Stunning Stained Glass in Procreate | Lisa Bardot | Skillshare
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Stunning Stained Glass in Procreate

teacher avatar Lisa Bardot, Happy Art-Making!

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      4:53

    • 2.

      Class Project

      1:58

    • 3.

      Tools & Resources

      3:07

    • 4.

      Stained Glass Technique Overview

      0:50

    • 5.

      Technique Part 1: Creating Lead Lines

      7:26

    • 6.

      Technique Part 2: Colorizing Pieces

      5:43

    • 7.

      Technique Part 3: Adding Glass Texture

      4:58

    • 8.

      Technique Part 4: Lighting Effects

      9:44

    • 9.

      Make Stained Glass from Existing Art

      0:53

    • 10.

      Existing Art: Choosing a Piece to Convert

      3:13

    • 11.

      Existing Art: Simplify the Subject

      15:45

    • 12.

      Existing Art: Choosing Colors

      6:27

    • 13.

      Existing Art: Texture Manipulation

      4:32

    • 14.

      Existing Art: Lighting Effects

      5:10

    • 15.

      Existing Art: Adding a Background

      3:39

    • 16.

      Speed Paint: Converting to Stained Glass

      7:15

    • 17.

      More Converted Pieces

      4:02

    • 18.

      Designing from Stained Glass from Scratch

      0:53

    • 19.

      From Scratch: Sketching from References

      16:13

    • 20.

      From Scratch: Creating Lead Lines

      14:54

    • 21.

      From Scratch: Colorizing in Layers

      14:19

    • 22.

      From Scratch: Texture Overlays

      7:54

    • 23.

      From Scratch: Lighting Effects + Background

      7:03

    • 24.

      Merging Stained Glass Layers

      4:49

    • 25.

      On Your Own

      1:20

    • 26.

      Conclusion

      0:55

    • 27.

      Time Lapses and Additional Artwork

      3:49

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About This Class

Get ready to play with light and color while making breathtaking art!

I think stained glass is so beautiful, I love the unique textures, the swirls of color and organic patterns, and the way the light glistens through the glass. Creating physical stained glass art is no easy feat. It requires specialized equipment, and handling sharp pieces of glass, working with scorching hot tools. So I figured out a way to create gorgeous glass art...the digital way! Let's make Stunning Stained Glass in Procreate!

This class is great for color-and-texture-loving artists looking to explore a new medium, or who love the idea of stained glass but don't want to invest in specialized tools, handle sharp pieces of glass, or use hot tools. Learn new skills while making stunning art. You're going to love what you'll create!

In this class, we'll cover:

  • The qualities of stained glass
  • How to simplify a complex subject
  • An easy way to choose colors for your glass pieces
  • Creating realistic soldering effects
  • Add depth and realism with lighting effects
  • Making your glass glisten with glare
  • Learn how to use Procreate's blend modes
  • Use filters and adjustments like blur, noise, and the curves adjustment
  • Plus plenty more helpful Procreate tips along the way!

This class will teach you valuable illustration and design skills, while also teaching you some nifty Procreate features.

Breathe New Life into Past Artwork
In the course, I give you step-by-step instructions on how to give your old art a stunning stained glass glow-up! Everything from selecting a piece to simplifying your subject matter.

Create Original Works of Art
Learn how to create your own designs, starting with a subject and simplifying it for the stained glass medium. It's so fun to make art without getting too caught up in the details.

I'm Lisa Bardot, an illustration artist, teacher, and all-around creative person. I've taught millions of people around the world how to find their creativity through drawing on the iPad. I love experimenting with different visual styles and sharing my knowledge with others. 

New to Procreate? Check out my Procreate for Beginners Tutorial
I will explain every step along the way so you can learn, no matter your current skill level. This class is perfect for beginners and advanced artists who want to learn an exciting new technique.

Students get my Stained Glass Toolkit packed with high-quality resources. This kit includes:

  • 16 original glass textures that I created by photographing and digitizing pieces of real stained glass
  • 7 starter designs to get you making art right away
  • Procreate brush set for making digital stained glass

Find the toolkit in the Projects & Resources tab of the class page.

Make Awesome Stuff with Your Stained Glass Art
When it comes to stained glass, the possibilities are endless! You can use your artwork in so many ways. Make them into stickers, print them on clothing, as wall art, and more. I even teach you how to make an Instagram sticker with one of your designs in the class!

By the end of this class, you'll have made three stunning digital stained glass pieces, and you'll be well-equipped to create your own original stained glass designs. Let's get started making stunning stained glass in Procreate! See you in class!

Share this class with a friend (and gift them 1 month of FREE Skillshare) using this link: https://skl.sh/3UtDL5j

Meet Your Teacher

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Lisa Bardot

Happy Art-Making!

Top Teacher

 

I am an illustration artist, teacher, and all-around creative person based in California, USA. With the iPad and Procreate as my tool of choice, I create industry-leading digital brushes, tutorials, and art-making resources to help beginners and experienced artists alike find joy in creating. My educational videos about drawing and illustration have been viewed millions of times, and I've received high praise for my thorough, concise, and fun teaching style.

I own Bardot Brush where I create Procreate brushes and tools beloved by artists. I also run Making Art Everyday, providing drawing prompts and challenges to help people overcome creative fears and develop an art-making practice, as well as Art Maker's Club,... See full profile

Level: Beginner

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Stained glass is such a beautiful art media. I love the way that light shines the tiny pieces of colorful glass to create a truly sturdy work of art. It really is magical. I love stained glass and I love making art on my iPad. I developed a way to create beautiful stained glass pieces the digital way, with no sharp glass or hot tools required. In just a few steps, you can create colorful, eye-catching works of art that are so beautiful, you'll want to hang them in your home. Experience the magic of light and color while making gorgeous glass art. Welcome to Stunning Stained Glass in Procreate. In this class, I'll teach you my method for creating amazing digital stained glass in Procreate. I'll take you through the ins and outs of the stained glass technique while making your first piece. Then you learn how to breathe new life into old art by taking a piece that you've drawn in the past and making it into stained glass. Finally, I'll teach you how to create a stained glass designed from scratch. How to choose a subject, look at reference photos, and create a one-of-a-kind digital stained glass piece. I'm Lisa Bardot, and I help people find their creativity through drawing on the iPad. I am an illustration artist, teacher, and all-around creative person. You might know me from my YouTube channel where I teach people about drawing, illustrations, and all things Procreate. I love exploring new artistic styles within digital art, and that's why I fell in love with stained glass. My first attempt at doing real stained glass showed me that there's a pretty steep learning curve. Not to mention that physical stained glass requires specialized equipment, handling sharp pieces of glass, and using scorching hot soldering tools. Probably not your idea of a relaxing time. That's why I love creating stained glass art in Procreate. I can do it anywhere at anytime and still get that satisfying feeling of making something amazing. [MUSIC] In this class, you'll learn about the characteristics of stained glass, how to digitally cut glass shapes, apply realistic lighting effects, and more. First, you learn lots of other useful art skills that you can apply to all illustration styles, like how to simplify a complex subject. You'll also learn plenty of digital art skills like working with layers and clipping mask, blend modes, using filters and adjustments like blur, noise, and purpose. Plus you'll learn plenty of Procreate tips and tricks along the way. By the end of the class, you'll have created three beautiful stained glass pieces, and you'll be fully equipped to start creating your own original stained glass designs. When it comes to subject matter for stained glass, the sky's the limit. You can create pieces depicting nature, flowers, insects, food, objects, and more. There's lots of ways to use your stained glass art pieces. You can create wall art sell them as prints, use them to make stickers on apparel, and so much more. I even have lesson showing you how to use your stained glass art to create a cute little Instagram sticker. I'll be teaching in this class using an iPad, and of course, the wonderful drawing and painting app Procreate. I've been using Procreate for over eight years. I've been able to experiment with so many different visual styles and techniques, and I love sharing my knowledge with others. It's great if you have some experience with using Procreate, but I'll be walking you through every single step so you can follow along, no matter your skill level. This class is great for both beginners and more experienced artists who want a little bit of creative invigoration. As a student of this class, you'll get a digital stained glass toolkit packed with assets to aid you in the process. You'll get 16 stained glass textures that I made from real stained glass. I purchased some beautiful pieces of glass from the local glass art supply store, illuminated, photograph, and edited them to create one textures that you can use in your artwork. You'll also get a Procreate brushset with brushes I designed specifically for making stained glass art. You'll get seven starter designs. These are Procreate files for when you just want to get started making a piece without worrying about what to draw. Get ready to play with shape, line, light, and color while exploring a new style and creating spectacular works of art. Let's make stunning stained glass in Procreate. 2. Class Project: [MUSIC] Your project for this class will be to create your own original stained glass design. In the class, I'm going to take you through creating three stained glass pieces. In the first section of this class, I'll take you through the complete digital stained glass process and you'll create this really cute orange slice design, it's a really simple design that's going to be nice and easy for our first piece. In the next section, I'll teach you how to take an old piece of art and make it into a new stained glass piece. You follow along with me and create this fun stained glass skate out of this old illustration that I drew many years ago. I'll talk about how to select a piece that will work well as a stained glass, as well as to how to simplify some of the details. In this section, you'll also pick up a few new tips about creating stained glass art in Procreate, like how to add a frame around your subject, how to add a background, how to manipulate some of the textures, and more. Finally, in the last section, we'll be creating a stained glass design from scratch. I'll be showing you my process of creating this original dandy lion design in stained glass. In this section, you'll select a subject, we'll look at reference photos, and then we'll talk about how we can take a really complex subject and turn it into something more simple that will work with stained glass. I'll have even more stained glass tips to share with you in this section, like how to adjust line weight, what to do if you mess up your lead lines or run out of layers, how to adjust colors, how to fix problems with your blend modes, and more. Once you have done all of that, you will be ready to create your own original stained glass design. That is going to be your project for this class. I want you to choose a subject. It can be anything you want. There's all kinds of subjects that make great stained glass pieces, so pick whatever you want and then create your own original stained glass design. Once you've done that, you can go ahead and post your original design in the class project section. I cannot wait to see what you create. 3. Tools & Resources: As a student of this class, you get access to the stained glass toolkit that I created to aid you in the process of creating digital stained glass. You'll find a link to download the stained glass resource pack on the Project and Resources tab of the Skillshare class page. Up next, I'm going to show you what to do once you've downloaded the file, how to open it up and store it on your iPad for easy access as we're making stained glass pieces. Also, show you how to import the brushes into Procreate so you're all set up and ready to go. After you've downloaded the stained glass resource pack, you're going to want to go into your Files app on your iPad, and you'll find it here in the Downloads folder. Here is the zip file of the Stunning Stained Glass resource pack. To open it up, you're just going to tap it, and then you can open up that folder that was just created. Inside, you'll find three different items. The first is the Stained Glass Textures. Inside here, you'll find 16 different stained glass textures. I created these using real stained glass. I went to a stained glass supply store, I purchased a bunch of beautiful pieces of glass. I scanned and photographed them, and then manipulated them to create these wonderful textures that you can use in your digital standard pieces. Next step is the Stained Glass Toolkit brush set. We can import this into Procreate just by tapping on it. It will automatically import to Procreate, and then you'll find it here in your brush set list up at the top. In this brush set, we have five different brushes. We have two lead line brushes, and this is what we're going to use to create those black lines that are in between the pieces of glass in our stained glass pieces, the soft color helper is a really fun brush that I'll get to show you in a little bit, and then we have two brushes that help you create a glare effect on your stained glass pieces. Then we have the Starter Designs. In this folder are seven Procreate files with designs that you can use to get started on a stained glass piece, without having to worry about what you're going to draw or making your own design. To open any of these up in Procreate, all you have to do is tap them and then it will open up in Procreate, just like this. Each file has a sketch, and then right above that is a layer where you can get started making your stained glass art. I've numbered these pieces in order from a more simple design to more complex. We've got a few simple designs, and then they progressively a little bit more difficult. I definitely would start with these easier ones, before progressing to the more difficult ones. We're actually going to be using this first one in our very first lesson. I recommend storing all of your stained glass resources here in the On My iPad section of your files app. To do that, you're going to go back to your Downloads folder, you're going to tap and drag this folder and drop it on the On My iPad, little tab over here. Then there you'll see the folder in your On My iPad section. Once you've downloaded and saved your files and imported the brush set into Procreate, we're ready to start with our first lesson, learning the technique for creating digital stained glass. 4. Stained Glass Technique Overview: Welcome to Section 1. It's time to create your first stained glass piece. In this section, I'm going to take you through the entire process of doing the stained glass technique in Procreate. We're going to be using one of my starter designs to do this, the cute little orange slice. It's a very simple design that will help you learn the ins and outs of this technique and get you started. Here's a quick overview of the digital stained glass process before we get started and show you everything. First, you would create a sketch of your artwork, then you would trace over your sketch, creating the lead lines in black using one of the letting brushes. Once you've finished, you're going to colorize the individual pieces of glass before adding some texture. Then we're going to create a 3D effect on these black lines as well as create some lighting effects. Let's get into it. 5. Technique Part 1: Creating Lead Lines: Now I'm going to take you through the entire technique of creating stained glass art in Procreate. To do this, we're going to be using one of my pre-made designs which you'll find in the resource pack. Let's go into the Stained Glass source folder, and then we're going to go into starter designs. We're going to be using the very first one here, which is called orange slice. Just go ahead and tap it and that should open right up into Procreate. After you've created a sketch like the one I've got here for you, the first step in the process is to create our lead lines. Those are the black lines that you see in a stained glass piece. They are essentially the metal that holds the different pieces of glass together, so we're going to go ahead and create those first. We're going to go up to the brushes, and I'm here in the stained glass set. I'm going to choose the Bumpy Lead Lines. I have two different ones. One is if you want smooth lines and if you want something a little more textured, you can choose the bumpy lead lines. That's the one that I'm going to be using. Then I'm going to go to my colors, and I'm just going to choose black. My brush size right now is at about 20 percent. You can just make a mark and just see if that's the thickness of line you want. You can go a little bit bigger if you wanted to have thicker lines, but I feel like that 20 percent is probably the sweet spot. Here's your first tip. If you want to make sure that you have consistent line weight no matter what you're drawing, it's a good idea to save your brush size. You can do that by tapping this gray rectangle on this slider bar and then tap the plus sign. That will save that particular size. If you accidentally change your brush size, you can just tap that and it'll go right back to that size. Let's get started drawing our lead lines. All we're going to do is just trace over the lines that I've already provided here. When we're doing something like this slice, I find it's a lot easier to draw the entire shape than to start and stop. Like if you were going to start and stop like that, I recommend drawing the entire curve like this. If you hold your pencil down when you reach the end of your curve, the quick shape feature will invoke and you can use that to fine-tune your lines. You can go up here where it says, Edit Shape and you can move it around. I'll use that quick shape feature a lot, when I'm doing these really perfectly round lines. Then I'll do another one. I'll also use quick shape here. Again, hold down when I get to the end of my line, and then I tap Edit Shape up here at the top and I can put that into position. Then I'm going to go ahead and draw these middle sections. One thing to note is you want to be careful when you're doing these, that you don't go beyond the line to make like a little piece like that. You want to make sure you stop before you get to the end of the line. Just be a little careful when you're doing that. It should look something like that. This does take a little bit of practice. If you find that it's hard for you to get it to perfectly line up, I do have a trick for that, which basically, is using multiple layers, but I'll show you that actually as we move on to another part of this illustration. I have done my orange slice now, I'll do the flower next. I'm actually going to use a different layer to do this. I'm going to go up to my Layers and I'm going to tap the plus sign to create a new layer. Now, I'm going to go ahead and trace over the flower. As I'm drawing this, you're imagining that each section or shape within the black lines is a different piece of glass. There's my flower. I'm going to go ahead and do the leaf last and then I'm going to clean it up. I'll create a new layer for the leaf, and then I will draw the leaf shape. Next, I have to draw these diagonal sections in-between. I did mention if you're having trouble getting your lines to line up or you're going over too far or something like that, here's a cool trick to help you out with that. If you find you're having that problem, go ahead and just create a new layer. Then if you do have that problem where you're going over, it's really easy to take your eraser. I just use the same brush to erase with, and then you can erase this overlap. Because it's on a separate layer from the leaf; the edge of the outline of the leaf, it's really easy to just erase what you don't need. If you're having trouble getting that little bit going off the edge, that's what you can do. You can clean it up really easily if it's on a separate layer. We've drawn all the elements of this illustration, now it's time to go on with our eraser and clean things up. I'm going to start with the orange slice. Basically, anywhere that is behind something else, I want to erase those lines. The flower is in the front, so I'm just going to erase any lines of the orange that I don't need, and I'm going to actually put the leaf behind the orange, so I'll leave that line intact for now. I'll go over to my leaf layer and I can erase that line, and I think there's a little bit right there I need to get rid of, and that should do it. I think that's all the lines. I forgot one right here. There we go. All of our lead lines are done. We'll go up to our layers and we're going to turn off the sketch layer just by unchecking this little box. Now we need all of these lead lines to be on one layer. Now we could merge all of these layers together, but I like to retain my layers separate whenever possible. Here's a non-destructive way to merge everything together. We're going to go down to here where it says Background Color and uncheck it to turn off the background. Then you take three fingers and swipe down on your screen to invoke copy paste, and then you're going to choose Copy all. Then you'll want to tap to the top layer because we're going to paste this above all the other layers so tap on the top layer. Take three fingers and swipe down again, and then you're going to choose Paste. If we go up to our Layers, you'll see that we have a layer now with all of those leading lines all merged together, and we have our original layers still intact. I'm going to go and turn on the background color, and then label all these other layers into a group. I like to keep them separated, just in case, I want to go back and make changes to something. Let me go ahead and just select them all. Tap, swipe to the right on all the layers and then choose Group and close the group by tapping this little carrot, and then I'll uncheck it to hide it. Now that we've done all of that, we're ready to start adding in our colored pieces of glass. We're going to be colorizing this next. 6. Technique Part 2: Colorizing Pieces: [MUSIC] Now that we've got our lead lines all finished, all in one layer, we're ready to start colorizing the individual pieces of glass. Procreate has a really great feature that we're going to use for this called a reference layer. Let's go ahead and turn that on. We're going to go up two the layers. We're going to tap on our layer with all the merged lead lines, and then we're going to tap where it says reference right here. As you can see, that layer says reference now. We're going to go ahead and create a new layer by tapping the plus sign and then place the layer below the lead lines layer that says reference. Now, if I select a color like orange, I can use color drop to fill in these shapes on a separate layer, using the shapes on this layer, that's the reference. It's really handy for what we're about to do next. Now, I could go in and start color dropping into my design here. But what I'm actually going to do is use one of the brushes from the toolkit in order to help out with this process. I'm going to go ahead and undo that, and then I'll go up to my brushes and I'm going to choose the Soft Color Helper. I have orange as my color. Now when I color in an area with this brush, and I'm being very loose here and that's totally fine, you can see that it creates all of these different color variations within the area that I've just colored, and the reason why this is helpful is because when I'm colorizing these different sections of glass, I like each one to just be slightly different. I don't like them to all be the same color even if it is an area that would all be the same color. I like them to have slight variations, so this is going to help with that. Before I show you that part, I'm going to go ahead and just color in these other areas very loosely. I'm going to choose a yellowish green to paint over the leaf a little bit. Maybe I'll get a cooler, darker green for this side of the leaf like that. Then for the flower, I'm going to choose a warm off white, something similar to that. Just a very like almost yellowish off white. Then I'm just going to loosely paint in these little petals, and then I'll choose maybe a darker, warmer color for the center, something like that. I've got my basic colors laid down and I'm just going to be using these colors to sample as I go ahead and fill in all these sections of my glass. I'm going to go ahead and create a new layer right now. I'm going to tap the plus sign. My new layer is below the lead lines, but above the Soft Color that we just did. Now, all I have to do is use my finger and just select a color within these colors, and then I can color drop that color into the section. Now if I go over here, maybe I'll get one that's a little more reddish and I can drop that one in and it's just slightly off. Maybe I'll grab this color and do this section. Maybe I'll grab this lighter orange for right there, and then maybe this darker orange right there. I'm just sampling a color within these colors that I've already laid down. I'll do the peel next with this darker orange, and we'll do that. The orange is all done, and as you can see, I have lots of different tones in there. Now, I'll do the leaf next. I'm just going to select a color within that shape. Select slightly different color for the next piece, and this is basically the process of coloring, is just like selecting and color filling, and it sometimes helps if you zoom in, so go ahead and finish up all the colors. This one didn't get a lot of color in, so I'm just going to take that color. Then the darker green. Go ahead and fill all those in as well. Sometimes it's hard to see exactly what you're dropping into, but I'll show you how you can double-check that you're filling them all in totally. If you turn off this layer that has the Soft Color, you can make sure that you didn't miss anything. Obviously, I haven't done the flower yet, but we're going to do that next. One thing I'd like to mention here as I color in this petal, is you want to be careful that you don't color drop anywhere on top of the black like this. You'll notice I have this white outline or it's whatever color I've selected. But I have this outline around everything, and basically, we just color dropped the actual shape of the lines, so you want to make sure you don't do that. Just be careful that you're actually color dropping within these shapes and not on the black lines. I'll undo that and I'll fill these in. They're all a little different. Almost done. I will get one a little darker using that area, and the middle. Now, I think I've colored dropped everything. I'm going to go ahead and turn off that Soft Coloring layer, and I can verify that, yes, I have colored in everything. If you wanted to fine tune any of these colors, you could definitely do that. Now, if I wanted to make this color a little darker, I just select it, choose a slightly darker color, and then I have a little more variation there. But overall, I think this is looking really good. The next step is going to be to add the stain glass texture. 7. Technique Part 3: Adding Glass Texture: Now we're ready to add some beautiful stained glass texture to this artwork. We're going to go up to our Layers and we're going to be placing the texture right above the layer that has all of the stained glass colored pieces. Just make sure that layer is selected. Then you're going to go up to your Actions menu, Add, and then choose Insert a file. Because we have these saved on my iPad section of the files app, we want to do Insert a file. You could alternatively save these textures to your Camera Roll, and then you would choose Insert a photo, but I think it's a little more organized to do it this way. Insert a file. Then here I am on my iPad section. I'm just going to go ahead and open up the Stained Glass Resources folder and then I'm going to open up the Stained Glass Textures. I'm going to go ahead and choose one of these pieces. You can choose any one that you want, but I think I'm going to choose the one called crackles here. It will import into your screen. I can zoom out a little bit so you can see this, but you just want to make sure that the texture is over the entire design. It doesn't necessarily have to cover the entire canvas, but it does need to cover the design. All these texture images are all a little bit different; they're not all the same rectangle, they're not all square. They're basically, whatever the size of the glass was that I photographed, so they're all a little bit different. But you can always resize it if you need to, but this is just fine as it is. Once you've imported the image, now we're going to use a blend mode to make it interact with all those colorful pieces that we just colorized. I'm going to go up to my Layers and I'm going to go to layer with a texture. I'm going to tap this little N to access my blend modes. Then I'm going to change it to the overlay blend mode. When you do that now, you can see that those colorful shapes that we just created, now have this beautiful glass texture on them. It looks really nice. Now, if you are doing traditional stained glass, you probably are using lots of different pieces for maybe different sections of a glass and your texture wouldn't be all uniform across the whole design like it is now. I'm going to show you how you can section off pieces and give those pieces a different texture. To do that, we're going to be using the selection tool. I'm going to go up to my Layers and I'm going make sure I select the layer with all the colorized pieces. Then I'm going to go up here to the selection tool, this little S. You just want to make sure that you're using the automatic selection mode. Go ahead and select Automatic. Then you're going to tap into one of these sections. When you tap it, you're going to actually slide left or right to make sure that just that piece is selected. You want this blue line to be as far as possible that way without completely flooding the whole thing. About right there is good. Then once you've done that, you can tap on whatever pieces you want to section off and put a different texture on. Maybe I'll just select every other piece or so. I think that looks pretty good. Now that I've selected all these pieces, I'm going to choose Copy and Paste from this toolbar down at the bottom. If I go to my Layers, you'll see now that I have those pieces all on their own layer. Next, I'm going to move this new layer above my other texture file. I'm just going to drag it above it and then I'm going to add another texture. I'm going to go up to my Actions menu, I'm going to choose Insert a File, and then choose a different texture. I'll use this one called Wash-Water. Again, I just want to make sure that it's completely covering all of my design here. I can actually rotate it. If you wanted to rotate it or have the grain go a different direction, you can do that as well. Then I'm going to go up to my Layers. I just want this texture to be on these shapes, so I'm going to use a clipping mask for that. If I tap this layer and choose Clipping Mask from the menu. Now, what's in this layer will only display within the shapes of the layer right below it, so within those other pieces that I sectioned off. Then the last thing to do it is to set the overlay blend mode. I'm going to go to little N and then choose Overlay. As you see, now some of these pieces have a different glass texture. It just adds a little bit of variety and a little bit more realism to the piece. You can do this as many times as you want sectioning off pieces of the glass. If you're doing a leaf like this, you can have all the pieces, have a grain that's going that way or that way, and just play around with your textures in that way. But I think this is looking pretty good. The next step is going to be adding a 3D effect to our lead lines. 8. Technique Part 4: Lighting Effects: [MUSIC] Next we're going to add a 3D effect to these black lead lines. To start, I'm going to go up to my layers and I'm going to select the layer with the black lines. I'm actually going to duplicate this twice. To do that, I'm just going to swipe to the left, choose Duplicate, swipe to the left and duplicate again. Now, I have three copies of that. The one that says reference, we want that one to be in the middle. I'm going to tap and drag that in-between the other two layers. Now, we've got three with the reference one in the middle. Basically, what these layers are going to become is this top layer is going to be, the texture of the lighting and the dark parts of it, this is going to be the highlight in the middle. Then this bottom one is going to be a glow inside the glass pieces. I'll take you through doing that now. I want to first lighten this middle layer because it's going to be our highlight. I'm just going to temporarily turn off the top layer. I just uncheck that box so that now I can just see the one that says reference. I turn off the one right above it. Then I'll use the hue saturation brightness adjustment to lighten it. I'm going to go up to my adjustments menu, which is the little magic wand icon and then I'll choose hue saturation, brightness. Then I'll use this brightness layer to just make it a little bit brighter so it's not black, it's dark gray. Now I can go back to my layers and I'm going to turn on that top layer that I turned off. I'm actually going to select that layer. I'm done with the reference layer. That's all I have to do with that one. Now I'm moving on to the top layer. This is going to be our texture in the dark parts of the letting. The first thing I'm going to do is I'm going to just move it so it's a little offset from where it is currently. I'm going to go up to my transform tool, the little arrow here. I zoomed in a little bit so you can see this, but I'm just moving it slightly off. I'm going down into the right, just a little bit so we can zoom in so you can see just how much. Not a lot, just want a little bit of the lighter color to show. Whatever direction you drag this, you can imagine the light, my light that's hitting the window or whatever this is, it's coming from this way. The light is hitting that way. If I moved it the other way, then the light would be coming from there so you can move in any direction you want, but I did it that way. Then the next thing we're going to do is blur this a little bit to make this kind of transition from dark to light a little softer. It helps in this step to zoom in a lot. That's what I'm doing. I'm going to go to my adjustments menu, and then I'm going to go to gaussian blur. I'm going to blur this layer to about three or four percent. I'm at three percent. It's just like a slight blur, not a lot. Then the next thing I'm going to do is add a little bit of texture to this to make these lead lines look a little textured. I'm going to go back to the adjustments menu. This time I'm going to go to noise. Now that I'm here, I'm just going to slide my pencil across the screen to increase the amount of noise. As you can see, that's how you can control it. I'm doing it maybe like 75 percent. Then I'm going to turn the scale up a little bit, 23 percent is where I have it. Then the octave, I'm going to turn that up to like about half of 50 percent. Now I've got this kind of texture on here, which looks a little too intense. We're going to actually use the curves adjustments to tone it down now. Once you've done your noise, we're going to go back to the adjustments menu and we're going to go to curves. Curves is a great way to increase or decrease the contrast of your selection or what's on your layer. I'll zoom in again. To adjust your curve, all you do is just move this line up or down. If I move it down, everything will get a little bit darker. Then if I grab it over on this side a little bit, move it up, those lighter spots will lighten up. This side of this line controls the dark values, and this side controls light values. If I move these down, my dark values will get darker and then my light values will get lighter. That's how you can control contrast using the curves. I just want a little bit of texture like almost not there. Just a little bit of something, something. This is what my curve looks like, but you can play around and just get the amount of texture that you like for your piece. Then the final step in creating the letting texture and light effects is I'm going to tap on this top layer and I'm going to choose clipping mask. That's going to make that blurred layer only appear within the lines of the layer right below it. It's a little cleaner now. Then the last step is we're going to go back to this bottom copy. Remember we have the three copies, we're going to the bottom copy. This copy is going to be a glow within these shapes, you might see in a real stained glass. The middle of the glass pieces usually the brightest and the areas near the edges are a little bit darker. We're going to tap on this layer. We're going to tap the n and we're going to change the blend mode of this one to color burn. Color burn has a darkening and saturation effect. It makes colors darker and a little bit more saturated, so it'll be perfect for what we're doing next. Then we're going to go over to the adjustments menu and we're going to choose gaussian blur. I'm going to blur that a little bit just so we can start to see that blurred effect. You don't want to go too much because then it'll all get really dark. Just so you can see that there's a little bit of a blur effect. I'm at about five percent. Sometimes it's nice to see the before and after. If it's still looks a little dark, you can always tap here and choose the or adjust this opacity slider, but I think it looks pretty good. Then our last lighting effect to complete the look is to add a little bit of glare like there's light falling on the glass. We'll create a new layer to do that. I'm going to go up to my layers. This new layer is actually going to be placed right above the one that we've turned on color burn, so the one that has this inner glow, we're going to create a layer right above that. I just tap the plus sign and now I have a layer right above that color burn layer. This layer is also going to get a blend mode. We're using a lot of blend modes for this. I'm going to tap on the layer, and this blend mode is going to be AD. AD is a lightening blend mode and actually has a really intense lightning effect. It's going to be perfect for creating this glare. I'm going to go over to my brushes now and I'm going to choose the glare brush. This is a brush that I made specifically for creating this window glare texture. Then for the color, I like to choose a warm color, so I go into the oranges. Then I go pretty much to the center of the color disk, but a little bit higher, a little bit above center. I have this muted brown that's not too dark. Different colors will have different effects. You can always play around to get the look you want. I've got my brush size right now set to 30 percent. I'm just going to go ahead and just draw a few strokes like that. As you can see, it really brightens it up a lot. These glare brushstrokes might look a little bit intense, which is why I've got the glare blender. This blender helps you soften out those glare strokes a little bit and it's designed to be used with the brush, not the smudge tool. Make sure you're using it with the brush. It does not deposit any color, it just blends things around and soften things out so you can just do a few strokes over the stroke you just made to soften them out a little bit, make it a little less intense. I like that. If I go here to my layers, I can see the before and after. It really makes those colors pop a lot. I like the way it looks. That is the complete stained glass effect. Just to recap what our process was, is we drew all of our lead lines in black, we merge them all into one layer, we colorize all the different pieces using the reference layer feature color drop. We also utilize that really cool color helper brush. Then once we had everything colorized, we added our stained glass texture using an overlay blend mode. We even sectioned out some different pieces and added a different texture to them. Then we did our lighting effects. We duplicated the lighting layer, we blurred it a little bit, offset it, added some texture to it and use a clipping mask to create a 3D effect on these lead lines. Then we use color burn to create an inner glow within all these sections. Then finally, we use the glare brush to create these nice shiny areas on our glass using the add blend mode. I'm excited to show you some more pieces that you can create using this technique. Up next, I'm going to be taking one of my older illustrations and showing you how I convert that into a new stained glass piece. 9. Make Stained Glass from Existing Art: [MUSIC] In this section of the class, I'll be teaching you how to take an existing piece of art and turn it into a beautiful stained glass piece. So for this section, we're going to be creating a stained glass piece using this roller skate illustration that I drew in Procreate many years ago. You can find a link to download this image right here in this lesson, so just go ahead and download it and save it to your camera roll. I'm so excited to teach you this part because I think that this method is a really great way to invigorate some of your old work, or if there's a piece that maybe was a little ho-hum before you want to like jazz it up in a new way, or maybe just breathe new life into some of your old art work. I think that converting it into stained glass is a really great way to do that and just see it in a completely different light. So I'm really excited to teach you about how to do this. Let's get started. 10. Existing Art: Choosing a Piece to Convert: In this video I'll be talking to you about some things to look for as you're going through your old artwork in order to select a piece to use to make into a brand new stained glass piece. Some things to look for right off the bat is you want a design or illustration that's pretty simple, has bold shapes, not a lot of super fine details because everything that is like a shape or a different color within the piece is going to have black lines around it. The more detailed it is, the more black lines you'll have, so just something to keep in mind. I've pulled a few of my pieces, and next up I'm going to just talk you through what I'm looking for as I look through those pieces and how I might tackle turning them into stained glass, and then I will walk you through doing one of those pieces in this section. Then at the end of this section, I'll show you the result. I've gone and turned all of those pieces into stained glass, I'll show you those results so you can check those out as well. Let's get started. I went through my artwork and I found a few pieces that I thought might make good stained glass pieces. I'll explain some of the reasons why I chose these particular pieces. This one, for example, it's a very simple shape, not a lot of complexity to it. There's also not a lot of detail or very fine lines or things like that. I definitely could see how I can make the little worm into little sections. This would be a fun shape. This leaf could be easy. That one would be a really simple piece that I think would look really nice. This one is a little bit more complicated, but again, there's some very simple shapes in here like these heart-shaped leaves. I could see these lines becoming sections in a stained glass piece. I probably would simplify these plant shapes that are in the back. This bubbly look right here probably wouldn't be the best, and I simplify what's going on here in the middle. But I think it's something that I could work with. It might just be a little bit more of a complex piece, but I think it would look really great. This flower piece is super simple. I think it would make a great stained glass piece. I would use these shapes but maybe not have all these lines. I could probably use this little shadow shape down here, the round shape here. I don't even know that I would keep these little lines here because every line in a stained glass piece has to connect to something else because they're individual pieces of glass. This one I think would be good. I would just have to change it up just a little bit. Then this one I thought would be super fun. It's a very relatively simple shape. I can see all of these shapes becoming individual pieces of glass, little lightning bolt. I would have to do some simplification with the laces, but overall I think it's super doable. In fact, this will be the piece that I'm going to show you guys how I'm going to convert in this video. I actually have a copy of this piece of art available for you to download so you can follow along with me as we create this skate into a stained glass piece. 11. Existing Art: Simplify the Subject: The first step in the process of taking some of your old artwork and making it into stained glass is to create all of the linework, the lead lines. In this step you're going to be taking your subject and simplifying some of the details in order to make it work for stained glass. I'll be talking to you about some of the choices that I make in this piece so that you can get an idea of some things that you might want to do if you choose your own artwork to create stained glass. Let's go. Here I am in Procreate and I've created a Canvas that is square. The size of this Canvas is 3,500 by 3,500 pixels. I'll begin by just importing that image right onto my Canvas. I'm going to go up to the Actions menu. I'm going to go to Add and then I'm going to choose Insert a photo to access my camera roll, and then I could select that skate and then I'm actually just going to zoom in and zoom out and resize this. It takes up a little bit more space. I don't want to make it too big because I think I'm going to add like a little frame around the whole piece. Overall, I think this is pretty good for the size. I've left a little bit space on top and bottom. Now when you're going through this process of converting something old into a stained glass piece, you could sketch it and sketch out where you want all the lines to be or you can just go for it and start drawing in your lead lines and just figured out as you go. I'll take you through the process of me just starting from there without doing a sketch. The first thing I'll do is go up to my layers and I'm going to tap the little n and I'm just going to reduce the opacity of this drawing. Then I'm going to create a layer right above that. This is where I'm going to start drawing my lead lines. I'm going to switch my color to black, and then I'm going to go to my brushes and I'm going to choose the bumpy lead lines brush. I'm going to start with some of the biggest shapes and then work my way into some of the more fine details like these laces and stuff like that. I'm just going to start by just tracing over the edge of the roller skate. All these different colors that are already in this drawing are going to become different pieces of glass. That part of it is pretty obvious what to do there. I'm just going to go ahead and trace over this whole thing. As much as possible, I tried to make continuous lines because when you start and stop a line, you might have something like that happen, which isn't the end of the world, but it is a little bit cleaner if you can make one continuous line. I'll try and do that right now. Let me connect it there and then I'll do this little lightning bolt neck so always imagined your piece as pieces of glass. Like each little piece has to be a piece of glass. This white area will be one piece of glass. I'm just going to trace over the lightning bolt like this. I'm going to actually connect it down to this piece. This whole thing is one one of glass and I'm going to do the top. Lightning bolt itself will actually be one piece of glass. Never be afraid to undo if you didn't get your line exactly how you wanted it to be. I think I might make that come to a point there. I'm going to try that one more time. There we go. We've got our lightening bolt and I'm going to come back to the laces. I think I'll do that part last. This whole piece could be a shape right here. I'm just going to go ahead and draw the heel of the boot of the skate. Then I can see where I can section like this metal part into pieces. I'm going to just draw that in a little top piece there like that and this piece right here as well. Then this can be a piece right here that connects the wheel. I can't supersede where the wheel is a little bit different right there. Actually, I think this wheel needs to come down a little bit. Let me actually just draw that first a little lower than in my original piece like that. Then I can draw this little connector piece like on this one. I've got my two wheels, then I have the center of the wheel. Now, I know that if this were real glass, I couldn't exactly have like a doughnut shaped piece of glass. Like I don't think it would be possible to cut out a circle out of the middle of it. We're going to have to divide this like doughnut shape into two pieces. You think about what would the most natural thing to do. You could divide it up however you want, you could do it into a bunch of little pieces like that if you wanted, but I want to keep it as simple as possible so I'm just going to draw a line there. This C shaped or arch, that could be a piece of glass for sure. Naturally, I could also make the bottom half of this skate like that color a little darker since it's the bottom, that could work. Let's do this like little stopper thing. Then we'll connect that there and I think that's just about everything. The last thing I want to do is these laces. Now you want to think about how you could possibly do this. You can't exactly draw something like this. You could, but it wouldn't really make a lot of sense. Like the glass would probably be broken more and connect and have all these little pieces which you could do. But I think it just adds an element of complexity that I don't necessarily need. I'm going to try and simplify this a little bit. I do want to show the individual laces. I'm just going to draw the leg like the tongue of this skate. I'm just going to draw a line coming down and around like that. We'll do that one more time. Something like that. Then, to do the laces, I can actually just section this little piece this long piece, which naturally you might do anyways, because it's a big piece. Just to add a little shoelaces to put this long, skinny piece of glass into lots of little sections, that's not there. That's how I'm going to tackle the laces, I think. You could keep going and maybe add little pieces of glass here for the holes that are in with the laces. You could do that. I don't think that would be a bad thing to do. Maybe I'll go ahead and do that. Now I've got something that looks like laces with the holes. It's not exact, but I think that it'll work for the stained glass piece. Now that I've done all of that, everything that's actually in the illustration, I'm going to go up to my layers, and I'm just going to turn off that layer. Here's where I can start to get a little bit creative and decide what else I want to add to this piece. Because I think it'd be really great to put it in a little frame. I like to having a colored background like I did in the other piece. I think I'm going to make it a white skate or off white maybe. I'm going to go up to my layers and I'm going to tap the plus sign to create a new layer. I think I'm going to do a square frame. I'm going to use the quick shape feature. I'm just going to draw a square. Then when I finish, I'm going to keep my pencil on the screen so it snaps into a more angular shape. Then when I let go, I'm going to tap up here where it says Edit Shape. I guess I didn't draw my shape too well because sometimes it'll say square right there. That'll pop it into a perfect square. But my square wasn't square enough that I drew so I could just do it again. I'm going to go ahead and just draw my square and hopefully procreate will catch my drift at its shape and square. This technically is a square, I can see it didn't. Quick shape doesn't always work the best, but that's okay. Basically, I want to make a square that has some pieces sticking off the edge a little bit. I really like it when I create a frame around my subject doing a stained glass piece, I like it. If some of the pieces stick off the side, it makes it look more interesting to me. I'm just going to draw my square, have a few pieces sticking off. I think this is overall pretty good and didn't quite connect here. I'll just manually draw that in, like that. Because I put this on a separate layer, I can easily go in and just erase the parts I don't need. I'll get my eraser brush, which I have the bumpy red lines brush, I'll use as my eraser. Then I'll just erase the lines that I don't need like that. Everything that overlaps this line, goes over the edge, I'll erase my lines away. Now I've got these big pieces of glass, especially this one. Here's where you can get creative and start to just section them off into smaller pieces in a creative way. There's lots of ways that you can do this. You could just make random angular lines like you might see in stained glass. But I think for this piece, it would be really fun to have like, I don't know, a wave. I can even maybe do like rainbows or something cool like that. I'm going to create a new layer to create this design. I'm just going to tap the plus sign to create a new layer. Select my brush and then I'm going to draw a wavy line that goes diagonally across. Then I'm going to draw some parallel, wavy lines all the way across like this. It's much easier to draw a continuous line than to try and stop or draw and then stop and then try to pick up on this side. Because you might not get it exactly in the right spot. That looks pretty good and you keep going down this way. I think that looks pretty good. Now I just need to go in and clean up and erase up whatever lines I don't need. I could go in and just erase them manually. But since I have this square, I'm going to get my selection tool. I'm going to switch over to the free hand selection. Then I can just trace over, select all this trace over here. Since makes it a little bit easier. You could go through and erase things manually. But even if you get it close and you mess up a little bit like I just did, that's okay. I've gone through and selected around the outside of that shape, tap this little node here. Then I can actually do a three-finger scrub to clear out what's in that selection. If I go like little Z motion like that, I can clear out that selection really easily. Then I can just use my eraser and clean that up a little bit. I'm going to do the same thing to get rid of what's inside the skate. I'll get my selection tool. Here, I'm not even being super careful. I'm just close to the edge of the skate and erasing. I've got this middle piece I need to keep. I'll do that much. Here we go and three fingers to get rid of that selection. Then I can come in here and it's I think a little bit easier than trying to erase the whole line by hand. Let's see. Here we go. I think I'll get my selection tool again and just clean this up a little bit more. Now the only thing I need to be careful of is this line in the middle of the skate. I need to keep that. Let's do the wheels. Yeah, I'm not even being super careful, but that's okay. There we go. I just did that three fingers scrubbing motion to clear out that selection. Now I'm just going in and making sure everything's nice and clean. I don't have any of these lines I don't need. Overall, I think this is looking pretty good. I don't have any stray lines anywhere. I've completed the red lines of this piece. As you can see, I have a few different layers for my led line. I need to merge them all into one. I'm going to use that copy paste feature to do that. I'm going to turn off my background color, so only the led line layers are visible. I'll take three fingers swipe down, choose Copy all from this copy paste menu. Then I'm going to swipe down again and choose Paste. Then I just want to make sure that this pasted layer is at the top, it's above everything else. Then, as I explained before, I like to just select all these layers and group them, and then just turn off the visibility. They're gone. That way, they're there if I need to go back and change anything. But I've got everything merged together. Then, of course, I'll turn back on the background color, and at this point, I'm ready to start colorizing my stained glass piece. 12. Existing Art: Choosing Colors: I'm ready to move on to coloring. We're going to turn on reference layer on this merged led line's layer, it's a tongue twister to say. I'm going to tap that layer and choose reference. Then now that I've done that, I'm going to create a new layer and I'm going to put the reference layer on top. Now, I can start coloring in the piece. I would like to look back to my original piece to maybe sample some of those colors. A really easy way to do that would be to go to the Actions menu, go to Canvas, and then go here where it says reference. This is a different reference than our reference layer, this is the reference companion where you can pull up an image to reference and look at as you work on your art piece. I'm going to tap this little toggle to turn it on and then I'm going to tap here where it says image, and then I'm going to import that image from my camera. There, I have it right there. I can sample colors from that and it's really awesome. I'm going to just zoom in and maybe sample this reddish color and I'm just going to go ahead and drop that in and I use the same color down here on the heel, so I'll go ahead and drop that in. I'm not using my soft color helper for this piece, I don't think I need it. I think I'm better off actually just selecting individual colors because I have a lot of different colors that I'm going to be using. So that's why I'm doing that. Now, the boot is a white color, but I'm going to actually make sure that I use an off-white in order to pick up on some of the glass textures. If I use a pure white, I won't see any of those textures. I'm going to choose a yellowy-orange area and then just an off-white color like that and then I'll drop that in. If you have a lot of little pieces to fill in the same color, there's a really handy tool for that. I'm going to use color drop to fill in one of these shapes and then up here you'll see in a second, it'll say continue filling with recolor. I'm going to go ahead and drag that in, there it is, continue filling with recolor, and then you have to find the crosshairs. Sometimes it's tricky to find, there it is. You have to find these little crosshairs and move it into one of these sections and then you can start filling in all the different sections. Just tap, tap, tap to fill everything in. But make sure you move those crosshairs first or you could be coloring in a part of your piece. Actually, no, I think I'll do these in gray because there those silver things. Let's go ahead and do that. I'm going to change it to gray. But be careful when you're using that, continue filling with recolor. You could be filling in something you don't want to, like right now. I'm going to zoom in on these because they're really small and it's hard to see what you're doing sometimes. There we go. I filled all those in and I need to colorize the bottom here, actually it's the same gray. I'm going to color that and then I'm going to choose a little bit darker gray for these bottom little metal parts and this one here. Then for the wheels, I'll use the same color that I used in my original piece. Then, I think I mentioned this earlier, but I'm going to use a slightly darker pink for the bottom, almost like the bottom, and there's a shadow. Then I'll use the same color for this stopper. Actually, I got to do this. I'll use that same gray there. I've painted my entire skate and now I'm ready to start working on the background. I think I'm going to do a rainbow, you could do any color palette you want if you're doing your skate, but I'm going to do a fun rainbow. I think I'll start with a lime green then I'll do one of these center ones. I'll make sure I'm doing the one because remember it connects all the way down there so we want to do both sides. Let's go now into our yellows. I'm just going to choose a yellow and do this one, and then an orange, and then we'll go into our reds. Actually, I'm going to go right over into pink because I have a red here in the skate so I'm going to skip right over to pink. There we go. That looks good. Then maybe down here into a cooler pink, make it a little darker, play around and experiment with colors. Now I'm going to go this way and the rainbow, so I'll start with this green and I'm going to go down into my blues, maybe I'll do like an aqua blue color for this next one. Let's see. That would be this one, I believe. I have then a sky blue would be nice, that one, and it goes down to there too because remember it continues down and now we're getting into the purple. So I'm going to choose a purple there and right there. I'm just going around the color wheel here. A little warmer. Two more to go. I'm going to now back into the pinks again, which is totally fine. We've got a lot of pink happening right there, but that's alright. Well, I'll just make it a darker pink. Cool, I think that looks pretty good. I'm going to go ahead and close this reference. I used a little bit, not a ton. But I'm going to go ahead and close it by tapping this x and now my piece is fully colored and I'm ready to start adding my texture and my lighting effects. 13. Existing Art: Texture Manipulation: Here are my layers. I just want to make sure that I have the colored layer selected. We're going to be adding in our glass texture now, I'm going to go up to my Actions menu, Add, and then choose Insert a file because remember we have this saved in our files app. I'm here in the Stained Glass Textures folder, and I'm going to choose one of them. I'm going to choose wispy-dark. Again, you just want to make sure that your texture is covering your design completely, so we're going to resize this a little bit to make it a bit bigger. Again, you can also change the angle if you wanted it to. Maybe I'll do that actually. I'm going to make it follow the wave of the rainbow. Just going to resize that to make it a little bit bigger. Again, it completely covers my design. Then I'm going to go up to my layers and I'm going to tap little N and choose the Overlay blend mode. There we have our beautiful stained glass texture. I do want to isolate some of these pieces and give them a different texture, so I'm going to go ahead and do that now. I want to make sure that I'm selecting the colored layer, the one with all the colors. Then I'm going to go to my selection tool and then choose Automatic. Then I'm going to start selecting some pieces of glass. I think I'll definitely select, again, move back and forth to choose the threshold. Like that. I'm going to select that color, I think this one. Then maybe every other piece here or something close to that. Maybe these bottom ones. That's good. Then I'm going to choose Copy and Paste down here in the toolbar. Now those pieces I just selected have been duplicated and they're on their own layer. I'm going to move this layer above the texture file that I just imported, so I'm going to move that above. Now I'm ready to add a new texture. I'm going to go to my Actions menu, Insert a file, and choose a different one. I think I'll choose antique swirls. You'll get familiar with what different textures look like, choosing which one you want to use. I like this one. I really like that swirl pattern on the corners. Again, making it cover my entire design. Then I'm going to tap this new texture and choose Clipping Mask. Now it's only within those shapes that we duplicated. I'm going to select the blend mode to overlay. Now we have a little bit more variety in our design here. I did want to show you, if you wanted to alter or intensify the textures, I'll show you how to do that really quick. Let's say we wanted to go back to this original texture that we imported and we just wanted to make the texture a bit more obvious, or a bit more intense. We can do that using the curves adjustment. Select the texture layer, go to the Actions menu, and then go to Curves. We can drag this side down. Drag the left side down, the right-side up. As you can see, if I do preview, now there's a lot more contrast to that texture. If you wanted it to be really intense and just be like that texture showing a lot, this is what you can do. Just adjust this little curve. I think that looks pretty cool. I wanted to do that with the other texture. I could do that as well, so I'll go to Curves. The darker or lighter you make the texture, it will also darken and lighten your colors a little bit, so that's something that also be aware of. You can tap and you get this little thing that you can preview, what it looked like before and after. That just makes everything look a little bit more intense, which I like. Overall, I like the way this looks with all my different textures. You can keep going and sectioning off pieces and making them different textures. But I'm going to go ahead and move on to making my 3D leading or lead lines and my lighting effects. 14. Existing Art: Lighting Effects: [MUSIC] I'm going to go up to my lead lines layer and I'm going to duplicate it twice. Swipe to the left, duplicate, swipe to the left, duplicate. Then I'm going to move this reference image to the middle, like that. We've got three copies. Reference is in the middle. I'm going to turn off the top layer just for a moment while I select the reference layer and I'm going to make it a little bit lighter. I'm going to go up to my Adjustments menu, Hue, Saturation, Brightness. Then just use the brightness slider to make it like a lighter or not quite so dark, a gray color now. Once I've done that, I can turn this layer back on. I'm actually going to select that top layer. We're going to use a Transform tool to offset it just a little bit. So I'm going to tap the Transform tool. Then I usually move it down into the right. But since we have these lines that all go this way, you can't really see the difference so much. I'm actually going to go this way because I think it helps me see the light on those lines a little bit better. You can always adjust how you want to do that. Then I'm going to go over to my Adjustments menu and choose Gaussian Blur so it's going to blur this layer a little bit. Blur it to like three or four percent. I'm at four percent. Then we're going to add some noise so that we can make a little bit of texture. I'm going to go back to the Adjustments menu, Noise. I'm going to turn it to, I don't know, that's 60 percent or so. I'm going to turn the octaves up and then the scale up a bit like 23 percent, 24 percent. Then to tone down the texture a little bit, I'm going to go back to the Adjustments menu and choose Curves. This particular layer takes a lot of going into that Adjustments menu to get it right. Again, I'm going to increase contrast by pulling the left side of the curve down, the right side of the curve up so they just have this like barely there of a texture. Then the final step for this layer is to make it a clipping mask. We're going to tap it and we're going to choose Clipping Mask. That is now just within the layer right below it. Now we're going to go to the bottom layer and we're going to set the blend mode to Color Burn. This layer is going to be our inner glow. Set the blend mode of the bottom of those three copies to Color Burn. Then we're going to go to the Adjustments menu and choose Gaussian Blur, and just blur until it looks good. This depends on the piece, but usually around anywhere from 5-15 percent or so. Let's see. I'm probably at 10 percent, move down just a little bit. If you find that the blur is a little too intense, you can also turn the opacity of the layer down. I can tap here and then turn the opacity down. I actually just turn it down to 64 percent, and I think that looks good. There's a little bit of a glow, but it's not so intense. Then the final step is going to be to add our glare. We're going to go up to our layers and tap the plus to create a new layer. We want this layer to be right above our Color Burn layer, right below the reference layer. We've got a new layer there. We're going to tap the N. Then we're going to change this layer's blend mode to Add. This is going to make our glare look really bright and bold. Add. Then change the color of our brush to a warm middle brown color, like red above center of this disk. Then we're going to the brushes and we're going to choose the glare brush. We're going to make diagonal lines for the glare and you can make them in any direction you really want. Since we have a lot of diagonals going this way, I think maybe we'll try going the other way just to change that. I'm just doing a few strokes with this glare brush. Not a ton. You don't need a lot. I've done a few strokes of that and I find that these strokes can be a little intense. I like to use the glare blender brush. We use this with the brush tool, not with the blend or the smudge tool. Use it with the brush tool, glare blender. I have the brush size up a bit 58 percent. Then just do a few strokes back-and-forth to soften this glare a little bit; spreads it out a little bit too. Do it as much as you want until it looks however you want it to look. 15. Existing Art: Adding a Background: [MUSIC] This is the finished piece, but I think it would look a little bit better if we didn't have a white background. I'm going to show you how you can create a colored background and we're going to add some stained glass texture to it. Now the normal way you'd make a colored background in Procreate is going down here to background color and just setting it to a color. But if we do that, you can see now it looks a bit messy. We've got all these layers with blend modes interacting and it doesn't look good. It's no good. We're going to do it a different way. Let me undo that. We're actually going to create a new layer above all the other layers. I'm going to tap this top layer and then tap the plus sign to create a new layer. Then I'm going to select whatever color I want in the color picker. I think I'll do a deep blue. I like to choose dark colors for the background because it really makes the design pop. We're going to choose a dark blue and then we're just going to take this color and drop it into the background. Because we still have that reference layer turned on, it's basically respecting the shapes of that reference layer and just filling in the outside of it, if that makes sense. We're just doing the outside, basically covering up everything else that's around. Then we can go ahead and add another texture. I'm going to go to the Actions menu, Insert a file, and I'll choose Reeds. I can choose this Fit to Canvas, will help make it a little bit bigger, and then you can just make sure it covers the entire canvas. Then I'm going to go up to my layers, tap this texture, and choose clipping mask. Then I'm going to tap the N to change the blend mode to overlay. Now I've got a textured dark background. I think maybe that the background could be a little bit darker. You could go back to this layer and darken the color or drop in a new color, or you can go to the Adjustments menu, hue, saturation, brightness, and you can play with the slider, you could play with the hue and just play around until it looks however you want it to look. I'm going to turn down the saturation a little bit, make it a little bit darker. I just want the background to be really subtle so that might design will really pop. There is my finished piece. Now if I go back to my layers, I think it's fun to see the original. I'm just going to duplicate it and move it to the very top. Now, if I turn up the opacity, there we go. Now we've got the original and there is the stained glass version. Obviously, they're the same subject, same shapes, and everything like that, but totally different, totally giving new life to an old piece of art. I think I drew this original piece back in 2017 or 2018 or a while ago. It's really nice [MUSIC] to breathe new life into it and make something really brand new and different out of this old thing that I had drawn. 16. Speed Paint: Converting to Stained Glass: In this video, I thought it would be useful for me to just record myself doing a converted stained glass piece from an old illustration from start to finish in real time, so to speak. This piece actually took me about 15 minutes to do, maybe 15 or 16 minutes. I have gone ahead and sped up the process to about six minutes or so. But as you can see, and you'll see in the video, it doesn't take long to go from an existing illustration to a completely finished stained glass piece; so about 15 or 16 minutes to do this piece. Once you get the hang of the technique, you'll get a little bit faster going through the steps. Let's check that out next. [MUSIC] For that piece, here is the before and here is the after. They're both really great, but I really love the stained glass piece. It just has so much more interest to it. Both super cute though. To talk about this piece just a little bit, this was already a pretty simple piece, so I didn't have to simplify it any further. It was pretty obvious what to do with the shapes. I could have added more lines if I wanted to break up this pear, but I liked it all as one piece. I decided to add a round frame and have some of the elements sticking off. Then I decided to add another frame around it so that I could do this cool little border, which I think looks really, really nice. I'm pretty pleased with that. Then you get to see all these color variations. When you're changing a piece into stained glass or you're designing from scratch, it's really nice to have a lot of little pieces because then you do get these nice color variations which really enhances the effect overall. But I really like the way this one turned out, especially the little worm. Those little lines were just perfect for breaking them up into little pieces. I really like how this one turned out. 17. More Converted Pieces: Then I want to show you some of those illustrations I showed you at the beginning of this section. Let me show you those now and I'll show you how I converted them into stained glass. Here are those red flowers, and here is the stained glass version. I really toned down the brightness of this and went with these more muted colors for the flowers. But as you can see, I really simplified the flower themselves into just these four little shapes; the front part, that little shadow, the inside, and then this center of the flower. I couldn't really do these little black things easily, so I just eliminated those completely. But the stems were all pretty straightforward. Then for the background, I added this wavy pattern just to make it more interesting, all within an oval frame. There's the before, and here's the after. Then here's the last piece that I showed you, this really cute stylized house plant with two different types of leaves. Here is the original art, and here is the stained glass version. I really loved the way this came out. These two, they're very different from each other. This is very light and bright. This has a little bit more on the darker side because of all the black lines. But I love the complexity. In fact, this piece was a lot more complex than the other ones that I showed you. There are a lot of little pieces to fill in and lines to figure out. You can see how I simplified these other leaf shapes in the background to more of a wavy design. But I really liked the way this one came out. I added a round frame around it and then just randomly broke that space into little pieces. There's not really any rhyme or reason to it, just went for it, which is a fun thing that you can do with this type of art. Again, here's the before and the after. Here is one more piece I didn't show you yet that I converted into stained glass. This is this cute little person that I drew. I decided I wanted to try and see what it would be like to do something that had a face in it and make that into stained glass. Here is the before, I'll switch that over, and then here is the after. I did a lot of figuring out for this one. Especially within the face, how to break it into sections instead of being one big piece of glass. Some of the creative ways that I tackled that was like here right above the eyes, I added these lines to break it up but also give the effect that it was eyelashes. I really liked the way that came out. Then I just in places, took the path of least resistance, and I broken the glass in these little small sections. Made it a little bit symmetrical overall because faces are symmetrical. That was the reasoning behind that. I probably would have added another break right there, actually, because that would be an awkward piece of glass. But this is digital, so we don't have to worry about our glass breaking, which is really nice. Then just to show you the before again. I really like the way that I was able to do the lines or the hair, where it had those dark blue-green lines. I really liked the way that came out. Then I decided to add a triple or double frame. We added one line and another line and then another line and in that way I got these double borders. Then I was going to do the stars and color, but after I colored the background I just like the way they look white. I just left them white. I really like the way that that one turned out. Let me again show you the before and after. 18. Designing from Stained Glass from Scratch: [MUSIC] In this final section of the class, we're going to be creating an original stained glass design from scratch. I'm going to be showing you my process of choosing a subject, looking at reference photos, simplifying some more complex aspects of that subject into something that would work for stained glass. The piece that I'm going to be creating is a dandy lion, this grouping of dandy lions and the different parts of them. They're one of my favorite flowers. I really loved them a lot. I encourage you to follow along with me and create this alongside me. Then after you do that, I think you will be fully equipped to start creating your own stained glass design. I'll talk with you about that a little bit more after this section. Let's go ahead and get started. 19. From Scratch: Sketching from References: Unlike what we've been doing previously, we're going to start out by making a sketch. There will be a sketching element to this. To sketch, I like to use one of my brushes from my pencil box set. I've got a brush called sketching pencil. You can use whatever pencil brush you want to sketch, but that one's my favorite. Then I'm just going to choose a dark gray. Whenever we're drawing something, I think it's really handy to have some reference photos up so we can get an idea of what we're doing. I like to use the split-screen feature of iOS to do that. To turn that on, there's a couple of ways to do it, but this is the way I like. I just drag up from the bottom to pull this dock up, and then I take Safari and just drag the icon over to the side and let go, and then I can re-size it with this little handle right here. I'm just going to type in dandelions, and I go to Images. I love the different parts of the dandelion. I like the yellow flowers, of course, the white like seed pods, whatever they're called, and then the leaves as well. I want to include all of those in this one illustration. I like the way that dandelion look from the front, where you could see the circle and they look really cool from the side because they make these triangular shapes. I am going to go ahead and piece all that together, and we can rearrange it and figure out how you're going to do it. I'm going to draw some basic shapes to just lay out where I want things to go. I'm going to do vertical piece. I'll start by doing one of these, that's the puff ball. I can draw a big circle for that, and then I'll do this three-quarter view. This one here from the top but also angled. Maybe I'll put that a little lower and go that way like that. Then I also want this view here, this triangular shape. Maybe I'll just put that there like that. Again, just basic shapes to lay out where I want things to go. Then I also want one of these little buds like this. That little thing was there. I don't know, maybe I'll draw that like a trapezoid shape. I'll put that there. The other thing I noticed on the seed pod, like white fluffy pod is it does also have that same trapezoidal shape, so I'll probably incorporate that somehow. But before I get into that, I'm going to just draw some stems. I'm going to have this one coming down here. Maybe that one there. Something like that, and I can have some leaves in here somewhere and actually move this all up. Let's see. Maybe we'll have some leaves coming out that way. See if I can squeeze one in right there as well. I think I might need to move this little bud. Freehand. That's looking pretty good as far as a layout goes. I'm going to even go ahead and maybe draw what I want the frame to look like, something like that. Again, really rough. That's okay. That's like a really basic sketch. Maybe also draw the shape of the leaves, just establishing the width where I want them to be. Let's start there. I'm going to go ahead and reduce the opacity of this sketch by tapping the end and then just going down like that. Now I can start to draw things in a little more detail. One thing at this point I want to figure out how to do is how I'm going to depict this because this little flower has lot of details, and that's not going to work. I like having all this teeny tiny pieces of glass, so we're going to really simplify that. Then same thing for the seed pod part. This part, I want to make sure that there's a lot of detail there, so I'm going to just simplify that. Let's start with this one. I think I'm just going to create a new layer too. I reduce the opacity and then I created a new layer right above that. I think I'm going to keep this in it's oval form. I want to add a bunch of little triangular shapes, but I think to keep it simple, maybe I'll just do these concentric circles like that, and then I can divide these up maybe into triangle shapes, I don't know. I'm going to play around with that. This one is at a weird angle, so maybe I'll move it with that. I'm just drawing these diagonal lines within this flower shape. Just figuring it out as I go. Maybe there should be one more right there. Then maybe I'll do the same thing here. Now this is probably already too detailed. Look at all these tiny little pieces that I'm creating. If this piece was just like one flower, this could work, but I think that's too much. I'm going to just undo that and then simplify a little bit more, and just do maybe some lines like this. I think that's a little bit better. A lot less pieces to deal with. You could make it very complex, there's nothing wrong with that, but I'm trying to keep it too simple. The thing with it being very complex is the more sections of glass you have, the more dark it's going to look because there's going to be a lot of black lines there, so you have to think about if that's what you want. Let's try to do this one. I think I'm going to stick with a simple smooth shape for that. I'll just do like a big circle like I had, and then we've got that where you can see the middle of it, and then the green part going down. I want to include that. I'm going to draw the center, as a shape like that. Maybe a little bigger even. Then I can just draw this shape to represent that. It's like a trapezoid. Then it looks like there's line, so I could just divide this into a few sections like that. I could do like that. Then how do I want to do all these little wispy seeds? That is a challenge. One thing that you can always look to is, how has this problem been solved in the past? If I actually go to dandelions stained glass, I can look and see how other artists have solved this problem. I'll go to Images. Here is a way that you could create that effect with these rounded shapes with lines connecting to the middle. Let's see. Here's another one that's a different view. I guess that's a dandelion. Here's another one that uses triangular lines, which is pretty cool. We're just looking and seeing how has this problem been solved, taking that in. You don't want to copy anything that you see, but you can get some ideas of how to tackle the problem, so to speak of simplifying this very complex thing into something very simple. This is fun too, how they did the dandelion, which is again, much more detailed than I did, but I like what they did. Let me go back now to my dandelion images. It's always better to go back to original photo then to look at other artwork and you might end up copying more than you maybe should. But I did like those triangle lines. Let me start by just doing some lines outward like this because the dandelions do have all those lines emanating out from the center because of the seeds. Then maybe I'll try some triangles, maybe I need more lines. I can try those triangular shapes like that. Something like that. That's again, getting a little complex, maybe this one is too close. We need one there. Then I'll change the spacing on this a little bit. There you go. Then I have this thing which I think I'm still going to add these lines like that. It doesn't line up right there. Maybe I'll add in another line or something. It's a process, trying to figure out exactly how you want to do it. Get the spacing right and everything. I still don't have enough. Hold on. We need like this, this, this, this, and then lines. I'll probably make all these green, but it has the same pattern going all the way round because that's what it would look like on a dandelion. I think that looks pretty good. Now I'm going to do this side view of the flower. Have a picture. Let's see. I think I can do a zigzag maybe. Let me try it again. Like that but I'm going to do it again. I'll draw the bottom. Picture 1 here. There's a good picture. Round at the bottom and then flared out like that. Then I can make these sections like this. That looks pretty cool. Now I can do this one over here which, let me find a picture of that. I'm keeping it pretty geometric overall. I don't have a lot of curved lines, a few but not a lot. To represent this, I can draw some lines coming out like that and then this can just be another line like that. These might end up becoming straight lines because that's pretty detailed for the lighting. We'll see. Once you get into the lighting part of it then you can figure things out. I love the way that dandelion leaves look, which is these jagged like little arrows. I'm excited to draw those. I'm going to start with a little arrow, go down like that. Something like that. Up and out. There we go. Something like that. I might add a little bit more to that and then I'll do the same thing here. Starting with an arrow shape and then curve it in and out all the way down. That's why it was helpful to establish the width of the leaf now that I can go back in and add these jagged shapes. That looks pretty good. Now we need to add our stems in. I need the stems to be thick enough that they can actually represent a piece of glass. Then I'm going to go over here and draw this stem. I'm coming down there. You see here, this is something that I try to avoid when I'm laying out, the lead lines for stain glass is, I don't want lines to unintentionally connect. It creates like a tangent where it looks like this line should continue into the flower and we don't want that. I'm actually going to offset the line a little bit for the stem. It's something to look out for when you're doing your stained glass art. Let's see. I'm trying to get it to seem like it's coming out the center here, like that. Actually maybe I'll make it go across like this. That's cool. I like that. This one needs a stem here. Things are getting a little messy in this section. I'm probably going to make it a little tidier when I do my final artwork. That looks pretty good. I'm actually going to make this one a little smaller because it's pretty big for a flower bud. I'll make that a bit smaller like that. Then we've got that stem. So far, so good. Maybe I'll draw a line down the middle of these. It's still pretty messy at this point, but we're going to clean it up as we go. The last thing I'll do is add my frame. I'll use QuickShape this time. Holding my pencil down and then tapping "Edit Shape", then I can choose "Rectangle". QuickShape doesn't always work that well. It didn't connect right there for some reason but anyways, I can now edit the shape. I'm going to probably put the bottom of the frame here so that the flowers are coming out of the bottom of the frame. Then I like to have some of the pieces overlapping the edge like I have right here. I think that looks pretty good. I decide if I want to see this one, maybe I'll move it over just a little bit so that that piece can go off the edge too. That looks pretty good for my sketch. I'm going to go ahead and turn off my rough sketch. I am going to actually resize this a little bit, make it a bit bigger before I move on to my final art work. Just get it to the size that you want it to be and if you need to rotate it or anything, now is a good time to do that. Cool. I think that looks pretty good. 20. From Scratch: Creating Lead Lines: [MUSIC] I'm just going to go ahead and close my references for now. I don't need them anymore. Now it's time to create the lead lines for my final stained glass piece, using this sketch. I'm going to go up to my layers and I'm going to reduce the opacity of my sketch about 20 percent, and then I'll create a new layer right above that, and then I'm going to switch over to my brushes and go to the Stained Glass kit and choose the bumpy lead lines. You can choose either the smooth or the bumpy edges. I just happen to like the bumpy a little bit better. Then I'm going to choose black as my color, and now I'm ready to start creating my lead lines. You can start anywhere you want. I think I'll start with this flower. You also want to test your line weight and see if that's going to work. I'm just laying these down and seeing if I like the line weight. I am at 20 percent. You could go bigger and then you'd have thicker lines, which I definitely don't want to do for this piece. Could also go smaller. That's a little bit too small. But I think what I'm at right now, 20 percent, is pretty good. I have also saved this brush size here. You can save any size by just tapping this little gray bar and then tapping the plus sign, and it'll save that size. You can go back to it easily. I'm going to go ahead and draw this, trying to get the pieces to connect smoothly there where the lines connect together. It's okay if it's a little messy; a little wonky. Basically, I'm just tracing over my sketch, and now I can draw these lines in between. You want to make sure that you're not going over like that. You just want to get them right in-between. That looks pretty good. I'm just going around and adding my little lines. I'm making sure that like I mentioned before with the stamp, I don't want any lines to connect, look like they continue on, so I'm offsetting each line a little bit from the line in the section below it. Using my sketch as a guide, but also just go in for it here. The space is smaller, maybe. We'll add one more there. There we go. I think that looks pretty good for that flower. I'm going to move on to do this one. For this one, I'm going to actually use quick shape to draw my circle. I'm going to draw my circle, get all the way to the end and then hold my pencil down, and then if I put another finger on the screen, it'll be a perfect circle. Then when I let go, I can choose Edit Shape up at the top and then just put it into position. You can also drag the outline and resize it if you need to, so I'm just centering it over this middle shape here. Now I'm going to go ahead and trace over everything I've drawn already. There's the center. I'm going to do this trapezoidal shape here. I think it goes like that. Also fixing my spacing a little bit for these lines. Just trying to make everything look nice and clean. Now I'm going to go ahead and draw all the lines there are. There should be a line right here, actually. I must have missed it. Draw a line right there. I'm adjusting the spacing as I go. My lines weren't perfectly spaced out. I can change it up a little bit, but I want to make sure that I have the same amount of lines in the end. That way all my triangles will match up. Got all my lines. Now I can do these triangle lines, little diagonals. Just go up and down all the way around. It's not perfect? Some of the lines are more spaced out than others still, but I think that's okay. Adds to the charm. But I think that looks really good. I'm going to do this one now. I think I'm going to change it up because I really like this look, and I think I could do it right here as well. Maybe I'll do it like this and make it straight across, and then I can have these same triangle lines. One more there, down and up. I think that's cute. Even though you did it differently in your sketch, you can always also change it up as you're doing your actual lead work. Do all the flowers first, this one I think I'm also going to simplify a bit. I'm just going to make that straight across the top. These I'm going to make a little bigger than I had originally drawn them because the line weight is so thick, and then here maybe I'll just make that straight. I think I'm going to do it straight like that. Let me do the leaves now. Again, curve there curving down, and then it goes down like that. I'm going to make this space in here a little bit bigger so I have room for that line going down the middle. Cool. You got one leaf done, let's do the other one. Then the other side. I'm going to make this one a little wider too, just like I did with the other one. Then I can draw the line down the middle. Something like that. Great. I think that looks good. Now I'm going to be doing my stems. I think I'm actually going to put those on separate layers so it's easier for me to erase other things since there's a lot of stuff overlapping here. I'm going to create a new layer and I'll start with this stem over here. I have that going in front of this leaf here, and then I can go back to the other layer, oops, and then just erase what I don't need like that. We go back to the stem layer because I can reuse that. I think I'm going to have this stem in the front, so I'll go ahead and just draw that first. I had it purposely connect to the tips of this so that these now become their own little pieces of glass. Wide. Good. I can go in and erase what I don't need here. That's helping to clean things up a little bit, make it less messy. For my other stems, I'll probably create another layer because I'm going to be overlapping things. Let's do this one here. Then going to run into the same problem here. There we go. It looks pretty good. Then we have this one, which I'm going to do another layer for that one. [LAUGHTER] That one's going to come in front of everything else. It's looking pretty messy. Let's got to clean things up a little bit. I'm going to go back to the layer with the flowers, and let's see. Erase maybe what's inside this. I'm going to have all the stems in front of the leaves because the leaves are making it messy. Let's see. Go to this layer, which is this one. We need to erase that. That looks good. I think that's it for that layer. I'm going to need to erase more here like that. Then I think I'll put this little stem in front. I need to go to this layer and erase that little bit. It's hard to figure out what's in front of what and what's on what layer, but if you're ever not sure like I want to erase this little bit right here, there's a cool little feature in Procreate that you can use. This is a little multi-function button. If I hold that down with my finger, I can tap on the area that I want to know what layer it's on, and there that I can see that that's on Layer 4. That selects it for you too, which is really great, and now I can erase that part that I don t need. Cool. I think it's all cleaned up. There's a couple of things in here that I might just fill in like this little spot right there. I don't know what's going on there, but I'm just going to extend that line down a little bit. Then this piece got really thin, so I'm just going to fill it in like that. Cool. All the flowers and leaves and stems are done. I'm going to go ahead and add a frame around it, so I'll create a new layer to do that. I'll go ahead and use the quick shape feature to do that. I'll hold my pencil down, let go, hit Edit Shape up at the top, and then just move it around. Let's move exactly where I want it to be. I want some of everything sticking off, but I think this is pretty good. We'll move this one down just a little bit. Cool. That looks pretty good. Now I just need to go with my eraser and erase little bits that I don't need like right here, here. Anything that overlaps that line basically we're going to erase. Here and this one. Then I need to erase these little bits that are underneath. I'll just go through the different layers and just erase whatever is down there. There's a lot of layers for this one because there are a lot of overlapping elements. This is looking really good. I'm going to go ahead and turn off my sketch at this point, so just uncheck that box. The last thing I need to do before I can move on to coloring is to break the background into sections. There's a lot of ways you can do it. You can put a pattern back there. You just go haphazardly and just break it into sections, but I think it'd be nice to do some curved lines. I have a lot of straight and geometric shapes in this piece, so I think some nice wide curves would be really nice. I like to choose the path of least resistance here, so I might break it where these two things connect. I'll draw a little line there. Maybe I can go there. I'm just doing curved lines, making sure not to connect. I don't want a line to come out of another line, so I'm offsetting my lines a little bit. This is bugging me. There we go. [LAUGHTER] I could break this section. I'll do curved line there like that. Up here, I definitely think it needs something. Maybe I'll draw a line that way. Down here for sure. Maybe do a couple of lines and go there, and then I can break it again and go like that. You can do as many sections as you want. Do one right there. Maybe do it the other way. Do it the other way. Cool. I think this is looking pretty good. I'm trying to go for basically pretty uniform-sized pieces of glass and I think I'm doing pretty good. I might break this up into sections too. See how that looks. Cool. I think this is looking pretty good and I'm ready to move on to coloring it. But before we do that, we need to merge all of our linework layers into one. We're going to go up to our Layers, we're going to turn off the background, and then I'm going to take three fingers, swipe down, choose Copy All from the copy-paste menu. Then I'm going to make sure I tap onto the top layer because I want this to be pasted above everything else so swipe down again and choose Paste, and there we have everything merged into one layer. You turn the background color back on and then I'll just select all these other layers and put them into a group and just turn it off, set them aside for now. You could merge everything together right now, but I like to keep them separate just in case I want to go back and make changes or something like that. Now that everything's merged, we're ready to start coloring. 21. From Scratch: Colorizing in Layers: We've got our line work. It's all merged into one layer, ready to start colorizing the pieces of glass. The first thing we'll do is we'll go up to the Layers menu and we're going to tap on this layer of all the merged line-work. Then we're going to tap a reference to turn on the reference layer feature. See it says reference. Then I'm going to create a new layer, and I'm going to put the reference layer up at the top with my new layer right below it. Now it's time to think about how we want to color this. Obviously, I think my flower is going to be yellow. This will be yellow, that will be yellow. Everything else is going to be shades of green, and then this is going to be an off-white. You can always pull up a reference photo if you want to get some ideas for colors, probably do a blue background. I think that'll look really nice. I'm actually going to use my color helper brush to lay down some colors that I can use to color drop into these pieces. I'm going up to my brushes and I'm going to choose the soft color helper. Then I'm going to go to my colors and I'll do a warmish yellow so I can start doing the flowers. I'm just going to basically paint within the shape, and as you can see, this brush automatically has some color variations built into it. I have a lot of colors to pick from. You can go a little more into the yellows if it was too orange. I like that. I think that looks good. I'm just going to go ahead and just loosely paint over all of my little sections here. I think the only thing that's yellow is that, which probably is the yellow. I think that's all the yellow. I'm going to do some greens now. I'm going to do like a warm yellow green. There's not a lot of variation in the greens because there's not a lot of little pieces. This will be green, this will be green. This will be green. Maybe I'll choose a cooler, darker green for the leaves or something like that. Maybe for these little pieces too. Hear I do this, it's hard to see it now, but this trapezoidal shape. Let me make that green. Maybe I'll make that a little warmer, little lighter. Cool. That looks pretty good. Some green down there. This is going to be like an off-white, so I'm going to go into my yellows and I'm going to choose just barely off white, little bit of gray, little bit of yellow. It's creamy colored. Not a lot of color variation here so maybe I'll just throw in a couple other colors. It's cool. I think that looks pretty good. This middle thing is probably going to be a brown. The only other thing I'm going to do is the background. I'm going to use a different layer for that because I don't want to accidentally paint over what I've done so far. I just create a new layer, put it underneath this other layer, and then I'm going to select a nice blue. Here I am doing the blue. Then I'm just painting around because it's on another layer. I don't have to worry about accidentally painting over some of these colors I'm going to be using in a minute so, cool. I think what I'm actually going to do is use this brush to, I want the bottom of the piece to be like a little bit darker blue, so it has a gradient effect. I'm going to choose a darker, cooler blue and then just paint some colors down here. I've got a few different colors to work with. I really didn't do like lighter, warmer, blue, like way up at the top. Cool. I've got some colors to work with as I go through and colorize all these tiny pieces of glass, I actually do see a mistake that I just made, which is here. I forgot to erase this little bit here. If this happens to you, thankfully, we have our layers of everything not merged together, so this is not going to be too hard of a fix. Glad this happened so you can see what you do in case this happens. Let's just turn off that reference for now and turn back on this group. I'll turn off all these other layers. Let's go back to this group. I'm going to find the layer that has the frame. I'll get my eraser and just erase that away. Double-check I didn't miss anything else. Great. Then I'll do my same copy all things, turn off the background, swipe down with three fingers, copy all. Tap the top layer, paste and turn my background back on, hide this group and now we're back in business. We can delete this messed up one, so I'm just going to swipe to the left and choose "Delete". Then I'm going to tap on this new merged layer and choose "Reference". We're back in business, turn these layers back on. If that happens to you, that's why it's good to keep these other separated layers in case you make a mistake like I just did. We're ready to start using color drop to fill in all these little pieces of glass. I'm going to go up to my layers and create a layer above these soft color helper layers and I'm ready to start color dropping. I'll start with my yellow flowers and I'm probably going to separate these colors into different layers just in case I want to adjust my colors. I'll start with this flower. Again I'm just going to sample a color within each shape. There's a few colors to choose from within each shape, because of this look. This brush and the gradient like curious, a little bit darker than over by the edges. It's a little hard to see, probably on camera, but over here I've got a lighter yellow and then on the other side I had darker one. Here's like a lighter yellow. I'm just making sure that whatever color I choose from within that shape is a little bit different than the colors of the shapes next to it. Here I've got some green spilling over from that. I'm going to avoid that, choose a lighter one. I will choose a more orangey yellow on this square, and a lighter one here. This part is definitely the tedious part of the whole process but I also think it's a little therapeutic too because you can turn your brain off a bit and just get into the motions of it. Just like select a color, drop it in, select a color, drop it in. Just keep going with it. When you have a lot of little pieces like this, it definitely takes some time, but I think it's a nice way to relax your brain. Cool and then you can always check to make sure you've got them all by turning off the layer. So I have filled in this entire flower. So I just turned off the one with the color helper brush. Now I'm going to move over to this one, I'm going to do the off-white colors first. Again, you want to make sure when you're color dropping not to color drop on top of the black because you'll get this weird outline and it's going to mess everything up. So don't do that. I'm going through and just selecting these different colors. Each one's a slightly different shade, some a little green actually. Then all those different shades are going to help make the piece look more realistic. You could go through just select one color and there's this, I'll show it to you, continue filling with re-color right here. Then you can just tap into the different shapes and fill them in, but then they're all the same. So I don't like to use that. So I'm just going to go through and select all these different colors and fill them in. This part is nice if you just put some music on or something and just go for it. Takes a bit of time, but I definitely think that it is worth it for the final result. You can also speed up this process just a little bit by keeping your sections you're trying to color fill up close to the little color picker circle that we don't have as far to drag. It's a tip but I'm almost done here. I think I've gotten all the sections here, I'm going to turn off that and see how it looks. This is all going to be green. So far, that looks pretty good. I think I missed this one, so I'm just going to select this color, drop it in. See all these really nice color variations. I think I'll drop that same color over here. Just for a little more visual interest. Cool, that looks really pretty. I'll do this flower next. It's doing maybe all the flowers right now. Just selecting a color within those shapes. One's a little yellow or so. This next one maybe I'll do a little more orange. This one's a little greener. Yellow there and then yellow here. Here we go. Another thing to be careful of is if you accidentally drag your brush across, instead of dragging the color drop circle, you don't want to do that because then you're adding this soft coloring in your layers. So this will be yellow. So I'll just go ahead and drop a yellow into there. That looks pretty good. I am going to create a new layer to do all of my greens just in case I want to use hue saturation brightness adjustment to adjust my colors or something like that. I'm going to create a new layer. No matter how many layers I create, they're all going to reference this reference layer and use the color drop to fill the shapes on that layer. That's really nice. Let's do a green for this stem. Will do one of these other greens for the stem. Just go through and fill all these shapes, they're all slightly different. This was long, which is this color and for these two, I think I will do two different tones. I'll do this darker green on one side. Then we'd all just choose a lighter, warmer green for the other side. Cool, that looks pretty good. Let's see. I think this stem still needs to be filled. Let's turn off this too. I totally missed that one. So I'm just going to sample this color, drop it in. We've got a few more to do this little piece and these pieces here, I get a lighter color to do this one. Cool. I think that's all the green. This right here. I'm just going to choose some of these colors. it's a nice little variations in there. Move my color or my shapes up closer to the color picker. Cool. I'll do this darker green there. Let's turn off that. Overall, it's looking really good. I didn't do this yet, so I'm actually going to use this same layer with all the flowers. I'm just going to do a brown color, like that. Awesome. Now all I have left to do is the background. I'll create a new layer for that. Then I'm just going to go through and select these colors. Each one a slightly different blue than the one next to it. Just deciding which blue to choose within my options within these colors. Fill that in. This one will be a little cooler. Now I'm getting down here. I had made some darker blues down towards the bottom. I almost have like a gradient happening. I don't know if I want to choose a color from over here for this one. There we go. Fill that I'm getting darker down here. Shows this darker color here. This little space. These really small ones you want to really zoom in because they can be hard to fill if you're zoomed out. Let's see. Do that one. Almost done. More there. I think I've got all of them. I'm going to go ahead and turn off. There, right there. Let's choose this one. I just fill it with that color. Zoom way in if it's really small, space. Awesome. I've got all of the pieces all nice and colorize. Now, the next step is going to be to add the texture. 22. From Scratch: Texture Overlays: Now we're going to add are stained glass texture. I'm going to go up to my layers and I'm going to tap the top most of my color layers. If you're using a lot of layers, you might eventually run out of layers. The amount of layers that you are allowed to have at any given piece in Procreate is dependent on the hardware of your iPad. More RAM equals more layers and the resolution of your canvas. If you're starting to run out of layers, you can always delete some of these light-color helper layers. You can also duplicate your project and then on the duplicate, you can delete layers and then you'll have a copy that has all the layers. So I tried to be as non-destructive as possible and not delete things just in case I need to go back, which you saw I had to do, so that's what I do. So you can delete those if you want or you can just leave them. But let's tap the topmost of our colored layers so that way we can insert texture right above it. I'm going to go over to my Actions menu and I'm going to choose "Add", and then I'm going to choose "Insert a file", and now I'm going to pick a texture. I think I'm going to do wispy-dark for this piece. Probably going to use a few different textures. I can choose this Rotate button to rotate it so it's the right orientation. You can choose Fit to canvas there. That happens to cover my entire design but if you needed to, you can always make it bigger by dragging these nodes around. Then you're going to tap a little n in the Layers menu and choose "Overlay". Now we have some beautiful stained glass texture on our piece that's already looking really good. A few things that I wanted to mention if you wanted to edit things before we continue further. You can manipulate the texture a little bit using the curve's adjustment and I showed this to you and we did the skate piece. But if you go to the Adjustments menu curves, you can drag the left side down and the right side up, and that will make your texture a little bit more intense. You can also just move it up or down. It'll adjust or it'll manipulate the colors overall in your piece, so something to pay attention to. Then if you wanted to change colors, this is why I put things on separate layers. If I wanted to change the color of the blue background to a different background, I could go up to my Adjustments menu, use Saturation, Brightness, and I could change it to a different color if I wanted to do a red or probably not green. You could play around with that. I'm going to stick to my blues. So that's why it's handy to separate things out on different layers. If you have something like where we have all these flowers, they're all on the same layer, but they're not really touching each other, so I could go in and just select just this flower really easily, and I could go up to my Adjustments menu, Hue, Saturation, Brightness, and I can make it brighter if I wanted to, I can make it less saturated. That makes it a little easy to adjust things. I wanted to add more than one texture to this piece, so I'm going to go ahead and select some pieces to separate out and add a different texture too. I'll start with the layer with the background, I think that would be nice to add some variation there. I'm going to go up to my selection tool, Automatic. Like I showed you in another video, you can tap into one of these sections and slide back and forth to adjust the threshold. Keep it as high as possible without completely flooding like that. That's pretty good. Then just go in and select a few random pieces to become pieces that will have other textures. This one, maybe that one, that one, and then that one. Then you can choose Copy Paste, and now we have just those sections on another layer. Move it above your texture file or your texture layer, and then we're going to import another texture. So add, Insert a file. This time I'll choose the one called Rapids. You can just play around and see which ones you like. This one's a little softer. Rotate, Fit to Canvas, resize it if you need to. Good. Then tap it and choose Clipping Mask, and then change the blend mode to overlay. Now we have some different textures happening within this piece. I also think it would be good to add some texture variation within these flowers, and there's a lot to work within there, so I'm going to select the layer with the flowers. I'm going to go up to my selection tool. Again, we're in automatic and I'm just going to tap into a few of these randomly and do the same on these. Just do a few of these in different texture. You could even do the same texture, just rotate it a little bit, would also add a little bit of variation. I've selected those, I'll do a few from here like that. I think that's good. I'm going to choose Copy and Paste. Now I've got those pieces on their own layer. Move them up to the top. Sometimes it accidentally likes to make it into a clipping mask. If it's right above another clipping mask, I need to turn that off. Then I'll create a new or important a new texture. Let's do this one called Scratches. All these pieces are up here, so I only really needed to cover this section here. Then I'll choose "Clipping Mask" and change the blend mode to "Overlay". I've got a little bit of variation on that. I might even make that a little darker like that with the color or the curves adjustment like I showed you. Well, this is looking pretty good. I think the other thing I'm going to do is one side of the leaf, I'm going to do differently. I'm going to go back to my leaf layer. I'll select this one and this one. I could also change some of the stems. Maybe I'll just change out that stem in that piece there. Copy and paste. One more time all the way up. I'm going to turn off the clipping mask add another. Actually, instead of adding the texture, I'll just duplicate this one. This was my original texture file, so I'll just swipe to the left and choose "Duplicate", and then I can put that above everything else. Tap it, choose "Clipping Mask". Right now it's the exact same as what it was before but if I just go to my transform tool, I can flip it horizontally or vertical. I can rotate it a little bit down the screen once you rotate it. It's just some different variation, I think I'll do that. The color variations within the stained glass texture are going this way on this side of the leaf and this way on that side of the leaf, so I think that looks really nice and so I'm happy with that. I'm happy with all of my stained glass textures. The next step is going to be to create some lighting effects. 23. From Scratch: Lighting Effects + Background: Now I'm ready to make the lead lines look 3D and also add some lighting effects. I'm going to go up to my layers. I'm going to tap the lead lines layer. I'm going to swipe to the right and choose duplicate and do it again. Now I have three copies. I've duplicated it twice. The ones called reference is going to be in the middle. The reason why we want this one to be in the middle is because we can still use this as a reference layer. We're going to be blurring and changing the other two. This is going to be the one that I want to retain its original shape. Let's turn off the top layer temporarily because we're going to lighten this reference layer. I'm going to go up to my "Adjustments menu, Hue, Saturation, Brightness," and just turn it into a lighter gray, I turned it to about 67 percent. Now we can turn back on our top layer, select it, select the top layer zoom in a bit so we can see what we're doing. Go to the Transform tool and then we're just going to offset it. Either offset it this way or this way. I'll do it this way this time. As you can see, I've just offset it just a little bit so you can see that gray from behind. Then we're going to go to our "Adjustments menu, Gaussian Blur," and blur it to three or four percent. I'm at four percent. Then we're going to add some texture with the noise filter. We got a noise, turn it to 70 percent or so. Turn the scale up to 24 percent octaves, just turn them up to halfway. Then we're going to tone down that texture with the curves adjustment. I'm going to Curves and just pull the line down a little bit and I can pull the other side up a little bit. Now we just have like really subtle texture. You see what it looked like before versus after. Then the last thing to do on this layer is to set it to a clipping mask. I'm going to tap the layer. This is the top layer again and then choose clipping mask. Now we have a little bit of lighting effects. One thing I wanted to show you is if you wanted the highlights to be a little more dramatic, you could go back to your reference layer, the one that's in the middle. Go back to "Hue, Saturation, Brightness." The brighter you make this, the more intense that highlight is going to be. I don't like to go super bright with this, I like to keep it fairly subtle. I just brightened it a little bit. Then the last step is to go down here to the third of those three layers. We're going to set this blend mode to color burn up towards the top. Then we'll go to the Adjustments menu and choose Gaussian Blur, and then blur it out a little bit. This blend mode seems to be causing some problems with these colors so I might go back and adjust them in a little bit. But let's see, I'm going to turn it up to five percent. Yeah, I don't want too much of these colors to go away. Because these pieces are so small, they darken quite a bit with this. I'm actually going to reduce the opacity of this layer just a little bit. We've just got a subtle glow happening. Let's go back to these pieces on this layer. I'm going to go to this layer. I'm going to just tap and hold that layer down to just select that layer. I think because these colors are so light, they're having that problem. Let's turn it back on and see if that help. Yeah, that helped that one so it's these three that I need to change. Just making them a little darker. One more will do. It's crazy how much that color burn changed it. Oops, I think I got the wrong one. Basically, I'm just tapping and holding this checkbox and it hides the visibility of all the other layers. We're back in business now. We just need one more, that one right there. Tap and hold, select that color and choose a little bit darker. There we go. Tap and hold to turn everything back on. That's looking a lot better. Our last little lighting effect is we're going to add a glare. We're going to create a layer right above the color burn layer. I'm going to select that color burn layer and tap the plus sign to create a new layer. This layer's blend mode is going to be set to add. I'm going to select a warm brown color for this, not too dark. Then I'm going to get my glare brush and I'm going to paint in a few strokes. I'm at 36 percent for my brush size. Just going to paint in a few strokes diagonally, like that. Then I'm going to get my glare blender brush. I'm using that with the brush tool and just soften these out just a little bit. Just do a few strokes here and there. That'll make it a little less intense, a little more natural looking. Cool. Now we have that glare just making certain spots a little bit brighter. Then if you wanted to, you can add background, if you don't want a white background. You could make stained glass go all the way to the edge of your Canvas. There's nothing wrong with that. I think that looks pretty cool too. I've been really enjoying having a finished frame and then just adding a solid background, just make the design pop. But to add a background, we're going to tap the plus sign and we're going to choose a color. I stick to dark blues, I think they look really nice. Because we have reference still turned on, it's just going to fill in the shape around the frame. Now I'm going to import a texture. Add, Insert a file. Let's see, I'll try wispy light and see how that one looks. Rotate it, make sure it covers the entire Canvas. Then I'm going to set the blend mode to overlay. Then I of course need to also create a clipping mask out of this, so tap that layer and choose clipping mask. Cool. I think that actually looks really nice. You can, of course, make your background darker or lighter or whatever color you want. But overall, I think this is really great. 24. Merging Stained Glass Layers: In this video, I wanted to show you how you can merge the layers of your digital stained glass piece so that you can use it for other purposes, like if you wanted to have it on a transparent background or if you wanted to use this graphic in some other design or paste it as an Instagram sticker or any number of reasons you might want to be able to merge everything together. It's not as straightforward as you might expect, so that's what this video is going to explain. Here's a cute little stained glass tea kettle that I drew. If I go up here to my layers, you can see that I've got quite a few layers here. As you've come to know, creating these pieces does take up a lot of layers. Now, if I wanted to have this on a transparent background and just turn off the background color, it doesn't quite work so well. Let me show you. If I turn off the background, as you can see now our stained-glass texture becomes visible and it's not transparent at all. Let's turn that back on. Then if you wanted to just merge everything together, you'd have the same problem. This is because of the blend modes that are used to add these textures. There's a couple of little things that you need to do if you want to have a transparent background or you just want to merge everything together. Let me undo that. The real key is to make sure that all of your layers that have a blend mode are clipped to another layer. We're going to use a lot of clipping masks to do this. You want to start from the bottom and work your way up. Let me explain so it makes a little bit more sense. Put my artwork over there. Starting at this bottom one, we've got a layer right above it that has the blend mode, so that's the overlay blend mode. We want to merge these two together but first, we want to use a clipping mask to clip this texture to this shape. If you have a lot of different layers underneath your first texture, you want to merge those together first, but I have them all on one layer right here. I'm going to tap the first texture and then I'm going to choose clipping mask, and now that I've done that, I can merge them together. If I had done it differently and not done the clipping mask, this is what would happen. Not good. I want to make sure that I turn on a clipping mask on this layer that we're using a blend mode with. Clipping mask, and now I can merge these two together. I just did a pinch to merge them together. Next we have these layers where I sectioned little pieces off until I can give them a different texture. I'm already using a clipping mask there, so I'll just merge those together. Then I can merge these two layers here together. Again, we're starting at the bottom while going up. Next I have this inner glow layer, and it also uses a blend mode. It uses the color burn blend mode, so I'm going to turn that one into a clipping mask. So tap it, choose clipping mask. Now that I've done that, I can go ahead and merge those together. Then there's no more layers that use blend modes anymore, so I can just go ahead and just merge everything together. Now if I turn off my background color, you can see that I have a completely transparent background. There's no weird blend mode things with textures just randomly showing up, it is all good. Now I can use transform, I can move it around. I can copy and paste this layer, and I can use it in a number of different ways. Because we have the background color turned off, it's got a transparent background. If we were to export this as a PNG file, we can do some fun things with it, maybe use it as a sticker in an Instagram story. Let me show you that really quick. I'm going to go up to my Actions menu. I'm going to go to Share, and then I'm going to share it as a PNG. This is the format that supports a transparent background, so PNG. I can choose AirDrop and I can air-drop it to my phone. There we go. Now if I go to Instagram, I create a story, swipe up at a photo and then I'm going to go back to the camera roll, tap the share icon, and then tap copy photo here. If I go back to Instagram now, it will say add sticker. And there is my cute little teapot that I can add as a little Instagram sticker. I hope that little bit of instruction opens up some possibilities for what other types of things you can do with this type of artwork. I think it'd be fun to create a page of similar graphics, if you had this kettle and a teacup, and a little [inaudible] or just like a whole bunch of little graphics, they could easily become stickers of a sticker sheet, refrigerator magnets, or whatever you want. The possibilities are endless. 25. On Your Own: [MUSIC] You have definitely learned a lot over the course of this class. You have learned the digital stained glass technique by creating this fun, simple, little orange design, we went through and converted some old art into a new stained glass piece, and we created a stained glass piece from scratch doing an original design. Now it's your turn to go on your own and create your own stained glass piece. You can either start with some of your old artwork and convert it into a new piece, or you can create something from scratch. If you're going to create something from scratch, the sky is really the limit as to what subjects that you can decide to do for your piece. You could do nature, you could do food, you could do people, animals, objects, really it could be anything. I really encourage you to get creative. I would try to choose a subject that is a little more on the simple side, nothing too complex right out of the gate, but of course, you can go wild with it and have fun and get as complex as you want. I am so excited to see your pieces. Don't forget to share your project on the Projects tab of the Skillshare class page. You can also include a little bit about why you chose that particular subject, what you thought about the project or anything really. I can't wait to see what you create. 26. Conclusion: Thank you so much for spending some time with me and learning how to create digital stained glass art in Procreate. I had a lot of fun putting this class together, I find this technique just so creatively invigorating. Every time I finish a piece, it just gives me that feeling of wow. It's just so fun and colorful, and I really love the process of simplifying a subject down into stained glass, you can avoid getting lost in the details like you might with other types of illustrations. I hope that you found that as well, and discovered other things that you like about it too. Keep making amazing art and don't forget to share your project in the projects tab. I can't wait to see all of the amazing stained glass pieces that you create. Thanks, and happy art-making.