Block Print Style Illustrations on Your iPad + Free Block Print Stamps and Textures for Procreate | Liz Kohler Brown | Skillshare

Block Print Style Illustrations on Your iPad + Free Block Print Stamps and Textures for Procreate

Liz Kohler Brown, artist | designer | teacher | author

Play Speed
  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x
8 Lessons (51m)
    • 1. Block Print Style Illustrations on Your iPad

      2:17
    • 2. Downloads and Inspiration

      2:59
    • 3. Creating Block Stamps

      9:53
    • 4. Using Your Stamps

      6:26
    • 5. Stamp Options

      5:06
    • 6. Combining Stamp Styles

      9:16
    • 7. Designing a Bouquet

      8:25
    • 8. Filling in Blank Spaces

      6:15
51 students are watching this class

About This Class

423a57c0

In this class, you'll learn how to create block print style illustrations on your iPad in Procreate.  I’ll show you every step of my process from creating the block print stamps, to creating a balanced composition.  When you watch this class, you’ll get all of my block print brushes as free downloads so you can start playing around with the process immediately.

You'll learn how to:

  • create a simple block print bird illustration with a short quote
  • create a carved block print look on your illustrations
  • use my free texture brushes, so you can easily add a stamped texture to your work
  • create a menagerie of plants and animals using several brush stamps to combine a hand drawn look with a traced solid block print style
  • combine plant and flower elements to make a graceful bouquet with simple hand drawn flowers and leaves
  • balance a bouquet with text, color, and asymmetry to create visual interest

The amazing thing about this process is that you can turn anything into a block print stamp that you can use over and over in Procreate.  You can draw from life, or use photographs to trace the shapes or figures you want to turn into a stamp. Once you build up your toolbox of stamps, you can create tons of compositions in Procreate in just a few minutes.  I was inspired to dig deep into block printing after seeing Abbie's Nurse's awesome linocut tutorial.

All you need to take this class is your iPad and a stylus.  I’ll be using the Apple Pencil, but you could use any stylus, or even your finger.

Here is the Pinterest Inspiration Board

Here is the Class Downloads Page  (you'll see the password in the first lesson)

Here is a link to some bird images on Pixabay

Transcripts

1. Block Print Style Illustrations on Your iPad: Hi everyone. I'm Liz. I'm an artist, illustrator, and teacher. Today I want to show you how to create lock print style illustrations on your iPad and procreate. I'll show you every step of my process from creating the block print stamps to creating a balanced composition. When you watch this class, you'll get all of my blog cred brushes as free downloads. You can start playing around with the process immediately. First, we'll create a simple block print, bird illustration with a short quote. I'll show you how to create a car block print look on your illustrations. I'll also share my stamp texture brushes with you as a free download, so you can easily add a stamped texture to your work. Next, we'll create a menagerie of plants and animals using several brush stamps to combine the hand-drawn look with a traced, solid block print style. I'll show you how to play around with color to change the style and mood of your print. Next, we'll combine plant and flower elements to make a graceful bouquet with simple hand-drawn flowers and leaves. I'll show you how I balance a bouquet with text, color, and asymmetry to create visual interest. The amazing thing about this process is that you can turn absolutely anything into a brush spam, and then you can use it over and over in your future procreate compositions. You can draw from life or use photographs to trace the shapes of figures you want to turn into a stamp. Once you build up your toolboxes stamps, you can create tons of compositions and procreate. All you need to take this class is your iPad and the stylus. I'll be using the Apple Pencil, but you could use any stylus or even your finger. Let's get started. 2. Downloads and Inspiration: The first thing I want to do is show you how to get all of the downloads that you'll need for this class. You'll see the link to get to this page and the about section of the class. You'll need a password to get into that page. I'll show the password on screen right now. Once you get into that page, you'll see download the brushes here, click and hold that, and then click open in a new tab. Once that new tab opens, you'll see download at the bottom here. This may look a little different depending on the browser you're using, but you should always see that Download button. Click that one time and then wait for the download. Then once the download completes, you'll see the brush name and then you can click Open in and choose Procreate. These will only work in Procreate, so that's the only option that will work with these brushes. So I'll click Copy to Procreate. Then it automatically opens the program for you. If you go to your brushes now at the very top, you'll see this whole brush set. So all of the brushes that I use in the class today will be within that set. Once you get this brush set into Procreate, you're ready to start making your first piece. The first thing I like to do when I start one of these projects is get some inspiration. I created this Pinterest board with a ton of different block print styles. Everything from woodcut, line or cut and everything in between. You can scroll through here and see that there are so many different styles to this art form. You could do something really intricate with a lot of lines and hash marks, or you could do something really simple with just a block form and some line-drawing over it. You could also start with just a simple shape and repeat that across your Canvas. One thing that's really easy to do with this style is create some simple plant forms, and then you can use those over and over in a lot of different projects. As you're thinking about this dial and what do you want to create. Just think about the shapes that you normally go to. Maybe that's some simple leaf shapes or a vine. Maybe that's an insect. Here's some butterflies and bees repeated. Or maybe it's an animal form. So something that you usually like to draw or create, you can turn that into block print style using this process. If you're not sure where to start, this is a great place to look. You can get a ton of inspiration from these block print artists and then make it your own. Find some shapes that you really love and turn those into stamps. Let's go ahead and get started with our first project. 3. Creating Block Stamps: For this first piece, I want to create a block print stamp of a bird and add a little bit of text and color. I'll start by clicking the plus symbol in Procreate, create custom size. I'll use inches here and I like to work at 10 by 10 inches. I find that works well for most of my projects, but you can work at any size here. I'll click "Create", then I want to start by getting some reference for my bird. You can draw this by hand if you prefer to draw by hand, or you can use an image, it's totally up to you here. I'm going to use an image. One source that I really like to use is Pixabay. This is a site that offers free images so you can download for personal and commercial use. I'll put a link to this in the About section of the class. I'm just going to search bird flying, and find an image that I like. This one would be really nice. You can see some nice wingspan here. I think I'm going to use this one. Click "Download" and then click and hold to save the image. Now that I've saved the image, I can open that in Procreate. Go back to my blank document, click the tool symbol, insert a photo, and then find that picture on my iPad. I'm just going to zoom in here and get this of the size that I want it to be for my stamp. Then I'm going to make this image semi-transparent. I'll go to the Layers panel and reduce the opacity. That way I can really see my drawing and photos not in my way. I'll click "Plus" to create a new image, and choose black as my color. Then I'm going to grab the lineup cut thin brush that comes with the brush set that you can download. I'm going to go around the edge of this silhouette and just create a thick line to totally capture the silhouette of this bird. I'm not trying to make this perfect, I'm letting it be a really loose version of this silhouette. Don't worry too much about imperfections here because block print is all carved by hand. There are a lot of imperfections and wavy lines in block prints. Feel free to make these really loose. They don't have to be perfect. In fact, later on you'll see I'll go through and add in some imperfections to make it a little bit more realistic. This continue circling this whole silhouette. I'm also going to skip these feed here. I don't want that included in my stamp. I'm just going to skip over that part of the silhouette. Now that I've totally outlined the silhouette, I can just click and drag that black and totally fill that bird. Now I have a silhouette black bird. Now I can start adding some of my carving lines to the stamp. I'll click the "Plus" symbol to create a new layer, and I'm going to use white for this layer. White is removing material, black is adding material. You can keep playing around with this as you were, just make sure you're on your correct, wider, black layers. My black layer, I'll reduce the opacity so I can see my bird again. Now I have white as my color and I'm on my white layer. I'm just going to go through and slightly smaller brush. I'm going to add in little carving lines for all of these wings. One thing I'm trying to do here is varying my pressure. Sometimes I'm using a lot of pressure and then sometimes I release so that you get some of that variation in line. We can add some more variation later. But I'm just going to add a little bit now as I work. Go ahead and do this with the whole bird figure. You can see that as I'm making these carving lines, I'm going totally passed the black. You can see when I return the opacity to the black, that makes the carving look like it goes all the way to the edge. Then later after I finish this portion, I can go through and clean up, any little edges that are too sharp or just don't look as I'd like them to. Go ahead and finish drawing the rest of the carving lines on this bird. Now that I have the basic shape of this bird worked out, I can go ahead and remove the image, so I'll just click "Delete" on that image. Then I can increase the opacity of the black so you can really see what I'm doing here. I'm going go to my white layer and get the same brush with the eraser, the liner cut then eraser. I want to find areas that just don't look as I'd like them to. Like this line seems a little bit thick. I'm just going to go in with my eraser and create some variation and just clean up some areas that I don't like. If you've ever used the block printing tool, you know how difficult they are to create an even line width. Anytime you see these perfect even lines like this one, it's not realistic as a line of cut. I'm just going to go in and create a lot of imperfections to just messy this up a little bit. I'll take a few minutes to go through this whole drawing and just create all these little inconsistencies. Another thing you can do is add in some white. I don't like how this feather doesn't go to the very edge of the bird. I'm going to get my white brush and just add a little bit in, and then get my eraser and add a little bit of variation to that line. Another thing you can do is go to the black layer and add some black. I don't like how flat this feather is. I want to add some randomness to that. I'm just going to go through and add that in. Then I may need to go back to my white layer and clean up the white around that. You can see you really have a lot of flexibility with how you create these pieces. I'll go back to my white layer and just clean up little areas that I don't like. I especially check all the edges because that's where the block printing tool would slide off of the image here. I really like to double-check that those areas look really nice and clean. Now that I have my final block print looking just as I'd like it to, I can go ahead and save this image to turn it into a brush. Click the tool symbol, click Share, JPEG, Save Image. Then you can go to any of the brushes that are in this brush side that our stamps, you wouldn't only use one of these other brushes, so you have different settings. Any of the stamp brushes are fine to use as a template. I'll just go to the first one here, swipe left and click "Duplicate". Now I have two of that same stamp. I'll click on at one time. Click "Source", insert a photo, and then find my bird that I just created. Now we have that bird as a stamp. I'll just double-click the name here and change that to bird. I've made two of these, so I'm going to call this bird 2. Now it shows up in my brush set. If I go back to my canvas, click the "Plus" symbol, let's choose a different color here, click one time, and there's my bird. It looks like my canvas is sideways, so that showed up sideways. You can see here we've got all of the nice lines that we created for that original block. 4. Using Your Stamps: I want to go ahead and create a composition using this stamp. I'm going to use the same document that we were already using. It's 10 by 10 inches. The first thing I like to do is lay down a little bit of color in the background. I'm going to grab a color that I like and get the linocut thick brush and make that pretty large. I'm just going to create a really simple bubble shape to lay this block print down on. Now that I have my shape, I'll go to a new layer. I always put everything on different layers of this process because it gives you a lot more flexibility for adding texture and moving things around. I'll go to my bird that I just created and click "One time". Let's make that a little bit bigger. You never want to make an image bigger. I would never want to do that because that's going to create blurriness. It's okay to make something smaller, but it's not okay to make it bigger. I'm going to increase my brush a little bit more. That looks like a perfect size. I'm going to make it a tiny bit smaller so it fits within my bubble here. I'll click magnetic so I don't distort the proportions of my bird. One note here as we are talking about the size of the stamps, it's really important to create your stamps at the size that you want to use them. I created this stamp on a document that's 10 by 10 inches. I can use this 10 by 10 inches or smaller. I could never use this stamp 20 by 20 inches, for example, because it would be blurry. That's one thing to keep in mind when you make your stamps you want to be sure to use a canvas that's big enough for the use that you have planned for them. The next thing I want to do is add a little bit of text to go along with this. I'm just going to draw this by hand. I'm going to use the monoline brush that comes with procreate. This is from the calligraphy section or the inking section of procreate. I'm just going to put that on its largest size and create a quote here. I want to make this text look a little bit more realistic as a block print. I'm going to reduce the size of my monoline brush and remove all of these curved edges. You would never see a curved edge like that on a block print. You more likely would see a sharp edge like this, or maybe even sharper. When you zoom out, it looks sharp enough. I'm just going to go through and add some sharp edges to these letters. I want to add a little bit of texture and dimension to this, it's a little bit flat right now. I'm going to go to the layer that has my bird and my text and I'll click my eraser tool and get the stamp texture. This is the texture that I like to use to add a little bit of a block print look to your pieces. What I always do before I start adding texture is duplicate the layer. Once I erase material from this layer, I can't go back easily. I'm going to duplicate it and then make the first layer invisible. I always have that first layer saved in case I ever want to go back and change my mind. On this new layer, I've got my stamp texture eraser and you can play around with the size of this here. I'll zoom in so you can really see if you put this on a big size, the dots are really large. I don't tend to use that big size very much. I tend to use the smaller one maybe about 10 percent or a little bit more. You can see that this adds a tiny bit of texture. You can go as far as you want. One thing I like to do is just flick one at a time until it gets far enough. Then if you change your mind, you can step back with your two-finger gesture and go back and create some more. It's totally up to you how far you go. If you're using a actual block to print, it really just depends on how much ink is on your block. You can create a really faded look or you can do just a little bit like I've done here. I'm going to do the same thing with my mustard background because I want it to look like a print as well. I want to add one more layer of dimension to this piece. I'm going to go back to my duplicated layer here, swipe right with two fingers to put it into the Alpha lock state. That means I can only affect what I've painted on this layer. I'm going to grab white as my color, click "One time" and click "Fill". Now I have a white version and a black version of the same thing. I'm going to grab my white version in the layers panel and click the Move tool, remove magnetics, and just do a tiny bit of movement here, so I get more dimension on my piece. I'll go ahead and call this piece finished and we move on to the next piece. 5. Stamp Options: For this next piece, I want to combine some of the trace style images that I did for the last project and some more hand drawn images for this one. I'm going to use the same size that we use for the last project. This is 10 by 10 inches and on a new layer, I want to be drawing with black. I'll grab my line button brush again. I'm going to get a pretty small size here. Because I want this to look like a tiny little carving line. I think I'm going to go with about 32 percent on this one. I'm going to start by just creating a central vine. I usually will take a few passes to do that. You'll see the faster you do it, the better it will work. Any little issues you have at the bottom, you can just grab the kneaded eraser, and just come in and clean that up. I want to add some leaves to this line, but I want to be sure that they're very even down the whole vine. I like to start by creating a guide. I'm going to grab my narrow wonder pencil and I'm on a new layer with black as my color and I'm going to just make a nice little outline here that I can follow as my guide. Now I know that my leaves can't go beyond this border. I'm going to make that layer semi-transparent so you can just barely see it and then go back to my vine layer. I've got my line button brush again. I'm just going to add some little curving lines here. I'm just creating this leaf shape and then just curving through it several times. You could go ahead and make all your leaf shapes first and then just go through and fill those in. I think that's the easiest method. So I tend to do that first, just build out my leaf shapes and then add all the curving next. Again, I'm trying to vary my pressure here. So that works if you're working with an Apple pencil. If you're not and you want to vary your line, just keep your rationale and then size, and then you can go back and take in some of the lines. Now I can zoom out and make sure everything looks just as I wanted to. I'm going to remove my narrow wonder pencil layer and then click Share JPEG to save the image and now I can make this into a brush using the same process that we used before. Duplicate, Source, Inserted a photo, and click that Image. Now we have this nice platform as a brush. I've done the same thing with a few other platforms and these are all brushes that come along with the class downloads. I'm going to use these all together in a single composition. I created a lot of other brushes using the same process and you can see those once you get the class downloads, you'll see all these brushes. But this flower, for example, I made using the same process that we just did. I created the leaf shapes and then added and those little lines. The same thing with this vine. I created a solid shape and then removed the white area. The same idea with this flower. I did this firmer tracing. I created a silhouette of the flower and then erased all the white lines. You can see there are a lot of different ways to make these and you can even do different things with the same shape. For example this month sterile leaf, I did a solid silhouette and then I also did an outline. So you could put those together. It looks like a screen print. For any shape you use to create your stamps, there are a lot of different options for the layout. 6. Combining Stamp Styles: Let's go ahead and play around with some of these stamps that I've created. I'm going to delete everything else on my canvas so I have a clean canvas. I'll click on the layer and click "Fill" and then I can fill this canvas with this color. I'm going to use white as my printing color. All of my stamps that I'll lay down, I'll use white, so it's as if I'm printing white ink on a colored piece of paper. I'll create a new layer for my first stamp and click on my vine brush that I just created and then I'll tap that one time. You may need to click the Move Tool and click Rotate depending on if your canvas is turned or if the brush itself was made turned. I'll lay down this stamp over on the side here and then I think I want to have another one of those vines in my composition. So I'll create a new layer, click it again, rotate, and whenever I use the same brush twice, I like to flip it horizontally and turn it a little bit so that it doesn't look so similar. I'm going to put this one a little bit offset, that way it doesn't look quite like the one that's over here. Next thing we're going to bring in another color and I'm going to create some animals here that are in a different color. So I made a giraffe's stamp using the same process that we used for the bird. I created a silhouette of the giraffe and then I removed all of these little spots and some lines in the tail. I'll put this giraffe down here in the center. Again, I can't make this brush any bigger, I can only make it smaller. I don't really like the size of that, so I'm going to delete it, create a new layer, increase the size of that brush a little bit, and then stamp it again, so that size looks better to me. It fills the canvas a little more. I'll put one giraffe here and then I can decide if these are going to overlap or if they're going to be separate. I'm going to let all my elements overlap a little bit. I'll click the Plus symbol and I'm going to add another giraffe at a smaller size and I'm doing this again on another layer. I'll put him over here behind this vine and reduce the size a little bit. I am trying to make them on the same ground level here, so I want their feet to be similar. I could put them together close or I could put one over here. I think I'll put them together for now, but I can always move them because they're on different layers. For my next layer I'm going to add in some of the birds. So we created for the first project. You can see now that I have this bird, I can use this in any composition that I create. Just because I used it in the last piece doesn't mean I can then use it again on this project. Let's add a bird in the sky over here and then we can add a smaller one. I'm going to flip that horizontally. Again, anytime I'm changing the size, I'm making sure that magnetic is selected so that I don't distort the proportions of my bird. So I'm happy with that, I'm going to create a new layer and start adding some more plants. I feel like the animals are the center important part of this piece so mainly, the plants frame those. I'll go back to white as my color by double-clicking in the white area and then I'll start adding some more flowers. So these are all brushes that come along with the download set. So you can feel free to play around with these and I'm just going to take a few minutes to add a bunch of different flowers that I want to use and then we'll add in the stem texture last. You can also add some hand-drawn elements in here. So I dropped these flowers onto the canvas and I really want them to have a stem so they kind of make sense in the composition. I can just grab my liner-cut thin brush and just add in a stem wherever it makes sense for this flower. I'm happy with the amount of flowers and leaves that are in there now, but you could certainly keep going and just fill up the whole page. One thing I do want to do now is start adding some texture in. I'm happy with this composition. I don't think I'm going to change anything so I feel confident with just merging all of my animals onto one layer and then merging all of my white plants. I'm just pinching to bring all those together. These vines, I think I'll move above the animals so that the animals are behind everything. Now I've got all my white on one layer and all my yellow on one layer and I'll start with my yellow layer with the stem texture. As always, I like to duplicate those layers and make the originals invisible so that I can always step back to those originals. I'm just going to keep those duplicates as the ones that I work with now. I've got my stem texture and I'm on my yellow layer. I'm going to zoom in and just do some light texture on these birds and giraffes, and then the same thing on the plants. Now that I have a lot of nice texture on this piece, I can kind of decide if I want to also add some texture to the background. If I do that, I'll do it on a separate layer and I'll get that color I'm using now and choose a slightly lighter or slightly darker color, I'll go with lighter for now. I'm on a new layer. I've got my paint brush and I'm going to use this spots brush. This is one I created out of some little paint drips and let's put a slightly lighter color here. You can see that it adds just a tiny bit of texture to the back and you can go as dramatic as you want with this, or you don't have to add any texture at all. It's totally up to you. This can just look like a paper texture. The last thing I might do is try out another color version. Let's say for example, I might try black and white. What I can do is go to my gallery, click "Select," click on the image and click Duplicate. That way I can start creating another color version without disturbing my original. So if I want to go back to that original color version, it's always there for me. But now I can just feel free to totally play around with this color without worrying about ruining my original. I'm going to go to this color layer and I think I'm going to make that black. So I'll choose black as my color, click on the Layer and click "Fill." I'll turn off my background texture for now. I'll go to my yellow animal layer, swipe right to alpha lock that or you can click on the Menu and click Alpha Lock, then you can choose white as the color and click "Fill Layer." Now we have up here black and white image. I could also add a little white texture to that background by creating a new layer and getting my spots brush and I'll make that a little bit bigger, just go through and add a little bit of spotting. It's totally up to you in terms of color and composition. My suggestion is just to play around with a lot of different options. Usually, the first thing you try is not going to be your favorite, but if you just keep working with it, changing colors, changing the arrangement, eventually you'll find something you like. I'll go ahead and call this piece finished so we can move on to the next project. 7. Designing a Bouquet: So for this next piece, I want to combine some lettering with a floral bouquet and in the bouquet, I want to combine some prints like we did in the last project, and also some hand-drawn elements. So we'll have a lot of variation on this piece. The first thing I want to do is set my background color, so I'll go to a new layer, choose a color I like, click on the layer, and click "fill". Then I'll create a new layer and I'll get black is my color, this is just going to be a sketch layer. So I'm going to use the [inaudible] pencil and I'm just going to take a minute to lay out this composition. Now I have an idea of what text I want to use and where I want it to be placed and especially, I wanted to know how big my bouquet can be. So once you create your texts, you know exactly how much space you have to fill. The next thing I want to do is add in my text. So you can do this by hand lettering if you like lettering or you could use a font or you could trace a font. So what I'm going to use here is a font that I created. I'm going to use the Over app to create my text. Over is an app that makes it really easy to add text into your images and procreate, so I recommend downloading that if you haven't tried it already. If you click the "Create" button here, you can choose a background color, and I'll choose transparent as my background and then I'll choose square as the ratio because my canvas is square. I'll click the check symbol to open the image, and then I'll click "Text" to start adding text. Now I can just start typing and on this line here you can choose the font. I'm going to use a font that I created and if you want to learn how to make your own font, I created a class on how to create a font on your iPad. So if you like this font and you want to give it a try, you can easily create your own font, but I'll also put mine up as a free download for this class, so you can pick up this font too. I'll click the check symbol here, and then click "Size" to increase the size and I'll just pull this slider here until it's the size that I like and then I'll click the check symbol and then up here we have the share button and I'm going to click "More export options" here and click "Save to photos". That's going to save this as a transparent file with no background. I'll click the Home button and go back to procreate. Click the "Tool symbol", Image, Insert a photo, and then find that photo and it's actually going to show up as blank because it's a transparent background with white text. I'm actually going to click right here in that empty space and there's my image. So make sure magnetic is on because you don't want to distort your text and I'm just going to take a minute to size this just as I wanted to be. That looks good and I have magnetic on here. I am getting this little line that's telling me the text is in the very center of the canvas. So that's a great way to keep your text really even. Click the "Move tool" to set that and now I need to move this text down here. I'll click the "Selection tool" and make sure freehand is selected. Then I just circle that text, click the "Move tool" and bring this down and again, I'm getting that middle magnetic bar that's helping me put this in the very center. Now I can click the "Move tool" to set that and now I can start adding in my bouquet. I like to start by adding in the stems. I'm going to click a color I like for the first stem and choose the linocut thin brush on a medium size and then I'll just come in and pull the stem down to a central point and I think I'll do two stems with the same color and then two more stems with the darker color, just add a little bit of variation. Next, I want to start adding in some flowers, so I'll do that each flower on a new layer. I'll get a color I like here and then click on the flower that I created and click one time, makes sure magnetic is selected and then I can move that around to be right on that little stem and it's okay if there is a little bit of overlap between the stem and the flower here because I can always erase that later. So don't worry too much about overlapping as long as you have everything on separate layers and I like to just take care of the overlapping last, I think that's easiest. I'm going to continue the same process with some more flowers. I also want to add in some hand-drawn flowers. So on a new layer, I'm going to come to this stem here and I'm going to make my sketch layer invisible because it's starting to get a little bit distracting. I'm going to go to this new layer, and with my linocut thin brush, I'm going to do a kind of thick then petal, so it's thin on one side, thick on the other side. I'm happy with that flower, I'm going to create a new layer and create another flower with this color and this one, I'm going to let just loop around behind my other flowers and I think I'm also going to pull this red flower behind the other ones because I think it just looks a little nicer when it's behind. I can also change the size, I wish it was a little bit smaller. It seems like it's dominating a little bit too much of the attention. I'm going to make it a little smaller and I've got magnetic on, so I don't distort the proportions and okay, I'm happy with that. Now I'm going to grab my eraser tool with the linocut thin brush and just come in and cut away some little marks to show the shape of this petal. So next I want to add in some vines, so I'll create a new layer and get a green color that I like and one of my vines that I created and then just stamp that down and you can see this is a little bit strange the way it overlaps. So I'm just going to drag this vine to the very back, so it's under all my other layers and now it looks a little bit better. You can play around with moving these layers and seeing which one looks best on top. I'm going to go ahead and keep playing around with adding some more pieces here. 8. Filling in Blank Spaces: I like the way this bouquet looks, but I want to add some little white springs all around the bouquet to reference the white and the tags and just add a little bit of variation in the middle. I'm going to create a stamp for that, and the easiest way for me is just to make everything invisible and just create the stamp right here, so, get black is my color. I'm going to do this as a branch style, and then I'll just create some smaller branches that come off the side. You can see I'm pulling towards the base of these twigs because with this brush, it's easier to start out small and get larger. It's really hard to start out large and gets smaller. One important thing to keep in mind with these branches is that the center should be the thickest branch, everything else should be thinner, so, it's important to start out with your main branch being thick enough. Now I'm just going to add some little circles on the top here, and I'm trying to make these circles a little bit jagged, because if you are carving this with a lineup cut tool or a woodcut tool, it would be really hard to get a perfect circle, so, I'm trying to let these be a little bit wobbly and off. Now that I'm happy with that twig, I can just click "Share", save it as a JPEG, and turn this into a brush. Now I can make my brush layer invisible, and go back to my bouquet layer, and continue with my bouquet. I'm going to do these sprigs in white. If your white is my color and I'm on a new layer, and then I'll just add these little sprigs in. I'm going to move all this to the back, I think these sprigs tend to look better if they're peeking out from the back and let the bold flowers be the centerpiece. Okay. So I'm happy with that layer, the only thing that I'm going to change at this point, is removing some of this overlapping. You can see, it's a little difficult to see this flower because I've got all these other pieces overlapping. What I'm going to do, is go to each layer that's overlapping and just erase it. This is optional, you may like the overlapping and may fit well with your style, but for me personally I like to remove it. I'm happy with how this bouquet looks, so, now I'm going to go ahead and add some texture. Over my beige layer, I'm going to get a light beige color, and get my spots brush, and just add a little bit of sparkling to the back, then I'm going to go to my white layer and get my stamp texture eraser, and I'm going to duplicate that white layer, because I'm not sure if I'm going to like this or not, so, I'll make that first one invisible and work on the second layer. I'm just going to zoom in so you can really see how this looks. Now I'm going to do the same thing with my flowers, just adding in a little bit of texture with each one. At this point, you could make some color changes if you'd like, let's say you don't really like that orange, you could either change it to a different color by alpha locking, choosing a different color, and then clicking the layer and clicking Fill, that's one option. Another option is to use the hue saturation brightness tool and just play around with the hue on that one element. [Background] Then you can do that for the whole piece or individual elements. I will go ahead and call this piece finished. I hope you enjoyed this class and that you feel inspired to start creating your own block prints? If you liked this class, you may like some of my other classes where I cover a lot more ways to design and paint on your iPad, like how to create modern folk art illustrations, and how to paint realistic watercolors using the free downloadable brushes I created. Check those out on my profile if you want to see more. Also, I share a lot of free downloads on my site. If you want to get more downloads like the ones you got for this class, check on my site, and I would absolutely love to see the final project that you create for this class, so, please share what you make. You can do that here on skill share in the project section or you could tag me on Instagram or Facebook. If you have any questions about the process you learned in this class, please feel free to reach out to me. You can now find on my discussion here on skill share, or you could contact with through my website. Thanks so much for watching, and I'll see you again next time. Bye bye.