Perspective Drawing for Beginners: See, Understand, Draw | Teoh Yi Chie | Skillshare

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Perspective Drawing for Beginners: See, Understand, Draw

teacher avatar Teoh Yi Chie, Sketcher, watercolour lover

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

12 Lessons (3h 11m)
    • 1. Introduction

      0:50
    • 2. Uses of Perspective

      6:05
    • 3. Perspective Basics

      13:35
    • 4. Drawing Without Knowing Perspective

      20:12
    • 5. One Point Perspective Basics

      18:37
    • 6. One Point Sketch

      26:44
    • 7. Two Point Perspective Basics

      20:59
    • 8. Two Point Sketch

      23:30
    • 9. Three Point Perspective Basics

      15:50
    • 10. Three Point Sketch

      24:24
    • 11. Bonus Lesson - More on One Point Perspective

      15:14
    • 12. Bonus Lesson - More on Two Point Perspective

      5:16
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About This Class

In this perspective drawing course, we'll learn the basics on how you can see, understand and draw perspective.

The course covers 1, 2 and 3 point perspective that you'll be drawing with reference photos provided.

No prior drawing experience is needed. 

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Teoh Yi Chie

Sketcher, watercolour lover

Teacher

I'm an artist, visual content creator and urban sketcher based in Singapore. My passion is in sketching outdoors with pen, ink, watercolour, and digitally with portable tablets.

Through his Skillshare classes, I want to share the passion and joy of sketching to all who wish to learn. 

You can find me easily on my Youtube channel (230K subs), blog and Instagram page (links on the left). I've hundreds of tutorials on Youtube, and many art supplies reviews on my blog.

If you want a more structured learning experience, these are the courses arranged from beginner to intermediate level:

1. Drawing with Pen, Ink and Watercolor for Beginners
2. How to Make Colour Swatch Cards with Watercolour
3. Watercolour Mixing for Beginners
4. Using ... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello and welcome to this drawing cause on perspective My name is till. I have designed this course for beginners who have absolutely no knowledge of drawing. So if you think you do know how to draw, doesn't really matter because there is actually a short lesson that teaches you the basics of drawing. And after that, we will jump into the basics of perspective and how you can use perspective to make a better drawing domain you're drawing more accurate. And some of the considerations to take note of when you are drawing from observation, when you're joining us scene or subject with perspective. I have provided some references for those for you. Some of the reference photos are going to be useful that drawing tutorials, but some of the extra photos you can use them foil Owen for extra practice. Ok, let's jump into the first lesson. 2. Uses of Perspective: And this first lesson, I'm gonna teach you how you can use perspective to make your work look better. Perspective is basically a set of rules, techniques that people can use to help them draw elements and things and make them few, right? As if they sort of belong to the real world because there are Sama, someone who has rules that govern how those objects should look. Now if you don't have no perspective, it doesn't really matter that much because you don't need to know perspective in order to draw, if you're just drawing from observation. But if you know perspective, it can help you with two things. One is to help make your drawing law accurate and the other is to help compose your scene like finding the best way to draw that element as subject that you wanted to draw and present it in the best possible way to the person that use your art. Let's see how we can use perspective to make your scene look better. So here in front of me are two toy trucks. I've pointed the camera directly in front of the truck so that you can only see to front and not this site. Based on this view. Can you tell me what type of trucks they are? Can you tell me the number of reviews they have and also whether it is destruct longer compared to this truck. So just based on the frontal view is actually quite impossible to tell because most of the details are hidden on this size M B prime. So this is the limitation of this particular view. But if you know perspective, you can actually change this up a bit. Now I'm using toy truck so I can actually hold them and turn them around. If you are drawing from location, drawing from observation, you may actually have to move yourself to the side of the truck. So now I'm going to show you the site of the truck. So from the side view, you can tell straight away what type of trucks they are. This is a rubbish dump truck and this is sort of like a container truck. But based on this site, we'll, you cannot tell how the frontier looks like. So again, there's this limitation for this particular viewpoint. So this is actually not the most ideal way to draw the trucks because we are only looking at one site, yada site use hidden. So in this case, the best way to draw the trucks is actually to draw them in this view, which is sort of like the three quarter view, where you can look at the front and you can look at the site. So it is, presents more information to the person looking at your drawing. So now you know how the front looks like and now you know how the site looks like. And at a glance you can immediately tell what kind of vehicles they are. So you can change your position and see more details. If you want to emphasize more on the front, you can move yourself like this. Or in this case, I moved the toys length is so they can see multiple front and less of this sites. If you wanted to focus to be on this site, you can and keen move yourself, change your position or in this case, move to toys to see more of this size. Because this is a toy. I can actually move my camera up to see what's up there. Like for example, for this is rubbish truck here, is this part here covered? Let's take a look at this higher viewpoint. Now we can see the top of the trucks. We can see that this rubbish truck here and this is not covered. And here on this trunk here, there are some labels there. And we can also see some of the lighting here on the front. So if you're drawing on location, you can change your location to change how much you can see if you are drawing steel live, you can change the placement of the subjects that you are drawing. Here's another view of the truck. This time I have placed my camera really looted grow and looking upwards. And because of this, the truck now has pretty dynamic lines here to angled lines. You see here, they are pointing downwards like this, like this. But if I were to draw the triplet is the lines are parallel to the grow, the vertical lines are just vertical lines. It looks less dynamic compared to this view, which gives you the angle lines. So this is another way and how you can use Perspective knowledge to change things up a bit, to make your elements look a bit more exciting. So how can you check the accuracy of your sketch of the thing that you are drawing with the help of Perspective knowledge. Well, we'll talk more about that in the later lessons with some hands on exercises. So that's how you can use the knowledge of perspective to change the way that you see things, to change what you can and cannot see. But this is just one aspect of perspective. Alright, for the homework of this lesson, I suggest you walk around your house, your apartment, and look at the things that you already have and see how you can change the perspective just by moving around. For example, this computer Haber right here, you can see this line. This is sort of at an angle line. How can you change your position, your viewing angle to this angle line, horizontal. Just move around and pay attention to how the angles change and how much you can see for all the elements that you are looking at. You can also go outdoors and look at beauty things, Architecture, book a, big abdomens, small elements, change your location, your viewing angle, and see how those elements, how the angled lines, how they change. So that would be your homework fall in this lesson. In the next lesson, we're gonna talk more about perspective basics like the eye level, horizontal line, and vanishing point. So that's all for this lesson. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me directly. 3. Perspective Basics: Hey, welcome back. In this lesson we're going to talk about the three basics of perspective, the horizon line, the eye level, and vanishing points. Now, get your pens and pencils and paper off because we are going to learn about we draw when you look at the horizon, regardless of whether you are standing, sitting on a very tall, beautiful looking down. If there's nothing blocking your view, you should be able to see a horizontal line as far as you can see. So this line is called a horizon line. The best place to see this line is maybe at the beach where there's nothing locking you. If you are in the city, there are a lot of tall buildings, there are trees, perhaps, there are cars. There are a lot of elements that block the horizon line. So sometimes you may not be able to see the horizontal line because it's hidden behind all this elements. But a horizon line is actually a very, very important concept. The horizon line is very important because it controls the perspective of every element in your scene. It controls how big a human figures are supposed to be based on their position. It controls the perspective lines of beauty things, the size of beauty things. Alright, let's start with people first. And before I introduce human figures in the scene, I need to introduce you to the concept called eye level. Usually the eye level coincides with the horizon line. I mean, when you are standing, when you're looking right in front at the horizon line, your eye level should always coincide with the horizon line. So that's tick this person, for example, we have the i's here and I'm going to put him down here. And you can see that the eyes crosses the horizon line. So this is a very typical scenario when you are sketching people in your scene. So how do you place elements in your scene based on this concept? Now if you look in front of you and you see this person to iss intersect with the horizon. It probably means most of the time that the eyes of other people in the scene, they will also coincide with the horizontal line. So if I were to place these paper cut outs in the scene, I would place them like this. By the way, you can do this exercise on your own as well. Just draws on human fingers, cut them out and draw a horizontal line and play around with the arrangement. If you don't know how to draw him figures. Don't get too detail. Just draw a simple over here. Draw a rectangular body, and then draw some licks year. The size of this body is equal to the size of the licks here. Nothing too complicated. So when I put the figures like these, you can see that the eye level of all these people to coincide with the horizon line, one I have told you is applicable if the person standing in front of me is of the same height as me, let's say I'm going to sit down on a chair. I'm going to lower my high level because of that. When my eye level is low, it it actually still coincides with the horizon line. But because my eye level is now lower, I am no longer able to meet the eye level of other people standing in front of me. But now I'm actually sitting down and my eye level now is actually looking at the chest level of all the people in front of me. And the chest level is going to coincide with the horizontal line, which is going to coincide with my eye level. And because the chest level coincides with the horizon line, all the people in the scene, they are chest level, is going to coincide with the horizontal line. And it was always my the high level second plays out if he goes like this and it would look right, I can place this figure here. And it would look right. If I were to place this figure like this is going to look off straight away. You may not know why it looks off, but that's because of eye level and horizon line. Because as you are looking straight at a horizontal line, you're looking at the chest level. Every single person in the scene. She had to chess level at the horizon line, except for this person right here. So to please this person correctly, you have to move it down like this. Alright, let's say I'm no, looking at the world through the worm's eye view, what would happen? So if I'm very low on the ground, like I'm really on a groan. If I look street, My eyes will still meet the horizon line. And as I look straight, I can only see the feet of other people. And in this case are the feet of audio people in the scene. They will coincide with the horizon line. And now and now this scene looks all right. It looks fine. Remember earlier, as I put my characters like this, this looks like a giant looks off. But now as I place audit fingers on the line like this, it looks right. So everything that you draw, every element in the scene actually relates to another element in the scene. They all play a part. If something is of length, this is going to look off. You may not know why, but actually is because the perspective is off. So what happens when you have a scene where you cannot see the horizontal line and there are still people in the scene. So take this sketch for example. I sketch this while I was sitting dow on my pupils do so I was at a rather low level. My eye level is rather low and there are two people in the scene, even though we do not see the horizontal line here, I can still use my eye level to place human figures accurately in the sea. So as I look straight at this two person here, my ad level actually coincides with dad chest under level. So once I draw a single figure here, I know exactly where the next figure will stand. The chance level has to be here on the same level as this person here. So my eye level tells me that I'm looking at the chest level of this person. Which means that the chest level of every person should coincide with the level of this person. So if I were to place a finger. I should place it like this so that a chest level coincide with the chest level of this person. And here, like this, maybe let's plays it further away. And here you can see that on the chest level, they coincide with the chess level, these people and the chest level. Every person here, they are at the same level. And if some fingers are off, like for example, if this figure is of again, you know that this V goes, yeah, they look right, but there's something wrong with the placement of this feeder. And that's because of the eye level, because of perspective. And it is too low like this. It's going to look a bit off as well. So I have two exercises for you to do at home. Just draw these human figures. Don't get too complicated. Just draw oval, draw the body and draw the lakes. The heat should be a quarter of the body size and the body size is the same as the licks. So once you have this, just play around a horizontal line, just try and match the body Pitot-static coincide with the horizon line. Alright, the next exercise is to go to a crowded place where either there are a lot of people, for example, at a Boston to translation or the shopping mall, stand and look at where your eyes coincide with body parts of other people. If you're extending, your eyes, should meet the eyes of other people. And then sit down on a bench or on a chair. And now take a look at where your eyes would coincide with other people. It should coincide at a lower point, maybe at the chest level, at a stomach level, all these people. And then if you can try to go a bit lower, maybe squat down and see where your eye coincides with their body parts of other people. In this case, you probably would be looking at the needs of other people. And the knees would quasars at eye level and coincide with the horizon line like this. So as you can see, depending on your eye level, depending on where your viewing from. All the elements in the scene depositions, they are going to vary depending on your eye level. All right. And now no reason why the horizontal line is important is because it affects the angles of beauty beings of structures in the scene. So once again, we have the horizontal line. And if I have a building in this scene, for example, Alexis. So we have a DAW here, some windows here. How do I know that this lines, this angled lines. How do I know that the perspective, the angles are correct? And that's where the horizon line comes in to help a game. And I'll fall. Admins that have parallel lines. Those lines are going to converge at a point on the horizon line, and that point is called a vanishing point. So in this case, we have the angle lines coming down here. If you draw an imaginary line, it's going to coincide here. And this line, it coincides here, C, That's because these two lines are parallel. If you look at this building. Straight from the front. These two lines are supposed to be horizontal, but if you look at it from the site, the angles would change. And the vanishing point is the one that affects the angle. There is another set of parallel lines here. And if all of this to parallelize the vanishing point actually is somewhere outside of this paper H here. Now if there are other buildings in the scene, for example, there is this building here. Like this. The parallel, I mean, the vanishing point for this particular building here will be somewhere here. Somewhere around here. Now, every set of parallel lines will have its own vanishing point. And this is very important to take note off. Every set of parallel lines will have its own vanishing point. So this two lines here, they are parallel. They would have, they would have the vanishing point, its own vanishing point. These two lines, they are not parallel with this because they are going in a different direction. And because of that, they will have a demo and a vanishing point somewhere here. And this two lines are not parallel with this to this two lines are also not parallel with these two lines because they are not going in the same direction. This means if you have a lot of buildings in your scene, each with their own sets of parallel lines, you are going to get a lot of vanishing points. Alright, lets say I want to add another beauty. And beside this beauty, and it's a very tall building. Now this meeting is just right beside it has shares the same parallel lines as is outbidding here. Now, the bottom of this building, this line is parallel to line of disputing. Sodium would go to the same vanishing point. And the top of this building here, It's, this angle, is going to be like this. So because it goes to the vanishing point and you can draw it like this. And this line here, it will go to another vanishing point somewhere over here. Because this line is parallel to this line, it will go to the same, you know, go to the same vanishing point here, we will talk more about the different points up perspective in the later lesson. The main things you need to remember are this. Vanishing points will always be on the horizon line. And there can be many vanishing points for every element in the scene. So that's main thing here. And for eye level, unless you are looking up in the sky where there is no horizon line. Unless you are looking down on the ground where there is no horizontal line, the eye level usually coincides with the horizontal line. So those are the two main things are you shoot, remember, do not worry if you cannot understand those perspective concepts yet because later on we are going to have a lot more hands-on exercises we'll learn as we go along. Now in the next lesson, I'm going to teach you how to draw from observation using propulsion techniques. All right, see you in the next lesson. 4. Drawing Without Knowing Perspective: Hello. In this lesson, I'm going to teach you how to draw what you see using observation and propulsion techniques. Now this lesson is for beginners who have absolutely no knowledge of drawing. The goal of this lesson is to show you that you can learn how to draw, even if you do not know perspective. And a secondary goal is to equip you with some excuse so they can follow along with the later lessons of get more easily. So let's get started. So this is the truck that we saw earlier and we are going to be drawing this view now to follow along with the lesson, please download the reference photo that I have provided. And the tools we'll need would just be a pen and paper. Let's start by measuring the truck first so that we can have fit this properly on the pitch. I'm going to be using my pen as a measuring tool. You can also use a pencil if you want to. So I am going to measure this pot here to white container. So the left edge of the pen will go to this each year and writes site. How will my Tom to measure that? So this is about one unit. We'll consider this one unit. And using this one unit, I'm going to measure the orange part here and see how big it really is. So this orange button, you can see that the front of the truck, it's wider compared to IDA white container. Maybe it's about one unit and a quarter. So bear that in mind. And if you take a look at the height of the truck, it's about one unit at a quarter as well. So this ship here, like a school where so you can use this same unit to measure are deposits of the truck. Now if you are measuring outdoors, makes sure you stretch out your hand and lock your albums. If you're just using a reference photograph, the reference photograph is not moving. So you can actually put your pen or pencil on the photograph. Now that we have some measurement, let's draw, I'm gonna draw the white container first. So remember this is one unit and this is about the same unit as the wifi. So I am going to be drawing that line here. If you take a look at photograph, we have the front part, which takes up a larger portion and the back part, a smaller portion. So this vertical line should be towards the right side. So I'm going to draw that like this. So this is sort of like one unit. And remember the wheels below, they take up some space as well, which is close to one unit, but a bit shorter. So this is this line here as border line at the top. It's I see some angle there. It's sort of like it's actually very close to horizontal. So I'm just going to draw that horizontally like this. And if you're not sure of the length of this line, you can always measure, just be accurate as measure and see how long it really is. All right, I can see that this line is shorter competitors line. So maybe I need to extend his line a bit. And bottom line here, this line, the angle is like this. It's not horizontal. Tubes up slightly and is put here, is one pot, two pots and three pots. They are almost sort of equal in with. So S I draw, I need to make sure that the equal in width. Let me draw this vertical line doll first. And so this is one pot. It's not like this. Goes up and goes up like this. It may look like the lines are horizontal but focus on what you can see. Observe carefully and really remembered angle and drawdown to angle that you see. Not what do you think you see. And for this line here, it tooks dance lightly like this at this angle. So we will go down like this is a very slight angle here. And I don't want to draw the lights first. I wanna draw them big parts first so that I can fill in the details later on. So now let's draw the orange pot. I'm going to draw this, this, this ship verse right at the top of the truck. So we have the top of the Tropic goes across like this. It tips down slightly, so it's not horizontal. That line is tilted slightly. And this length, let's measure again. So this Lang, it's about this pot here, these grep hot here, it's longer compared to this. And from what I can see, this part is about this pile like this. This is the gray pot. And this is sort of like one unit as well. So you can just connect it. And now let's draw the vertical line here. This vertical line, if you have an imaginary dotted line that goes across, you can see that is point here. This point is going to intersect here or right here. So when you are drawing, make sure that this vertical line comes down beneath the sheet here. It doesn't go all the way here. It comes down here. And as you draw it down like this, it's actually at an angle. It's not totally vertical as you draw down, remember, right, it's going to stop, it's going to stop somewhere here. And this line here, it tubes down in this direction. It's not horizontal, it just all slightly like this. And it's going to come here and is going to end right here relative to this point here. And now I can start off close up this rectangular box. And this angle here. It's going to be like this. And this edge here you see this is h is just right beneath this sheet here. So as you draw, make sure you stop right here. So I'm stopping it right here. And I can see that this part here is very thin. So let me just draw that in like this. And it will turn down like this. Alright? And this unit here will go down. How far down does have an imaginary line. So it's all here. It's a ball. I think she stopped around here. So let me just draw that. As fought a front bumper here. Pay attention to the angle of the line is going to start here, is going to end here, right beneath the window here. If you want to, you can draw the windows universe. Right? So this line will start here and we will, and right in the middle of the window, which is this point here that I put down is going to stop right here. And angle make sure to get it right. That's like this. So it's going to stop here. Alright. Notice mine, Gita realign. It doesn't really matter where they are aligned. You tours on nod, we've malpractice, you will become more confident. So now I can draw this pot here and connect this like this. And despite actually 2Ts dont slightly before it, before it gives you a parallel line. Parallel line compared to this and goes up like this, right? This k. So now we have this pot here. You can view the details later on. Let me just draw this all it'll hit like here. As i, for all the elements that I am drawing, I am actually comparing with other elements that I have a ready drawn. So now I can draw it a wheel's dish shoe for this wheel. Or maybe I should draw this part here first. Remember drawed big ships where it's going to meet your drawing a bit easier. This pot is going to disagree pot. The exhaust we will come down here, coincides with this hit light here. So the exhaust is going to come down or right here. So you can draw it like this goes up, this. So this is the exhaust. And you can see this line here. So we're going to draw that line. Connects here, connects here C, and then goes up here. And then this line connects here like this. So now that we have this general shape, we can draw the little details inside this as draw a line here to show off the site, off the truck. And on this side of the truck we have this little thing here. I'm not sure what this is as a little rectangle here. And this is the DAW. And this Dalvik go down all the way here and here. And there are these little window here. And if we take a look at this window, you can see through the window. And I want to draw that. Also notice that my window is that it came up a bit short. So it should be like this. And managers are shaded in. So now you can see these are see-through window like this. You can also share this if you're using a pencil, you, we, you will be easier to share. I'm just doing some very simple shading, right? And let's zoom back down and see what we haven't drawn. This plot here. See this part here. We can see the underside of this arch. Assume. So we need to draw that. And this angle here, it tilts up like this. So notice that as I'm drawing, I'm always thinking about angles, where the angles are going. And I can draw details later on. Let me just draw the wheels. These wheels, they are sort of oval in shape. They are not circular. So based on observation, they are oval in shape. And the top of the wheels sort of starts here. And the bottom of the wheel sort of ends here. So you want to draw an oval shaped like this. Doesn't matter if it's not that accurate, as long as the placement is writing, you will. This is going to look like a truck and his Alright. This is, I'm not sure what this part is. So we'll try and draw that and draw it a little details inside if you want to. And now let's just add in the little details. The heat light here. And if you want to add in more detail, so CDs pot here. There are three lines, 12, sorry, two lines 12. And then redraw the grills. Now the grills, the angles of each grill is actually different. I mean, they may look like they are parallel, but actually they are different. Because IP is a panda measure. You can see that angle for deafness line that's like this. But the angle of the last line is like this. So this is something to take note off when you're drawing. And I can just draw it like this doesn't really matter. The goal of this lesson really is to teach you how to draw, okay, see Citizen mistake that I've just made. So it seems like the will is supposed to be a bit bigger. So let me just draw it a bit bigger like this. And I also want to draw the edge of this Will. You may not see it in the photo but in sexually there. And let's draw the other wheels. Now for this particular, we'll take a look at the bottom of the wheel coordinate such as here. So the bottom of the wheel is here, and the top of the wheel is here. So we can just draw that like this, like this, some details there, some dequeues which was a bit thicker, so I went to draw it a bit thicker. And for this loss of wheel here, and I see that is pot here, it coincides with the Robert pot there. So it's here and a wheel starts here. So that's droid n. And like this. And at, in some detail news reels. And alright, so we sort of have the truck, the general shape of the truck. And alright, let's draw the lights here. Let's draw this pot here first. You see it is like here. This light is directly above this window here. So it's right here. And it goes to the right site, stops right here at each of this window. And we have three little things there, and then we have another light. And then we have this little thing there. Again. I strongly support. And now we can connect the lines. I did not draw that line first because I want it design. He likes to be in front of this white container here. And now I think I've pretty much drawn, or that I cannot draw some of these shapes here. Is it is shadow areas here. They are very difficult to see because of the photograph. But if you're actually drawing in real life, if you're drawing on location, you should be able to see dequeues in shadow ears because your eyes more sensitive compared to the camera. So this is a very quick sketch of their truck. Now if you find that your drawing, it doesn't look very similar to the reference photo. Go back and find out why that is. So usually it's because the proportion is off, is because the angles, they are off. Even for me, sometimes I still get to my angles a bit off because sometimes when I'm drawing I lose concentration. So let's see what are some of the mistakes that I have made here. The first thing I can see is this angle, the angle for the bumper. It's slightly off. If we take a look at the reference photo, it seems that this bumper, it's too much steeper angle compared to my truck. So I should have drawn it like this at a steeper angle. And the wheels here, you can see the wheels here. They sought all of this wheel is in front of this wheel, but formats catch here. They are solve separate. And let's see yotta style. Oh, and this front part here, you see it is grill here. It looks sort of like a squarish shape and mine, it looks like a rectangular shape. It looks a bit wider, competitive, who does? And when you are drawing, if you make a little mistake here, if you get that proportion of, let's say it is our window, here, you get a bit wrong. It's going to affect other parts of your drawing because when you're drawing other elements, you actually basing what you're drawing based on what you have already drawn. So if you draw something off, your proportion is off somewhere, then it's going to affect other parts of your drawing. So it really, it really pays to be a bit more careful, Be a bit more observant. I should have curved this part. You see here it curves down into the exhaust. I actually went all the way here. So the images, I shall just live it as it is. Sometimes when you make a mistake and you go back to correct mistakes, it's going to make it worse. So I'm just going to live this as it is. Notice I drew this sketch straight away with pen and ink. If I make any mistakes, it would be difficult to correct. Now if you are not convenient, you can use pencils to draft in some lines first to help with your drawing. If I'm gonna be using pencils, I will be mocking out the age of the truck, the right hitch, the midpoint between the front end container, the top of the truck and there's left it or age of the truck. This this and the bumper and the bottom of the wheels. Because the wheels, as you can see, they are sort of in prospective the move higher and higher. So you need to get the, get here accurate to get a sense of perspective. So we can use pencils to mock out the age of the wheels like this. And after you have use the pencil markings, you can then draw with your pen. That would be a bit easier. And as you practice, the more you draw, the better you will get and can just start drawing with pen and ink without using any pencils. And don't worry about little mistakes like overlapping lines in blocks like this. They do not matter as long as you get your proportion right. And notice as I was drawing this truck, I did not talk about perspective at all. So you can definitely draw something from observation if you used a correct observation and propulsion techniques. But if you know perspective, you can use it to your advantage. So for example, as I'm looking at it right now, because I know perspective straight away. I can tell that angles of this lines, they are off. I know because the lines, they should be going in this direction. So CDS lines here, they are going in this direction. So straight away, I can tell that this lines, they are off because I know perspective. So that's how you can draw something without even knowing perspective. If you want to practice more, I have other reference photographs off the truck and different angles. You can download them and practice on your own. If you want to learn more about drawing fundamentals, I actually have another online cause caught between his guide to drink from observation where I talk more about the basic drawing, fundamentals and techniques. You may want to check that out if you want to learn more about drawing. In the next lesson, we will draw one-point perspective. 5. One Point Perspective Basics: Hello and welcome back. In this lesson, we are going to learn one-point perspective. One-point perspective is basically the concept where a set of parallel lines will converge tumor single vanishing point on the horizon. Alright, let's learn by drawing. So have your pen and paper ready. Let's start by drawing a horizontal line to represent a horizon. So let's imagine we are going to draw a street. So we have this long straight road that goes on into the horizon. So this will be the vanishing point. And for this root, there will be a set of parallel lines, the left edge of the road and a right h under root. So I'm going to draw a left and a right h. So this doesn't look very much like a route yet. But let's draw the root markings. So we have those white markings. Now as we draw the vertical line, make sure to point the line to the vanishing point. So you can see me doing this movement and trying to align this line to the vanishing point. So let me just try and do that as accurately as possible. And this point here will go to the vanishing point as well. Because I have drawn this marker a bit to the left side. This line here, it's totally perpendicular to this line, so it's totally vertical. Now let's draw the Nixon wrote marker. Has put it down here, draw it half the size because it's further away, should be smaller. But the same thing as you draw the vertical line pointed to the vanishing point. And next wrote mocker half the size and smaller and smaller. So this looks like a ruin. And if you take a look at the diagonal lines, they are all pointing to the vanishing point. The reason for that is because this lines, they are parallel to one another. Let's say this root has some Len pose on this site. So I'm going to draw a pencil line two to a vanishing point here. I'm going to draw it like this, right? This is just a guideline for me to draw the lamppost. So for the first lampposts, I'm going to put the base of the lamp goes here, align it with this root marker here, and draw it to the top. Doesn't have to be too fancy. So this is the first lamppost C where the intersection is, it's on the pencil line. And for the next lampposts, I'm going to align the base to this marker here. And Freud to the top. It's going to stop here. And this is where I will draw the light. And do the same for the other two. Going to align it here and here. And at last lampposts, it's here. Now for the last lamppost because it's nearer to you, you can actually draw more detail cuz it's nearer to you and it's bigger. You can actually draw the thickness of the lamppost, but when it goes further, further into the background, becomes very difficult to draw it in. Just one line will represent the lamppost and even follow this lamppost. It's cropped off by this pitch here. So now I can see that this lamppost, they are supposed to be equal in size, equal in height. And because of that, they align here. The top of the lamppost D should converge to the vanishing point as well, because this line is parallel to this line. All right, let's say that there are other buildings on this street. Does a beauty unless it has a building here on the left side of the street. And disputing is parallel to the root because there's beauty is parallel to the wrote that line. The base of the building should go to the same vanishing point. Remember, if the lines are parallel, they should go to the same vanishing point. So I'm using my pencil as a guide here. I'm going to draw the base of the building. I'm going to use the shadowed as caused by the pencil to draw the base on the beauty. Alright, so this is the base of the beauty. Now, this meeting is quite tall, so he's going to block the horizon. So this is the horizon. It's quite tall and that's draw it quite tall. It's going to block the horizontal and the top of the muting the roof line. The roof line is parallel to the base of the building, which is also parallel to the road. So because they are parallel, they would go to the same vanishing point. So we can draw that in. Now. It's moving, it's so big that it's out of the pitch, doesn't really matter. Now let's draw the age of this meeting and as broad a war disputing. All right. So disputing, let's see, there are some doors and windows errors. This door here, the top of the DAW. This top edge of the door. The liner, is parallel to the base of the DAW, which is parallel to the base of the beauty. And because they're parallel, they will go to the same vanishing point. And again, I'm gonna use my pencil to draw this. If you're drawing on location, you can just do this motion that I showed you earlier. Just point it to the vanishing point. And it doesn't really have to be that accurate. As long as you point it to the vanishing point, it's good enough. It will give you the illusion of perspective, of one-point perspective. Let's say there's a window now. A window is going to point to the vanishing point as well. So let's do that. And the bottom of the window as well. Now, the angle here and the angle here, it's actually different. Alright? So if you take a look at the angle of the line at the top here, above the window is like this. At the bottom of the window. It's like this. So if you are going to draw this from observation, sometimes you may not get the angle right, but if you are using the vanishing point to help you, you can just draw two. It's the vanishing point and the angle will be very accurate. Let's say there's another window here. You can draw to the vanishing point as well. And as another window here, your, this is the law. And all right, so these are the windows. So here we have a one-point perspective scene with some lamppost rode the beauty. If you want to add additional meetings, you can do so if they are parallel to the road, the lines, they will converge to this point here. All right, so this is a very basic one-point perspective street scene. Let's practice. Let's practice a bit more. We're going to draw some cubes in three-dimensional space. So let's put down a vanishing point First. I'm going to put the vanishing point on the left side, somewhere around here. Okay, let's draw the first cube or rectangle. I'm going to draw a cube. Now, the lines of the sight of this cube will go to the vanishing point. Sometimes I would put my finger here. If I didn't put the dot here, I would actually put my finger here to represent a dot. And I would draw the diagonal line is pointing to the dot. Now because this line here is very close to the dot, it's, you wouldn't see very much of the bottom of the cube. Let's draw another element here. I'm going to draw a big rectangle, a vertical rectangle behind as Q. Alright, the sight of this rectangle will point to the vanishing point as well. And here it will point to the vanishing point as well. So notice that there is some a thickness for this particular rectangle. Let me draw another one. This, and this rectangle will go on and we across like this. Now on this point here, same thing will go to the vanishing point. You can draw the line for very long to make this a very long rectangle in 2D background. But I'm going to stop it right here. And this line here, join will go towards the vanishing point. And we can draw a vertical line like this. This point will go here, like this. So now we have three rectangles as draw one on the left side. I'm going to draw one at the bottom. Now, Addis rectangles, they are at the right site. So let's draw one here. This so same thing as draw. You can draw your rectangles anywhere, you're boxes anywhere. Just tried a different placements, Alright, for this particular rectangle, I'm going to draw the left edge just right beneath that vanishing point here. So because the left h is here, this point here as it goes to the vanishing point, this line here is vertical, just like this line here. All right, and now let's use what we know about one-point perspective to draw a bookshelf. Alright, a bookshop is a tall vertical rectangle like this. There are many shelves. I'm going to put three shelves, 123. And this bookshelf is quite tall. So my eye level, we'll be looking at the first shell right here. And I'm going to draw the horizon line because a horizon line happens to coincide with the eye level in this case. So I'm going to draw a horizontal line at back here just to help me out a bit. Now. Alright, remember, the vanishing point should appear on the horizon line. So this shelf has some thickness because we are going to put some books in the shelves. So let's, I'm draw some books here. I'm going to draw a shoe box here as well. So this is the shoe box. Now, I'm going to place the vanishing point is somewhere around here, for example. Alright. And now let's draw the diagonal lines down to the vanishing point. And this line here will join this point here in this corner here, two-dimension point like this. And that's joined is to together. Alright? So this is the back of the shelf. I can't maybe cholera, this shit is so as to hide the vanishing point. Alright, so this is the back of the shelf. You can see this diagonal lines. They go to the measuring point here, which is now heated. Alright, we have a shoe box here. Now for the second shelf here. Again, we are going to have some books as well. We're going to have more books. So all of these books, at the top of the books, we should be able to see the top of the books because, I mean, this is a top bookshop at her books out on the second shelf. And the top of the books, those lines, those parallel lines, they are going to diminishing point as well. So we need to draw those in. So let's just draw them in. Now as we go and draw the books here. You see this line here. This, this two lines, they are almost vertical, but they are actually pointing to the vanishing point. And as we draw the books here, the lines will point this side. The photo books here lines with point this site. So that's how one-point perspective affects the angles of the lines for the objects in your scene. Okay, let's draw the depth of the bookshelf. So because this is on the second shelf, we are not able to see the upper side of this is shelf, so, so we cannot draw that, but we can draw the back of the Bookshelf, which is here, because this line continues down here and this line will continue down here. So this is the back of the bookshelf and Florida last last shelf here. Let's draw or a shoe box on the shelf. So I'm going to draw this shoe box here. Now because this she walks is quite close to the ground level of cause I'll we'll be able to see the top of the shoe box and the lines, the parallel lines, there are two sets of parallel lines, left and right. The left one will go to the vanishing point. Remember it's here. So make sure you get the angle right. And this line here, we'll go to the vanishing point as well, get the angle right and draw it like this, right? And Ford, bottom of the bookshelf, we should be able to see the bottom because we are looking down right now. So this line will, the plate of the shelf will go down here. And this line here, we'll go to the vanishing point as well. So this is the bottom of the bookshelf. And this is the back. So this is what we have. And this line here, that's this point here, should go to the vanishing point as well. This line is very steep, so be careful when you're drawing the line. Tried to get angle correct. So the angle is like this. This is very steep. So here we have a bookshelf with some books you can add in books are the books as well. But make sure to point the lines here. Alright, let's take a closer look here. So this had a books on the first shelf, that top shelf. Now we should be able to see this site of this book here. And there is this line because we can see the size of the book that goes to the vanishing point. So I want to draw that as well. The vanishing point is on the horizon, so just line will tilt down slightly like this. And this is the site of this particular book. So when do you know when to connect those diagonal lines too? Vanishing point. Well, if you can see the vanishing point and if the parallel lines go to the vanishing point, then you can draw the parallel lines to the vanishing point. But if the vanishing point is here, it's actually hidden behind something. You cannot see the vanishing point, then you should not draw the diagonal lines to the vanishing point because it's actually heated behind this box here. If you draw the lines to the vanishing point is going to look like this. It doesn't look like anything. Let's recap what we have learnt. So for every set of parallel lines, they will converge to one single vanishing point. Lets say for this example here there's another rule that runs beside his route that wrote, We will have its own set of parallel lines. And if those lines they happen to be parallel to the lines of this route, they will share the same vanishing point. But let say that root turns right, unless it has a root junction here at that root tons, right? Then obviously they are not going to the same direction. The lines, they are not parallel, the lines for that root, they are not parallel to this lines. So that will have its own vanishing points somewhere else. But this root will have its vanishing point here. And a vanishing point is always on the horizon. Sometimes the vanishing May be hidden. You cannot see the vanishing point. But the vanishing point is always there because all the lines in the scene, they will be affected by that finishing point, even if you cannot see it. For the homework of this lesson, I want you to draw something like this plays vanishing points somewhere on the plate. She maybe at a bottom right, on top right, and then draw as many kids as possible with the diagonal lines pointing to the vanishing point. So that is one thing you can do. The other thing you can do is draw a bookshelf again. This time, have three shelves as well. But this time plays the horizontal line here. So now play some books on their bookshelves and draw the back of the bookshelves and also the diagonal lines. We have been the bookshelves. So this is your second homework. So that's all for this lesson. In the next lesson, we're going to look at some real examples of one-point perspective. And then we will draw a dto sketch of a one-point perspective seeing with the help of a reference photo. So see you in the next lesson. 6. One Point Sketch: Welcome to the second part of this lesson on 1 perspective. In this lesson, we are going to draw a one-point perspective street scene and use what we have learned in the earlier lesson. Here, it's time for some hands on exercise. So this is the scene that we are going to draw. This is a very typical one-point perspective scene with the root going into the background. We have two rules of buildings on the side. They are parallel to the route, so we have diagonalized pointing to this era here. See all these lines here. So this is what we are going to draw before we start drawing, let's take some measurements. So I'm going to measure the left edge of this beauty to the vanishing point. So this is one unit, and here it looks like it's two units. So we have one unit here and two units here. And because our vanishing point is somewhere here on the left side, we can see more of the walls of the buildings here. So that's how you make use of perspective to choose your composition. If I wanted to see more of the walls here, I would move to this the street so they can see more. We are not going to focus on the details. We just want to get the angles and the proportion right. After you get to angles and proportional right? You can fill in the details afterwards is going to be much easier. Okay, let's find a vanishing point. Vanishing point is somewhere here. If we connect the parallelized down into the background and vanishing point is somewhere here to the right side of this building. At somewhere here to the right side will dispute, and this is the age of the beauty here is to the right side. So you find it seemed to be complicated. Floyd is complicated because there are a level, lots of windows, cars parked on the streets, many things going on. You find this complicated. You can't start with pencil first. So I'm going to mock out the vanishing point with a small cross here. Dimension point is somewhere to the lower left side of the scene. And early on we measured one unit here and two units here. So we want to leave some space of one unit and two units here. So if I put my cross here, it's like one unit, three units. So I need to put my vanishing point here, close to close on this site. And this is the beauty, the height of the building on the left side here. And the beauty on the right side. It's also around the same height. So it is here. The vanishing point is very close to the ground. So I'm going to draw the ground here is, I'm just using the pencil to draw out a general shapes. Later on, I'll be using pen and ink. Ink. So now that we have this vanishing point, let's try and measure the angle. When you are drawing this scene in real life on location. To measure this angle, you should stretch out your arm. Lock your elbows and use your pen or pencil to measure the angle. And try and remember this angle. So this angle is a very steep angle. If you compare it to a clock face, this is trough clock. This is 11 o'clock, so this is quite close to 12 o'clock. So I went to draw the angle with the help of the vanishing point. And it's a very steep line. So just be sure. Sometimes I would put my pencil down on the pitch just to make sure that I get the angle right. I think this NGO is pretty close, so I'm going to draw like this. Okay? So this line goes all the way up and it's a very steep point. This is the H off the building. These h, because this photo has I'm camera distortion. The lines to, to, in real life, the lines ship you street. How do you know when to stop drawing here? Again, let's measure. If we imagine a horizontal line going to the left side, you would cut disputing right here. And this is about one unit. So we have 12345. So this part here is about five times longer than this, but if you measure it, vanishing point. And you can use the pencil again to measure the angle. So this rote curve here is about 45 degrees. When it's closer to the building, it's it's less is more gentle. So this is the line. Alright, something like this. I'm just using penciled in Morocco and on this side here, remember that building on this side is two units to building on this side is one unit. And this roof line, as Mary as measure again, it's about 45 degrees. So let's see if we are right. So if you connect this vanishing point to each of the meeting here in the background and go all the way up like this. And this angle should be pretty accurate, right? Looks right. So one unit, tool, units h of this meeting should stop here. And because we know the vanishing point is here, I can draw the base of the building here. And if we take a look at the photo, the line goes across horizontally. And this part here, it goes up like this angle. This angle is like this, and this roof angle comes down like this. So we will come down like this as well. So this is drawing from observation. Okay, so now we have pretty much seen blocked out. And let's sub-divide does a scene. So this is a multistory shop house and CDs line here. This line is exactly half of this two points here. This line here. So half of this is here, and half of this it's here. So you can connect this like this. And same thing on the left side as well. There is this point here and this, this point here, half, half, we can join together like this. And while this site is very far short and vertical impress you can see the windows here they are closer to you. They are larger, but Windows here they are so small that you cannot even see to Windows. So to draw this sort of foreshortened perspective, you need to divide the scene again and again. So I'm going to divide the senior right here at this line here is behind the car, halfway here. So this point is here. And his pot, this line is here, half here. Alright? And you see this sign boards here, design boss. They are very helpful because they can help you place the elements in the scene. So I wanted to draw this sign, but here, first, this sidebar is about half the height of this portion here. So why did draw that in? And this sidebar here, see this one here is small one year. If you have a horizontal line that goes across from the base of this sidewalk to this site. You can see that this I bought is actually much lower. So same thing than sidewalk here. It's, it appears here, but it's much lower. And using the placement of this sine box, you can draw the ADA sine what's in the scene. Right? It's something like this. Okay, so now let's try and use our pen to ink. Ink. There's our general ships here at the top of the shop houses. I have just ink over the pencil lines, so let's continue to draw. So this is the midpoint, the meat line and what is below the mean line, that area sort of in line there. So I'm going to draw that to, to draw this line. I am not going to draw from observation. I'm just going to draw that line pointing to the vanishing point. So that is how you use perspective to how you determined angle. So it's going to be something like this. And sometimes I like to draw some dequeues here and dare to help me identify where I am. In this case, I'm drunk this so this is the halfway point and this is tau, it is dislike that I'm drawing. This is actually this line. Now notice that there are some shelters here that comes out to provide shade for customers. So this shelters the lines here. They are parallel to the beauty. So D will go to the same vanishing point. So I can actually draw them like this. So for this angle, I would just pointed to the vanishing point like this. I don't have to think too much. Just pointed to the vanishing point. There are some cars. Maybe I should draw this particular car first saw NIJ, I'll just leave it that is done. Draw the details worse. Sign bots. Sometimes you don't have to be too precise for the locations of the sign boards, for example, because the US so far back, it's very difficult to get a precise location. As long as it looks like there are sign bots, it looks it's giving you the suggestion that there are sidewalks is good enough. So that's how you draw. This part of the building. Owner does draw the windows. So it's the honest windows here. The windows, the top and bottom on the windows, they go to the vanishing point. So that's draw. As rod is Windows here. I'm going to draw this part here. So this line here, this bottom line goes to the vanishing point. So with the help of the vanishing point, I can draw this angle very accurately. And at top angle was appoints to the vanishing point, so it's very accurate. And there's another set of windows here, come down like this. And Windows inside. So the angles at the top and edit bottom, they are really important if you draw something, if you draw the angles wrongly, it's going to look a bit off. So that's how you use Perspective knowledge to have you get accurate angles. If you're drawing from real life, you have to measure them one-by-one. It's very difficult. So there are more windows here, right? See to sign bought here and decide what is also in perspective. So I'm gonna draw that sidebar in this peeler here. This is a peeler. There is car here. Alright, this car is kind of challenging. I mean, cars, they are always challenging. The back of the car is somewhere here. And the line goes here and comes down like this. When you are drawing a car, tried to use contour drawing techniques. Look at the car, see red line's going. The heat light, it's here. Comes on like this as the wheels. All right. I think it's something like this. And this pillar here. Intersects the current right here. And this is the road curve like this. And this is actually the pillar of this building here. Like this. And this we have coherent as it always has a working doorway here. And this on this side of the building will go to the vanishing point. So we'll just draw it out to the finishing point. And it looks like there is a table here. A table. I can see the top of the table, so the table is lower than me. So the top of the table should go to the vanishing point as well. This and this bottom here, the shock front, that glass window is very difficult to see from the photo because it's very dark. The bottom of the glass window, this line here, because these lines parallel to the road, it's going to the same vanishing points. So we can just draw it like this. And see this line here is line. We also go to the vanishing point. And some of these shops, they have posters pasted on the glass. We know so that say there's a poster here. Now the top of the poster will go to the vanishing point as well. And the bottom of the poster will go to the vanishing point as well. So this is just a poster. So now we can just continue to Butte in d 2s. There is a car here and other car here. Now this car, it's half the height of this car here. So you have to draw it half the height. The bottom of the car starts right at the top of the tire here. So it's here. Will. And there is another car behind. You may not need to draw so much details. And we've cars, the more you draw them, the better you will get. So don't worry if it doesn't look like a car, you can actually just draw square box on the ROI. It doesn't really matter. Jazz mixture the proportion or risk, right? That is the most important. Alright, for all his buildings in background there are, it looks like there are lots of vertical lines. So we're just going to draw that some windows as well. Now another thing about perspective is four elements in the background. And they are foot away, they should be smaller. So sometimes it actually is better to just draw with a thinner line to give you the illusion of perspective. So I'm gonna turn my phone in pen over to draw with thinner lines. And I'm going to draw this building here. Like this comes up. Is. So, so you see this line here. It's a thin competitor, thicker lines here. So it makes, it looks as if this building is further away. And there are little buildings here as well. If you look at the Windows closely, notice that the bottom of the windows, they are actually horizontal. And a Tophat of windows also horizontal. And as they move down to the background, to the vanishing point, notice that the height of the windows, they go progressively lower and lower and lower and oddest windows, they overlap each other. So let's try and draw that Windows here. Those wouldn't windows that I have just shown you the belonged to this rectangular block here that I have already marked out with my pen. So this is the halfway point. So we have one window here. And as the window goes into the background, you can see overlapping elements like this. This. Of course, if you want accuracy, you can draw from observation. But now I'm just using my perspective knowledge to draw this Windows. And for windows here I'm going to turn my phone and pan around because is Windows they are so much smaller. And here I'm just going to draw those rectangular boxes, perspective rectangular boxes, K. So this is, this is pretty much, this is, I think this sketch is pretty much done. I've already gotten the proportion right. This sketch is starting to come to life as you add more and more details. Now, I'm going to draw the lamppost on the left side. So there's one impulse here that starts around here at the base of the demos is somewhere around here outside of the photograph. But the lamp itself, the light bulb. It's I think it's just right above here. Yep. That's right above here is actually right above this building here. If we measure the height of the lamppost to you, this building here, which draws on T2s here without us actually Window here. Will do is here. By the way, I am just drawing this to help me get the height of the lamppost. So the lamppost is right here? Yep. Just right here. Above this building here. So it goes down, Alexis curves down like this and goes down at this. Right? So this is one of them post, there is another lamp post right here. Right here. This is the light. And Islam pose will curve down like this and go down like this. Now, notice this lamppost, they are in perspective as well. So if we take a look at the age of the lamppost, you see that this line here, it points down exactly to the vanishing point. All right, so that's pretty amazing. And if you were to compare the base of the lamp post, it would actually go to the vanishing point as well. Like this. And there is a shadow line. What is the shadow line? The shadow line is parallel to the root, so it goes to the vanishing point as well. I'm just shading the shadow for you so that you can see. Of course there are some cars here not occur. That is POC right beside Islam pose, try and draw that in. That's measured at COD, height of that car. It's here. I am using this car here as a measurement tool. So this car here, it's some right here. Is this is this site. The top of the car. It's about one unit and a bottom of the chi is both two units. So this is about the size of the car. So that's how I measure the car behind. There is an icon BI, it's about half of this car like that. And for the background, I'm just going to draw some little lines there. Now for this site of the beauty, we have some of those Shelter again. There's one that's curved like this. Now notice my lines, they overlap the initial lines. Now if you want to avoid this overlapping lines like this, you have to plan in advance because this lamppost is in front of the beauty issued an overlap. I mean, the line from the butane shouldn't overlap. The lamp goes like this. So sometimes when you draw your shoot, planning and funds. Now the windows here, unlike the windows here, they are not, they do not have horizontal tops and bottoms, so you have to draw them from observation and from what I can see, the lines they angle like that. And here I need to draw another line as well because that's the floor. So there are some windows there as well. And these windows, you need to draw them from observation because the angles they are, they are different from these windows here. And I think this sketch is pretty much done. You can continue to add details, continued to add a Windows. But this sketch is sort of considered done. So the peelers, remember to everything that you draw. You have to use other elements that are already in the scene to help you get the right proportion. So just continue to add little d 2s. Here in dead. Who make the sketch our common life. So this is the completed sketch. I have used Perspective knowledge too. The angles of, of some of the lines that are sort of hidden or some dotted lines that I do not want to measure. For beginners, I would suggest you start out with a pencil first to mock out the vanishing point, to block out a general proportion to block out the angles. Make sure that you get those angles right before you start drawing. Once you get the proportions right, it's going to be much easier. And you can fill in the details within those shapes a little later on. The most important thing is to get the proportion right. So if you get the proportion of this site, Rome, for example, this is supposed to be two units. If you draw it like three units, it's going to look, the perspective is going to look a bit weird. Now I want to show you some of my sketches that make use of one-point perspective. So for this particular sketched or vanishing point is actually out of the pitch. So the diagonal lines, they point here to point here. That vanishing point is actually here. So when I am drawing this particular sketch, I would actually place my finger here to help me remember that vanishing point is here. And as I draw the lines like this, I can just draw them straight to the finishing point and I will get to angles very accurately effects I'm bold. Lines here. Sketch is a bit similar to the earliest sketch that we drew together. So take a look at the diagonal lines. They are pointing to the vanishing point which is here behind this beauty here. And audience diagonal lines for the windows and shops to shelter. They all go to this vanishing point, this managing area here. This is a cafe scene and the vanishing point, can you find out where it is? It's actually here. Just look at where the lines are going. So this is the table top, it goes here. Lines go here, and this table that's just beside me goes here. So the vanish point is somewhere here. Once I know that fashion coin is here, everything that I draw later on, I can just point those diagonal lines to the scene, to perspective would look, right. This is a sketch from a tall building and a vanishing point for this is actually all pitch is actually right up there. You can see these are buildings DE, are parallel to the route. So the vanishing points, they go up out of the pitch. For the homework of this lesson, take a look at the reference photos that I have provided and draw them. You can draw very quick. Simple thumbnails like this. Don't focus on the details, just focus on getting the angles right, getting the proportion right. And once you feel that you are comfortable with one-point perspective, you can then draw a more detailed sketch. By the way, I have created extra videos analyzing this photos. So after you have practiced drawing these photographs, you can go ahead and watch those videos to understand a bit more about one-point perspective. So that's all for this lesson. In the next lesson, we're going to look at 2 perspective. 7. Two Point Perspective Basics: Alright, I hope you are now comfortable with one-point perspective. In this lesson, I'm going to teach you the basics of two-point perspective before we jump into the next lesson where we have to draw in Tutorial 2 perspective, as the name suggests, there are two vanishing points and vanishing points. They are always on the horizontal. So let's start this sketch by drawing a horizontal line to represent a horizon. Alright, I'm going to draw arrows CT, cine using two-point perspective. Let me just please the vanishing points first, I'm placing them randomly, tried to keep them apart so that you don't get a lot of distortion. So let us draw or a skyscraper. I'm going to put a skyscraper right here, very, very tall skyscraper. And this is the corner of the skyscraper. And I'm going to draw this line here down to this point here like this. And this line will go here like this. And here I'm going to draw to this face here like this, and here to this point here like this. Alright? So usually fall skyscrapers, there are some sought of horizontal windows going on. If you wanted to draw it a windows, no data windows, they are parallel to the top and bottom of the buildings. So when you are drawing those Windows, make sure you point. Those are lines to the vanishing point. Sometimes I like to draw that line in the middle fist like this. And then I saw the fight like this, like this. And like this. These are your help keep the angles accurate. There's one line here. This is a horizontal line. And this line, like this. Yes. So all these lines must point to the vanishing point because they are parallel to one another. The lines here, if they are very tricky because they are actually quite close to del, horizontally. But if they are not on the horizontal, they should not be horizontal and they should have some sort of angle. So uneasiness thought off, how does skyscraper would look like? Let's say there is a big Bu bought on this building here. And I'm going to draw the top of the BU bought the poster here to definition point and a bottom. We will be like this. So, so you're gonna get something like this. Let's say you wanted to add and not abusing. You can do so very easily. Just plays the beauty of a site by site. If the face of the beauty of the Walton beauty not parallel, they should go to the same vanishing point. So for this particular beauty, and let's draw it half the height. This is, and this point here, it will come here. Let's say this is a very, very long beauty. So I'm gonna draw this a bit longer, like this. And this part here where it will be like this. So now we have two cubes or two buildings in 2 perspective. In a city there will be a lot of buildings and the buildings, they are not always site by site like this. Some of the beauty and see if you look at the top view, the satellite view, they are sort of rotated slightly. And because they are rotated, those lines, those buildings that are rotated, their lives, we'll go to a different vanishing point. For example, i, let me plays another vanishing point here to create an unappealing. So I'm going to draw another beauty here and disputing we'll use this vanishing point. And is being happens to use this vanishing point. No problem. Depending on how many buildings there are. You can just draw as many AES-128, but just pay attention to where those are diagonalized. I'm going. So let's say I have and not abusing behind here, that goes to a vanishing point here. And this beauty, we'll use these vanishing point. Yeah. So this is starting to come alive. It can draw some trees in the background. So this is a very basic two-point perspective. See, does it solve and outdoor scenes. You can also apply two-point perspective indoors. And now let's draw an indoor scene to appoint perspective also applies indoors. So that's draw or horizontal line again to represent a horizontal. So usually when you are indoors, you will not be able to see the horizontal eye because it's blocked by del, walls. And now I'm going to draw a room. I'm going to place the vanishing point here and here. I'm going to draw the corner of the room here like this. So the top of this room, we'll go to this vanishing point here like this. And here it's like this. For the other one, couldn't make it bigger so they can see more of the wall. So the vanishing point for this war is here, like this. And like this. Okay? So we have our two wars here. Let's say I wanted to put a painting, painting on this war. I want to place the painting high on the wall. And the top of the painting is parallel to the top of the room and bottom of the room. So that line actually goes to the same vanishing point here. So let me draw that. So let me draw the top of the painting here. And here like this, the bottom of the painting were pointed, a vanishing point as well. That's leaped up painting some thickness because it's using a wooden frame. So this thickness will go to this vanishing point here. Everything in the scene will be affected by the two-point perspective. So we have a painting here. Alright, let's say I want to draw a table. I won a table in this room. So the left edge of the table will be here. I wanted to table to go to the corner of this room. So it's going to, that line will stop here. But the angle of that line would be determined by the vanishing point. So I can draw like this. And this H here will come here. So I'm going to draw it like this. And let me draw this line. You see this lies, the angle is, is very close to the horizontal line, but there is an angle. So you have to get those angles right. And if you are drawing this from observation, sometimes it can be quite tricky to get those angles are right. K, I'm going to join this imaginary line here. And I'll maybe I should just use a pencil just to help me out. It's much easier like this. And this line will hear this. Okay? So this is how the table will look like. Let me give it some with some thickness. This is the bottom of the table. And this lake here, this link will also be in perspective. Its leg we'll stop right here. Is it is imaginary line that goes to the vanishing point. That's where that leg of the table will be. And the edit link will be here. Alright, so now we have a table that's maybe draw a lamb here to make it more like a room is hanging from the top. And now maybe let's draw or shelf a wash off. So for this particular wash off, I'm going to put some books on it. The top of the shelf is parallel to top off, does more here and a bottom of the wall here. So they will go to the vanishing point, the same vanishing point here. It's a very long shelf. Yeah, let's make it a long shelf. And this will come down come down. This bottom line here will be like this. Right? Now because the horizontal is lower compared to the shelf, we are able to see beneath that shelf, so we need to draw beneath the shelf. This line will go to this vanishing point. And this line will go to this vanishing point like this. And this is the thickness of the shelf. And this line here will go to this vanishing point. So far I am drawing this bays on imagination because I'm using basic perspective rules to help me construct this c. Let's give the Hsiao of some thickness before we put the books in. So we can see that there are some thickness to the shelf. We need to draw the thickness here as well. So this line here, we'll go here. And this is this line we can here like this. This line will also point to the vanishing point, by the way. And now maybe I can play some books here, maybe some boxes here as well. This is actually a very common scene. You will see this sort of scene wherein you can see two sides of the war. Whenever there are two sides of the wall, you will have a 2 perspective because those diagonalize the outgoing somewhere. This wall that I go lies there. They're going to division point here and here they are going here. Two sides of the wall, two vanishing points. If there is another wall here, there may be another vanishing point. And now let's take a look at some reference photo to see some real-world examples of 2 perspective. And the thing we have to pump perspective or any other perspective is we don't really look off all of them. That's why when we see subjects like Theory is we don't really think too much about perspective, but when something is off, when the angle is off, we know straightaway, but sometimes we just cannot explain why that is so, and that's usually is because our perspective, Alright, for this scene, this is a very typical law street scene. You can see the diagonal lines. They are going to do this direction here and here. So this is the vanishing point which is blocked by this peeler here. This is 1. So this is one vanishing point. And the EDA vanishing point is actually somewhere out here. You can see this lines here. They actually go out of the pitch. So when you have a vanishing point that it's out of the page when you are drawing. At least for me, I will always plays my finger somewhere maybe here. So as I'm drawing, I would draw two. What's my finger like this? So if I were to draw it like this, I would draw two. What's my finger? And notice this tall building behind this diagonal line is also pointing to this vanishing point. And this sine c, d psi here, this line and this line DE are parallel to each other. These two lines are parallel to this. So this lines, they also go to the same vanishing point on the left side. Here's another full whom we've have computing in 2 perspective. So does diagonal line. We'll go down here and we would go out of the pitch and here. So it, a vanishing point is somewhere around here. And a vanishing point for this line is that's here. And notice that there is this pot here. So this is the corner of distributing. Now, these line here and this line here, they are parallel to each other, but they are not parallel to this, this, these lines here as they are not parallel to this set of parallel lines. And because of that, there was actually another vanishing point for this two lines. If you were to draw like this, ought to, we. There's another vanishing point, right on the far left. But generally speaking, when you look at a scene like this, you look at a building like this, we have to lacZ wars. There are going to be two vanishing points, even vol, tables and chairs like days. We don't have really a thing about them, but they are actually in perspective. So you see this two lines, they are parallel to each other and just two lines we'll go, we'll go into the vanishing point and ride upside to photo. And this line will go here, and it will go here. The vanishing point for this two lines will also be offset with a photo. And you can see how the chairs are arranged. They are arranged parallel to the table. So audience lines, CDs diagonal lines, CDs, handle here. These will go here. And there's another hand DO here that goes here. So the vanishing point is somewhere around this area here. And CDs diagonalize for the chairs, the benches. They are pointing in this direction. These lines, they are all parallel, so they will go to one. They will go to a single common vanishing point. And also notice this seat here. You see this seats and the seats. You see these lines here. These lines, the angle of the lines, they are controlled by the vanishing point. So the angle of this piece of wood here as like this, and the angle up this piece of wood here that forms the seat. It's like this. When you draw this lines without careful and angles, it's going to look a bit off and notice the towels on the ground. They are also controlled by perspective. They are also controlled by the vanishing point. So all these lines, you can see this is all alpha like the main point here. And all these lines, they will rotate based on this vanishing point. See the angles, how they change based on the finishing point. And there is this line here and this line here that goes to the vanishing point on the right side. These are some of the things that we pass every day and we don't really think about them. Rubbish bin and slime bots, but they are also affected by perspective. So for the rubbish bin, we see diagonalize here and here. And they will converge somewhere outside of the photo as well. For this sign bought, the diagonalize here, and we can use the bottom of the feet here. The vanishing point we'll converge outside of the photograph as well. Now notice this curve here. This curve is exactly horizontal. This is actually the horizontal line. And when I took this photograph, my camera was at this level. My eye level is at this level. So when you take a look at the horizon line, any line that is close to the horizontal line is going to appear to be horizontal. For example, the CDS line here from the assign bought. It is AC exactly on the horizontal line. And because it's on the horizontal line, it's exactly a horizontal. But as he moves up here, these line becomes a bit too, that if you were to draw this line horizontally, this sidebar is not going to look right. The perspective is going to look a bit off and you will wonder why. And that's because the perspective isn't been off. And also notice the diagonalized Vada shop fronts. This line here. This line is parallel to line, to this line. And it was so to this line. And because they are parallel, they will go to the same vanishing point is long as well. They are parallel, they are going in the same direction. And that's see one on the diagonal lines. There are these lines like this. And this lines just line these three lines if they are going in the same direction. So they would go to the same vanishing point. Here's another street scene. We've some buildings in 2 perspective. For this photograph, I place my camera very close to, to grow as well. That's why we don't see a lot of ground. So this is the corner at the beauty of this is the diagonal life, or this building goes down here. This comes here. So the vanishing point for this building, for this side of the wall, it's somewhere out here. You can see it is shelter here. The lines they also going to at this point here. And for this side of the building, aligns to outgoing outside of the full graph. It is lines here. Now disputing here you see these viewing here. This side of the wall is actually parallel to this wall. So these lines here, they are going to the same vanishing point. And this line here, this line is parallel to this AB wrote parallel to this. So this lines, they will go to the same vanishing point. Now let's say I went to draw and not abusing behind his muting. I can draw like this. I will use the same vanishing point here. Draw like this as it, Correct. Yep, it's correct. And I will use the vanishing point on the left side. Draw like that. And there. And you will have a beauty that loops. We will not look out of place if you were to draw it like this. Because this building for those, the perspective of this photograph, of this scene. So those are the basics of 2 perspective. In the next lesson, we are going to draw a 2 perspective scene using the knowledge that we have just learned. Now the homework for this lesson is very simple. Just go outdoors, look around, maybe you kinda stay indoors and look at your room, look at everything and try and find a vanishing points for all the little things that you see in front of you. It could be a table, it could be a shoebox, it could be a beauty. Some chairs. Have a pencil ready, just stretch your hands out like this and measure the angles. Find a vanishing points vault and parallel lines, find a high-rise online. So that would be homework for you. 8. Two Point Sketch: In this lesson, we are going to draw a building in 2 perspective. Let's have some fun. And so this is the reference photo that we are using for this tutorial. Let's talk about the perspective for us. So I see some diagonal lines, S1 here, the most obvious one, longest one as one here in the middle of the beauty, as one here. Underground torpedos, they are standing on this diagonal line here. This line actually goes through the whole building and the roof line here. And there are some lines here as well at the bottom, but they are hidden by the tables and chairs. So this diagonalized, they are actually parallel lines in real wool. And this lines, they will converge at a vanishing point outside. Often photograph you extended lines they will converge at a single vanishing point outside of the full graph. Now disputing is in 2 perspective. There is not a set of parallel lines. Ks, they are diagonal lines that are converging to a vanishing point. So we have 123 and here as well. So let's try and extend deadlines as C where daikon virtue. And we're gonna use my pencil or pen to align the lines and see where it is. So in real life, this is exactly what I would do. I will actually halt my pen or pencil and try and find out where to finishing point is. And in this case it's actually here. Alright, so I can extend this line here, here and here. And this vanishing point is actually on the horizon, which is mostly hidden behind this beauty. But you can actually get a hidden here from this wall here, the top of the wall is horizontal, is perfectly horizontal. And this is actually the horizon line. Before we start drawing, let's do some measurements. So I'm going to imagine a wave of this building using my pencil. So this is considered one unit and the height of the building, it's about one unit plus maybe one fit. So it's taller than it is wider. And on this side is above one unit, class two thirds of this unit. And this part here, I would say it's maybe a quarter, a quarter of this our unit. And this side here is water. It's also about a quarter or maybe one that, alright, so now that we have established on measurements, we can draw, if you're unsure of the propulsion, you can stop with some pencil drafting lines first. So I'm going to draw the right of computing the longest vertical line that I can see. So I'm going to draw it like this. I'm not going to make this a very big drawing because I don't want to draw too much detail. So this is that line. And now I'm going to measure that angle line at the top. I'm going to stretch out my and locked my elbows and measure it. So the angle is something like this. This, remember this is called C dot one unit. So for one unit it's like this. I think it's something like this one unit and one unit will be something like this. So if we extend this line across, so this will be two units. So this is sort of like the perspective of the building. Try and get the angles right in the pencil links, which maybe is about here. And here to the bottom of the building. You can also draw a line across if you want to, to help you. And extension here on the left side, it comes out for Aum here. So it goes to the vanishing point on the left side. But since we don't know, we have to actually measure the angle here. And this angle is like this. And then we can draw all the way down. This is a small extension, so this, we fear will not be as big as this. This is just a penciling stage. If you want to do some correction later on, you can do so with your pen and ink. And here, this side of the wall, this angle it's about this angle is about 45 degrees, I believe. And from what I can see looks like 45 degrees. So I'm going to draw that 45 degrees. Or maybe it's a bit steeper than that. Yeah. So if you always be measuring, if you're not sure, just spent a bit more time to measure. And this will come down like this. And bottom on this viewing here, it will coincide horizontally with this pot here. So you can use this as a to-to get the proportional does pot here. And then this line here, you see this line. This line is actually the roof line and it should go through this booting. Noted I measure, I realized that I have drawn this a bit too high up. So this should be the actual line that goes this is the roof line that goes through here and comes out here. And my camera lens was not white enough to capture the whole buildings. So we are not going to be drawn to this part of the building. So we can leave that out. And there will be some tables and chairs blocking this part of the building. So we'll leave that alt. And this, this line, we'll continue here. You can use your pencil to measure it just to get the angle right. So it'd be something like this. And let's draw the horizon line as well. The horizon line is somewhere here. I'll be using this as a measurement two and horizontal is about a quarter of the height of this part of the beauty here. So this is the horizon line, or in the photo, this is the wall. And there are some trees behind. Okay, now that we have this proportion, let's draw in some of the other major lines. The other major law, the average draw is this line here, this white block here that cuts across the beauty in half. So that is very important. And this line is angle as well. So you need to measure the angle. It's pretty gentle is a pretty gentle angle. So it's something like this. Now I've drawn it a bit to horizontal, so let me just tilt it up a bit. And here the bit. Now we have these two lines here. We can use the horizontal. Let's just, let's just used horizontal and draw imaginary river faint line cross to find the vanishing point of these two lines, right? So you've been here. Here. I think it's here, right? The vanishing point is here. Now if I'm looking at the photograph, I will use my pencil to measure and find the vanishing point on the photograph and remember where it is on the photograph. So if I have this scene in front of me, I will use my pencil to measure like this, and measure like this. To see rare exactly is the vanishing point. It is right here. Alright? It's right here. And I will remember this vanishing point as I draw all the other lines, I'll remember this special point. So for example, as I draw on this white line down like this, I will point to the vanishing point. I, I did not measure angle based on the photograph. I actually just drew those lines down to the vanishing point. And this line here will be like this. For this line, you actually have to measure it in real life. And if you have a bashing point on the left side, it will make it so much easier to draw the angle of this line here. Okay, so this is basically the pencil drafting stage. If you are more experience, if you're already comfortable with this stage of this process, you can actually just draw straight with ink, which is what I'm gonna do right now. I'm going to ink over the pencil. Now as you are drawing, bear in mind. Pay attention to what are some of the elements they are going to overlap the building and leave those lines out. For example, there are tables and chairs here, so you don't have to draw this line at the bottom of the building, have to you have to actually leave that out. Then there's the roof, right? For this roof here. This extension, this little extension here that goes to the vanishing point. So we don't have to measure it from the photograph. We can't just just draw it straight to the vanishing point like that. And my right in there and got it wrong. So if you get the angle here wrong, you did not draw it straight to the vanishing point. The angle is wrong immediately, you will know something is off there. So that is the beauty of unknowing perspective. You can help, it can help you check your work. And r is this extension here again, the roof. So this time around, I wanted to try and get it right. I'm going to play cheat. I'm going to use my pencil here and I'm going to draw this angle or right. Alright. As you become more and more experience, more and more comfortable with perspective, you can draw those lines are very easily. So this will continue across here, stops right here. And this line, again, this line, we'll go down to dimension point. I am again using my perspective knowledge rather than measuring the angle in real life. So let's draw this line down. This. Actually the fashion point is bit further here. So I'll draw it like this. And like this. Right now there are some little details here. I went to draw those inversed. Just you give this sketch a little dequeue right at the start. So the roof is select is. I'm not being very particular with DTT using. I see that I am drawing really fast. This is a very fast sketch. Alright, so now that I have this, let's draw this line here. So this line will go up slightly like this to divide the beauty into half. So I've deviated slightly away from the pencil line, doesn't matter. And this will go up like this. Okay, so maybe I want to draw this horizontal line as well. And now let's draw the Windows. We need to do some measurement. This window is a lot of us say like this, there's, there is a space between the two windows like this. And there is this are little white pot there as well. That I'm not going to draw the white part. I'm just going to draw the window. And it goes all the way up about 1 third of the height, of this height. So it goes all the way up, comes down, and we know itself comes out like this. This angle, you should get it right. The top of the window here coincides with that top of the frame here. And it goes down that is closest. And this angle comes like this, goes down like this. This line will go to the vanishing point of lines. And there will be this window here because this window is opened, so we have to draw that in, comes down like this and close it up like this. There is some some depth to this Windows. So I went to draw that depth. This and that's broad. Rio's dare. There are some little details on the windows. Now, I'm using a phone and pencil. I'm able to actually tend to fall in pen or raul like this to draw the lines. So these are just some little details that I am adding right now. The most important part of drawing the windows here is to make sure that the gap between these two windows, this space here, this base here, and this space here, it's accurate. K dot E or down axis, this line that goes down, we'll go down to the vanishing point. I am not measuring the angle, I'm just drawing two direction points. So this is how you can use perspective to help you. So there is this, although we know here, is he does line here, this line here. I have drawn it at the wrong angle. So immediately I know that this is way off the line. The angle should be like this. All right? Not like this. And you can do some correction if you want to. Sometimes correction may make it worse. Sometimes may make it better. Really depends on you. Sometimes I may just leave it. And this window, this angle is slightly tilted upwards like this, comes down like this. And this is the other window that is hidden behind this window. Right? So for all the details on this window, I'm, I think I'm just going to leave it, right? Just gonna leave it. Now there are some little details on top that triangle. Now for my actual sketch, if I'm using this with watercolor, I may not draw this with pen and ink. I would just remember that this triangle of that, that I should not paint over because it's white in color. You see some of my lines, they are so a wobbly. It doesn't really matter if the wobbly or not, as long as the general direction that January angle of deadlines and the ACO erect the bottom of the peeler and bottom of the PLO. Here. They will go up all the way here. And they will go cross this line here. This is not a horizontal line, it's an angle line down here. And there is another, there are some chairs here actually. So maybe I want to draw the charis in. Let me just draw it up kilos in first. So this bottom part of this line here, we'll go to the vanishing point. And this will go up like this. And I'm going to draw it a cherubs in. I'm not going to be a very detail because in real life I would not be able to see the details. All these chairs. And there's this h here. You see this semi-circle thing. It will go like this. And it will come down here, right? And there are some steps here. This steps, they are angled lines. They will go in this direction. And peeler here. And this semi-circle thing. I'm still here. And a steps we will come right here. And there's this white peeler here. I think this is somehow reception for the waiter. And little details insight here, which I'm not going to draw. So that's, I'm drawing some additional tables and chairs. And we're just going to represent tables and chairs using little rectangles like this. Just keeping it simple. And the bottom of the wall will go to the vanishing point there. Make sure I get and go correct. Okay, for the windows on this side, I'm gonna use my pencil to help me out again. So this is the vanishing point. This is the window. Window here as well, is very, very difficult for me to see the details. So I'm just going to sort all of them. Draw them as much as, as best as I can. This table is very flat because of the perspective. So make sure you draw that accurately and share theirs. And make sure that a feed off the chairs they are in perspective. Let's see what I have left out. I am left out is up pipe here or this pipe here that goes your comes down here, goes like this. Now this pipe is actually in front of the building. So those are lines that overlap. Nowaday, look a bit off because the animal criss cross. I should have plan a bit better and loved those pots white. So Deck and draw this pipe that is above, those are lines. And I've left out a window here as well. So you see here flooded windows here, not a lot of details, but a father windows that are larger, doubt closer to me, I can see more details. And there's a tree here. The ranchers the tree actually intersects the roof right here. And this angle is this angle. This is just, this is just off. Alright? It's not pointing down like this. It should not issue actually point down like this. If you use a pencil to do disrupting lines are properly, then try and follow. Those are angles. Here I drew a bit too fast, so I made a mistake there. And there are some drainage dreams here at the bottom here that goes across like this. I'm not going to draw that because it doesn't really contribute to the font. So four lines that contribute to the change of form to the change off the plane. You should draw them in the four lines that do not like the dream on the bottom. You can actually leave that out. And in this case, if I'm painting with watercolor, painting the dream with watercolor, not by drawing. The train with pen and ink. So this is the completed sketch of the photo. Let's compare and see where we got it wrong. Okay. A street glands, I can tell that some of the angles are bit off. Like this line here is angle here. I believe it should be a bit steeper like this. So I kinda feel that is a bit off. I can see dies a bit off. It's more obvious here, this angle here, definitely off. You see, this angle is like this. But in the photograph it's like this. So sketch should have been like this, the angle should have been like this. So it really helps if you get vanishing point, right? And you can draw to us to finishing point. But this will still look believable because they are still using prospective concepts. These lines, they still converge at a vanishing point. So this will still look believable, although this will not be an exact match to the angles in this scene, I'm only concerned with those long lines and the angles for the little details inside. Once you are able to draw these lines accurately, the most important lines accurately and get the proportion right. While the details we then not as important compared to getting the propulsion right. And also to placement is quite important. Like the placement of the windows here relative to this shape here. That's why I divide it does sketch into half using this line here. There's actually more to this side of the building, but because of the cropped photograph, I'm not able to see this pot. But that's the good thing about drawing. You can choose not to draw everything. So that's all for this lesson. For your homework, take a look at the reference photographs that I have provided. Analyze them, you'll get angles, try and get the angles right. Look for the vanishing point, look for the horizon line. Now when you are drawing, don't be too caught up with the details. Get angles, get a propulsion right first. You can add that details later on. The most important thing is to get those angles and a propulsion, Right? So thanks for watching this lesson. In the next lesson, we will be tackling three-point perspective. 9. Three Point Perspective Basics: And in this lesson we are going to learn the basics of 3 perspective. We are going to look at some examples are analyzed them for you. And in the next lesson we will draw a three-point perspective. Seen three-point perspective, it's actually not as common compared to 1.2. That's because it only exit is under certain circumstances. It has to fulfill certain criteria before you can actually see it. And the way our eye works, the way our eye views the world, we usually do not see it as the name suggests, 3 perspective has three vanishing point. So this is the horizon line. I have placed one vanishing point on the left, one on the right, and I'm going to place one right at the top here. Alright. So let's draw or cityscape scene again, I'm going to draw building here. This is the H off the beauty, the angled line. We'll go to this vanishing point here. And this line will go to this vanishing point here and this line here who'll be affected by this vanishing point. So we have to draw it like this. So this line actually goes to dimension point up there, this vertical line. Since it's directly beneath this matching point, it's vertical and it's pointing there. And we have another line here and not align here and an underline here. So this is how this building would look like. And you draw some windows. So this is how the building would look like. It will look a bit VOIP. So this is not something that we usually see in real life. Let's draw another building on the lattice site. Okay? So disputing this next meeting is on the left side. I'm going to place the bottom corner of the building here and draw it straight up to the vanishing point in the sky. This is appalling muting. And there is another side of the building. So for this side, I'm going to draw it to this vanishing point. This is a much bigger beauty, so I'm going to draw it a bit bigger. And this line here will, like this comes down like this. And here this point here will go to the vanishing point. So you will be like this. So as joining it like this. And here, select this, comes nullclines is and where it will be like this. Okay? So obviously this is very warped, very distorted. So these are something that you may see if you are actually taking a photograph. Maybe you place your camera very low underground and have the camera point up, then the camera lens will work to give you this sought of our perspective lines. But in real life, if we are looking straight on at a beauty, we are going to see the beauty in 2 perspective rather than 3 perspective on the ground level, when we are looking at something with all eyes, we usually do not see things like this. It is usually happens when you are taking a photograph and you're pointing the camera outputs, the finishing point could also appear beneath horizontal line. So let's say this is a cityscape and now I'm on the 90th flaw of a skyscraper. So this is the horizontal line. There are lots of buildings are around here. And that is disputing that it's very close to me. Let me put a vanishing point right here. Alright? So I'm going to draw that building. This will be the corner of the building, will go here. This and this corner of the building with cohere like this. And come here. This, Alright. Now, this vanishing point here will contribute to this line here. And this line here is tell me by this vanishing point here. And this will control this line here, right? So this point here, we'd go to the vanishing point and can this, and we have an underlying here. This line here is controlled by this vanishing point. And this will go here. So it's something like this. And this corner here will be controlled by this. So I need to draw it like this. Alright? So imagine this is actually or skyscraper as well. Because you are taller than the skyscraper. You can see the top of this skyscraper building. And there are lots of windows. So far 3 perspective, the vanishing point can either be above the horizontal line or below the horizontal line. And for you to see this sort of perspective, you have to usually be very high up on a building looking down, looking below the horizon line. And then you should see this. So usually if you're on the ground level, you won't be able to see this and you will be able to see the earlier example. Let's take a look at some reference photos. Now bear in mind that some of these photos, they were taken with the intention to re-create three-point perspective. So some of these photos, the beauty and the scenes, they may not look exactly like this. For example, with this particular photo, I took this photo with the camera rather low Underground pointing up bots to bend deadlines in so that I can recreate that vanishing point right up there in the sky. In real life, these lines like this, these lines Fe are supposed to be vertical as in vertical like the H off this photograph type other vertical. But here we can see that this photo was sort of distorted and it lines they bend in slightly. So there's one vanishing point right at the top is very far, right up there in the sky because the lines, they are not bending like this. So I was still pretty parallel. That's why the vanishing point is very high up. So there's 1 is dy, and this is a 2 perspective scene. So we have a 3 perspective photo here. If you want to have a clear example of three-point perspective in real life, go outdoors and find a tall building and stand close to the beauty so that you can see the two sites of the beauty. One side and two sites and look up in the sky. So as you look up in the sky, you will be able to see the lines. They will go up into the sky. They will continue to go up into the sky, and then they will converge at a vanishing point right at. Right at the top in the sky. So that would be one vanishing point. And as you look at the top of the building, the two ages, here and here. And if you look at the bottom of the buildings, you will be able to see the yada two vanishing points. Sometimes they are very far apart, such as in this case here. But when you are looking up at a tall building, you will be able to see a real live three-point perspective example. And notice this lamp posts here. Islam pose is also affected by the vanishing point right up there in the sky. And here as it bends, it's affected by dimension point on the left side. Whenever I see a vertical line that is too tough, especially in a photograph like this, for example. 3 perspective comes to my mind straightaway. So it is will go up, it will go up, and this will go up. So that's one vanishing point right at the top. And there are two or more vanishing points at the ground level on the horizon. And here's another example of three-point perspective. I took this photo on a very tall residential block. So the red is the residential block that I'm at. His actually has taught us this. And from what I can see the horizontal lines here. So you can see this horizontal line. This is affected by the horizon line and it goes across the screen. And the vanishing point for this, you can see that this line actually goes down. And this also goes down like this. There is a vanishing point right on the ground somewhere as very far down. And this is a 2 perspective as well. Take a look at the diagonal lies on this building here. So this diagonal line will come here. And this will CDs lie here. This will come here. So the vanishing point for this building, it's here. And there is another vanishing point fall into this building here. Cds diagonal line here. And here. So does a vanishing point for this beauty shots from right here and all these little blocks right on the grow. Here's a close up. I can still see some diagonal lines here. And here you can compare to the H off to photograph which is vertical. And this ADA diagonal lines. Some lines, they are not going to be that obvious. They're going to look vertical. That if you look closely, you can actually go and measure with your pen or pencil, they actually tooted. And that's because they are affected by the vanishing point right? On the ground somewhere. It's more obvious if you were to, let's say go to the window ledge there and look down on the ground level, you will be able to see the lines converge at a vanishing point on the ground. Let's take a look at some examples of 3 perspective that I have drawn. Now this sketch was actually drawn with the help of a reference photo that I have taken at a very tall skyscraper. So because I've taken the photo with a camera or there are some camera distortion and vertical lines. They are all sort of bending inwards like this. Now if I were to draw this in real life, I would actually see these vertical lines as vertical lines, like really vertical lines. But to get a sense of height in your drawing, for me sometimes to recreate that sends out height, I may actually 2D the vertical lines inwards slightly just to get a sense of height. Even though in real life as I look forward, look in front of me, Those lines are actually vertical. So this sketch, for this sketch, it's actually this reference loaded I've shown you earlier. So we have diagonal lines like this going down. But in real life, as I was drawing, I drew these on-location. I saw it aligns vertically. Here's another sketch. This is actually just 2 perspective vertical lines. They are all vertical lines. There's no tooting. I drew this sketch on location at a very tall hotel looking downwards. But as I look forward in front of me to test the skyscrapers, they are all pretty Street. That's why I drew them Street. So if you want to draw three-point perspective, if you want to introduce 3 perspective in your scene, actually sometimes you have to make a conscious decision to introduce a vanishing point, even though that vanishing May not be there. Here's another example. Now this is a sketch of a very messy table desk in an office. There are lots of magazines around unless off books around. So let's try and find a vanishing point. So this is the h of the table and it points upwards here. See these boxes here. They point up what's here. So there is a vanishing point right here. When I drew this sketch, I was actually standing. So my eye level as here, that vanishing point is actually right here. And this vanishing point, it controls certain diagonalize. In this particular sketch, you can see this morning Terry here is monitored. The diagonal line is controlled by the vanishing point right up here. And if we take a look at the task and the bottom of the desk here, this line here, this is a table, the site off the table and it's supposed to be vertical but bends in. That's because there is a dashing part right at the bottom summary there. And that vanishing point also controls the angles of this line, this line and this line, and certain other elements in this scene. Now I drew this sketch looking straight on. If I were to turn left and turn right, I would be able to see more of the sites of the table and that would introduce more vanishing points. Is this considered a three-point perspective scene? Well, I'm not too sure. When I'm drawing this particular scene. I mocked out the vanishing point on the paper for a soda can draw those diagonal lines to the vanishing point. And as I reach the bottom of this sketch, as I was drawing disease areas here, I wanted to tip the lines down to the vanishing point, be low so that the sketch would look right. So it looks like as if I'm booking in front and as I looked down, I can see those lines aren't going down. Now. This also reminds me of another place where you can, where you can find a three-point perspective and it's just right in front of you at your desk. You can look at your desk and look down at your desk, twist a flaw and see where those lines are going, whether the licks going. For example, if you take a look at this table that I'm filming this video at, there is a vanishing point on the left side. This line, this line at pointing left, there's a vanishing point on the right side of this line. This line, they are pointing to the right site and there's another vanishing point right down there. At the bottom. It is diagonal line here, it goes down. This is also sort of tilted. It goes down as well. And if you move closer to your desk or sit closer, perspective effect is going to be more obvious as well. So this line here, we'll go to the left vanishing point. This line hand will go to the right vanishing point. So we have two vanishing points in 3D. And you see the licks here. They are going down like this. They are going down to another vanishing point. So those are the basics I'll three-point perspective. Now for your homework, I want you to bring a pen or a pencil and go around your house and maybe go outdoors and look for real-world examples of 3 perspective. They may not be easy to find. My tip for you is to look up or look down if you're just looking straight in front of you, a vertical line is just going to be a vertical line. And if you see diagonalized, you are going to just find two vanishing point. It's going to get you a 2 perspective. But as he looked up or as you look down, the lines may start to converge together to produce another vanishing point. So that's the all 3 perspective. And that's your homework. Just go around and look for examples. In the next lesson, we have hands-on tutorial. We are going to draw a scene in 3 perspective. 10. Three Point Sketch: In this lesson, we are going to draw a three-point perspective scene. Please download the reference photo that I have. Provide it so that we can draw together. This is the reference photo that we'll be working with all this lesson. Now I took this photograph with my camera very low to the ground pointing upwards. That's why I'm able to get this diagonal lines that sort of converge at a vanishing point right up there. Now if I were to look at this scene from location with my eye, these lines are actually vertical. Perfectly vertical is just that with a camera and a camera lens and the distortion, the lines look like they're bent in this, if you wanted to take photos or 3 perspective oil, unusable reference. Now, you have to point our camera slightly upwards to 2D those angles in. If you're just pointing the camera straight on those vertical lines, they will be perfectly vertical and that's actually how your eyes will see them. Okay, so let's try and find a vanishing points for the beauties in this photo. So I'm going to draw a diagonal lines to the sites. And here. There's another beauty here as well as one here. And this is also going down axis. So the vanishing point on the right side is going out of the photo. The vanishing point on the left side is somewhere around this area. I do not know the exact vanishing point. It doesn't matter. Read and knowing whether or not you know, the exec vanishing point, as long as those lines, they go to our area here that sort of converge with all these diagonal lines. You are mostly accurate enough. And this happens to be the horizontal line here, and this is also my eye level line. Okay, for the vanishing point at the top, we can draw this diagonal line up what's left is, okay, so you can see here right in the center of the photograph, this line here, it's perfectly vertical. And here on the site state the lies they bend in liked fear. So later when you're drawing, you should pay attention to debt. And also for this pot here you see the windows for this hotel. They are affected by perspective as well. 3 perspective, the lines that go up like this, and the lines here they go down Lexis. And this is actually a hospital. The lines like days SLL. So when drawing the lines on the buildings, you have to pay attention to the perspective. I'm going to show you how to do that later on. We will start the sketch by using pencil to draft out some lines to help us position the buildings. So I'm going to start by drawing the booting Nero to the center first. The left edge of this muting is vertical. And the line will go up. And from what I can see the line, it's something like this. Now to draw this line, you actually have to measure by citing, by observation. And this line as you draw down like this, it's supposed to point it to the vanishing point. It still looks very vertical, but is actually two tests lightly. So you need to have that little angle there and this one. And then as it comes down, we have to measure that angle again like this. If you make any mistakes at this point, at this stage, you can correct them with pen and ink later on. So now for this particular hospital, it has two roof. So we can draw the roof. I'm here as a little triangle here. And then it comes down here that this and follow this building on the right side. It's about two times as tall. And this lie it's tilted line that intersects right in the middle of the hospital roof. So this line, it's about the same height as this line. And this line here is diagonal line here will go down to the vanishing point on the lattice site. So from what I know, because it goes down to the vanishing point at the angle should be something like this. So I'm placing my finger here to help me get that angle right. K. And we have another line that goes down like this is also a tilted line and angle line here. I have to measure this because the vanishing points too far on the right side is very difficult for me to get that angle right. And this line here we'll go would be a two-tailed line. Right? So we'll draw that line there. K. Now this seems to be a bit more to it than I want it to be. So maybe I will correct it slightly. So depending on where your vanishing point is right up there, if your vanishing point is here, those lines here, they will be angled like this. And as you can see, those, if they're angled like this, is going to look very real derivation points actually right up there, right at the top there. There's this office block here, which is half the height of this block. Maybe these boys even higher. So control at a site of the block. This site here will go to the vanishing point and come down axis. Intersects here at a hospital. So disputing definitely, yes, a bit taller. If you are using pencil, you can make some little adjustments here and there. There is another office block here. And this angle will go down like this. And there's this little honeycomb structure beside this hotel muting. And this time around is lying here, will tilt to the right site. You would just slightly to the right site. It goes up. It stops here because this building is taller than disputing here. And it comes here, it goes up again and then goes like this. And let's see, you can measure disputing compared to a disputing, which I'm going to do so right now. It is exactly the same we've as disputing. So it's like this. And this line here, it will go down slightly. And a real point, wisdom right site. Because the vanishing point is on the right side. And we can see a side of the roof here. And it will go down slightly and come down like this. We can see these slight wall here and this angle here, this is a very steep angle, but we, you know, the vanishing point is somewhere here so it can draw two. What's that vanishing point and come down here like this. And there is another beauty here, which is lower compared to this building. And this is the tree line. This treeline will block the dequeues on. At the bottom. You can draw those details if you want to. You want to challenge yourself, but I'm just going to leave it like this. Okay, so now that we have the a pencil lines, we can ink the sketch. So I'm going to start by drawing this building here. I'm still going to place my index finger here to represent the vanishing point. So as I draw the lines here, I wanted to point it to the vanishing point. So this is the site here. Remember this ought to tilt lines and then this line will go down to the right side. It will go down to the vanishing point on the right side, on the far right. Terrorism not as site war here as well, goes up and is tilted line. Again, we go to the vanishing point. If you are drawing this for all observation on location, these angles, they are actually quite difficult to get, right? And now we can draw this line, right? This, we go to dimension point on the right side, which is out of the pitch, is getting a come down like this. There is an extension here. And this is the honeycomb structure that comes down and stops right here above tree line. I think there is a line here, if I can see properly. So on choice, on lines here. Now we have the basic structure of this del. I'm gonna divide it here because there is a line that runs down along the way like this. And let's draw a windows for the hotel. So the windows, it's going to start here. I'm going to draw all the way down like this. I know he stops here because if I draw this line down like this, it will intersect with the windows here. And as we go down all the way here and then come down like this, alright? So there are eight windows across. And as for the number of windows that go down, I'm not too sure. I don't really care. I'm just going to draw it like this. Half and half it again. And now I can 1-2-3, 4-5-6, and now I can have it again, have it Tophat and have it. And then I can draw a line across. So this is one way to draw this Windows. Make sure that as you draw the lines across, they sought all right, rectangles. Sometimes I may draw like this, sometimes I may actually draw this as outlines and Dan drawn the individual windows like this. Depends on your personal style. And usually if I draw like this, I may not draw order windows. And I may just leave it like this and give the viewer the suggestion that the windows, they continue. Alright. So DES is basically a stylistic choice defect depending on your personal preference. That's the name of the hotel, Village Hotel. Hey, let's continue to draw on this side. I'm going to draw the hospital here first. This hospital, from what I can see, this honeycomb structure is here. The hospital is actually lower towards the bottom half of this honeycomb structure. So, so notice I'm deviating away from the pencil lines. That's how the lines, how they help us. And is we'll go to the vanishing point on the right side, sorry, on the left side. The angles osteo, correct. Comes out like this. And now I want to draw this line here that goes down. It's tilted slightly. And this line here, this angle is like this and this line we are just going to 2D Das latently that has this little light teeth there. And then we draw the line down again. And this line, we'll then move down like this. So we'll draw like this. And we have another angled line here. And now we can draw the roof of this hospital. Does this little triangle here. I want to draw them in so that I can connect deadlines like this. There's a little angle here again, like this. So I have this, I can draw this on tall structure behind. This is an office block, a Gothic design with a Gothic design. So I'm going to draw it up like this. This is, we've turned a corner here. As it tend to cloner, This line will point down to the vanishing point. On the right side. There is a line here. To draw that in cities and all the little details they are actually not easy to draw and not easy to get, right? Air all fall vertical lines here. One. This is almost vertical, 234, as the lines move out, they're going to kill slightly in. And there's this thing that goes across. And once this building reaches here, it will turn like this. Basically, as you draw this structure here, pay attention to the angles of the lines. Remember where that vanishing point is on the left and on the right side. Because those vanishing points, they affect the lines here. And here. It goes down to the vanishing point on the lattice site. You can make this more accurate by drawing this a bit slower or you can add more details. We feel pencil during their penciling stage. So for me, I think this is good enough. Now let's draw this office block behind. Now, this line here. And when I measure it, it looks like it's not the same as this hospital roof line, its angle like this. So I have to draw the angles slightly down. And this angle will be the same as the angle here. Because because this side of the office block is actually the same as parallel to decide. In fact, I think my angle is not that accurate. It doesn't matter. I'm just going to leave it as it is. If I make more corrections, it's going to make it worse. So we're live in as it is. And now let's move on to drawing the tall building on the right site. So it is building wheels thought here. Because these are getting is two times the height of the hospital. You'll start here, goes down like this, all the way to the midpoint of this roof. So we've just connect, binds. And you go up like this. This line here is affected by the perspective on the left side. So when you are drawing this line here, you can make use all of your perspective knowledge to get the angle right. K. I think this is, this looks fine to me. And now I can draw it all the way down. There's this little pod to x truths out that stops right here. And as Liz little hole here on subtle debuting. And there's another hole here. I think I've got my proportion of bit off here, so it should be a bit squash. And it really doesn't matter. Then this will go to the right site. And now let's draw this angle like this. And I'm gonna go down here, stops here because it goes in, comes down. This does, this structure comes out like this. Not like this. There are three pillars here. 123 and this lined at linda S behind a pillar will be like this. And think we are pretty much done with does building here. We can draw in the sign the name of the hospital here. Okay, so now we can continue to add some more details. For example, I wanted to add D to use for this site here, I'm going to flip my phone and pan around and draw those Earth in the lines. And there is this part here as well. I'm going to draw this on lines like this. And make sure they go to the vanishing point on the left side. As the lines, as they move down, the line is not going to be more and more horizontal. So take note of that. Just make sure you point this lines to the vanishing point. Okay? And we have this little thing here that continuous from this part here. There are some vertical lines here as well. And for the lines here, and these are horizontal lines that go to the vanishing point on the right side. Now, for the lines here, I'm going to divide the beauty being half like this. So make sure these line goes through the vanishing point. And then half like this. And then like this. And Diana, we'll just basically if you induce alliance, this will help you get the angles of the lines, right. Because as you, because the vanishing point is very far on the right side as the line kids up, the lines are those lines. They are going to be angle and otherwise they're closed at horizontal, they are going to be horizontal. And now let's draw the windows for the hospital. I'm going to use the with my pencil to help me MacArthur perspective of this hospitals so that I can draw those lines properly. Grottos, windows properly. I mean, so this one, I'm going to start with this. First, I'm gonna tilt the line like this and then tilt it, turn the direction. So there we see a change in the surface. And the hospital, there are a lot of Induce. So I'm not going to draw all the windows on girls going to draw them like this. So I'm not going to draw out a window, so I'm just going to draw. And like this, you can continue to draw all the windows. So this sketch is almost completed. I wanted to add some more details here. On the side, there are some windows, vertical windows. So instead of drawing a rectangle to draw those windows, I'm just going to represent those windows with vertical lines like this. Sometimes when the windows they are too far away, they're too small for you to see. You can use a line to represent a window or a dot to represent a window. And 40 years honeycomb structure maybe I'll use dots. So this is the completed sketch. Now if you are drawing this from observation in real life, you have to make a conscious effort to actually 2D the lines in if you wanted to recreate that 3 perspective effect. And this effect often mix buildings often make latch structures look more majestic because you are looking upwards at them. But if you are drawing this on location, the lines here, they are actually perfectly vertical so you have to make that conscious decision to bend those lines in. And as I compare my sketch to dereference photo, I can see where some of the angles are a bit off, especially for this beauty. And here you can see this building is a bit, the angle is definitely different compared to my sketch. Neither of these are right or wrong because this photo has some camera distortion. And here I applied my own artistic license to bended lines a bit more. When you have a complicated sketch is important to get ships right? That proportion, right? The angles right, get those right. First. Don't focus on the details, focus on getting the proportion angles and a shapes, right? The reason for that is because if you get the ships wrong, for example, you get the proportion wrong. You drew this building smaller like this, then this building will be smaller. And this will also be smaller. So every mistake that you make or every element that you draw in the sketch is going to affect all the other elements that you are going to draw the later on and the details. Well, you can just add them later. So that's basically how a 3 perspective works. If you find that you need more practice, you can check out the reference photos that I have provided and draw with. And this is also the last lesson for this perspective cause I hope you have learned something helpful. Perspective is actually very fun. Sometimes it's challenging, but most of the time is actually very fun. My parting advice for you is next time when you are outdoors, maybe you're waiting for your food at a restaurant, weeding boyfriend all waiting at a train station or anywhere. Just look around you, look at your surroundings and look for those diagonal lines, find a vanishing points. What then? Find where's your eye level? Whereas the eye level of other people. And just really look at the world with what you have known on know what you have just learned about perspective. This would actually make you understand perspective more. Annie were really helped with your drawing. You can lend perspective by drawing from observation, but I find that to really understand perspective, you have to understand why prospective work that way is how it works. And when you really understand how it really works, then perspective will be put up your knowledge. And next time when you draw, you won't event thing off perspective anymore because it's already in your subconscious and it will really help with your drawings. So those are my putting thoughts. Thanks for getting this cause. See you in the next costs by. 11. Bonus Lesson - More on One Point Perspective: Alright, let's take a look at some photo examples of one-point perspective. We are going to have some fun finding the vanishing point. Now if you find that there is too much information to, as ZAB doesn't remember this two things. Each set of parallel lines will converge to a vanishing point. So if there are many sets of parallel lines, there will be many vanishing points. The second is that vanishing point is always on the horizon. Sometimes you may not see the vanishing point because you cannot see the horizon, but the vanishing point is always there. Alright, let's take a look at this photo. Let me identify the parallel lines for you, for us or this line here. And this line, they are parallel. So there should converge to a vanishing point. I'm going to use two rulers to help me find a vanishing point. Vanishing point is somewhere here. So it is a dot here. It's there. Now let's take a look at their shadow. Now this shadow here, this part of the shadow is caused by this part of the roof structure. And because the shadow is from this roof, this lines here, they are parallel to the roof. So this set of parallel lines should also go to the same vanishing point. Here as well. You can see that it goes to the same vanishing point. Now notice that this, this part of the shadow, the angle is different from this shadow here. So this is another set of parallel lines and the vanishing point for this to these two parallel lines here, they are going to be different compared to this two. So let's draw the line to the vanishing point. So the vanishing point is actually here because the lines we'll converge here. So the vanishing point is here. I'm not, I'm not sure if you can see it. But if vanishing point is here. Now, notice that this two vanishing point, they are sort of our site by site, they're sort of horizontal. That's because the vanishing points, they are on the horizon and this is the horizon is actually hidden behind, is beauty behind, hidden behind the trees. He didn't behind a cars, but there is a horizontal line across this photo. It's a bit challenging to see where that vanishing point is because this building, this building, it's quite tall, sorry. Because this building is quite tall. But we will still connect or the parallel lines and try and find a vanishing point. So using this ruler here, I'm going to draw all the way down like this. This is the top of the building and this is the bottom of the building, the site curb. So using this two lines, I can say that I can tell it tell straight away that the vanishing point is right here, is blocked by this white building behind. Now notice that there are many diagonal lines here as well. Windows from the air conditioning units. So od is diagonalized the going to the same vanishing point as well. You can draw like this and you can see straight away that they are all going to the same exact vanishing point. That's because all this lines, if you look at this meeting, a street on all this lines, they are actually parallel. And notice that this line here, you see this line here as this curve here. It goes vertically up here. So this line is also sort of like a diagonal line and it goes to the same vanishing point here. Alright, let's take a look at the next photo. Is photo is the same as the earlier photo but diminishing point is hidden behind cars. I'm just going to draw the mean vanishing lines. So this is the top of the roof. So the passion point is here. Now notice this roof line here. What is this roof line? It's almost vertical, like almost 90 degrees. So if you were to draw it straight to the vanishing point is going to look something like this. And we have a current here for this photo, for this house. This is also in one-point perspective as well, but it's not that obvious because we are looking at the building straight on. But if you look at the diagonal lines, you can get some hints that going in a certain direction. So let's try and find him where the vanishing point is. So this line here, we'll be coming down like this. And this line here, this line here will go down like this. So this is where they intersect. So this will be the vanishing point. Let's check, let's double-check. So this line here and this line here, they are supposed to be parallel. So that's draw and see where they go. So you can see that these two lines, they go to the same point. How about the peelers here in the bottom of the peelers, you see this Peter here behind it's actually a bit higher. Competitive is P dot here. So this Peter is actually going to displace here. We can actually draw a box here. And we can draw CDs cube shape here. This is the vanishing point. There. Anymore finishing points are diagonal lines. Oh, there's one more diagonal line here. So you can see this diagonal line. It goes to the same vanishing point. That's because this line here is parallel to this line, is parallel to this line. So this is a very typical tree and track type of photo. We can see the parallel lines here and this building here, it's parallel to the train tracks. So the parallel lines, you can go to the same vanishing point. So let's draw the diagonal lines to the vanishing point here. And for the beauty thing, I'm going to draw the top of the building and maybe the midpoint of the building. So you can see that let me zoom in closer for you. The vanishing point is somewhere here, and the vanishing point is actually hidden behind is train station. You see this part here does, is actually horizontal, but the vanishing point is actually a bit, is somewhere here. So remember earlier I said that when should you join the diagonal lines to the vanishing point? You can only join those diagonal lines to the vanishing point if you can see the horizon. And in this case, you're not able to see the horizontal line, so you should enjoy it. And this is how it should look like in real life. Here's another train track photo. Now for this particular train track, the track turns to the left side at this area here. Now that's drawed a vanishing point and a diagonal lines for this. Alright? The vanishing point for all this two parallel lines somewhere around here. As the train track tens it's direction. The lines here, they are no longer parallel with these two lines. These two lines here, they are parallel with each other. They are parallel with each other, but they are not parallel with these two lines because they have tend the direction. And if you were to draw the diagonal line to the vanishing point, let's see what happens. So this point here, this is the vanishing point for this section of the train track. And you see the train track, it turns right again. And there'll be another vanishing point here because there are now three sets of parallel lines. Set one, set two, set three. So in this particular sr, There are 31 perspective and the vanishing points. They will be on the horizon, which is somewhere here. But behind a beauty things behind the trees. Here's a very typical escalator scene or a stack he's seen. Now remember parallel lines, they should go to one vanishing point. So the vanishing point for this, and this is actually here. Now notice as the Handel goes down here, it tuns direction. So these two lines, they are parallel to each other, but they are not parallel to this too, because they have turned direction, the vanishing point is going to be different. And if we draw like this, like this, the vanishing point is actually out of the photograph. But there will be a vanishing point because, I mean this is a set of parallel lines. There will be a vanishing point, just that they are not indice. This is also a one-point perspective scene, but it's a bit tricky because the diagonal lines, they are sought of Eden. I can tell that it is, is a one-point scene because this is a road that leads to the back. So this is going to be a one-point perspective scene, but the vanishing point, not that obvious, that try and find a vanishing point and a diagonal lines. The first place I would look is under root our, we'll look at the root markings or the root curve. So in this case we have some root markings here. See the road markings. So the Roma kings, they point somewhere here. So the vanishing point is somewhere here. Now the second place I would look would be the roof lines. But in this case, some of these roofs, they are actually triangular, so it's not going to be accurate if you draw the diagonal line two to the vanishing point. So I'm not going to use the roof line, I'm going to use the windows and the air conditioning units. So C does air conditioning units. This line is parallel to the ground, and because it's parallel to the ground, it's going to the same vanishing point. So if I were to extend his line, I can see that it goes to this point and the bottom of this air conditioning unit goes to this point as well. If there is a DAW somewhere here, it will also point to the vanishing point. I'm not sure. I cannot see any doors here, all the doors I here, but it's not obvious. So let's say I'm going to draw a dot here. This is the top of the door. And the tail of the dog will go to the vanishing point. So the toe of the door is going to be like this. So if there is a DAW year, it's going to look like this. This is the last photo I wanted to show you. So in this photo, there are many diagonal lines. C1 here, here, here, here, and here, and here, here as well. All these diagonal lines that I have knocked out, they are parallel to the ground. And because they are parallel to the ground, they sort of parallel to each other, they are going to the same direction. And the vanishing point for all this parallel lines is a sum or a here. Now let us say I want to draw our beauty behind this shop houses. Let's say I'm onto drawer or taller muting here. I'm going to draw the top of the roof here. So what angle should I draw it? So because this is a one-point perspective, is going to be very easy. You just jaw line this point here. And then for all this diagonal line like this, and write down like this and follow their windows. Let's say there's a rectangular window. And we do that angle of the window at the top doing go window. We, we'd like this. Like this. Let's say there's another window. See how I am pointing this line to this vanishing point and was appointing this line to this vanishing point. Take note that the angle of this line here and the angle of this line here, they are different. Let me use this style is to show you. So this is the angle of the window at the bottom. And this is the angle of the window at the top, kissy, kissy to difference in angle. They are actually different. Let's say you are drawing this scene on location and you went to draw and not abusing that happens to be behind. You, draw the vertical side of the wall and you draw this line, the roof line. Now, if this building is parallel to all this beauty, if this side is parallel to this side of the wall, straight away, I can tell that this line, the angle is wrong because this line is parallel to all this lines should point to the vanishing point. The angle should be like this in state c. Even right now, as I drew this line, I can tell that it's a bit off. So at angle should be like this. Once you know the vanishing point, when you draw diagonalize, if the diagonal line is a bit off, you will know instantly. So that's how important the vanishing point is. 12. Bonus Lesson - More on Two Point Perspective: Don't focus on the details like things like this. Focus on the big ships first like this shape. This shape, this shape focus on getting the angles right, finding the horror eyes on finding the vanishing point, getting those long lines accurate. So don't focus on little details like this. The hat here, the words here, this person here, those are not as important. You can draw them at a much later stage. The most important things to draw and to get right, right at the start is the angles of the, the lions and the propulsion. And for this photograph, I also get the angles right? And these vertical lines here, they are supposed to be vertical, not tilted like this. This is camera distortion so that you can draw them vertical and make sure to get the size of this stop sign right relative to the size of the beauty here. So you can see that it's very big. So I get this right and also get the height of this beauty or right, relative to this beauty that you are drawing. Let's take a look at some examples of sketches that I have drawn that are in 2 perspective. So this is the grand palace in Thailand. This is a very long building. And let's take a look at the roof and see deadlines. They are angled. It go in this direction to the right side. And here you go to the right side as well. So there's this vanishing point, Sal to pitch. And for this side of the building, this angled line state go to this vanishing point, which is also outside of the page. Right? So this building is in 2 perspective. And notice done. There are a lot of people. Now I, while standing when I sketch this, so my eye level is at this line here. And my eye level coincides with the eye level of all these people here. So these people, they are actually around the same height as me. And notice these guy here, his eye level is higher. This guy is actually taller than me. Here's another sketch in 2 perspective. There are a lot details, a lot of colors, but don't let the detours and Calas distract you. You have to get the angles Darius, so that's fine. I'll wear to vanishing point is, so this is the horizontal line. This is almost a horizon line. Is actually, the horizontal is actually this line. So does light tails up slightly. When I sketch this, I will sit down on my portable student. So I was ALCI to quite low. So the vanishing point is somewhere here. So you can see there's this vanishing point here that affects this line. This is a very difficult line to draw if you're drawing from real life because it's very steep. And this green building and this pink building, they are sawed off site by site. So this line here, It's also the same angle SDS line here that go to the same vanishing point. And this buildings, the yellow and the blue beating, they have their own vanishing points and they go somewhere here. Yeah, there are vanishing point is somewhere around here. And you can see that they have angles like this and they have angles like this. So this is a 2 perspective building. So the vanishing point is actually somewhere on the left side. So for this to buildings and also DSI shelter here, they are all affected by perspective. You have to get the angles right in order for, for this sketch to local right? As for this angles here, well, they have their own vanishing points, but in this case you don't really have to worry about vanishing points because they are just too many sets of parallel lines in 3D. So you can just draw these based on observation. Like two parallel lines follow this and this. Just draw them from Jose Fusion folder, tricky, angled lines. You can use a perspective concept that you have just learned. Some scenes can be a mix off 1.2 perspective. Sometimes the one-point perspective is more dominant in such as the case here, you can see all the lines going in this direction, going into this vanishing point that is somewhere around here. But there's actually another vanishing point for this sketch. You can see the angle lines here. What assign here, here, here, here, and this table here. You see the angle IS they actually point up, what's up, what's my eye level is here and the horizontal line is actually here. So that's why the tabletops day out 4x horizontal. So just as my eye level and adventuring point is somewhere around here. So there is one vanishing point here, and there is another vanishing point here, and it affects everything in this scene. So the first thing that I do whenever I sketch something is to use those diagonal lines to help me find a vanishing point.