweed it reminds me of tents and canopies, especially if I'm developing a complex composition like this, and it has a lot of straight lines and then triangles and these coby depths. I am always reminded of camping tents and just the way they stand with those rewards and the tents over it. I don't know why, but I'm always reminded of them. The funny part is that I've never even been camping, I have only seen lots and lots of pictures of camping tents on social media sites, and I keep saving them, hoping that someday I will go to a camp site and have fun. I think that's just so embedded in my head that now every time that I'm working on compositions like this, I am reminded of them always. Now coming to all of these empty areas that we've left, you can fill them up with more betweed lines, or you can add curves to them and then put in some weight at alternate edges, like so. The reason why I'm basically adding these scopes at some of the outer shapes as well as some of the inner ones, is just so that the whole composition looks a lot more complex, and there's almost like an optical illusion that's forming over here. You can't really make out where exactly the composition begins and where it ends. Everything looks as if it's getting tucked beneath the layers of the shapes that are around it, and so you can't really make out what's on the top and what's at the bottom. While I'm adding these new lines and roundings, I'm also looking at all the lines nearby, and as I'm progressing, I'm constantly retracing, fixing, correcting some of the previous lines, just to neaten out the edges and make the composition look sharp. Now, with all the line work and the rounding stan, we come to an end to today's exercise. If you feel like you want to add more details into this, you are free to use any of the patterns that we have learned so far, or even any new patterns that you come across and use those to fill up all these spaces over here. You can customize the design to your liking and you can build further on it anyway that you like. Tomorrow, I'm going to meet you with yet another interesting exercise. Till then, keep creating. 21. Day 16 - Fun with Firecracker: [MUSIC] Hi everyone and a very warm welcome back to the challenge. Today we're going to be working with a very interesting tangle called firecracker, which starts off with a simple channel-like grid, and then you build further on it by creating subsections. Now to create the channels, all that we need to do is just create some wavy lines, and as you can see, each of them are different in terms of thickness, so not really paid attention to making them all equal. You can of course create the sections with equal width also, both of the techniques are correct and they give a different visual appeal, so anything is fine. Now we come to the first channel over here, and we start to divide it into small sections by putting in these curvy lines. As you can see again over here, I'm not really paying attention to the thickness, so I'm just making some of them thinner, some of them thicker. I'm purposely trying to keep almost like an abstract field or this whole design. Now the step out for the original tangle, which has been developed by Suzanne McNeill includes all of these sections as equally sized. But I'm basically taking a few liberties over here, and I'm just having fun with the tangle and just adding some of my personal touches. I prefer to have these sections unequal, and that's why I'm creating them like this. [MUSIC] I'm also going back to some of the channels and just making even more small, narrow sections. Just so that there is some visual variety in each of these channels, and so that they all look interesting. Now once you are happy with the sections that you have created, we come back to the first channel or the first row, and now we start filling this up with the pattern. However, now what I'm about to do over here is going to be different from the original tangle. In the original tangle, we basically have small triangles in one of these sections, and then we have straight lines and the next one, and then we have a plane one, and then so basically they are like in the sets of three. We have triangles, straight lines, and then plane. Then triangles, straight lines, and plane. But over here what I'm basically doing is that I'm coloring one of the sections black and then I'm moving to the next one, where I'm creating these small, curvy, U-shaped lines. Almost like a lace or a frill hanging out from the previous section. Then I'm putting the straight lines into the next one, and then I'm leaving one blank. I'm basically following a slightly different approach as compared to the original tangle step out. Now coloring the sections sometimes takes a little bit of time and it distracts me from the drawing process, so one of the things that I like to do is that I just basically put a small mark over there, which helps me remember later on that that's the blob that I need to color, and then I just basically continue with the drawing process. That little mark basically just stays there as a placeholder. Now once I'm done with the first channel, I'll come to the second one. In the second channel, I'm going to start off with a plane section, then I'm going to do some diagonal lines, and then I'm going to put in some triangles at the bottom of the section, forming a little border. Then again, I'm going to leave one blank and repeat the exact same process. You can do this in any order that you like. You can either put the lines first and then come back and do all the triangles, or you could go with each section at a time, whatever makes it easier for you. Now with the second section done, I'm just going to finish the coloring of the first one as well, so that you can see them both together as a pair. Now once both of these are done, we're just going to repeat the exact same process in the other two sections also that we have, so we're going to basically repeat them in sets of two, but while doing so, we're going to do some minor variations in the designs. What I mean is that I'm not going to do the exact same pattern or the exact same order in the next channels that I have empty with me, but I'm going to use similar elements. As an example. I'm going to start off by coloring the first section black, but now in this case, I'm going to make my curvy lace facing the other way. Then I'm going to add my straight lines, and then this time I'm basically not leaving any section blank, and I'm straightaway going to the next one, coloring it black and repeating the exact same process. Even though the design elements are exactly the same as the first channel that we had created, I have made slight tweaks and variations to it. Using the exact same elements, I have still managed to change the look of this particular channel, and I have not left any section empty in this one [MUSIC] Similarly, now when I come to my fourth channel, I'm going to make my triangles facing the other way, and then the next section is going to have my diagonal lines facing the opposite direction, opposite to the diagonal lines that we created in the second channel. Then I'm going to leave one section blank after the diagonal lines are done. Again, it's the exact same elements or the same geometrical shapes that we used in the second channel, just that I have changed the positions and I have changed the orientation of these fillers. Then for the fifth channel, I'm going to start with straight lines, do my lace as a border on the upper side of the section, then I'm going to color one black, and I'm not going to leave any section blank over here. I'm simply going to go ahead and start doing the straight lines again, and then the lace again, and then again, I'm going to color this section black and repeat the exact same process. It's interesting to note that even though we have the exact same geometrical elements or the exact same design elements throughout the design, we have just changed their positions here and there a little bit and that basically changes the look of each of the channels. Even though individually they're all different from each other, they all share certain similarities, which makes the whole design very cohesive. This is actually one of the easiest ways to bring variations in a design. Every time you feel that your design is starting to look a little monotonous, you can simply switch the orientation or change the order of the design elements and place them in a different direction, and that will automatically spice things up and bring in some visual interest. Now of course, the design variations that I have done today over here using this channel grid and the firecracker tangle are basically just my improvisations to the original tangle, but you are free to do your improvisations as well. You probably might have more ideas or better ideas than me as to how you can customize this tangle, and you're free to try out your designs as well. If you want to create your firecracker repetition in sets of three instead of sets of two, or in pairs the way I have done it today, you're free to try that as well. Whatever variation or version you choose to work with, make sure that you put that in the project section so that I can have a look at it. The best part is that, since each of you will be coming up with your own versions and variations of this, when you all put your projects together in the gallery section, you will basically be inspiring other artist, and you will also get inspired by other artist because there'll be this whole library of new patterns that will suddenly bloom in the project section once all of you share your ideas. Now, with the last one, as you can see, I'm basically just putting diagonal lines, keeping one block empty, then doing triangles facing in the top direction, keeping another section empty, and then basically doing that exact same repetition. With this, we come to an end to today's exercise, and like I said, I look forward to seeing all your versions and variations of this tangle. Tomorrow, I'm going to meet you with another interesting exercise to continue our challenge. 22. Day 17 - Crescent Moon: [MUSIC] Hi everyone and welcome to day 17 of our creative challenge. Today, we're going to be working with one of the most classic tangles of all time, which is crescent moon. Crescent moon basically starts off with the semicircular shapes at the edges of your paper. Now, today we're actually working on a dual tangle, which basically means that we'll be working with two tangles. The first one is going to be crescent moon, and then we're going to combine it with paper later on. Now, as you can see, I'm basically placing these semicircular shapes at the edges of my paper and some of them haven't turned out to be very neat, but that's okay because we're going to be coloring these later on. But we basically just start by placing the shapes and then we're going to build up further from there. Now, I'm just going to color these up quickly and show you what it looks like once the first stage of this tangle is done. Now, once you have colored all of these semicircular shapes, the next step would be to build an aura around each of these. An aura in the Zentangle terminology basically means an outline to an existing shape. I'm basically taking my thin micron pen and just adding these outlines around the shapes. Now, you can see that I have spaced out my semicircles quite a bit on the top and the bottom edges, but I haven't spaced them out so much on the left and the right edge. That's because I personally like to have them slightly uneven and slightly asymmetrical, but if you are keen to make the tangle exactly symmetrical, then you can also make all of your semicircles equidistant from each other on all the four sides. Now, the next thing that we're going to do is keep building further on these auras. The first couple of auras are going to be very easy because they're simply just going to outline the previous ones. But as you go ahead further, you will realize that these auras will start meeting each other or that they will basically start coinciding with each other at some points on your paper. When that starts to happen, we basically just merge the curves and convert it into one large shape. Now, this point our focus is to basically keep on building these curves layer by layer, and even if you make a couple of mistakes here and there, it doesn't really matter because whatever next curve that you're going to make will simply match the boundary of the previous one. It will eventually become a part of the design and your mistake won't really stand out so much as a mistake, it'll just get merged with the design and nobody will really be able to make out that it's a mistake. Just breathe easy, take your time, and do these curves as slowly as possible. Even if a couple of them turn out to be slightly thicker than you wanted them to be or if they are not as symmetrical as you expected them to be, it's completely okay because at the end of the day, this is a handmade piece of art and some amount of imperfections are always part of the process. So don't be too hard on yourself and enjoy the process. Now, as you go further somewhere on the corners, you will also notice that it will start to appear as if a couple of the curves are overlapping the other curves and so some will start to appear on the top and the others will get hidden behind. We're just going to basically continue making these curves in an overlapping manner. Finally, once you're almost at the center, we're just going to do a couple of these auras in the middle of the paper as well. Finally, we will have this hollow space inside which we are going to fill up with pepper. What we're basically going to do is that we're going to place the small horizontal dashes, which is the first step of paper. Once we have those dashes, we're going to extend the lines towards the center. Again, the trick to getting a good pepper center is to know where exactly to end your lines so that the space inside stays clean and hollow. Then we just go back to the edges and add the roundings or the weight at the edges of the lines. Once you're done with paper, the next step is going to be to add some contrast or inky details to the outer crescent moon lines that we have created. My favorite technique is to go alternate, where I basically color some sections black and then I leave the alternate ones white, almost giving like a stripe effect. But today, I think I'm going to also play with a little bit of mark-making. I'm going to color some sections black, but on some of these semicircles I'm going to add tiny dots or other little details which are basically just going to bring in some visual interest. Now, these steps are completely optional, and depending on how closely you have drawn the order lines, you might feel that your crescent moon is looking quite detailed already, or it might be looking more intricate than mine. If that's the case, then you probably don't need to add the detailings and you can skip the coloring and all of these other steps. But if you feel like you want to add some details, then you can add any of the patterns that we have used so far or you can come up with new interesting mark-making techniques and add some little details here and there. You're free to customize the design in any way that you like. With this, we come to an end to today's exercise. We will be using crescent moon again at least a couple more times in this challenge and I thought it would be a good idea for me to introduce this in a simple and easy manner today, so that when we include it in compositions later on, it's easy for you to identify the pattern and follow the steps. Hopefully, this exercise has given you a good warm-up on this tangle. With that, we come to an end to today's lesson. Tomorrow I'm going to see you with another interesting exercise to continue our journey. 23. Day 18 - Marasu & More : [MUSIC] Hi everyone and welcome back to the challenge. Today we're going to be working with a wonderful tangled called Marasu, and then we're going to be combining it with another tangle called scallops. Both of these tangles have a rounded, curvy nature to them, and they go together very well. They're complimenting tangles and I find them both to be very interesting, which is why I end up using them together a lot of times in a lot of my artworks. Now to begin Marasu, we basically start off by drawing a spiral. Now, once I have this spiral in place, I'm going to go in with my pen and start to make a small sections like so. These are basically sections with curvy lines, and I'm basically placing these curves in pairs. Two curves basically make one unit. I'm also trying to place them in a way that the curves on the outer rings of this spiral do not touch the curves of the inner rings of the spiral. They're going alternate, fitting in between the empty spaces of the curves of the previous line. Now once you have placed all of these curves, we're going to take a thicker pen, and we're going to go in and color these little sections that we just created. After the colorings are done, the next step is going to be to take our thinner pen again and to basically go back and add some other lines to these curves at the top as well as the bottom. This is the reason why I spaced out my curves in such a way that they don't touch the curves of the previous in our rows of the spiral, so that they all stand out alone, independent, and they don't really marge with those sections of the previous inner circles of the spiral. That's why I space them out. With that, we finish Marasu. Now, the next thing that we're going to do is work with another tangle called scallops. Our scallops is a tangle which can easily be stacked one on top of the other, so you can keep building further and further on it with no stopping point really, and you can literally just keep billing it to infinity. But today we're only going to do one row of this. Basically, as you can see, we start off with some semicircles, and then we go inside each of these with an inner aura. Then we leave a little bit of gap, and we come back, and we add three more semicircles towards the bottom edge. Again, keep rotating your sketchbook in order to get the best possible angle. Once you're done drawing these curves, we go to these empty spaces that we had left between the outer auras and the inner auras, and we start to fill them with lines. Now I'm currently doing them as straight lines, almost like sun rays coming out of a center point. But you can also do them as curvy lines, and even they look very pretty. Finally, we go inside these innermost shapes and just color them black. That's how we get one full row of scallops. Now, as I said, this tangle is a stackable tangle, so you can keep building further and further on this. But I have a little challenge for you today, which is to come up with an interesting technique to fill the rest of the space, which is not scallops. I want you to try to challenge yourself and come up with a curvy shape or a curvy design that complements all of these circles and curves that we have just drawn on our paper, and think of an interesting way to fill up this space. Basically, this is like an exercise and design harmony. I want you to try and stay away from shapes that have sharp angles, such as squares and rectangles or triangles. Try to basically work with some curvy wavy pattern that complements these two tangles that we've just put in over here and fill up the rest of the space. I'm sure each of you will come up with a lovely way to finish up this empty space over here, and I look forward to seeing all your versions and variations in the project section. Tomorrow, I will also show you my completed page and the pattern that I have chosen to finish up this empty space over here. Until then, keep creating. Have a good day. 24. Day 18 - Reveal: [MUSIC] Hello everyone and welcome back to the course. As promised, before we move on to our next exercise, here is my project from yesterday. I actually didn't end up doing a lot of detailing on this one. I first divided all the empty space into small sections using these curvy lines and I made them into thick strips of black, and then I went inside each of those sections and I did lines. Then on the alternate ones, I put in these flux leaves. The idea that I was going for over here was imagining Amaterasu to be like a really big flower, and the scallops to be the petals. Then I thought that the flux would look like pretty little leaves in the background. I imagined this whole thing to be in a garden floral like wybie and that's why I went with these patterns. Of course, it helped because flux also has a curvy nature and it went in very well with the scallops and Amaterasu. That was it, that was my exercise from yesterday and I look forward to seeing all the versions and variations that you will come up with. With that, we are ready to move on to our next exercise. 25. Day 19 - Nanalee Improvisation: [MUSIC] Hello, and welcome back to Day 19 of our creative challenge. Today we're going to be working on a mono tangle project again. The tangle that I have chosen for today's exercise is called nanalee. Nanalee is a wonderful tangle inspired by banana leaves, and it has this very nice luscious playful, bouncy quality to it, which I totally love. I thought that this would make a very good exercise for today. The way the tangle works is that we start off by making a stem very similar to how we make our muka stems. Then we just basically go around it, making a wavy leaf and connect it to the bottom of the stem. Then we go inside and we start to add these thin lines very similar to the veins on a banana leaf, and these are not all equally sized, and they also don't really have a specific pattern to them, so you can go random in terms of placing these. Now once these little veins are done, that's pretty much all there is to nanalee. However, in my usual style, I like to add some details, and so every once in a while, I like to make some tweaks to the tangles. For this one, I like to basically go back to those veins and put in tiny little dots over there just so that it has an ornamental quality to it and it just looks more decorative. Again, these decisions are very personal. If you're the person who likes to have tangles, looking like real-life objects or you'd like them to be representative of the source from where they came, then you can totally skip these steps. But I like to push my boundaries and I like to add some fantasy elements or some unrealistic abstract elements to all my tangles. That's how I ended up with this variation of nanalee. I also like to go back to the centers and color those stems black, just so that it increases contrast. In my usual style, every time that I draw a leaf, I basically go back with a thicker pen and add some curling edges just so that they increase contrast and make it appear as if the leaf is curling. That's how I do my nanalee. Now for today's exercise, I'd love for you to apply the Hollibaugh technique with nanalee. When I say the Hollibaugh technique, it basically means that we overlap with the tangles, and we keep some on the top and we keep some at the bottom. I'd love for you to keep rotating your sketchbook and keep creating many such nana leaves. Once you've placed all your leaves, then go back and add the little details and basically just have a conversation with yourself and see the details that you like. Try and take some inspiration from real-life objects or things around you and just try to incorporate some ideas over here and see what all versions of nana leaves you come up with. I'd love for you to try this as an improvisation exercise and show me all the different variations that you come up with. Once you have them ready, make sure that you put them up in the project section so that everyone can see your wonderful variations and so you can also see the variations put up by other students. This way we'll all collectively be able to build a wonderful library of variations from a single tangle. That's it for today. Tomorrow, I will see you with another interesting exercise, which is inspired by sea life. 26. Day 20 - Mystery Eggs & Tearce: [MUSIC] Hi everyone and welcome back to the challenge. Today, we're going to develop a composition which is inspired by sea life. There are a couple of tangles which I have been playing with for a long time. Every time I work with them, they remind me of sea life and sea creatures and different coral reefs, sea plants, sea weed, and stuff like that. Today I thought we develop a composition keeping that idea in mind. Now the tangle that I have chosen to begin with is called Mystery Eggs. The way it works is that we start with a small oval and then we basically just drawing order towards the bottom of this oval. Then finally we create a plump body at the bottom by just going a little below that order and making a semicircle like so. Then we come back to that first oval and we color most of it black but we just leave that one little section white, which is to act as like a sparkle, and so that serves as a highlight. Now, we're going to be making a bunch of these Mystery Eggs in the center of our page today. You can keep the composition slightly asymmetrical as well. If you want the whole bunch to favor more towards the left side of your page or the right side of your page, that's fine too. Or you could choose to keep it exactly in the central. Anything works. Now as you can see, while I'm drawing these eggs, I'm basically playing around in terms of the orientation as well as the size so that the whole bunch looks interesting together. They almost have this very alien quality. Apart from looking like sea plants or some organic creatures found under the sea, they also remind me of futuristic gadgets or probably maybe some extraterrestrial creature has eyes like these, or maybe there are some plants on some other planets which looked like this. There's a very futuristic space like web also to this. I also use this design often in a couple of my designs inspired by galaxies and just general stars and stuff from the universe. I like how versatile this tangle is. Now once you have a nice bunch of these on your paper, the next thing that we're going to do is add some details. Now there are many different ways that you can add details on these. I have done stripes, I have done a small dots, and I have done small hearts inside of these. I have also done little fescue shapes inside of these. There are many different variations that you can do. But for today, the filler that I'm going to use is going to be these little tiny dots. I'm just going to use these on the edges of the eggs just to add some texture and interests and to again give them that little alien-like or plant-like quality. Then once you're done with the dots, we're going to move on to the next tango, which is called tearce. Now, tearce is a tangle which moves in a radial manner, but I'm going to use it slightly differently today. It starts off by making these thin ribbons which are coming out of your focal point or they could even just be a filler on a plain piece of paper. Then we basically just keep coloring them to make them thick strips or thick ribbons. Then according to the step out of this tangle, you basically draw these thin lines coming out of it. Only on one side of the tangle, which I think they've referred to as the hair, which is coming out of this tangle. Very similar to how we did the centers of the Nana Lee. But I thought that it would be interesting to do the hair on both sides of the ribbon. Instead of doing it on one side, I thought it'd be nice to do it on both the sides, just so that it adds a little more texture. They almost look like little fiber threads coming out of these strips or ribbons. The ribbons themselves look like little tentacles coming out from behind the eggs. Now, the next thing that I'm going to do is use a little bit of fescue over here. Again, this just goes to say how versatile fescue is. Not only is it a great tangle to use in any floral composition or anything to do with a botanical or a floral theme but it also works very well when you're using it in these underwater inspire teams as well. Because it has this nice tentacle-like quality to it. I'm just making a few of these around. Now, once you're happy with the fescue, you can also draw some bubbles around, which can be like tiny little circles just to give it an underwater vibe. You can also fill it up with a few more dots of different sizes, just so that the whole composition looks full and interesting. But again, as always, this is an optional step. If you're the person who prefers nice clean backgrounds and you don't like too much of details in the background, then you can leave it plain as well so that the eggs and the tentacles that we have drawn standout a little bit more. With that, we're done with today's exercise. If you end up trying any different versions or variations with these tangles, I'd love to see them. In case you feel stuck somewhere, make sure that you put up your questions or your queries in the discussions tab, and I'd be happy to answer them for you. Tomorrow, I'm going to see you yet another interesting exercise, which is going to be on improvisation. Till then, keep creating. [MUSIC] 27. Day 21 - Phone Cord Improvisation: [MUSIC] Hi everyone and welcome back to the challenge. Today we're going to do yet another improvisation exercise and we're going to start off by making some curvy lines like so. Recently while I was developing anesthetic journal spread for myself, I came across this picture with old telephones and I saw these wonderful vintage telephones with phone cords. Somewhere in the '80s and the '90s these landline phones used to be very popular with lovely spiral phone cords and so I got inspired by that little curvy nature of it and I thought I'd convert it into a pattern. I basically did a little brainstorming exercise and I realized that this curvy rope that we're doing right now can be converted into so many different patterns by just adding few details here and there. Just to show you a couple of examples. For the first one, I thought that I'd color all the loops black and then I went back and added some dots at the edges. Then this turned out to be a beautiful ornamental border that I thought would look very pretty on greeting cards or any DIY project where I can put in some ornamental designs and probably even color it with some metallic colors like gold or silver and I thought that this would look really pretty over there. So this was one of the first variations that I came up with. Then I also thought that these loops reminded me of little pendants or little gems hanging from a necklace or earrings. Then I thought it'd be nice to sort like a curvy shape around it, almost like a little frilly border around it and then that led to another variation. Then coincidentally while I was making these variations in the background of my TV goes on with news playing on it and it just so happened that during the time of filming this class, the Miss Universe Pageant was happening and India happened to be the winner and so they were basically doing this feature on all the different crowns that all Miss Universe women have worn over the last few years. Then this variation basically came after I got inspired by looking at one of the crowns from there, which was I think the Mickey motor crown. This was one of the variations that came from there. I basically just played around with a lot of different variations and I decided to show you a few of these in class. But basically you are free to experiment with any other variations using this little phone cord template that I have designed. This is basically like an improvisation exercise like I said and I would love for you to try and get inspired by things around you and use them creatively in your pattern. Later on at some point when you refer to your sketchbook, this will serve as a good resource for you to build borders or even more patterns in the future and this is a good way to keep all your things together at one place. I would love to see all your versions when we meet tomorrow for our next lesson and of course, as always I will also show you a few more versions of mine and I hope you enjoy doing this exercise till then. 28. Day 21 - Reveal : [MUSIC] Hello, and welcome back. As promised, here is my finished exercise from yesterday. I wanted to include a lot of different ideas on the same page, which is why I ended up doing them individually instead of trying to do them as strips. These are all my completed patterns from yesterday. I definitely like the ones with the frilly lace and even this version when I tried to do a little bit of fescue inside. I am not very sure of the one where I did a heart and then I did a little thick border around it and then I added three dots. This was actually inspired by the design on a cookie. [LAUGHTER] I'm not really sure I like this one, but it's good to have this as a reference for later on if I want to improvise on this further. I do like these too. This one was inspired by looking at some Easter eggs, and this one was inspired by looking at a list again, which are these spiky borders. These two definitely are something that I see myself using in the future. This one, I had already shown you guys yesterday and I tried a variation of this where I thought I could turn those spikes, all those little sticks into curves, very similar to fescues and so maybe this is also something that I will use. Then I tried a couple of versions where I thought I could treat the teardrop shape as a flux and then I tried to do the echoes. I did one facing south and the others facing north and I think they're quite nice. Maybe I can do a little bit more finishing and polishing to these, but overall, I think they are quite nice. This one was just a random thing. I thought what if I tried to do phone calls inside as well as outside? I like tiny ones because the whole thing is inspired from a phone cord, so I thought what would happen if I included phone cords in and out as well so this one was that. I don't see myself using this a lot because it's a little more doodly and it's a little more animated. But still, it's good to have it as a reference. This one is inspired by loose threads and so during the process of filming this lesson, I'm also indulging in a little bit of embroidery on the side. I had a lot of embroidery threads around me and then this one just came as an idea out of that. I think I was going for a loose threads wave, coming out of a central gem or a center piece. This idea came from that. Then I try to do another variation of it where I did not do the threads. This one's also okay. This one was honestly inspired by Sunnyside out, just eggs on a banner. But it also reminds me a little bit of the curvy nature of nano leaves and so that's how this came to be. But I'm not really sure I'm going to end up using this, but like I said, it's again fun to just do all these activities and just keep design ideas for future reference. Then this one was again inspired by hearts and this one was just reverses. Out of all of these that I have done, I definitely like the ones which have a slightly more ornamental wipe because I see myself using these in combination with other patterns. The others are slightly more doodly and slightly more animated than my usual style. But I didn't really mind doing this as an exercise because these are good for days when I do want to push my boundaries and I want to work on slightly more animated design so these will be good as a reference for that time. These are all my ideas from yesterday and I look forward to seeing all your ideas as well. If you have any questions, feel free to put them up in the discussions tab. With that, we are ready to move on to our next exercise. 29. Day 22 - Gra-vee Bubbles: [MUSIC] Hi, everyone and welcome back to the course. In today's lesson, we're going to be developing yet another abstract composition using duo tangles. Today's project is again a duo tangle project, and the tangles that I have chosen to work with are gravy and bubbles. Now to begin gravy, we start off with a wavy line somewhere on our paper. It doesn't have to be exactly the same way as I'm doing it, you can do it in any other direction that you like. Then we're going to crisscross this line with another wavy line but notice the difference between the two curvy lines. The second one is more like a roller coaster ride, you can see there are a lot of dips and curves in this line as compared to the first one. Also my line has got a little bit jittery towards the end but that's okay because we're going to fix it in just a few moments. In case you also end up having a slightly jittery line or you're not very happy with the shape right now, that's okay. The reason why I say that we're going to fix this is because we're actually going to come back with a thicker pen, and we're going to accentuate all of these dips and curves that we just created by going inside of them and coloring them in. The idea over here is that the most wavy parts of this new line that you have just drawn are going to be colored in, and they're basically going to accentuate those little curvy crevices and those little dips and bumps that we've just created. That's how we basically develop this gravy tangle. Now you'll probably notice that the tangle is quite forgiving in that sense because when you're doing this step, you're actually getting an opportunity to fix some of those curves and you can actually play around in terms of the thickness of these little colored sections. Even if you ended up drawing a line that you weren't happy with in the beginning, for example, the way I messed it up a little bit towards the end, you can still go back and you can smoothen out the lines by adding these little colored sections and it'll all get blended in. Now once you are done making this first ribbon, we can move on to making more such ribbons on our paper. The number of ribbons really depend on the paper size that you have with you. I think, I'm just going to add one more over here and leave the rest of the space empty to fill up with another tangle. But you're definitely free to add more if you feel like your paper is bigger or if you want to increase contrast in your composition and you want to have more of this tangle, you're definitely free to do that. Now as always, the coloring process can take a little bit of time so if you feel like you want to pause the video and then come back once you're ready, feel free to do so. Now once our gravy ribbons are done, we're again going to take the thin pen and we're going to come back and add another tangle over here called bubbles. Bubbles basically starts off with three concentric circles, and you can make these circles of any size. Once you have the three circles, we go inside the first one, and we just basically make a tiny C-shape over there and add a little bit of color. If you notice that little sectioning that we just created inside the bubble to fill up the color, i