Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create a Retro Landscape Illustration | Helen Bradley | Skillshare

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create a Retro Landscape Illustration

Helen Bradley, Illustrator for Lunch™ & Photoshop for Lunch™

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15 Lessons (1h 26m)
    • 1. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Retro Landscape Image Introduction

      1:35
    • 2. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 1 Set up the document

      6:47
    • 3. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 2 Make the hills

      6:20
    • 4. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 3 Make the sun

      6:18
    • 5. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 4 Add the clouds

      6:23
    • 6. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 5 Add the lines to the clouds

      4:03
    • 7. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 6 Add lines to the sun

      3:36
    • 8. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 7 Lines for Center Hill

      4:14
    • 9. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 8 Right Hill Detail

      6:45
    • 10. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 9 Make the trees

      7:26
    • 11. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 10 Add the windmills

      5:10
    • 12. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 11 Add the buildings

      6:45
    • 13. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Wrapup and project

      3:07
    • 14. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Bonus Reuse Elements from this illustration

      7:28
    • 15. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Bonus Answers to Student Questions

      10:09

About This Class

Illustrator for Lunch™ is a series of short video courses you can study in bite size pieces such as at lunchtime. In this course you'll learn to make a retro landscape illustration in Illustrator. This project makes use of an entire range of Illustrator tools and we'll concentrate on tools and techniques to speed up the production of the document and also focus on organizing a document so it is easy to work with.

You will use graphic styles, custom swatches, brushes, transform and rotations, blends, symbols and more to create this illustration. The tools used are available in almost all versions of Illustrator.

More in this series:

4 Illustrator Shading Techniques - An Illustrator for Lunch™ class - Simple Highlights & Shadows

5 Hexagon Patterns in Illustrator - an Illustrator for Lunch? course

Create Color Schemes in Illustrator for Using, Sharing & Selling - An Illustrator for Lunch? Class

Create Patterns in Adobe Capture for Illustrator & Photoshop

Create Wreaths & Other Floral Designs - An Illustrator for Lunch™ Class

Designing with Spirals - An Illustrator for Lunch™ Class

Doodle Flower Design & Pattern in Illustrator - An Illustrator for Lunch™ Class

Draw a Hot Air Balloon in Illustrator - Fun with 3D! 

Illustrator - Design in Black and White - Create Positive/negative images

Illustrator for Lunch? - 10 Interface and Setup tips too Speed your Workflow

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 10 in 10 - 10 Align tips in 10 minutes or less 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 10 in 10 - 10 Type Tips in 10 minutes (or less) 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 10 in 10 - Ten Top Illustrator Tips in 10 Minutes 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 10 Layer Tips in 10 minutes

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 10 Pattern tips in 10 Minutes 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 10 Pen tool and Path Tips in 10 Minutes or Less 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 20 Appearance Panel Tips in 20 minutes or less

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 20 Color tips in 20 Minutes

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 20 Gradient tips in 20 minutes

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 20 Pathfinder, Crop and Cutout tips in 20 minutes or less

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 20 Recolor Artwork tips in (around) 20 minutes

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 20 Reflect and Rotate tips in 20 minutes or less

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 20 Things New Illustrator Users Need to Know

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 3D Extrusion Effects - Text, Shapes, 3D

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 3D Perspective Cube design and Bonus 3D star

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 4 Exotic Patterns - Quatrefoils, Moroccan Trellis, and Layered Diamond 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 4 Handy Patterns - Diagonals, Plaid, Colorful Dots, Chevron

Illustrator for Lunch™ - 5 Cool Text Effects

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Abstract Ombre Background - Color Scheme, Blend, Transform 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - All you need to know about Brushes in Illustrator

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Backgrounds for your projects - Sunbursts, Halftone, Blends & Brushes 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Banner and Award Badges - Appearance Panel, Masks, Warp 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Blends and Gradients - Blends, Blend Modes, Gradients 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Braids, Rick Rack and More

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Circle Based Patterns - Rotate, Blend, Multi-Color Dots

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Clipping Masks, Opacity Masks & Layer Masks

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Complex Block and Half Drop Repeat patterns

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Complex Rotated Repeating Patterns Made Easy - Using MadPattern templates 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create a Floral Alphabet character

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create a Nighttime Cityscape Image

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create a Plaid or Tartan Pattern

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create a Range of Triangle Patterns

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create a Retro Landscape Illustration

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create a Textured Dot Pattern - Transform, Vector Texture, Patterns 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create a Wave Pattern 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create a Whimsical Tree

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create an Ikat Inspired Pattern

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create an Isometric Cube Pattern - Shape Builder, Align, Pattern Make

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create Complex Art in the Appearance Panel

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create Diamond, Harlequin and Argyle Patterns

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create Guilloche Effects

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create Hi-Tech HUD rings

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create Perfectly Overlapped Rotated Shapes

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create Seasonal Ornaments - Learn new skills while making seasonal art

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create Stitches and Sewing Elements

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Create with bends and blends - techniques for icons, logos and more

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Creative Half tone Effects

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Custom Corner Tiles for Pattern Brushes

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Cute Furry Creatures

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Cutout Text Effects - Photos, Pathfinder & Text

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Designing with Symmetry

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Doodle-Style Heart - DIY Brushes and Nested Shapes

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Draw a Retro TV - Shapes, Texture & Sunburst

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Draw a Vintage Birdcage - Shapes, Transform, Texture

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Faux Tissue Paper Collage - Blending, Texture, Transparency 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Flat and Dimensional drawing techniques

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Fun Effects with Graphic Styles - Appearances, Brushes, Styles 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Fun with Scripts - Download, Install, Run

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Get Creative with Blends and Brushes

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Get Export File Sizes and Resolution Correct

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Going in Circles - Brushes, Blends & Transformations

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Gradient Background Effects - Find, Adapt, Create & Use

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Houndstooth & Rose - Vector Halftone Tracing & Houndstooth Pattern 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Illustrating Cacti with Custom Made Brushes

Illustrator for Lunch™ - I'm Seeing Stars - Fill, Warp, Clip & Crop Shapes

Illustrator for Lunch™ - In the Frame - Shapes, Fills, Strokes & Color

Illustrator for Lunch™ - In the Kitchen - Cartoon Art with Live Paint 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - In Your Face - Pen Tool Practice 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Layered Paper Style Collage - Gradients, Graphic Styles, Transform 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Let's Go Steampunk! - Shapes, Rotation, Textures 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Make a 2017 Calendar from Scratch - Grids, Layouts, Text, Patterns & More 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Make a 3D Y Shape Pattern - from paper illustration to digital design

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Make a Lace Pattern Brush - Stroke, Blends, Pattern Tiles, Rotation 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Make an Organic Spiral Pattern

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Make Art Brushes - Configure, Color & Scale

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Make Art Using Other People's Art 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Make Custom Organic Patterns - Transform, Scissors, Align, Pattern Swatch 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Make Retro Shapes - Pathfinder, Scripts, Rotation

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Make Scrapbook Papers to Sell - Patterns, File Formats, Marketing Materials 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Make to Sell Printables - Stripes, Grid, Lines & Isometric Grid

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Mastering Live Trace - Turn Bitmaps to Vectors

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Meandering Hexagon Pattern

Illustrator for Lunch™ - More fun with Scripts - Text to code, more scripts, more fun (trees too!)

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Multi-Color Faux Pattern - Patterns, Transform, Expand 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Neon Effect - Appearances, Graphic Styles, Fonts

Illustrator for Lunch™ - On (a pattern making) Safari - Repeating Patterns 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - One Design Concept - Many Variations 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pattern in a Pattern - Achieving the Impossible in Illustrator 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pattern in Pattern & Irregular Repeating Patterns

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pattern Know-how - Install, Transform, Recolor

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pattern of Lines and Dots

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pop Art Style Star Pattern 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Real Time Mandala Design

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Real Time Mirror Drawing - Symmetrical drawing

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Road Trip - Custom Brushes and Live Paint

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Roaming Square Pattern

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Seamless Repeating Texture Patterns

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Season's Greetings - Shapes, Brushes, Texture 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Semi Transparent Flowers - Scatter Brushes, Opacity, Blend Modes 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Sharing and archiving files - troubleshooting the pitfalls

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Sketchy Image Effect - Image Trace, Swatches, Sketchy Effect

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Something's Fishy - Appearance Panel Tips & Tricks 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Stipple Texture Effect - Grain, Gradients, Blends 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - String Art Inspired Designs

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Stylish Doodles to Make and Sell

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Type on a Path - Type, Paths, Shapes

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Using & Troubleshooting Bounding Boxes

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Using Photoshop Objects in Illustrator - Images, Shapes, Patterns and more

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Vector Textures - Vectors, Clipping Masks, Pathfinder

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Warp Shapes & Text - Envelope Distort, Warp, Gradients 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Watercolor Magic - Type, Downloaded Patterns & Brushes 

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Watercolor stripe seamless repeating pattern

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Whimsical diagonal line patterns

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Whimsical Scrapbook Paper Designs to Sell or Share

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Whimsical Text Effects

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Whimsical Textured Drawings Using Hand Drawn Brushes

Illustrator for Lunch™ - Zentangle® Inspired Pattern Brushes - Shapes, Effects, Brushes

Make Ditsy Patterns in Illustrator

Pattern Design in Illustrator Masterclass

Piping Effect in Illustrator - An Illustrator for Lunch™ Class

Rainbow Gradient Shape & Text Effects in Illustrator - an Illustrator for Lunch™ class

Terrazzo Patterns Without Drawing a Shape! - An Illustrator for Lunch? Class

 

 

Transcripts

1. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Retro Landscape Image Introduction: Hello, I'm Helen Bradley. Welcome to this episode of illustrative for Lunch creative retro style landscape. Illustrative for lunch is a series of Illustrative classes H of which take a small range of Illustrated techniques. You'll get plenty of opportunity to practice your new skills in the project you'll create. Today we'll create a retro style landscape in Illustrator. Now this project focuses on the process of creating an image efficiently. You will see how to harness the power of graphic styles, brushes, and even strokes to speed up the workflow. You'll also learn some basic organization techniques that will make working on an image with lots of individual parts just a whole lot easier to do. I've packed a big variety of tools and techniques into this class and all of these are going to be handy additions to your illustrated toolkit. Now as you're watching these videos, you will see a prompt which asks, "If you would recommend this class to others." Please, if you are enjoying the class and learning from it, would you do two things for me? Firstly, answer yes, that you would recommend the class and secondly write even in just a few words, why you're enjoying the class. These recommendations help other students to say that this is a class that they too might enjoy and learn from. If you'd like to leave me a comment or a question, please do so. I read and respond to all of your comments and questions. I look at and respond to all your class projects, so if you're ready now let's get started creating our retro style landscape here in illustrator. 2. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 1 Set up the document: We'll start her landscape drawing in Illustrator. I'm going to create a new file. I'm just creating one that's 1920 by 1080 pixels in size, that is screen size. I'm working in RGB color mode, and I'll click "Create." Now I want to set up some colors to use, and I'm going to use global colors just because they make it a little bit easier to change colors later on if you need to. So I'm going to open up the swatches palette and I'm going to select everything that's in the swatches palette right now and just get rid of it. Basically you can clean out the swatches palette and the only things that are going to be left are the none and this register. I'm just turning this off here too so that I've just got everything nice and clean. Now I'm going to import the swatches that I have created and I'm going to give you this swatches file too, just to save a bit of time. I'll open up the flyout menu, choose open swatch library and go down here to user defined. I've already saved this in a file called landscape, and here it is. So these are my color swatches and they've been created as global colors. I'm going to show you before we go any further, how you can do that yourself. So you're just going to open up that swatches panel and just drag everything into the swatches panel and that's going to be your swatches. These are all set up as global colors. Now, let's go and create a global color just so you know how to do it. I'll double click on the fill here just so I can choose a color. I'm going to choose a pink color and I'll just click "Okay." So that is now my fill color. Forgotten my swatches palette. I can just click here on New Swatch. What Illustrator assumes is that I want to take this fill swatch, the one that is at the foreground here and do something with it. What I'm doing is I'm going to set it as a global color and I'll just click "Okay." Now it's added to my swatches as a global color. Now the beauty of global colors is this, if I go and create a whole series of shapes using that particular color and even if I don't have the shape selected, if I go and change the global color, I'm going to turn preview on here, the shapes all change color because it's a global color. That's why with a very large drawing, you probably want to be working with global colors. So let's just get rid of all of this. I'm going back to my default colors here, don't need this and so I'm just going to delete it. So I'll give you all of these swatches so that you have something that you can work with. We're going to start at the bottom, and of course at the bottom of the image is the background, and the background is going to be the sky. So I'm going to click here on the rectangle tool. I'm going to add a rectangle that is the document size, which is 1920 by 1080. If your document's a different size, just create a rectangle that is the size of your document. I'm going to use my global color blue here. I don't want it to have any stroke, and I want to align it to the art board. So let's go to the align tools. You can get to this by choosing window and align. Hit the flyout menu here, click "Show Options." Make sure align to art board is selected so that when we click here on the horizontal align center and vertical align center options, our rectangle is centered over the art board. Since it's the exact same size as the art board, it's neatly tucked on the art board. Let's go to the layers palette, because what we're going to be really careful about in this project is labeling everything because it's really easy for things to go haywire really quickly. So I am going to call this background. I'm also going to lock it down because there's nothing I need to do to this background and I certainly don't want to be selecting something and have it move. So I'm going to lock it. Now the other thing I'm going to do is I'm going to create what's called a clipping mask. So let's just go and get the rectangle tool again, click again in the document. Again make a 1920 by 1080 rectangle. Click to create it, and then align it perfectly over the art board. So here in the last pallet, I've got two rectangles, they're identical. One's going to be my background and this one is going to be what's called a layer clipping mask. Now, it's really important that you deselect everything before you go any further. What you're going to do is just click on this layer. You're not clicking any of these icons here. You're not clicking to select anything else but what you're going to do then is open the flyout menu and choose "Make Clipping Mask." What that does when I select that, is you'll see that this rectangle on the top is now a no fill, no stroke rectangle and it's got an underline underneath it. What's happened is that this is like creating a regular clipping mask, but this is a clipping mask for a layout. So anything I draw that is drawn outside this layer, even though this is a fill blue shape, have a look and see, it doesn't show up. Because this clipping mask here is clipping everything to that size rectangle. So only if a shape is here, let's just recolor this one, only if a shape is actually inside this rectangle that we've created, this one here that's the clipping mask, will it show up. So if I put this one over the edge here, the only bit that shows up is the bit that's inside this rectangle. Now, layer clipping masks are a really, really good thing to use for a project like this, because we've got bits and pieces that go over the edge. They're going to be clipped. We are going to make some bits and pieces that are going to go over the edge. So this clipping mask is just going to make it so much easier for us to work on this project. Now, when you create a layer clipping mask, the rectangle though, the shape that you're going to use for that layer clipping mask has to be at the top. But once you've actually created it, it can be anywhere. So you have to put it at the top to create it. But once you've created it, you can take it away anywhere. Just the fact that it's got this underline underneath it, it's being used as that clipping mask. So let's call this clipping mask, don't touch me. Okay. So this now has a warning. It's clipping mask, don't touch me, we can lock it down. It's not going anywhere but it is going to operate to clip everything on this layer for us so it's going to work perfectly. That's another one of the techniques that's really handy to have when you're working on an image of this size and of this complexity. 3. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 2 Make the hills: We're now ready to create a hill, so I'm going to zoom out a little bit so that I can see my Artboard. The reason for this is that when I draw my hills I need to go over the edges of the Artboard because the transformation effect we're going to use on the hills would be visible in the area where the hill intersects with the edge of the Artboard if it doesn't actually go over the edge of the Artboard, so we're going to draw a bigger hill than we really need. I'm going to the pencil tool, just selecting it here and I'm going to double click, you can see that I've got it set to nearly smooth but not quite and I've also got close paths when ends are within 15 pixels select it. So that it's actually going to close up to a solid path, it's going to be a closed path. I'm going to start drawing out the edge here and I'm just going to draw, the first of my three hills, going over the edge of the Artboard because that's really important. So that's one of my hills, let's draw the second one. So there's one on the left, one on the right, and there's going to be one in the middle. we can move this a bit later on if we need to. Let's go and target the first of these hills and we're going to name them in the last pallet because that's going to help us with the organization later on if everything is named and labeled properly. So this one I've got selected is the left hill. This one here is the right most hill, and the last one is the center hill, so let's work first on the left hill over here. I'm actually going to drag it to the very top of the last pallet right now so that we'll be able to say the effect properly with it selected I'm going to the appearance panel, you can see it has a one point stroke and has no fill, well, I'm going to add a fill and I'm going to select one of these green colors. I'm going to add a second fill and the second fill here, I'm going to choose the bottom most of the two fields because these are both identical right now, I'm going to set the bottom most one to white. So the green one on the top and a white one on the bottom and you can't see the white one on the bottom because it's hidden by the green one on the top. I'm also going to duplicate the stroke, they need a spare stroke as well, so let's take this stroke and let's drag and drop it onto the new icon. So I've got two black strokes, a green fill and a white fill. Well, I'm going to start working on this stroke first, the second of the strokes, I'm going to target it so it's selected and I'm going to choose Effect Distorted and Transform and then Transform, I'll turn preview on. I want four copies of this and I'm going to move this, stroke horizontally about five pixels, probably a little bit more, maybe six and I'm going to move it vertically in a negative direction, I'm going to go up about minus four pixels, now it's important that we go up or we wouldn't be able to say this effect, so six pixels horizontally and minus four pixels vertically. I'll just click. So inside the stroke here is this transform, and this transform is what's creating the repeated lines. Now I want to do the similar transformation to this fill down here, so what I can do is borrow this transformation and put it down here. So I'm going to make a duplicate of this I'm going to click on it and drag it onto the new icon, it's got a double transformation if you like, right now but what I'm going to do is take the second one from the stroke and put it in the fill. I'm just opening up the fill here and then take the transformation and just dump it in there, so now I have my line transformed and my fill transformed, I've got this interesting edge effect. Now I've got this heavy stroke effect happening here. If I select my mountain and/or my hill and take this transformed stroke and put it behind the green fill then I'm going to get a nicer edge, so we're just really ordering the stacking order of all these effects, so that we get the effect that we're looking for. A single stroke on the top and a green fill and underneath that is a transformed stroke with four individual transformations and a transformed fill with four individual fills. We've done a lot of work in creating this one hill and the good thing about this is that we can actually take this transformation of all these effects and we can just put them on the other hills, and we're going to do that by creating this as a graphic style just so we can use it over and over again. So I'm going to open up the graphic styles panel, I have this hill select, I'm just going to click here on, New and that adds this hill effect, the color and all the transformations as a graphic style, so now let's go and select this hill here and apply the style to it and this hill here and we'll apply the graphic style to it. Now the layering is not correct, but all the formatting is just fine. we'll take this right most hill here and we're going to bring it out to the front. So that's pretty much the look I'm looking for in my hills, except the colors are not quite right, so what I'm going to do having created all this look of the hills using a graphic styles. I'm just going to select the hill I wanted to make a change to and all I need to do is to change this fill, this green fill to something different, and it's got a totally different color, but the effect is being applied to it just by using that graphic style. So let's go to the center hill and to the appearance panel and I'm going to make it, well actually I'm going to send it back to that same color and let's just go and get this hill and do something a bit different to it and these hills can be moved around so you can adjust their placement and their height as you wish. 4. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 3 Make the sun: The background of our landscape is going to incorporate a sort of flaring sun. We're going to start creating the sun right now. Now it's going to be easier for us to work with the sun if we lock everything else down. I'm just going to lock down all the hills so nothing else moves. I'm going to select the polygon tool. I'm going to click once in a document and make a three-sided figure. Just ignore whatever the radius is, just select that as the radius. We're going to fill this with a yellow color and it's not going to have any stroke at all. Now I'm going to size this. I'm also going to zoom out even a bit more than I was before. Now I'm not really happy with the placement of that center mountain, but I'm just going to ignore that for now. But I want my sun flare to be sort of centered in the document. I'm looking at about that as being the placement of it. Now it's a really big shape, but we're only seeing the bit that's actually inside the clipping mask, but that's just fine. We're going to select on this and we're going to choose Effect to distort and transform, and then Transform. You'll turn preview on and there's nine little boxes here, and you're going to select the one in the top middle. What that's doing is setting this as the rotation point around which we're going to rotate this triangle. Now I want 19 copies because that means 1 original plus 19 copies is 20 in total. I'm going to type 360 divided by 20 to get the number of degrees I need to transform this to make it even all the way around, and I'll press the Tab key to move away from the angle dialogue, and you'll see the Illustrator has now updated my sun flare. Now if everything looks the way you want it to look, if you've got enough rays and you're pretty happy with it, you can just click Okay. This is editable so you could make skinnier rays or thicker rays by just adjusting the size of this triangle. If you want more rays, then you're going to need to go back to the transformation and edit it. With a triangle selected, you'll go back here into the appearance panel and click on the Transform entry here, turn preview on and now you can adjust these values if you wish. But I'm happy with the one that I've got here now. Just might widen it a little bit. This is going to be my sunburst, I need to move it behind this middle mountain. Let's go and get it and move it behind the hill. At this point, I think that my hills need a bit of rearrangements so I'm going to do that. We're going to target each hill in turn and I just want to move this one over a bit. I'm going take the left hill out here a bit more, and the center hill, I want to move just a little out of the way so that I can get my sunburst to sort of sit over the edge of the hill. Now let's go and grab the sunburst and let's move that a little bit more into position. I really want the center over it just behind the hill. Now I can zoom into this image just a little bit more, and with the sunburst, what I'm going do is I'm going to add an effect to it. With the sunburst still selected, in fact, it's not a sunburst, it's just a triangle that has been rotated around, I'm going to choose Effect, Stylize, and then Outer Glow. I'm going to turn preview on and I'm going to select a glow color which is going to be from my color swatches. It's going to be the yellow color that I've been using. Here's my yellow color. I'm going to add a glow of the exact same color and click Okay. Now I've got it set to screen blend mode. That means it's going to have a lightening effect. I've got the opacity set to about 60, but I might want to increase that. I can obviously take it up to a 100 if I want to, and I can also increase the blur value. I might do that to about 30 and just see how that's going to look. Once you're happy with the effect that you've got, just click Okay. At this point, I'm going lock down my sunburst just simply because that polygon thing at all the time is going to be a real irritation. I'm going to add a small circle over the top of the center of the sun. I'm going to the ellipse tool. Let's try and drag out a circle holding the Shift key so that it is a perfect circle. Now it's inheriting the same color as the sun, that's fine; that's what I would want, and I'm going to feather it. I'm going to choose Effect and then Stylize, and then Feather. Feathering is just softening the edges. Let's click on Preview and this is the kind of effect that I want. I want just a little bit of a flare, so I'll click Okay. Now this is at the top of the last stack. It needs to come down so its just sitting on top of the sun, but behind the mountains. At this point we can just move it into position. I really want it pretty much over where the center of the sun is. I'm going to lock down my mountains right now because I don't want to be able to select anything, and let's call this center of sun and and this is the sun. Now at this stage, we could group these two. Because they are the sun, I'm going to select both of these objects and then choose Object Group. The reason for grouping this is that wherever the rays of the sun go, the center of the sun's is going to go with it. It just makes good sense to actually group them at this stage. Then the group is going to be called sun. Again, I'm going to lock it down because I don't want to see it as I'm working. 5. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 4 Add the clouds: Now one of the really fun and cool parts of this illustration is the cloud, so I think it's about time that we attack the clouds. I'm again going to use the pencil tool and I'm going to sit with the value that I had for smoothness. I'm going to draw out my clouds, now, this is the point at which you don't want to be too careful but I suggest that you create clouds that have about four bumps. You're going to create two little bumps, a bigger one and then a small one and then the bottom, we're actually going to add the bottoms of the bumps to our clouds here because that's going to give us an interesting effect later on. Now I've lost my cloud, I can't see it but if I click on it in the last panel, I'll be able to see it and I'm going to fill it with white. There's the first of my clouds, I'm going to create a couple more. Again select it over here in the paths palette and fill it with white. Now, the less scientific you are with the clouds, the better they going to look, you really want them to look whimsical and a little bit on the cute side. Now, I'm a little bit worried about this one because it's got a bump on it, so I'm going to select it with the selection tool and I'm going to the smooth tool because with it selected, I can just smooth out that bottom edge. I don't have to re-draw it, I just need to smooth it out. Now this one's also got a bit of an overlap in here and that's probably not going to apply well with the effect we're going to use in a minute. I'm just going to re-adjust the handles on this curvy bit, just so that the twist is gone and I'll double-check to make sure that there are no twists in any of the other clouds. They all look pretty good to me. Having created the clouds, we can now go and use the graphic style to format them, so I'm going back to my graphic styles panel and I'm going to click to create the exact same graphic style for the cloud as we created and used for the mountains. Now, I'm a little bit unhappy with that, I think that the spacing is really out here, so I'm just going to undo that. Let's go back to one of these mountains and let's just do an adjustment on it, let's actually go to the left hill and I'm going to go to the appearance panel, with window and appearance and I'm going to adjust these transformations, I'm going to bring back down the size. I'm going to do four pixels and minus three and I think that's a bit better, in fact, I might do three and three and click "Okay" and then I'm going to do the exact same transformation here on the white fill. I'm going to do this as three and minus three, much happier with that. This is now going to be my graphic style, let's just click away from that shape, let's get rid of this graphic style and let's go and create this one as the new graphic style. Now we can click each mountain in turn or each hill in turn, provided we've got it unlocked and we can apply the graphic style to it. I'm going to do the coloring in just a minute but let's now go through the clouds and let's see how the graphic style works on the clouds, I think it works a whole lot better. Now, we don't want green clouds, we want white clouds but that's easily solved. With the cloud selected, I can go to the fill here and I'm going to make the front fill white as well as the back fills with white. Now it would be possible at this stage to even decrease the values that we've got in the clouds to make them a little bit different to the hills but still using the same basic technique and I think I'm going to do that right now. I'm going to take the stroke white down to about 0.5, so I'm going to decrease both these stroke whites and I'm going to the transforms and I'm going to drop them back down, 2.5 because we can do half pixels, we just need to type them in. I've got a transformation on this strike, I've got a transformation here on the fill which is not right, so rather than actually adjusting this one, I'm just going to trash it and I'm going to make a copy of the one I do like and just move it down to this fill. Now I've got a transformation for my clouds, it's marginally different to the one that I used for the mountains but it's the same basic philosophy, it's just the distances are a bit different. Now, it would be off at this stage to make this as a graphic style so I can use it on the other clouds. With it selected, I'm just going to click here on new, so this is my cloud graphic style and I can name graphic styles by just double-clicking on them and applying a name to them. Now let's go and get the other two clouds and just apply the graphic style to them. At this point, I'm going to start moving my clouds around and I might also adjust the size of them now. If you find when you've increased your cloud that the spacing on the effect has actually changed, just go back and reapply the graphic style because that one has the 2.5 and minus 2.5 adjustments in it. When you size up a shape, you may find that the effects of scaling up as well, will just reapply your style, it's very, very easy to do. Now with this one, I want it behind the mountain, so I'm just going to drag it behind the right most hill and the cloud now appears behind the hill. Again, you'll probably want to name your cloud so it's easy for you to work out where each of them is in the illustration. 6. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 5 Add the lines to the clouds: In the last video, we created the clouds and because I've got my clouds already settle now, I know that might stroke. My outside stroke is half a pixel. We're going to add some additional embellishments to the Cloud. Let's just zoom in at this point. I'm going to the Pencil tool. I'm going to turn off my fill. I'm going to have a stroke only. I set my stroke to half a pixel. I think that's a smooth tool right now. With a Pencil tool, I'm just going to draw a few little dashes inside my cloud. I'm going to try and follow the edges of the cloud. But I'm not overly worried if they're not perfect, I just want them to be okay. If they're not okay, just press "Control" or "Command" C just to remove them. Now, once you created these lines in your clouds, you'll want to go and select the lines and actually gather them up together so that you can make up your last palette, so I'm going to select one of the lines. Let me just go and click on this one. I'm going to choose "Select" and then "Same", and then choose "Fill and Stroke". That's going to select all of the lines. You can see that they're all selected here in the last palette, because they all share the same fill and stroke. I'm going to choose object "Group", because I want these all to travel together. These are going to be the lines for the cloud that's over here on the very left. Let's put this group over the top of the left cloud, which is an appropriate layering because we want these lines here to be behind this cloud here. This is the left cloud lines and this is the left clouds. Let's just call those left cloud lines, and we've got a left cloud. I'm going to select both of these and I'm going to group by those. I now have a group that is called the left cloud. If we open up that group, it's got a group of lines and the cloud itself in it. Again, nice, neat, and tidy operation. You'll go ahead now and create those extra little lines for the middle cloud and the right cloud, group the lines for each cloud together, and then group the lines and the clouds together. That will enhance the look of the clouds as well as ensuring that you have a really nice and neat layers palette. Now, I've gone ahead and I've created the line work for the second cloud. But if I select one of these lines and go and select all the other lines that share the same fill and stroke, I'm going to be selecting the lines that belong to this cloud over here. Here's a slightly easier way of working with a whole series of lines that you want to do something with. The way of doing that is to go down to the bottom of the last palette and just lock everything else down. If you lock everything except for these lines, then you can very quickly and easily select the lines by just clicking on the layer itself. Because everything else is locked down, the only things that you can select are the things that are not locked down, which are your lines. Let's go ahead and group them. These are now the lines for the middle cloud. Now, we want to group the lines for the middle cloud and the middle cloud. We can't group them while it's locked, so we have to unlock it, select both of those, and then go ahead and group them again and again, name it. I'm going to go ahead now and I'm going to create the lines for the third cloud and we'll come back in the next video to continue the work with our landscape. 7. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 6 Add lines to the sun: I've gone ahead and finished the lines on the rightmost cloud. Now to do that, I moved the cloud out of the way of the mountain. Having completed the cloud, I can now go and put it back. Now the reason for doing that is that if I want to later move the cloud, I don't want to just have lines that were visible. I want to have lines also available on the hidden parts of the cloud, just so that I don't have to reproduce them later on. Having completed our clouds, let's go and look and see how we can create a similar embellishment for the sunrise here. What I'm going to do is I'm going to set the stroke here to this dark brown color. I'm going to set my line weight to about half a pixel. I am going to the line segment tool. I'm going to drag out, a series of lines that follow the lines in the sun. These are going to be of varying lengths. We're going to break them up in just a minute with a really interesting method for breaking them up. But for now, you just want to get them into place. But you do want to create quite long lines and you do want to have them towards the edges of the sunrise. I don't think that we're not really liking them so much, if they're in the middle, you might find that you do like them. But I'm putting mine just along the edge. I'm bearing where they are, as we varied the lines in the clouds. Then once you've created all of these lines, you're going to do exactly as we did before. I'm going to lock everything else down so that I can select these lines and just click here to select them. Now I'm going to the stroke panel, so I'm going to click here on stroke. I'm going to create a dashed line. My dashed line is going to be an uneven line. I'm using things like 50 pixels as a dash, 30 pixels as a gap, 200 dash, 20 pixel gap. Let's do a 150 dash and a 55 gap. When I click away from this, you're going to see the result. You can say that this is broken up the lines, but because each of the lines with different lengths and because they started and ended in different places, it's not looking as repetitive as it might. It's actually looking like we've got a whole series of dashed lines but all we did was draw straight lines and then we broke them up by creating them as a series of uneven dashes. Now I still need to select all of these because I want to group them with object group. The lines that are in front of the cloud so, I want to make sure that they come down and they're sitting just over the top of the sun. I'm going to call this lines for sun. Then I'm going to select the lines for the sun and the sun, and I'm going to group those all together. Name it Sun and lock it back down again. 8. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 7 Lines for Center Hill: Next up, let's have a look at this middle hill. I've got it unlocked here. I'm going to select it. I'm just going to adjust the fill on it, so I'm going to make it a lighter color, probably about that color. We're going to add some embellishments over it, so I'm going to lock it down just so it doesn't move. I'm going to use the Pencil Tool to draw the line. What I'm going to do is draw a line that is pretty much the shape of the hill, but it's going to start down here, it's going to end over here. Then I'm going to do another one just down here. I'm just holding a space bar as I move the image up, just so that I can see where I'm working. We've got two lines here. I'm going to use these two lines to make a blend. I'm going to click here on the Blend Tool. I'm going to click on one line and then on the second line. You can see that you're in the right position because you get this little plus sign just at the bottom right of the mouse indicator. What you get now will really depend on what your Blend Tool is set to. If you don't see three lines, don't worry. What you're going do is just double-click on the "Blend Tool", and you're going to turn Preview on, so you can see what you're doing. You're going to set this to Specified Steps and then start moving the number of steps up. What we want is some lines that are going to go over our hill. I'm thinking that this is a pretty good number except that I think this line is too high up, so I'm going to move it down here in a minute, which means I'm probably a couple of short on my lines. Well, maybe even another one. By the time I move this down, these are going to be stretched apart a little more, so click "Okay." Let's go to the Selection Tool here. I'm just going to double-click on this until I get this line selected. I'm just going to move it down and you can see the whole blend realigns itself. I click here just to go back to working in the document. Here is my blend. At this point, I can break out my lines into individual lines by choosing Object and then Blend and I'm going to choose "Expand." That just turns it into a group of individual lines, so I'm going to leave them in a group because they belong together. But with these lines selected, I'm going to make them a darker green, not this black color. I'm going to choose a green from my collection of colors here. I'm thinking probably this color green. I'm going to increase the Stroke quite a bit. Then I'm going to set a profile, so instead of Uniform, I'm going to come down here and select this as my Width Profile. The lines are going to be a bit narrower here and a bit wider up the top and the color is just awful. Let's go back to a slightly better color here. The lines have some dimension on them. If I want to, I can also rearrange the lines because I've got lines all as a group, so I can bend them and stretch them to get the effect that I'm looking for. Then since these lines all belong to the center hill, what we're going to do is take this group of lines and seat it just above the center hill. It obviously has to be above it because, otherwise, if it were behind it, it would be hidden by the hill. I'm going to call this lines for center hill. I'm going to unlock the center hill and I'm going to select the lines and the hill and I'm going to group those together as well, Object, Group. Then we're just going to call this center hill. We'll lock it away as well. 9. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 8 Right Hill Detail: Now the lines we're going to use for this rightmost hill are going to be created using a brush. I'm just going to zoom out a little bit here so I can see the rightmost hill a little bit clearer. I'm going to start with the lines and I'm going to do this using the Pen tool just simply because they're going to be easier to draw that way. I'm going to start down here and I'm going to click and drag upwards. I'm going to come up to about here, and I'm going to click and drag a little bit just to add a slight bend to this line. Then I'll press the escape key to stop drawing. With the line selected right now, I'm going to apply a black color to it. I'm going to make a duplicate of this line by selecting it holding down the alt or option key. I'm just going to move it to about here. What I'm trying to do is imagine where the line of this hill is going to come. I'm going to make a blend out of these lines, and click on this one, click on this one, here's my blend, double-click on the Blend tool, turn preview on, choose specified steps, and I'm going to just increase the number of lines that I've got here across the hill. I think that's going to be pretty good. Click okay, and I'll choose object blend, expands. So we have a series of lines, a group of lines here that other lines on the hill. I'm going to make a brush that I can use on the hill, and for that I need a triangle. So I am going to the polygon tool, and I'm just going to work out in this area here, and I'm just going to click once and make a three-sided figure. I'm going to fill it with black, and I'm going to size it right down. So what it is, it's a spiky little triangle. I'm going to rotate it through 180 degrees just simply because I find it easier to work with them pointing down. I don't know why it just makes better sense to me. Now that I've created this shape, I'm going to make sure that I'm clicked away from it. I don't want it selected. I'm going to click on the pen tool and I'm going to click right over the anchor point at the tip of the triangle, and then I'll press escape. What that does, is it's created here just a single point. With that point still selected, I'm going here to the Reflect tool. I'm going to hold my mouse pointer over the top edge of this triangle, hold the alt key on a page, say option on the Mac and click once. What that does, is it sets this point here as the reflection point. I want to do a horizontal reflection. With preview turned on, you'll see up here is the anchor point. It's moved from here to here because it's been reflected across this point. Now I don't need to make a duplicate of it, I just need to click okay. This is going to be very hard to find in a minute, so it's best that you just keep it selected, and you're going to select e to end this polygon. So you have the anchor point and the polygon selected and we're going to make a brush out of that. So we're going to the brushes panel. You can get to it by choosing window brushes we're going to click here on New Brush and we're going to create a pattern brush and click okay. Now we need to increase the spacing on this brush. So I'm going to hold the shift key as I press the upper arrow key. I'm going to add probably about 100 percent spacing on it. I'm going to set the colorization method to tints, and I'm just going to click okay. I'm going to keep this brush paces here just in case I need them in a minute, and I'm going to press control or command zero to zoom back out so that I can see the areas over which I want to apply the brush, and that's these lines here. So let's go to this group, I'm going to select the group objects. With the line selected, I'm going to apply the brush to them. This was the effect that I came here to create, but there are a few problems with it. One of them is the color. I don't like the color, so I'm going to select a color from my color picker here. I want a dark green but not a black. So I'm pretty happy with that color. Now the other thing I want is I want the brush to be narrower at this end and thicker at the bottom end. To do that, I need to apply a brush profile to this lines. So from the uniform drop-down list, I'm going to choose this as my width profile. That means that the brush's narrower at the top and thicker at the bottom. Now when I click away from my selection, you'll see that I've actually lost the lines themselves. I've got the brush lines, but I don't have the lines themselves. What I'm going to do is I'm going to take this group and I'm going to make a duplicate of it. So I'm going to drag it on to the new icon here. I'm going to take this group and I'm going to press the letter d to set it to the default values, which is a fill and a stroke. That's fine. I just wanted to get rid of the brush really. So I am going to turn off the fill, I'm going to select the stroke and I'm going to make it the same green color as I've been using. I'm going to widen up the stroke a little bit, so it's a bit thicker and I'm going to apply the exact same brush profile to it. Now when I click away, you'll see that I've got the stroke and the brush as well. So I've got this interesting effect happening here on my mountain. I'm going to call this lines for right hill, I'm going to call this brush on right hill, and I'm going to select both of those sets, and I'm going to group those. So this is going to be right hill detail. Let's go and put it immediately above the right hill. Let's go and grab both of these, the right hill detail and the right hill itself, and let's go and group those, and lock it down. Now at this point, I don't need the brush spaces any longer. So that is this little anchor point here and this polygon, and this is going to delete them. 10. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 9 Make the trees: Now if you haven't already done so I suggest that you save your document at this point because you don't want to lose all the work that you've done. On this hill over here, we're going to put a tree. I'm going to select the ellipse tool and drag out a smallish ellipse and I'm going to borrow the transformation that we used for the cloud so I'm just going to click here and apply that to the tree. Let's go and make a tree trunk which is going to be a small, rounded rectangle and do the exact same thing with it. Now I just need to adjust the colors of this pencil so I have the tree trunk selected. Let's go to the appearance panel and the topmost fill is the one that's the actual tree trunk, we want to make that a dark brown. Let's go now to the tree and with the selection tool, select it and again, the top fill is the one that's going to be the one that we're using for the tree itself. I want that to be a dark color and I'm really not happy with that color. Let's just double-click on this color and create something a little bit darker. I'm going to click Okay and I'm going to add this to my swatches panel as a global color. Let's just bring it down here, and we'll use it for our tree. Much better. Now let's go and get the two pieces of the tree. We're going to change the order in the layers palette so that the tree is above the tree trunk. Think the dimensions need a little bit of work. Let's just zoom in here going to narrow up the tree trunk at little bit and widen the tree. I think the transformations on these are a little bit too much. With the top of the tree selected, I'm going to start adjusting this transformation and I'm going to take it down to two and minus two. That's the transformation on the black lines. Let's click Okay. Let's make a duplicate of that transformation by dragging it onto the new icon. Let's get rid of the transformation on the fill, and let's just move the copied transformation down on top of the fill. We've got a better look here. Now if we want to save that, we could do so. I'm just going to grab the top of the tree. Let's go to the graphic styles panel. Let's click new, and this is going to be the tree style. Click Okay. Let's go and apply it to the trunk of the tree and then all we need to do is to change the top fill to add dark brown color. Let's make sure that the tree and its tree trunk are centered. We'll go to the align panel and I'm going to open up the options, make sure align to selection is selected and let's choose horizontal align center so that there is a centered, we choose choose object and then group. Now let's just zoom back out. I'm going to create this tree as what's called a symbol. If you haven't used symbols before, this is a really good time to start using them. It's going to give us the ability to create trees all over this mountain quite easily. With our grouped created tree selected, we are going to the symbols panel. You can get to it by choosing window and then symbols click here on the new symbol icon, click Okay and you've created your symbol. At this point we can get rid of this tree. Creating the tree as a symbol now allows us to spray the tree over the mountain. I'm going here to the symbol sprayer tool. I'm going to target it, I'm going to double-click on it so that I can set its options. The intensity is very high and I really want to be able to click to create my tree. I'm going to choose an intensity of two for now and a symbol set density of about three. Just click Okay. Let's see what happens. What I'm going to do is just click here to create my trees and because we've got this clipping mask in place, the trees can go over the edge of the art board because they're going to be clipped to the art board. Once you've got a fair covering of trees, you can start working with the trees. Underneath the symbol sprayer is the tool called the symbol shifter and the symbol shifter allows you to move the symbols around. Now if they don't move fast enough, it's because of that intensity setting. We could up that now to five and then they're going to move faster. You can just drag over the symbols of the trees to rearrange them. There's a symbol scruncher tool which moves them closer together. There's a symbol sizer tool that you can use to make the trees bigger or smaller. Click on them to make them bigger, Alt or Option click on them to make them smaller. Now the size of the brushes determining how many of these trees are being selected at once. If you want to change the diameter of the brush, you could do so. Take it down to a 100, for example and now it's smaller so that less trees are being adjusted every time I click with the symbol size and now I'm just making my trees smaller. Don't really want them to be much bigger than they are. I'm using the Alt or Option key. At this point, you might want to go back to the symbol shifter tool and perhaps move things around a little bit again. Especially when you've got trees that are on top of each other that you might want to space them out a little bit better. Now one of the reasons why I tried to make my trees quite dark to start off with is the symbol stainer tool because if I click on a tree with the symbol stainer tool, I can lighten it a bit way too fast, so I've just done that. Let's go back and reset the intensity down to two. Now when I click on a tree, it's going to change color, but not quite so fast. I still think it's a bit fast. Let's take the intensity down to one. Now I can just change the color of the tree by clicking on them and if I click more than once, the tree is going to become lighter and lighter. We can get some variety into the forest using the symbol stainer tool here. Once you've created your forest of trees, you can say that there is a set of handles around your trees and so you could drag them into position a bit better. You can also size them. That's just going to adjust the size of the trees. Now we've got our forest over here. It's time to add some windmills over here, and we're going to do that in the next video. 11. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 10 Add the windmills: Over here on this mountain, we're going to add some windmills, we're going to make them the modern style windmill. I'm going to drag into position so I can say what's happening over here. It might be easy because this layer has a clipping mask associated with it. If I added a new layer so I can assemble my windmill over here. I'm going to close down this current layer and lock it. I'm going to click here, to create a brand new layer. I'm going to use it to assemble my windmills. I'm going to click here on the line segment tool. I'm going to drag out a vertical line for my windmill. I'm going to make the line white, let's make it this white color. Let's increase the stroke white, and and apply this triangle width profile. The problem with this is that, this was going to be the top of the windmill and this is going to be the bottom. I need to do one of two things, I either need to turn my line around, or I need to reverse the direction of my line, because lines have direction. What I'm going to do is reverse the direction, so I'm going to select over my line, I'm going to the pen tool here. I'm going to click on the end if I want to be the beginning of the line, I'm just going to click once here. You'll see that, the brush profile inverts. Now, I'll press the escape because I'm going to stop working with the pen tool. I've got the stand for my windmill, now I want one of the arms. I'm just going to drag out a line for my windmill. This is one of the blades, let's zoom in. Make it a little bit longer, so I'm going to hold the Shift key as I do, so it's just perfectly horizontal. For the blade, it's going to have a shape to it, and we can use the width tool to create that Shape. I'm going to the widths tool, I'm just going to come in a little bit from this end of the windmill blade, I'm just going to drag up, and now I want to make this a bit sharper, I'm going to click here, and I'm just going to press upward so that I've got a slightly sharper bend here, and if I want my blade too deep or too bow out here, then I'm going to make a bow at this point or a dip. This is the shape of my wind mill blade. I want the rotation point for the blades to be somewhere about here, so I'm going to the pen tool and click here and make a rotation point and press escape. I'm going to target the blade of my windmill that I want to rotate, and select over here the rotation tall. Now, I'm going to hover over that anchor point that I just created, and am going to hold the Alt or Option key and click once, and that just sets that as the rotation point. Now, the windmill blades, there are three blades on these windmills, which means that there are three rotations in 360 degrees. If we divide 360 by three, we get a 120, and that's the rotation needed for this blade. We already had a blade out here, so we want an extra one. We're going to click copy. We want another one, So we're going to hold down control command on the Mac and press the letter D, and that duplicates that again. Now we have our windmill, let's just zoom back out and coming over here, and this is going to be our windmill. I'm going to select over it, and I'm going to group it with object group. At this point, I can re-size the windmill, and I can bring it back into my drawing but I'd really like to bring it back into a layer that everything else is on, so I'm going to unlock this layer, open it up, open up this layer, and this is my windmill. I'm going to drag it down onto this layer. It's going to disappear because it's being blocked by that clipping group. I'm going to select it and just move it into position. We're going to call this windmill. Especially because it's going to be impossible to say in the last pellet because it's white. I'm going to make some duplicate because I want a row of windmills here, so I'm going to hold the Alt or Option key and just drag the next one down, and the next one, let's put one just over the edge here. These are our four windmills, and since they are a set of windmills, we could grab all four of those, and put those in a group of windmills, or press control or command zero to zoom back out so that we can see the image itself. 12. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Pt 11 Add the buildings: The last thing I want to do is to create a little farm building in here, let's zoom into that area. I can get rid of layer two because I don't need it anymore. I think the farm building is going to be easy enough to draw in position here. I'm going to create a rectangle for it. It's going to be a long, narrow rectangle, and it's going to be filled with white. I'm just going to fill it with white. I'm going to make a duplicate of this rectangle by pressing the auto option K, and just dragging a duplicate up here. I'll make sure that the windmills, and the trees are all locked down so that the only thing that is selectable on this layer right now of the rectangles that I'm working with. This rectangle is going to be the roof of the barn. I'm going to use my brown color for it. That's going to be the fill and it's going to have no strike. Truly I think red color would be better. Let's go and make it a red color. Let's add this to our swatches panel as a global color. I'm going to the direct selection tool and I'm going to click away from the roof here and I'm going to drag over just the top points of the roof. I'm going to the scale tool here, click on it. I'm just going to drag in on the roof line. That brings both ends in at the same amount. I'll go back to my selection tool. I'm just going to smoosh up the roof a little bit. It was way too much of a roof. I think it's the bottom of the building up a little bit as well. I want some windows, I am going to create those using a rounded rectangle, just a very small, rounded rectangle. Well actually let's make a bigger one. Lets put the points all the way out and then size it down a bit. If you don't have a rounded rectangle tool just to a regular rectangle. That's not really too much shakes here. It's just a window in a building on a mountain. Let's just zoom in there. Because it is way too rounded edge for me right now let's make it a little bit more square and let's try and get the edges right out, with it now selected, I'm going to choose effect, distort and transform and then transformed because I want a whole row of windows. Turn preview on. Let's make them 12 windows plus our original. Let's start moving them. Click okay. I'm going to zoom back out a little bit so I can see the result didn't go far enough. Let's go back to the transform, and let's increase the distance a little bit, and increase number of copies. Click okay. Now I want a bigger building for behind here. I'm going back to zoom tool. Let's just zoom out a little bit, and let's go and make a bigger building, which is going to be a tall silo. It's going to be a large white filled rectangle. Let's go and put the lead on it. We're going to do that with a triangle. Let's go to the polygon tool. Let's click once and we're going to create a triangle. Now I think the radius is going to be way too big, so let's just make it 25. It's going to be more visible. Well, that was lucky. I did not expect it to be anywhere near as accurate as that, maybe I shouldn't admit that. Let's put it on the top of the building here. Let's shrink it down a little bit. I'm going to add an extra anchor point around eight side of this ongoing with its selected, choose object path. Add anchor points because that gives me an anchor point at the bottom here, let's go to the direct selection tool. Let's select this anchor point and let's make it a round anchor point. Then just drag down. That's going to suggest that this is actually a round building. Let's go and put a window in it. This time I'm just going to choose a long. We know well lets we can probably do a couple while we're here. Let's select all of these objects, all four of these objects that go together to make this building, we can just double-check here in the layers palette that we have all four selected and let's group them. That's going to be at silo. These here are the barn. We're going to group those together and will call us the barn. Let's zoom back out so we can say everything in place. I wanted to put this building over here and potentially behind some of these trees. Let's just unlock the symbol set and let's move it over a little bit so that the barn can be behind the trees, and the silo is going to be behind the barn. I think it might be a bit tall, so let's just shrink it down a little bit. To put the silo behind the barn, we're just going to drag it down in the stacking order. But both of these need to go behind the tree symbols at the very latest. Let's grab both of these and let's put them all the way down actually behind the right hill. They tucked in behind the trees and behind this hill, they are not in the right place yet. There's still not behind the correct hill, because it's left hill not the right hill. Have a big problem with left and right, which has just become really, really obvious. Again, this is why you make the last pallet neat and tidy. Why you name everything? Because it then becomes very easy to find the pieces that you want to work with. Here is the left hill over here. I'm going to move these all down behind the left hill much better. There is a finished piece of art. 13. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Wrapup and project: We've now pretty much finished all the elements that are going into this landscape, and really all that's left is some minor tidying up. For example, you may want to change the colors of these hills. I should probably have done it earlier, it's a good exercise to do it right now. I've got this hill selected and that's the pace over here, it's the right hill. We can check it by just turning it on and off. But in this group is not only the hill, but also these decorative elements. If we want to change the color of the hill, we need to make sure that we have the hill selected and not the decorative elements. But remember, the hill also incorporates some extra fills, which is this area that was transformed. We'll go to the appearance panel and identify the actual color that we need to alter, and that is this particular fill. Now I'll drop it down and choose perhaps a different color for it. I could also go ahead and create a color for it. I think I'm actually going to do that. I'm just going to double-click on this and let's go and find a bit of a darker yellow color for this hill. That may be a little bit better, but you can play around with the colors. It's really important that you select the right hill or the right element to actually recolor. If you want to add these to the swatches panel, just going to open up the swatches panel when they're the front color to fill here is going to click here on new swatch. Make sure it's a global color so you could alter it later on and then just click, Okay. You may want to adjust the colors in the hills. You could also adjust some of the placement of the hills and the clouds and stuff as well. I hope that you've enjoyed this class and I hope that you've learned things about Illustrator of which you were previously unaware. Your class project will be of course, to create your own landscape and experiment with the tools and techniques that you've seen shown in this class. Post an image of your completed landscape as your class project. As you're watching these videos, you will have been asked if you would recommend this class to others. Plays, if you enjoyed the class and learned from it. Would you do two things for me? Firstly, answer yes, that you would recommend the class and secondly, write in just a few words why you enjoyed it. Recommendations like this help other students to say that this is the class that they too might enjoy and we'll learn from. If you'd like to leave me a comment or a question, please do so. I hurried and respond to all of your comments and questions, and I look at and respond to all of your class projects. My name's Helen Bradley. Thank you so much for joining me for this episode of Illustrator for lunch, and I look forward to seeing you in an upcoming class soon. 14. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Bonus Reuse Elements from this illustration: For this additional video, I just want to go over how you could save the elements that you've used in this illustration if, for example, you wanted to be able to use them in another set of illustrations. The reason for this is perhaps you were creating some landscape illustrations to sell as stock. In that case, you may want to develop a series of landscape images that would all work well together. You may want to use similar colors and you may want to even repeat some of the objects or elements from this particular illustration in some of the others. Let's see how you would save this. The first thing I'm going to do is I open up the Symbols panel, because some of these objects could be saved as symbols. If we go to the last pallet and just unlock some of these objects that we may want to save, we can go ahead and save them. With the Selection tool selected, I'm going to save one of these clouds. Go to the Symbol panel here, click "New". I would name it Cloud 1 or something. Click "Okay". Then we'll go ahead and do that with each of the clouds. It will be to your advantage to name these, but I'm not bothering at this stage. Now, let's go to the windmills because the windmills are in a group. We can get inside the group by choosing the Group Selection Tool. When you click on an element with the Group Selection Tool, you're going to click on and select just that element. If you click a second time, you'll select the subgroup, and this windmill is a subgroup inside the group of windmills. If I click the third time, I'll select all the windmills. It's a really handy tool to use, but we only want one windmill. So I'm going to click once to select the pace of the windmill. Click a second time to select the actual whole windmill. Now, let's make a symbol out of that. For the windmill, I will want to name it because it's going to be impossible to say what it is because it's white here in the Symbols panel. Let's go and select the sun. Now I can select the entire sun, all grouped elements by just clicking on this icon here and add it to the Symbols panel. I want to go back to selecting with the mouse, then I'm going to need to go back to the selection tool because the silo is a single group of objects. I want the whole group, and so too is the barn. These are the elements that are savable as symbols from this illustration. Of course, we could also save the colors. Let's go to the swatches panel. You want to make sure that nothing is selected so that if you're fiddling around with the swatches panel, you won't inadvertently add a color to an object that you didn't really plan to do. Now, I've given you this particular set of color swatches. But if you had your own set of color swatches, the first thing you would do is go ahead and remove any swatches that you weren't actually using so that your Swatches panel has none, and register and then just the colors you're using and that you want to save. Go out to the Flyout panel, choose "Save Swatch Library" as AI, and go ahead and name it. Now, I've already saved mine's here in landscape, but you would go ahead and do that. You could also save brushes. In this example, we have this as a brush. Again, make sure that nothing is selected because you don't want to apply a brush inadvertently to an object. Click on each of the brushes that you're not using and don't want to save in this group, and just remove them. Now, some of these may not be able to be removed because they are actually in use, but some of them might be able to be removed. Well, that's as far as I can get with this brush set. Now I'm going to click the Flyout menu, choose "Save Brush Library", and I would go ahead and save, and I've already got it saved here as landscape. Again, you can use those brushes. Now, you can also save the graphic styles. Let's go the graphic style menu here. Again, make sure we don't have anything selected. Now, I'm going to click and shift click on the graphic styles set. I'm not in use in this document and that I don't need to save. I'm just going to get rid of those, and so I've got these three I wanted to save, click the Flyout menu, save Graphic Style Library. Again, save it as landscape. Click "Save". In this case, I'm going to write a new file. We've saved some elements as symbols, some as styles. We've saved a brush and we've also saved our color swatches. So if we were to create a new file, let's go and see how we would access these elements that we've already saved. I'm going to quickly add a background to this document, so that when we add elements to it, we can actually see them. It's going to lock this down. Let's go and open up the Symbols panel. Our Symbols aren't here because they're saved in a file. Open the Flyout menu, choose "Open Symbol Library" and then go to user-defined and select your "Symbol Set". Now, for these symbols to appear in that list, you have to have actually closed illustrator and opened it up. Symbols operate a little bit differently to, for example, brushes, they tend to be a little bit less accessible, so you will need to close and restart illustrator. But at this point we can just drag our clouds out. Here is a silo and our barn, and we've also got the sun ray. These can be placed in a new document and then rearranged to suit. In the Swatches panel, what you want to do is again, make sure that nothing is selected. Go ahead and clean out the swatches panel of anything that you don't want, anything that's currently in this document you probably won't want to be using. Click the "Flyout menu", open "Swatch library", go to user-defined and go and grab your landscape colors. They'll come in as a panel separately, so you'll just drag and drop them into the Swatches panel and they can now be used in the document. To get the graphic styles, you'll open up your graphic styles panel, which has taken off on me here. I'm going to open up the Flyout menu, open Graphic Style Library, go to user-defined, go to landscape, and here are our graphic styles. Again, making sure that nothing is selected, we can now click on each of these in turn, and that just adds it to the Graphic Styles panel for this document. For our brushes, open the Brush panel, open the Flyout menu, open Brush library, user-defined, and go to landscape. Here is our brush. Make sure that nothing is selected before you do this, otherwise, you're going to apply the brush to it and just drag and drop the brush into this document's Brushes panel. So that's an easy way to reuse the elements that you've gone to the trouble of creating in this landscape image, so that you could reuse them to create an entire series of landscapes that all had repeated elements in them. 15. Illustrator for Lunch™ - Bonus Answers to Student Questions: I've had a few questions on this landscape project, and instead of answering each of them individually, I just thought it would be a really good idea to add a very quick video to answer those questions. Now one of the questions was, what can I do with these symbols? How can I get these shapes out as individual shapes because I want to change the ordering of the layering of some of them? What you're going to do is just select over the symbol set. Once you've got selected, you'll choose object expand. All you want to do is to expand the object, not the fills, so, I just click "Expand Object". Now over it in the layers palette, you're going to have a group of trees, so, let's just open this up. Now, at this point, the last thing that you want to do, is to break these layers out any further because each one of these trees is an entire symbol. What you're going to do then, is select them as a group and go to the symbol panel here and unlink them. You're going to break the link through the symbol, and now you've got a group, so, each of these trees is a group with an ellipse and a rectangle. You could break them out of the subgroups, so, just take this group and break it out. But you know what, it's probably overthinking that process and probably just leave them as groups here. But that said as soon as you have got them broken out, you can then select a tree to edit it. Now, just clicking on the trees is not going to work because that's going to select all of them, so, you'll need to come to the group selection tool and just click on a tree to select it. As soon as you start clicking on a tree, you're going to select various parts of the tree. Now to move it, you're going to have to select the whole tree. Just start clicking on it and that will indicate to you in the last pallet here which tree it is. Now you can go ahead and select the entire tree, and if you want to move this behind, then we're just going to grab it and move it to the bottom of the stack here. Well, I'm just going to drop it down about here. Let's click "Away". Now this tree is gone behind the others, but we'd need to do something with this tree, so, back against the group selection tool, select the tree that is the problem identified here, and then just drag it behind the other trees until you get it into a position where it's going to work better for you. That's dealing with the symbols. Now, the next question that we had related to the brush that was used over here and the lines, and I just want to explain to you why I did the brush the way I did, so, I'm going to do this in a new file, just simply because we just want to focus on the brush issue. Now, typically you would apply a brush like that to a line, so, I'm just going to draw out a line here. It's not going to have any fill which it doesn't. I'm just going to increase the stroke weight and let's give it a green color. Now, the way that we drew the brush in the class was to go to the polygon tool, and I made a three-sided figure, was just a narrow rectangle and it was a filled rectangle, and in the class I rotated it because I prefer my brushes to be pointing down, just makes better sense to me. Let's have a look at the problem that I was trying to avoid. I'm going to take this shape and I'm going to make a brush out of it. First of all, we would make it black because brushes are better if they're black because then they can be filled with any color. I'll go to the brush panel, I'm going to click here on the New Brush icon. It's going to be a pattern brush. I increase the spacing on it and we'll just click "Okay". Now let's apply this newly made brush to this line. I'll select the line and just apply the brush to it. This was what I was trying to avoid. If you see that when I have the line selected, the brush is actually over the middle of the line and it's not actually hanging off the line. If we have to create a second set of lines to put the line on, which is what we did in the class, so, let's just go here and let's duplicate this line and then this one wasn't going to have any brush on it at all, so, I was just going to remove the brush from it and I was just going to make it a solid line with a brush profile on it. You will see that we would have to move this second line to be able to place it over the edge of the first line. In addition to that, you can see that it actually doesn't place itself very well, it's almost impossible on a wavy line to get this line in the right place because of the bend on the line. It's really not the best way to do it, so, I'm just going to get rid of that. Let's go back to this line. Well, let's go back to the brush and see how we would solve that. The solution is to push the pointy bit of the brush down so it just hangs off the edge of the line, and then you do that by doubling the size of the triangle. You have to add as much to the triangle up here as you have done here. One way to do that, is with that little anchor point trick. What you'll do is make sure that the shape is not selected, you go to the pen tool, and you're just going to click once just over the top of the anchor points so that you create an anchor, then you press "Escape". In the last pallet, you'll see that you've got your anchor and you'll select it, well, it's already selected still. You go to the reflection tool, Alt or option, click on the top of this line to mark that as the point for reflection. We're going to do a horizontal reflection, I believe you've already turned on. We can see that the anchor point is up here. This combined shape of the triangle plus the anchor point is now double the height of the original triangle. That's all we came here to do. I'll click "Okay". Now, when I select both of these shapes and make them into a brush, it's going to work differently, so, we'll select over this line and apply a new brush. Now the brush is hanging off the line, so, we could create a second line very easily by just dragging and dropping this onto the new icon. We'll take the top one, we're going to remove the brush from the top one and we'll just add a thicker stroke and our brush profile, and so, we're getting the result that we want by doubling the height of the brush effectively. For neatness psych, also apply the brush profile to the line with the brush on it. If you have trouble creating your brush this way with a dot, I'm going to show you another method for doing it. Let's just go in here and I'm going to borrow the triangle from here, but not the point. There's an anchor point up here, I'm not borrowing it, I'm just taking the triangle. What I'm going to do, is I'm going to make a second triangle. With a triangle selected, I'm going to the reflection tool. This time I'll Alt or Option, click on, again the top line on this triangle, and I'm going to do a horizontal reflection, but I'm going to make a copy. Now I have two triangles, I have the one I want to use as a brush and the one that is just a place holder that is just giving me the extra height I made for the brush. With this triangle selected, I'm going to make it no film, no stroke. So effectively we can't see it but it is there. Now when we make a brush out of this, the brush is going to run along the line. Half of the brush is going to be transparent and above the line the other half is going to be visible and below it. Lets go and re-select the line that has the brush on it, which is this one here, and let's go and apply our new brush to it. Here is the brush again, it's running along the line, but there's also all those little triangles above the line that you just can't see that are helping position this brush along the line. Once we've re-applied our brush, we can just go back back and re-apply our brush profile. That was the reason why we went to that little work around with the brush was just to make sure that whatever shape the line, your brush is going to align with the line and it's not going to be placed halfway across it. The last question I had was in relation to graphic style. Let's just go and have a look at the graphic styles panel. The question was, somebody made a graphic style, and when it showed up here, it was on the letter T. The reason for that, is that there are two ways that you can show the thumbnails here. You can use the square for a preview or texts for a preview. A lot of people use texts for a preview, particularly when they're working with graphic styles that were designed for text. Simply because it's often easier to see what the text effect is going to look like, but these graphic styles can be used for text or for shapes, it doesn't matter. This preview is only how they're showing up in the graphic styles panel. So just the visual that you're getting, there's nothing different about a graphic style that is shown as a square or one that's shown as a letter T. So that was just a different setting that they had set in Illustrator. That's so far is the major questions from this class. I hope this helps you, particularly if you had questions that were similar to the questions that other people had. Please, if you have questions, don't hesitate to post those questions in the class project area or in the community area so that I can see and reply to them, and I'm quite happy to add additional content to the end of this lecture just to build up a resource of extra things for this class because there's a lot going on in class, and I want you to be able to do what you want to do with the image that you've created.