Playing with Texture in Procreate & Adobe Photoshop: Glow-Up Your Designs | Sarah Beth Morgan | Skillshare
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Playing with Texture in Procreate & Adobe Photoshop: Glow-Up Your Designs

teacher avatar Sarah Beth Morgan, Director + Illustrator

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Class Trailer

      1:59

    • 2.

      Class Project + Materials

      4:34

    • 3.

      Introduction to Digital Texture in Illustration

      7:36

    • 4.

      [Photoshop] Getting Started

      15:44

    • 5.

      [Photoshop] Linework Texture

      5:48

    • 6.

      [Photoshop] Spray + Grain

      6:04

    • 7.

      [Photoshop] Gloss + Shine

      6:58

    • 8.

      [Photoshop] Dry Brush

      7:59

    • 9.

      [Photoshop] Charcoal + Pastel

      5:14

    • 10.

      [Photoshop] Inking

      6:48

    • 11.

      [Photoshop] Color-It-In

      5:17

    • 12.

      [Photoshop] Collage + Photographed

      6:48

    • 13.

      [Procreate] Getting Started

      11:16

    • 14.

      [Procreate] Linework Texture

      7:29

    • 15.

      [Procreate] Spray + Grain

      7:23

    • 16.

      [Procreate] Gloss + Shine

      5:41

    • 17.

      [Procreate] Dry Brush

      7:24

    • 18.

      [Procreate] Charcoal + Pastel

      5:23

    • 19.

      [Procreate] Inking

      5:36

    • 20.

      [Procreate] Color-It-In

      6:24

    • 21.

      [Procreate] Collage + Photographed

      7:13

    • 22.

      Experiment: What else can you make?

      1:16

    • 23.

      Share Your Work!

      0:42

    • 24.

      Thank You!

      1:32

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About This Class

In this class, I will be teaching you quick and easy steps for how to add texture using digital brushes in both Adobe Photoshop and Procreate.

Texture can often make or break a work of art - and artists everywhere seem to agree. In fact, one of the most
frequent questions I get asked on social media.. via email… while teaching.. basically EVERYWHERE - is “what brush did you use?” 

While designing and illustrating digitally, artists add most of their detail and texture using a variety of pre-made brushes. In this class, we’ll be going over the simple steps for texturing your illustrations in both Adobe Photoshop and Procreate - feel free to follow along in either program. We’ll go over all different types of texture - like drybrushing, spray texture, inking and more. And the best part - each technical tip is short and sweet! Quick and simple, easy to digest.

If you want to learn about digital texture and truly transform your work from flat to FABULOUS, this class is for you! No matter if you’re just starting out on your illustration journey or you’re a seasoned professional who wants a sneak peek into another artist’s workflow. 

Lessons Include:

  • Detailed workflows in both Procreate + Adobe Photoshop 
  • Two pre-made downloadable illustrations to work with
  • An extensive Brush Guide 
  • An easy introduction to digital texture 
  • My favorite texturing techniques using masks, clipping masks and blending modes 
  • How to distribute texture successfully 

Find the Brush Guide Document Here!

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Sarah Beth Morgan

Director + Illustrator

Teacher


Hi, you! I'm Sarah Beth - a freelance animation director & illustrator based in Cleveland, OH. I grew up in the magical, far-away Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, where I was deprived of bacon and cable television - but was granted a unique and broad perspective. After attending SCAD and a two-year stint in LA at Scholar, I decided to move onto literal greener pastures in the PNW and join the talented folks at Oddfellows. Now, I work from my own little studio with my fluffy assistant, Bandit.

 

Join my newsletter to stay up to date on my latest thing-a-ma-bobs!

See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Class Trailer: One of the most frequent questions I get asked on social media via email while teaching is, what brush did you use? It's a valid question. While designing and illustrating digitally, artists add most of their detail and texture using different brushes. Let's demystify all of your burning texture questions and let me tell you all about the brushes that I personally use. Hey, I'm Sarah Beth Morgan, and I'm an animation director, illustrator, and designer. Over my eight years working professionally in the animation and illustration industries, I've curated a few quick and easy steps to adding texture to my work that I use all the time. In today's class, we'll be going over these simple steps for adding texture to your illustrations in both Adobe Photoshop and Procreate. We'll go over all different types of texture, like dry brushing, spray texture, inking, and more. If you want to learn more about digital texture and truly transform your work from flat to fabulous, then this class is for you. No matter if you're just starting out on your illustration journey or you're a seasoned professional who wants a sneak peek into another artist's workflow. I'll provide two downloadable illustrations for you to use, and I'll demonstrate how to apply each unique texturing style to it step-by-step in quick tutorial videos. Feel free to follow along in either Photoshop or Procreate. I'll even provide you with an easy-to-follow brush guide with all my favorite free brushes plus a bonus 20 percent off discount to RetroSupply brushes that I love. However, and you can have 100 percent succeed in this class with free brushes. In the end, your work might go from something like this to this. I truly have confidence that by the end of this class, you'll love using digital texture just as much as I do. I'm so excited to dig into this with you. Let's get texturing. 2. Class Project + Materials: [MUSIC] We're getting right into it in this class. No lectures or extended lessons, no off-topic rollerblading or unnecessary dancing from me. Although that was pretty fun. Everything you'll be learning today will be quick and simple, easy to digest. You'll be experimenting with these techniques on your own projects in no time. Today, we'll be working together on all digital texture brushes. I found the best way to explore these and how they differ from each other is to work with a consistent design, so I and you can focus purely on the unique quality that each tool brings to the table. [MUSIC] I've provided you with two downloadable illustrations to work off of. You will find these in the class resources tab below. These are also the illustrations I'll be using to demonstrate with for the majority of the class. I provided two because one version is easy illustration and the other one is labeled hard. But honestly they're both workable, and you will be able to quickly adapt to adding textures to either of these designs. For each provided illustration, there's both a Photoshop version and a Procreate version. Be ready to use these downloadable files as more of a template rather than your final project. We will be breaking it apart, erasing bits of it, redrawing and restructuring it to fit the type of texture we add in each lesson. You'll be transforming this file in ways that you probably couldn't have anticipated before taking this class or so I hope. [MUSIC] As an alternate option, you are more than welcome to use any of your own work for this class. Perhaps you take an old digital design that you want to add some spice to, or maybe you have an idea for a project that you've been wanting to pursue and this is the perfect excuse to get started. If you're wanting to make something new, and you're not sure where to begin, I'd suggest taking my playing with shapes in Procreate class to come up with your own graphic still life illustration first. [MUSIC] Now, you may be wondering which program should I use; Photoshop or Procreate? Well, that's the beauty of this class. You can use either. Whichever you feel most comfortable in honestly. I really wanted to make this class accessible for people who use either program. Honestly the lessons are pretty identical, and they're both going to tell you similar things. No one should feel left behind here. I've created an identical lesson for each program. Whenever I teach about spray texture in Photoshop, there will be an extremely similar lesson for Procreate on spray texture. The only real difference for each of these lessons is the technical aspect of each program and the actual brushes that I'm using, which are honestly particular to each specific program. If you look at the list of class lessons in the scroll bar to the right, you'll find that there's a chunk of lessons for Photoshop and also a chunk of lessons for Procreate. If you're planning on only using Procreate, feel free to skip all the Photoshop video lessons, videos 4-12, and begin on Video 13 for the Procreate portion of the class. Likewise, if you're planning on using only Photoshop, feel free to skip videos 13-21. In each lesson, I'll be using brushes that are default to the program that I'm using, free with the program, or they're discounted. There will always be a free option for the brushes that I use. But you know I'll also be demonstrating some of my favorite paid brushes that I mentioned in the intro video. You are absolutely 100 percent not required to use the brushes that cost money. You are definitely able to succeed in this class without using them. This is just because I want you to have all the options available to you. Obviously, since these brushes aren't mine to distribute, I have provided a handy-dandy Google Sheets document with links to where you can access all of these brushes. If the brush I'm providing is part of a pack, I'll show you how to find the specific brush I'm using within that pack by providing you with the brush name which you'll see on the Google Sheet. I'll also show you how I download and access all of these brushes and each respective Getting Started video for both Photoshop and Procreate. [MUSIC] 3. Introduction to Digital Texture in Illustration: Texture can often make or break a work of art. It's especially helpful if the texture adds some sort or purpose to your work. It's not just necessarily added there for beauty if it's more than just a detail that makes your work look pretty. Of course, looking pretty is also a nice feature and totally valid in its own way. Let's look at a few examples so I can show you what I mean. First I'm going to look at a couple of examples of my work because, I actually textured it myself, so I have probably a little bit more insight. This is a piece I did for Bath and Body Works. The brush that I used here was primarily, a dry brush and I masked it out. I clipping masked it. I used it with different opacities, and you know like I said before, texture doesn't always just look pretty. There's meaning and purpose to it. At least for this one, what I mean by that is like using some of that texture created some of the reflection, made it look more dabbled, made it look more broken up. On the birds here it makes it look more like a feather texture, so it actually gives a more lifelike quality to the animals. Sometimes even the lack of texture can add something to a piece. For this one, I didn't really add much texture. I add a little bit of speckle in here just to give the cherries a little bit more of a realistic vibe. But it almost makes the, using this like big soft gradient brush almost makes it feel more like hyperreal, surreal because I use semi accurate shading, but it's not perfect. I tried to get a little bit more of a realistic look with the lighting and with the water droplets. Obviously it doesn't look real, but the lack of texture gives it like this weird other worldly vibe. In this one I used a combination of brushes. I use like a pastel brush for lighting and shading, so obviously texture can be more than just like adding a texture to a flat object. You can use it to create shading and lighting as you would if you were just drawing on, like a piece of paper, you got to use some brush in real life, like a dry brush or a pastel or charcoal, or something that's actually going to give a textural quality to your work that you might not necessarily get on the computer, so adding that in here after I've created the shapes gives it this more realistic vibe I guess. Looks like it more like it was drawn on paper than if I just left this all flat. But I want to look at a couple of other artists who I think use texture really well. I'm going to butcher this artist's name, but their name is Anja Susanj. I'm so sorry, Anja. Obviously, I'm pretty sure Anja actually creates everything on paper. At least it looks that way, so this wouldn't actually be for digital texture. But one thing you could do potentially is, you know, color something in, texturize something, draw something on paper, scan it in, and then edit it with your texture brushes in Photoshop. If you're going for a more abstract look, Daniel Entonado work is really cool. I'm pretty sure a lot of this is tactile like drawn on paper, but it almost looks like some of it was edited digitally. But experimenting with actual real brushes like here you can see this like Reiki, dry brush in here is really cool and that's something I tried to emulate with my digital work. Giacomo Bagnara's work is really cool and I feel like he uses digital texture super well. You can tell he almost created all of his shapes, maybe in illustrator. I'm not sure if he did his textures in illustrator, but he definitely like masked out some of the texture and applied it to these flat shapes to give it more of an interesting field than if you were to just create a flat vector Bezie piece, so that comes through in a lot of his work. I love Kim Salts work. Kim Salt uses texture super well and you can tell that, you know. You see the edges by the hair and on the chin. It's almost like Kim is trying to emulate something a little bit hazy, almost feels like a dream. I think that leaving some edges hard and then adding textures to some edges really creates an interesting look that I probably never would have thought of myself, and I think it really gives it like a dreamy, surreal vibe that you wouldn't be able to do without some digital texture. I absolutely love Ping Zhu's work and I'm probably pronouncing that wrong, so I apologize. They use texture super well. It almost looks like a combination of painted texture and then perhaps they went into Photoshop and added digital texture. I'm so used to digital texture now that I call it a real texture. You know, I could be totally wrong, but it almost looks like the trees were painted by hand, but if they weren't, I'm very impressed they're using texture super well, but as you can see like, they are using a textural brush to create these forums from scratch. It's not always about slapping some texture on once you're done with your piece, sometimes it's about using something textural to begin with, to create your work, like whatever tool you're using, whatever medium you're using, and then allowing that to breathe through into the final piece. Okay. Those texture examples are all fun and good, but how the heck do these artists make it looks so effortless? Well, I'll be telling you all about it and each video lesson for getting started in both Photoshop and Procreate. Obviously, I'm using brushes throughout this whole process, which I provided to you already. But one technique that I really enjoy that'll be going over with you is using clipping masks and masks. They're used a little bit differently in both Procreate and Photoshop, so checkout Videos 4 and 13 to skip ahead and learn more about these techniques depending on which program you're using. I really like using masks and clipping masks because it gives you flexibility to go back in and edit out your textures and manipulate them, change the blending mode, erase bits and pieces without damaging or affecting the rest of your illustration. That's my go-to texturing technique. I know there are other ways to do it, but I'm excited to share this technique with you and we'll hop into it in those Getting Started videos. We'll also be going over different types of texturing because not all textures are added in the same way. Oftentimes, it can just be added after the illustration is done on to solid shapes. You know texture isn't always just added detail. Perhaps it is used to create light or shadow. You know maybe it's uses dappled light or reflection in water. It often has to be integrated into your workflow from the very start. In some of these lessons, I'll be redrawing and recreating some of my shapes from scratch to get the best looking effect. 4. [Photoshop] Getting Started: Welcome to the Adobe Photoshop portion of this texturing class. In this video, we'll be going over all of the technical aspects of using Photoshop as your program of choice for adding texture to your illustrations. I'll introduce you to our warm-up sheet and downloadable illustrations, which I said before you can find in the Project Resources tab. We'll also discuss how to download and adjust your Photoshop brushes to your liking. I also want to point out that while I'm working here, I'll be using a Wacom 22-inch Cintiq with a pen. Of course, you are welcome to use any tablet or if you want to connect your iPad to your computer to get that done. Whatever works for you is totally fine for this class. The first thing that you're going to be doing for this class is obviously going to the Class Resources tab and downloading the downloadable illustrations that I've created for you. Once you have those downloaded, they should show up in your Downloads folder. I've dropped them into this folder here. However, I just want to point out that there's Photoshop files as well as Procreate files. Depending on what program you decided to use, just make sure you open those respective files in their programs. But first, I'm going to show you what I've provided for you. First up, we have the class project warm-up sheet. Now, this comes in both color and gray scale. I honestly don't think you're really going to need the gray scale version, but it's there if you want it. This is where I'm going to be trying out all of my texture brushes and just see how they work before I hop into the actual class projects. Then I also have this easy class project, which is a bunch of fun shapes that I've created for you. The great thing about this one is that there are a lot of overlapping shapes. So lots of opportunities for shadows, adding different textures to different shapes, playing around with color, blending modes and all of that. There's lots of opportunity for that here. Everything is separated and labeled. I was very clean with this one because I made it specifically for this class. This will be a really great one, especially if you're just beginning out and you're trying to learn how to use Photoshop for texturing. Obviously, the warm-up is great for that, too. But I would suggest starting on the easy one if you're not feeling super comfortable in Photoshop just yet. Then I've also provided you with this harder class project. Now, this is a project that I've created just on my own time in the past. This is an illustration I just did for my Instagram, but I repurpose it here by changing the colors up and making it a little bit easier for you to play with by getting rid of some of the extra stuff that was in there. However, it's not 100 percent clean, like everything is grouped and layered properly. However, not every layer is labeled. Just keep that in mind as you're working. I've already got some clipping masks in there. I'll show you how to use those in a second here. Once you get the technique down and you know how to navigate these folders and files, it's not really going to be that hard to add texture to any of these. This one gives you a little bit more opportunity to play with detailed and smaller textures. Maybe you want something that feels more like lighting and shading and you can apply it to this one, and then perhaps this one is more like for abstract graphic textures. There's endless opportunities of what you can do with these files. Next up, I wanted to go over the brush guide with you a little bit more in detail and also specifically for how we're going to be using it for Photoshop. Like I said earlier, we've got links for everything. I have the name of the pack that the brush is in, and then the actual brush name. The way that you would go about downloading all of these is very simple. Follow the Photoshop link. Most of the Photoshop brushes that I'm providing to you are actually default with Adobe Creative Cloud. Anything that has this tiny URL link is going to take you to this page, which is all of Kyle T. Webster's brushes. Kyle Webster is honestly a Photoshop brush genius, so everything in here is amazing. I'm just pointing out the ones that I really like using. If you have Creative Cloud, if you have access to Photoshop, you should have access to these. Any of these are free for you. However, if say I want to download this linework brush, I can specifically check out which pack name it's in. This one is in the mega pack, and then press "Download". Once you have that downloaded, just go back to Photoshop, press B to bring up your brush tool, and then click on this little gear and click "Import Brushes". Then find that brush pack in your downloads file, and it's the megapack.abr. All of your brushes are going to be .abr, and that will show up on the bottom of your brush library. There's the mega pack. Then if you look back at this and it says Inkbox for the pack name in parentheses, just make sure you check in this Inkbox folder, and then the brush is called Fountain of Yoots, which I think his brushes are named so funny, it's my favorite thing ever. It might take you a minute to find it, but everything should be in alphabetical order. There's that brush, and you've got your brush to use. Obviously, I highly encourage you to go into these packs that you download and try out all of these brushes because they're all freaking cool and I think they're going to be really useful to you. One thing that I'd love to point out to you for Photoshop specifically is that it is such a game changer to organize your brush packs. Normally, my brush packs don't look this intense. I usually have from here to here as my main brush packs. Honestly, what I've done is I've gone into all of my brush folders, my mega pack and my other Kyle Webster brushes, and then I've selected the ones that I like the best and I've organized them into smaller groups. My Big Lines folder, there's only seven brushes in here. So it's a little bit easier for me to sort through because I oftentimes forget which brush I like or which brush I'm using. Then another handy thing you can do is, obviously, if you click on the gear, you can make a new brush group and label it like texture project. Then you can start pulling in your favorite brushes that you're using for your project specifically, and then have them in this one folder. This is a really great trick to have at your sleeve because if you're working on a project with a bunch of friends or you're working on a client project, you can easily save that brush pack by selecting all the brushes that you want to have exported and then you go to the gear and press "Export Selected Brushes". It's really, really great. Photoshop in the past couple of years did this update where they made it so much more organized and I'm so grateful for it. I love it. That's basically how you're going to be downloading all your brushes. Obviously, there are some that don't come with Photoshop CC. Those you just grab them from the website that I've provided, add them to your cart, and then they'll email you the link. So you'll get a link to those specific brushes, and then you just import them the same way. Another thing that you may want to do is select how big to see the brush is in your brush panel. Then also you can select things like showing the brush name and showing the brush tip and the brush stroke, which some people don't like seeing all of it, but I think it's really handy and it gives you a really good idea of how the brush is going to work. Highly recommend doing that and customizing your brush panel to your liking, and then you will feel comfortable getting started on this project. Another thing that you'll have the opportunity to do in this class is to actually customize your brushes to your liking. I often typically use the Kyle Webster brushes and the default brushes. Honestly, all of my brushes, basically how they are. A lot of them will have a preset size, reset flow and everything. But sometimes if I'm feeling fancy and I want to change the size of the brush, you can press the bracket tools left and right on your keyboard for a shortcut. I use that all the time because it's such a hassle. You can go to your window and bring up your brush settings on the side, which is super helpful because then you can just slide the size. But honestly, I'm always editing my size as I go. Having this brush panel open is actually super helpful, but I honestly don't keep it open all the time because it does take up a lot of space on my screen. The other feature that I like using a lot is the flow. The flow is going to basically determine how much of the ink is coming out of your brush at one time. If you turn the flow down a lot, you're going to get something that looks a lot more scattered and light. But if you apply pressure to your Cintiq pen or your tablet pen, it's going to make it a little bit more full. It's really about the pressure, and you can turn the pressure sensitivity off, if you want, with this tool here. It's just like even no matter how hard you press. The other tool I really like using is smoothing. A lot of times if I'm using a cleaner line, say, this ballpoint pen, it starts looking bad. If I'm trying to draw this shape and I'm having trouble making it look good, what I'll do is I'll turn smoothing up even more. Then it just guides your brush, so there's not as many dense in your shape. Then obviously there are also the more intense editing tools. To demonstrate, I'm just going to use this graphite brush. You can see it has this very interesting scattered look. But, say, you wanted to adjust how much scatter there was, you can slide the scatter in the scattering section of your brush settings and it'll make it a lot less scattered, or if you want to do more, you can see there's more space between the particles there. There's a lot of different things you can do like texture, the scale of the texture. It's hard to tell on this one because it's so light, but there's a lot of different things you can mess around with them here. You can play around with that on your own. I'm not going to focus on that too much in this class, but I will be adjusting the flow and the smoothing. You can even adjust the opacity and how that changes with pressure and everything. These are tools I use all the time. I thought those might come in handy to you before you get started here. The technique that I use all of the time for adding texture, especially where there's a bunch of flat shapes that are on their own layers, I'm personally going to use masks and clipping masks the most. I'm going to be using this technique all throughout the class, so I thought I might as well just go ahead and show you how to do that here. Let's pull up our color shapes. Say, I'm going to use this oval and, say, I want to add brushy graphite texture to it. I would start by creating a new layer, pressing this button on the bottom or Command Shift N now also create a new layer, and draw your texture on it, above it or whatever. Say, you want it to look like a little bit of shading there or something. Then Alt+Click between these two layers to clipping mask your texture to that shape. Oftentimes, I will adjust the blending mode and the opacity when I get there. It's honestly how I texture everything. I'm always using clipping masks. In addition to that, I'm also always using masks. The way you add a mask, and I usually am masking on top of my clipping mask. So have your clipping mask texture layer selected and then press this little mask button at the bottom right corner of your Photoshop panel. This white shape is what we call a mask, and you use black and white in the mask to selectively view and hide areas of the layer. Black will hide, looks like you're erasing part of the layer. But if you delete the layer mask, the information is still all there. So you're not actually erasing parts of your layer. I love this because you can't really mess anything up. Say, I erased too much or I masked out too much, it's fine because I can go back and just delete my layer mask and start over. However, on the flip side, say, you're like, "Oh, I don't really like that. I think I erased or I masked out too much," press X and that will flip your black and white values on the left side, and that will make it so that you can selectively add and subtract from your layer mask. This is the technique I use all the time. Highly recommend getting used to these keys and shortcuts because I'm going to be using them all throughout this class. However, this is not the only way to add texture. There's plenty of other ways to do that, and we'll be going over those in a few of the lessons. But personally, I do this all the time. I love to create the overall composition and color palette of the piece first, and then I'll go back in and add texture afterwards. That's just my process and my favorite way of working, especially if you're more of a graphic illustrator. Anyways, that's my technique. I hope it helps you. Now that we're here, I think we're ready to get going. I'll meet you in the next lesson on linework texture. Now that you're all setup in the program, let's add some unique types of textures to your illustration. As always, feel free to ask me questions in the discussion tab here on Skillshare if you're not sure about the setup portion of the class. Move on to the next video to start with these textures. 5. [Photoshop] Linework Texture: [MUSIC] Linework texture, what exactly do I mean by that? Honestly, this technique is something I use all the time in my work. What I mean by linework texture is essentially drawing something like creating a base shape by using a textured brush. Some examples of that might be, say, in this design frame I did down here, you can see the edge of this rectangle is created using some sort of textured charcoal brush. Then I use similar brush to do the linework throughout to give everything that overall textured feel from scratch, which I prefer honestly when I'm trying to make something feel more warm and hand-drawn and tactile, as opposed to creating a vector shape and then adding a texture over top. The best way to do that in Photoshop is, I'm going to go ahead and use the brush that I have listed here, the Fountain of Yoots brush. Basically, what I want to do is redraw some of my shapes here to have more of a textured edge. Sometimes it's nice to not even turn that smoothing feature on and then just have a wonky feeling shape. I have the actual linework of the shape here and it looks super wonky, but that's what I'm going for. Then in Photoshop, if you press W and you select the inside of it with your magic wand and press G to bring up your paint bucket tool and fill it, you end up with this weird edge, which doesn't look very nice. I want to also teach you this little trick. I think I might have taught this in some of my other classes, but I have this Photoshop action I've set up to avoid that. This is setup custom, and I think I've probably shown it to you in a couple of my other classes. Basically, what you're going to have to do is pre-select the inside of your shape. Then press this Play button on the right, which will bring up your Actions tab. But essentially what you want to do is you want to press this Plus button and create a new action. I will just call it fill action. Obviously, I already have one set up. I'm just going to choose a random function key to assign it to, and then press Record. Then you make sure you have your inside selected already. The next step is to go to Select, Modify, Expand. If you're using a thin brush, like I am here, I'd expand it by like two or three pixels. Let's go with three. Basically, what that does is it expands your selection by three pixels. It just makes it three pixels wider all around. Then it's very important that you use the key command for this, which is Option Delete, and that will fill with your foreground color that you have selected. Then finally, press Command D. This will just make everything easier, that's de-select. Then press Stop on your Actions panel, and now you have a fill action setup. Obviously, my brush itself is low opacity. But if I use like a more crisp, intense brush and I use my new fill action F8, it's going to fill that in completely, and there's no pesky weird border anymore, which you get from just using the Fill Bucket tool. That's how I love doing this linework texture. I've got a wonky shape. Now, obviously, there's also just using a textured brush for creating linework, which you can see I've actually used both of these techniques in my hard illustration here. Let's go ahead and just apply a little bit of that to this part here. I'm just going to redraw a couple of shapes using my Fountain of Yoots. But I'm going to make it larger so that you get more of a textured edge. Then I'm going to make sure it's at full opacity. I'm going to turn the original shape layers off or low opacity so I can trace them. [MUSIC] Use that fill action. You can also, as a trick I do, if you have a low opacity brush, is just press Command J and duplicate your layer and then select both of the layers together and press Command E, which will merge the layers. It immediately gives you like a full opacity shape instead of having to go in and manually color that in. I've got some really funky shapes and textures going on within these shapes. You can also obviously go in and add some subtle linework, or not subtle actually, probably the opposite of a subtle, using some of the color palette, go in and add some of that actual linework in there using the same pen and just see what you can come up with. Add some detail, make it a little bit more interesting to the eye. That's pretty much linework texture for you. There's obviously endless possibilities. You can use any brush to do this. I just chose to use this one because I thought it was fun. But yeah, go ahead and apply this to your project, I'd be really excited to see what you come up with. 6. [Photoshop] Spray + Grain: [MUSIC] Next up we have spray and grain. What I mean by spray and grain is any texture brush that adds noise, grain, spray, scatter, anything that gives you the subtle texture look, it's actually been pretty popular in social media unlike in motion graphics for awhile, but you can see a lot of it coming through in this piece I did for School of Motion. Then here's another great example. [LAUGHTER] I did this one I swear like six, seven years ago, but I really laid it on heavy with the spray texture. This is definitely a fun option to use and I'm going to show you how to go for it right now. For this one I actually have three different Photoshop links. The first one is just a Kyle Webster brush. Using that same link I showed you before, download that brush from the spatter pack and then the brush that we're going to be using is called big basic. Get into your spatter brushes pack and find that big basic brush, which should be right in the beginning because it starts with B. The way that I like using it is oftentimes I'll use it in black and white and just apply it using that clipping mask technique to your shape. Obviously, as you could see in the example I showed you, I really like using this spray textures for shading and lighting and adding a little bit of dimension to stuff. The way I'll go about that is once I've applied this heavy texture, I might turn it on multiply mode, blending mode, and turn the opacity down. Then I'll also add an actual mask to it. Then it can make the opacity variable or non-variable by pressing this button. That means it might fluctuate opacity applying to your brush pressure, your pen pressure. You can mask it out using black and white and get more of a refined look, which I often do. Then I also want to go in and do another clipping mask to add a highlight. The smaller this brush gets, the more detailed it looks, the more subtle. Sometimes I'll put my highlight on overlay and turn that opacity down. Kind of matches your base color a little bit better. But that's how you get a really subtle look. I like using this brush for that. Then the other brush that I have is two from Retro Supply, which I have downloaded already. We have the Turbo textures brush, the sporadic grains spray. I'm just going to apply this to my squiggle shape. You can look at it first without masking it. It is like much more of a scattered look. A lot of times I'll just use this for more of a graphic feel, or say you want something to just feel rough. If I make it larger, it gives it an even more cool like speckled look. Then the final one I want to show you is this Doggone Grainy Scatter course scatter brush and this one. I like using this one actually more as like an overall grain texture. What I mean by that is like, let's say I apply it to this rectangle, I'll just apply it evenly to the whole rectangle. Maybe put it on multiply, turn the opacity down. It just gives it like your work look a little bit of more of a paper feel. Some ways that you can apply that might be by actually going in over your entire piece and just making this grain layer over everything, which looks horrible when you first do it. But then if you adjust the opacity and maybe even make it an overlay so it's more subtle, that adds a really cool overall texture. Then I might go in and use one of those brushes. Like let's say I'll just use the Kyle Webster brush, my spatter brush to create some hard shadows. What I love about this canvas, this easy class project that I've created for you is that there's so many overlapping shapes you can play with. Adding in some fake shadows to everything actually is cool. I'm just going to do this like really heavy shadows everywhere by just making everything look a little bit more dimensional. [MUSIC] That already has created such a different field than our original if you go back. Even compared to that line work texture that we played with them last round, it's got such a different vibe. This is like go bolder, go home. This is a lot of spray texture. If I were to spend some more time in finesse, I'd probably work on it a bit more. But I think that there's something nice and unique about just throwing some texture on there, go big. Make it really intense and like have a lot of contrast and I think works pretty well with shape, stuff like this. That's spraying grain texture. We'll be using a similar technique in the next lesson on gloss and shine. 7. [Photoshop] Gloss + Shine: [MUSIC] I'd say that gloss and shine is almost like a lack of texture. It's a look that you can much easier get across digitally than if you were to actually try to paint something on paper, you can use this digital soft brush that comes default in Photoshop or Procreate. You can get this hyperreal, smooth, glassy vibe. Here's some examples of it in my work. This was something I worked on with Gunnar, a studio that I worked with as just using the default soft brush in Photoshop, and you can obviously get away with this in Procreate as well. But as you can see, it is pretty versatile. You can use it to mask shapes out to create something that feels see-through. You can use it to create spheres. Obviously, this is something you could definitely get away with painting. However, I'm just not talented enough at painting to get this very soft look and feel. I'm going to show you how to play with this gloss and shine in Photoshop and Procreate right now. In Photoshop, basically, just press "B" to bring up your brush panel, and then you're just going to go to your default brushes and click "Soft Round". If you look at the brush guide, I'm literally just using the soft round default brush. It's the only brush we're using that comes with Photoshop that is already in the program when you open it. Like the spray brushes, I like using this brush to create dimension. Let's just use this oval shape to create a clipping mask, and then use black and white to create light and shading. Say we wanted this side to be the dark side, and we want the right top side to be the lighter side. You could leave it like that or you could adjust the blending mode and opacity to get something that has more dimension. Say you also wanted to use it to create a little highlight or something, then you could also mask out that highlight. Sometimes I'll change the opacity to variable to make it a little bit more flexible when adding those highlights or just anywhere. Oftentimes when I'm applying the soft brush though, I'll make sure it's like at 100 percent opacity, and then I'll use my masks to clipping mask that out. Pretty easy, pretty straightforward, you can obviously also use it in a different way, like almost like a gradient tool. If you wanted you can even use it as a background gradient. Just see how everything blends together. It creates an interesting effect. But say I wanted to add some water texture in. One of my favorite things that I like doing with the soft brush in Photoshop or Procreate is start by using just like your default hard-round brush or your hard-round pressure size brush. Turn it to white and then just create or illustrate what you think a water droplet might look like traveling down your oval shape. I'm just going to restart this. [LAUGHTER] Doesn't look perfect, but it could be an abstract water shape. Then using that water shape instead of adding clipping mask, just mask out this shape. Then go to your soft round brush and use that to actually mask out the shape. With water and really reflective texture, sometimes I'll turn the opacity on and usually you to keep the edge and like any of these thinner moments white. It looks like there's thicker parts of the water that are more reflective. That looks like a droplet. But then in order to make it look even more so, I would just go in and add some highlights, whether they'll be small little highlights here and there, or big chunky ones, and then you can use your masks, even erase and create some hard edges on these highlights, which makes it look more realistic sometime. If everything is too soft, it might look a little fake. Then you could go a step further. If you want it to look like it's actually protruding off of the shape, take a little bit of your darker color, turn it on multiply mode. Just create a new layer underneath it and add a little bit of shadow. Sometimes it's going to look too heavy, so you might want to mask out some of those interior parts and turn the opacity down. There you have it. You've got the easiest way to create some water looking stuff. In the spring green lesson, I went in and applied the texture to this one. I don't really think it's necessary to add it to one of the projects. In this one, I would actually challenge you to see what maybe this easy class project looks like with this gloss and shine texture. I'm not sure if this particular easy class project will look because it's more graphic. I'm curious to see what you could come up with to create a gloss and shine version of this one. If you work on that and you get it done and you really like it and want to share with the class, I would strongly encourage you to add that to your class project. 8. [Photoshop] Dry Brush: For dry brush. Now, this is a type of brush that you find a lot in Kyle Webster's brush. There's lots of brush packs you can find online for it. In my work, I really like using this brush. I use it for a lot of stuff. As you can see, I used it in my bath and body works piece here that I did for hornet and bath and body works. You can see it coming across in the water and the streams in this flowy, curvy texture in the background. It's on the cornfields that the fox is running through here. It's in the water. Then it's also in my short film between lines. I use this brush a lot. I actually use it in combination with that gloss and shine effect a lot. It creates a really interesting contrast. As you can see, it's like on the bubbles here, and even a subtle bit behind the character. Then in here you can see it coursing through the water, to add more of that rough texture. If I were to discuss how it added meaning to my work or purpose to this piece, it creates a little bit more tension between the real and the tactile and the hyperreal and the surreal. There is some thought that went into using it, but I really like this brush. Basically, as you can see here. It's just if you had a real paintbrush, and it was dry and you didn't dip it in water first and you just went straight for the paint, and maybe the paint is a little bit thickened or something and it creates this reiki feel. Let's dig into using a dry brush in the Photoshop. If you go to my brush guide, I have a couple of different options. Both of the options come with the Kyle Webster brushes. The first one is in the dry media pack, which is down here, and it's called the bone dry brush. Let's try it on the warm-up. I'm just going to make it this darker color. If you just use it small like this, it could almost be used as linework. If you increase the size, it becomes thicker and more paintbrush like. But a lot of times what I really like to do with this brush is I turned down the flow, so you actually get more space between the pixels. It looks even more dry, you could go to 10 percent. Looks crazy dry. But let's say we'll do something more like this, 16 percent. You can use it stylistically. Let's clipping mask to the oval. Maybe you're just adding some rough texture in there, and you just want it to have a collage feel like it's almost not created to add highlights or shadows. That is a cool way to use it. We've been playing with different colors, that creates a totally different effect. Then obviously we can also use it as shadows and lighting. Say we wanted to add a little shadow under this guy here. That's another way to use it. I love using it both ways and I often do use it both ways in whatever piece I'm working on. Then the other brush that I have in here is from the megapack, in the paint box section it's called the Ruffin brush. Let's go to the megapack. This one has more of a watercolor painterly feel. Both are very cool to use in whatever way you want. Maybe this one is used more as an actual paintbrush, and the other one is more of a graphic stylistic brush. But you could use it whatever way you want, whatever works best for you. But see that created some dimension in my squiggle shape here, by just adding a little bit of erasing or clipping masking whatever you feel most comfortable doing. I'm going to go ahead and apply some of this to my easy class project. Let's go into that first brush we were using. I'm just going to start with something more graphic. Staying within the color palette, and then messing with the opacity. Just adding a little bit of visual interests there. Another way that you can use it as more like an actual paintbrush. Say you were just wanting to slap it on there like you would like a real paintbrush, to create some highlights on this thing on a Bob piece down here. Then you could go in and with the same brush and mask it out. I would maybe turn the opacity on. You get more of a streaky, painterly feel. It really depends on how you want to use the brush, what your piece is, what its purpose is. We can use the other brush as well, the Ruffin brush. Maybe you're using this in a circular motion, that gives you a totally different vibe. There's plenty of ways to go with this. Then if you wanted, there'll be a great opportunity to play with this brush in the hard class project. Now I'm not going to go in and fully fill this one out for you, because I would love to see what you can come up with on your own. But say I really wanted to add some texture to the leaves, and I want to use it in a dimensional way, say this is the shadow of the leaf. Sometimes just leaving it super rough is actually really cool and nice looking. Maybe I go in and add it to all of the leaves, and then use it for highlights in places. I feel this class might get repetitive if I do it to every single piece. You all are super talented, and I would love to see how you bring this to life using the dry brush. 9. [Photoshop] Charcoal + Pastel: Charcoal and pastel, pretty similar brushes in Photoshop and Procreate. They give a similar vibe in terms of texture. Some ways that I've used that in my work in the past is here in this piece that I created just for fun, I used a lot of a charcoally texture to create highlights in the clouds, to create dimension and shadow on our hero character here. Then in this Old Navy spot, I directed while at Odd Fellows, our team used charcoal and pastel on a lot of places. Mostly it's pretty graphic, but we added a bit of warmth to the piece by adding this charcoal masked out texture in the trees. You can also see it in the buildings here. They added some nice subtle shading in with that brush. It's a pretty versatile brush as well. I think it's really nice. It feels really realistic to me like some of the dry brushing stuff doesn't always look super realistic to me in terms of making it look like it's actually made on paper, but I feel like you can achieve that here. In Photoshop, the brush that we're going to play with first is the charcoal brush, it's in the charcoal pack from Kyle's brushes and it is fine charcoal too. Here's what that looks like. Off the bat, it could be just like a line work brush that you use that fill action with. It doesn't really work super well because it has some low opacity edges. But you can use it that way. Also you can change the flow and everything to get it how you want but you can use it as a shading tool. It's an interesting brush because it follows the direction of your pen. You can see the actual shape of the brush moving around. Might take some getting used to. But I love how it masks out. I think it looks really natural. Then the pastel brush we're going to be using is in the dry media pack it's a pastel soft square. It's not the same, but it does have a very similar textural quality to the charcoal. That's why I lump them together is because I feel like you can use them interchangeably. Like say you are working on a piece for a project and you've just had both of these brushes in your repertoire, I think they would pair together really nicely. That's where I'm going with this one. If you wanted to mask out the charcoal brush with the pastel brush, it gives you a really cool effect. I'm just going to dive right into the hard class project for this one. I think that this piece could really benefit from some realistic tactile texture. I'm just going to go ahead and use both of these brushes and apply them to a lot of the shapes in here. I'm going to use it mostly as shading to our dimension. I'm just going to demonstrate that. You can see where I'm at at the end. What I actually ended up doing was using the pastel brush and then I masked it out using the charcoal brush. Honestly, you could use them interchangeably and it would still look cool. But I feel like compared to where this was before, it has a lot more dimension, it has a little bit more personality, it feels less like a graphic illustration and more like something painterly. Adding that texture in really created a lot of interests to this piece. Highly recommend using charcoal and pastel. I think they're super fun to play with and I'm excited to see what you do with it. 10. [Photoshop] Inking: Inking brushes are my absolute favorite. I think they're so versatile. I really love using them mostly for line work, but sometimes to fill shapes and add patterns and a little bit more detail to my work. Here's an example of where I used it in a piece that I did for career in a year, which was created IV Studio. As you can see, someone, the wonderful Allen Laseter animated it using the same brush. It is a great inking brush. I'll show you what those are in a minute. I also used it for one of my other Skillshare classes, for my easy-peasy palettes class, the base illustration that I provided was actually created with an inking brush that I'll show you here in a minute. Then even in your class project and the hard one, everything I drew here was used with Kyle Webster inking brush. I love it. I don't know if that necessarily looks like real ink. I'm sure it does, but it's got this really nice, rough textured edge that I don't see with a lot of other brushes. It's bloody and it's loose and sketchy. It just adds this really fun quality to your work. It's a great one. In Photoshop, I have two recommendations. We've got the running inkers pack from Kyle Webster with the Big Blot 2 brush. Then, we also have some brushes that you can get from Retro's supply from the broken anchors pack the blotchy anchor. Let's just pull that up. The Kyle Webster 1. If you go to the running inkers pack and then go to Big Blot 2. These are all really similar. You can play around with them and see which ones you like best. I thought this one was nice because it wasn't like too overwhelmingly broken up like sometimes, I think with the other ones. There's spaces between them and then select you can't create a closed shape as easily. The one that I like best is this number 2. Obviously, we use that fill action technique in the line work lesson and if I just fill it in, it gives this really bumpy quality to your shapes and that's what I did in the class project here. I love it. I mean, if you use it everywhere, it would make your piece look really textured. Then you could combine that with your charcoal or your dry brush texture to do some fills on the inside, and it would just look super cool. I also recommend the broken inkers from Retro Supply, and the blotchy inker is really nice, so it's very similar, just a little bit smaller. Maybe the texture isn't as prominent. Maybe you want it to be a little bit more subtle. Those are both great options. Either one works, and you could even adjust the Kyle Webster brushes to look more like that. Obviously, using whatever you feel most comfortable with, you don't have to buy anything. A lot of times I like to use this texture to add detail. Say I wanted to make something that looks like it was like a wood texture. I would go in and like fake that. Draw some wood lines. I don't know what this looks like, but some knots in the wood. I actually might make it the color of the background and put it on multiply. From far away and it looks like fake wood, I guess. That's how I add a lot of detail to my work. You could do that and so many different ways. I think it'd be really fun to just add some line work patterns in here. Maybe we just add some squiggles to some of the shapes. Then you could obviously go in and make all the shapes have more of a textured edge by recreating the shapes with you inker brushes. But another thing I would like to encourage is just look through these packs. If you have them and see which other brushes you can find that you really like. They can all give you a different textural feel and play with the pressure and the opacity on your brushes. Like maybe this has a totally different look and feel than the ones I recommended. This is the Old Faithful inker. Maybe you want it to look like really rough. You can get a really different effect depending on how you use the brush and which specific brush you use. All of those inking brushes look so different from each other, and I'll just keep adding texture, keep playing around. Add a little bit of pattern and excitement to your piece. Combine those different inking brushes, and then even go ahead and add even more of those brush techniques that we learned earlier in the class. I think the best way to get your favorite work of art, your best piece from yourself is to combine all these textures. I think using them together is stronger than using them alone. That's inking for you. I love inking brushes. They're very simple, as you can see here. You just use them to create a piece, and it has this different quality that you wouldn't have had if you just used the vector shapes, so great stuff. 11. [Photoshop] Color-It-In: When I say color in, I mean, basically exactly what it sounds like. If you were to use a pencil on paper and you wanted to fill in a shape using your pencil, you would have to fill the whole thing in by hand. That's what I mean here. But with digital work, obviously, if you just fill something in with a paint bucket tool, it's going to fill it in perfectly. For this technique, I want it to appear less perfect, that's the whole point of it. If you look down at this little fire cluster on the bottom right corner, it looks like I colored it in with pencil and then I used this technique in this piece here. I didn't put it on every shape, but like say, on this girl's sweater here, you can see I hand colored it in on this girl's pants, the dog's sweater, and this girl's hair. It just adds a little bit more of a tactile effect and you can do this using any brush. I'll demonstrate that for you in Procreate and Photoshop. In Photoshop specifically, I've just chosen an arbitrary textured pencil brush. It's from the mega pack and it's the ultimate charcoal pencil, 25 pixels. I'm just going to demonstrate, so there are two ways to do it. The first way would be to already have a shape drawn out for you. It can be vector. You could have used the line-work technique to fill it in with the fill action, anything like that. But the first way to do it would just be to use the mask. Then you take your pencil or your brush of choice and then just arbitrarily mask it out. Doesn't really matter what this looks like. Then you're going to press X to reverse your colors so your white is your top color. Then you're just unmask that out. You're left behind with these little gaps in your color interior and this is a quick and easy way to apply that texture. You can obviously go in and add bits here and there if it looks uneven. That's one way. The other way is to literally go in manually, draw your shape, and then obviously just fill it in like you went on paper. I personally tend to just use already filled shapes and do it because it just is much faster. You could just do it in a couple of little sections and then mask those little sections out to just give it really like a subtle look. It doesn't have to be everywhere. It saves you some time. But I mean, you can do this with any brush. Say I wanted to use this chunky charcoal brush. It has a totally different feel. It's going to leave behind a spattery noise texture. The interesting thing about this is, if you put a shape behind it, you're going to see the color of that shape shining through because it's masked out. Basically it's letting that information from behind it shine through. Let's just go ahead and use that charcoal pencil and apply it to the hard class project. Basically what I'm going to do is I'm just going to select every shape that I want to mask out and just do that technique. I think this will give this piece more of a hand-drawn feel. It already has that line work inking texture everywhere. But I think we can give it a little bit more. There you have it, there's the color-it-in technique and you can see that gives you a totally different effect than like say, the charcoal and pastel technique. Whereas you're creating dimension and adding more, in the colored in technique, you're actually subtracting from your piece to create this texture. Give it a shot. I would love to see what you come up with. Use a different brush than I did, play around with the textures that can shine through once you mask them out. I think it's a really great technique and I use it all the time. 12. [Photoshop] Collage + Photographed: For collage and photographed textures, what I mean by that is literally taking a high resolution texture off the Internet or a photo you took and creating a texture out of it over your shapes. I've used this technique for pitches and for client work, but I often don't bring it up in my own work that you see on my Instagram and stuff. I don't have too many examples of my own on my website. But you can see I took a paper texture and applied it to this silhouette here, and even this handwritten note has been applied to the silhouette as if it was written on there. But I think I pretty much just took a stock image and dropped it down there. If we take a look at Pinterest, we've got collaged type put on this woman's dress, and then we have a paper texture applied to the background. We see some of that collage effect here as well. It's hard to get across what I'm about to show you through these examples, but basically it's exactly what it sounds like. Taking a photograph and then manipulating it and applying it to your piece to create something that's unique and different and isn't necessarily using a texture brush. I think this one has a lot of great opportunities, and the great thing about it is you can take your own photos of textures. Maybe you find a really cool wood pattern on your desk and you're like, I want this to be on my illustration in a cool blending mode. So you take a picture of it and you drop it in there, manipulate it, and come up with something that you haven't seen before. There's endless possibilities with this, and I'm going to show you how to do that right now. I've provided this wild texture link that I found online. Someone graciously created these free high resolution textures and patterns for commercial or personal use. Basically, that just means they're free for you to use, they're all high resolution, there is no chance of you stealing anyone else's work. I caution just grabbing photos off of Google images because they might not be available for you to use. You might have to have to pay or it might be someone's artwork that you're taking. I would just recommend if you're going to use a texture you find online, just try to find something that's free for commercial or personal use. This website is great. I'm just going to click on "Textures" and you can see there's a very wide variety of textures that you can use here. There's 12 pages, so there's a lot. Personally, I would probably mostly use paper textures, I like the Styrofoam texture. A great thing is you can search, say you want a paper texture, you just search paper, and then it gives you all of these options. Let's just grab one and I'm going to apply it to my warm-up sheet. Once that's loaded, go down to the bottom of the page and then click "Download". It'll just pull it up in your browser window. Wait for it to load, so much loading time, you've got to be patient. Then I usually just copy the image and paste it on a new layer in my program Photoshop. I'm just going to clip and mask it to my oval here. You can see there's so much texture happening here. Obviously you can make it smaller so you can see more of those particles. Just find a part of the image you really like, and then here's where you can start manipulating it. I will put it on multiply, try out different blending modes. I feel like multiply is always a safe bet because it's going to pull out all the whites and then you have what's left of your texture being applied to your shape. Sometimes I'll turn down the opacity. It gives it this subtle collage feel, almost like you cut it out of paper and dropped it on there. It's a very simple technique, you're just using your clipping mask and then you could obviously go in and mask out parts of it. Say you want to use your spray texture to mask it out so you only see parts of it, that's definitely an option. But let's just go into the easy class project and add it to a couple of shapes. I think it'll look really cool on this one because this is already feeling super graphic. Adding even more graphic look to it with just flat photograph textures could be really cool. I like graph paper texture. If you want to go really bold, just leave it on its normal setting, it's definitely making a statement. Let's see what else we can add in, maybe the Styrofoam texture. It looks like a spray texture already, but maybe it'll give us a little bit of a different feel. Drop as many of these as you want everywhere. It looks pretty cool how it is, but what if you combine that with one of your spray textures? Combining textures can be super powerful. Go ahead, check around on the Internet or take your own photos and play around with adding a collage or photograph texture in. There's endless opportunities. You could literally take a picture of your face and use it as a texture. It's really time to get experimental and play around and just enjoy creating and coming up with unexpected results. 13. [Procreate] Getting Started: [MUSIC] Welcome to the Procreate portion of this texturing class. In this video, we'll be going over the technical aspects of using Procreate as your program of choice for adding texture to your illustrations. I'll introduce you to our warm-up sheet and downloadable illustrations. We'll also discuss how to download and adjust your Procreate brushes to your liking. [MUSIC] If you're using Procreate, obviously make sure you have your iPad available. It doesn't really matter which iPad you have as long as the latest Procreate works on it. First, I'm going to show you how to use those downloadable illustrations that I've been providing to you for this Skillshare class. Go to skillshare.com and download them. Then the best way to open those in Procreate is just open Procreate press "Import", and then it should be in your files on my iPad if you've saved them to there, and then you just click on them and they import into Procreate. I've got my warm-up sheet, and I've got my easy class project. Then I've got my hard class project. I just want to go over these really quick with you. I'm going to be using all of these illustrations. I think that the warm-up sheet is a great place to get started if you just want to try out different texture brushes, experiment of the shapes. This is also a great place to start if you're a beginner. The easy class project is a little more complex. You know we've got some shapes layered over each other, which actually makes for a great opportunity to add shadows and that's a great place to add texture. We'll get into that in each lesson but as you can see, everything is on a separate layer. Everything is labeled and it should be really easy to navigate so you can turn things on and off and move things around. Obviously, since this isn't a class on how to use Procreate, I'm not going to go into detail, and to actually how to use the program for other features other than texture. This is a pretty straightforward file. Then obviously we've also got our hard class projects. Now, [LAUGHTER] this is an illustration that I actually created for myself a long time ago, and I've adjusted the colors and made it a little bit easier for you to navigate. But everything is in groups and folders here. Everything that's like these little yellow beans and leaves that are everywhere, those are in one folder. We've got the broccoli [LAUGHTER] in another folder, the hand in a folder. However, in each folder, everything's not labeled as intensely as in the other one because it's a lot more complex of a file. There's a lot of like layer 7D, layer 92. Just be aware of that when you're using it. But obviously, you can turn it on and off to see where the layer is. Still a pretty standard file. Everything is on its own layer, everything's separated. You should be able to add texture easily everywhere. Those are the downloadable illustrations. Hopefully, you got those downloaded really easily by following along here. Next up, I want to teach you a little bit about actually importing brushes into Procreate, because that's what this class is all about. We're going to be using different types of texture brushes for each lesson. [MUSIC] Now that I've shown you how to use the downloadable illustrations and bring those into Procreate, I want to really quickly go over the brush guide with you. Obviously, since this class is all about texture, we're going to be using a lot of different brushes. I have provided you with a brush guide using Google Sheets. I'm just going to pull that up here. Obviously, if you have the Google Sheets app on your iPad, you can use it. I would highly suggest making sure you have this app open so that you can press the URLs. But we're going to specifically be looking at this Procreate section here. This section on the left is for photoshop, and the section on the right is for Procreate. Everything should be labeled very clearly. I have it labeled whether it's free or paid. Also have the name of the pack and the brush name. A lot of the brushes that we're going to be using in Procreate, actually are default with Procreate. There are already in the program. If you go to the brushes, you have all your basic brush libraries in here like sketching, inking drawing. A lot of these brushes are already amazing, so I want to show you how to use them, and how I use them for texture at least. I'll always let you know if it's default with Procreate and where to find it in the program. But we also have different brushes that are free that I found on the Internet. We also have some brushes that you can pay for, just follow the link to those. If you want to buy them, you obviously don't need to buy them. But I will be showing you how to use them here. If you actually want to download a brush, I'm going to show you how to do that in each lesson. But just so you have a heads up, let's go to this one. It's a free brush from pixelbuddha.net. Honestly, all you have to do is press "Download" and then go to your files. Then just hold down on the zip file and then make sure you move it to on my iPad and just copy it over there. Then go to browse. Then you'll find that it's in your on my iPad folder. Now that it's there, you have this option depress and compress. That will open your zip file, and then you can actually go in and there are the green brushes, which is amazing. You can import all of them into Procreate by just holding down on them, sharing, and then pressing "Open in Procreate". Then if you look at this imported folder that appears in your Procreate brush library, it will appear, so you can just use that brush now. Obviously, I have to make sure my Bluetooth is on, so it recognizes my Apple Pencil, but you should be able to use that brush very easily. There we go. That's how you import brushes into Procreate. Obviously, like I said, a lot of them are already in here, so you might not have to do a lot of that anyways. [MUSIC] Now, I'm going to show you how to customize your brushes if you want to tweak them to your liking. Obviously, if you know Procreate already, you probably know this. You can adjust the size on this left slider here. Then you can adjust the opacity on the bottom left slider, which can come in handy with a lot of brushes. Wow, then now when it gets big, it gets crazy. But then there's more advanced settings too if you want. Open your Brush Library, click on the brush you want to edit. Then there's a bunch of different settings. Personally, I don't use this tool that much, but some of the most popular things to adjust are your spacing so you can see that the actual pixels of the brush are getting spaced apart further. Streamline is one that a lot of people like using. It actually just makes your brush smoother and easier to use. It'll smooth out your paths for you. Some people like that, some people don't. It just depends on the brush you're using. Jitter will move your pixels away from each other a little bit and make them more jittery, obviously. Then you can also adjust the falloff which affects every brush differently. However, obviously, say you adjusted your brush like this and you're like, wow, I really don't like that anymore. You want to go back to how it was. Just click "About this brush", and then click "Reset all settings" and it'll just take you back to how it was originally. Now, if you want to make a copy of your brush so that when you edit it, you have the original still and you want to play with the settings and you want to have both brushes. Just swipe left on your brush and press "Duplicate". There you go. You have too, and you can mess with the settings however you want and the original won't be affected. [MUSIC] Now, the final thing I want to share with you before we jump into the actual different types of textures and brushes is the most common technique that I personally use for adding texture to my shapes in Procreate. I typically use just masks and I use clipping masks. The reason I like this is because it doesn't affect any of your original shapes. Some people they like to press Alpha Lock on their shape layer. That means you're drawing areas restricted to the shape. Basically, it locks it so you can only draw within that shape. But then if you look at it, [LAUGHTER] everything is connected, you can't move the texture around, which I really like to have flexibility. I personally don't like doing that. I'm just going to turn the Alpha Lock off and then the way I add texture normally is I just make a new layer and then I click on that layer and press "Clipping mask". That frees me up to add the texture separately. Say I want to add that texture in there, but then I want to move it around or I want to go in and I want to put it on a blending mode overlay, so it has more of a similar color to the original layer. I could also change the opacity. The other thing I can do, which I really like is click on your "Texture Layer", and then also you can turn it into a mask. Let me just zoom in on this here. Masking is where you use a black-and-white mask to affect how much of your texture layer is actually showing up. If you make sure you have your Layer Mask selected, sometimes I'll use the exact same texture brush to do this. It looks like you're erasing part of the layer, but all that information is still there. If I don't like how that looks, I can just delete my layer mask and it goes back to how it was as a clipping mask. This is how I'm going to be adding a lot of my texture. Obviously not everywhere is going to be the same. There are lots of different ways to apply texture, but that's just how I do it. We'll be using that technique for the class. Let's just dig into it. I'm really excited to get into these textures with you. Now that you're all set up in the program, let's add some unique types of textures to your illustration. As always, feel free to ask me questions in the Discussion tab here on Skillshare if you're not sure about the setup portion of the class. Move on to the next video to start with these textures. 14. [Procreate] Linework Texture: Linework Texture, what exactly do I mean by that? Honestly, this technique is something I use all the time in my work. What I mean by linework texture is essentially drawing something like creating a base shape by using a textured brush. Some examples of that might be, say, in this design frame, I did down here you can see the edge of this rectangle is created using some texture, charcoal brush, and then I use similar brush to do the line work throughout to give everything that overall textured feel from scratch, which I prefer honestly, when I'm trying to make something feel more warm and hand-drawn, and tactile, as opposed to creating a vector shape and then adding a texture over top. Now, let's open our brush guide. The one that I'm going to be using is default with Procreate. If you look over, we've got our linework texture. It's in the sketching group. It's just the Procreate pencil, and it's the most basic texture tool. But it's one that I use a lot. Let's go to the sketching folder and press Procreate pencil. Now, if you can see this right here, like it has a lot of texture to it already, and I like it, because say you wanted to just draw a regular shape and you want to fill it, first of all, make sure you just drag your color and drop it into the shape and then if you want to adjust the threshold, which determines how much the shape is filled, if there's no extra little bubbles around the edge, I always mess with the threshold. You just make sure to hold down while you're adding the texture, and then you can slide your pen around to see how it feels. That already gives the shape so much more texture. If you go into the actual class project, the hard class project, you'll see that I actually already added a lot of texture to the edges here. I actually made this in Photoshop a long time ago, but I used a different brush to add this texture. Then in addition to adding texture through the edge of each shape, I also added in through line work. Just having a little bit of a textured line in there that varies by width and shape and thickness, and color really adds a lot of life to this scene already. This could be done and we'll go into adding different types of textures in the next lesson. But I'm going to actually show you how to use this like line work texture on this easier class project because this one is a lot less textured already. It'll actually be a really good example of how it can look different. I mean, this seems almost counterproductive, but I'm just going to make a new layer for each shape and just basically redraw each layer. Another thing you could do, just go in with your Procreate pencil and re-outline everything and just add a little bit of extra texture to the edge. But then I find that like all my shapes get a little fatter and they don't look as good. I'm just going to turn the opacity down on each and redraw them. Obviously, you wouldn't need to do this normally if you were just starting from the beginning. But this is how we're going to do it. This's how we're going to practice. One thing I would suggest is you don't have to be precious with how good the shape looks like if you're trying to add more life and personality and texture to your work. Maybe your edges are a little bit wonky. Maybe you don't need to turn on that streamline tool, although I'm having a lot of trouble getting this right, maybe you don't need to turn on that streamlined tool to actually make it look good. Maybe this makes it a little bit more interesting to the eye. Just make sure you turn off that lower layer, the squiggle layer and see like that is already looking way different than the other shapes around it. I'm going to go ahead and just apply that to a few of the other shapes so that we have some varied texture going on. I didn't even add it everywhere. There's already such a nice subtle difference to what I had before. Obviously, it doesn't look that different, but I strongly believe that, what makes our designs special and unique is by just really paying attention to detail and trying things, playing around with different textures, adding more warmth to our work. This I feel like automatically makes it feel more playful and childlike. But say you didn't actually want it to only be in solid colors. Another way you can add in some of that charm and linework texture is by just like adding fun patterns throughout. I'm going to use that clipping mask technique and apply it to this squiggle shape here. Maybe using a nice contrasting color will work well. The great thing about this Procreate brushes, if you're using a specific angle, it'll show up stronger than at other angles of the brush. It's very lifelike. I'm just going to make my brush pretty big so that you can actually see the texture really well. I'm just going to add some squiggles here and there. Makes it more fun and interesting, and maybe as a rule add it to all of the dark colored shapes. Then maybe you go into your brush library and find another linework pen that you really like, like maybe this one I was using in the demo, and apply it to different shapes and play with the opacity. Just have fun with it. That already looks like a different piece that we began with. Adding that texture, added a whole lot of warmth and personality. Maybe this texture is just for looks and it's just for fun and there's no actual reason we added it, but I just wanted to make something pretty, so I think that adding this line work texture improved a lot. 15. [Procreate] Spray + Grain: Next up we have spray and grain. What I mean by spraying grain is any texture brush that adds noise, grain, spray, scatter, anything that gives you the subtle texture look. It's actually been pretty popular in social media, unlike in motion graphics for a while but you can see a lot of it coming through in this piece I did for school of motion. Here's another great example, I did this one, I swear, like six, seven years ago, but I really like laid it on heavy with the spray texture. This is definitely a fun option to use and I'm going to show you how to go for it right now. For the spray and grain textures, I'm going to be using a couple of different brushes. The first one that we are going to be playing with is the default with Procreate spray paint, medium, nozzle brush. In addition, we also have some free brushes from pixelbuda.net, which I actually showed you in the getting started Procreate video. Then we also have a brush from RetroSupply that is pretty different from all the other ones, but as always, you are more than welcome to just use the free ones. But I thought I'd show you just a wide range because these are brushes that I use all the time. First, let's start with the default brush. That brush is going to be under spray paints, medium nozzle. Let's just start with this oval shape here. My technique I'm going to be using for this is mostly clipping masks and masks like I showed you in the intro video. Keep in mind that with these spray paint brushes, which I just clicked away from, I tend to change the shape or the size and the opacity a lot with this one because it gives a really different effects like the noise and spray edge becomes so much more fine when it's a small brush and then when it's a larger brush, you can see more of the scattery grain. There's a lot of ways you can play with this, you can go really hard with the texture or you can say you wanted to just have it be one with the color, or you can change the opacity and blending mode, it'll give you more of like a dimensional feel. A lot of times what I'll use this brush for is creating some dimension. So like perhaps I'll put a little bit on the bottom left, that's a shadow, and then I'll put a white version of that on the top right, that's a highlight. As is, that doesn't really look that impressive but we can go in and change the blending mode, we can change the opacity. Then we can also use our mask feature, which makes it more subtle. So using the same spray medium nozzle brush, we're going to go in and mask some of that out. You can even adjust the opacity of the brush to get a finer look and feel. If we did it for the shadow here, you can get really precise with how much of that texture you want to see and it becomes even more subtle. That's great for creating dimension. But there's a bunch of other different scatter and grain and texture and noise brushes and spray brushes, I'll show you how to use those. Say we want to use the brush I downloaded in the intro video, which is this grain for brush, this one, I would say this one is more like just a grain brush. It creates an even grain look and feel, which I'm going to clipping mask to my pink shape. That almost is used as an overall texture, sometimes I'll just put that on and turn the opacity down and it just looks like we have a rough, almost like paper shape. But then if we use the RetroSupply brush, which can be found under the RetroSupply doggone, green brushes, I select the dark no grain brush, this one has a totally different look and feel than your other brushes, especially if you turn the opacity all the way up. It's like a really crispy brush. What I mean by crispy is it's just like really sharp edges. The opacity isn't very fine, it's very graphic. A lot of times I'll use this when I'm trying to create a more bold look, and maybe I just want to have some really intense texture. Then, obviously there's a bunch of other brushes you can play with, if you go back to the spray paints, you can play with this fat nozzle brush, which gives you a little bit more variation and what your scatter looks like on your brush. This has a bit of spatter combined with that fine grain brush, which can be really fun to play with. If you change up the size, it can get even more intense if you use it. We see you can see those big dots, big splotches. There's a lot of stuff you can do with spray and grain textures. I feel one of the ways that I use it a lot is by using it as almost a shadow brush. You see that we have a lot of overlapping shapes in this easier project file downloadable illustration, one way I'll use it is by looking at where the shapes overlap and then actually using it to create a shadow. Obviously, that adds a little bit of something, you could go in and also add it as a highlight. Or we can use that free grain brush that I had from Pixelbuddha and we can just add an overall grain texture to the whole image. So taking that texture, let's put it on black and going over the whole image with it, I mean I know that looks crazy like I don't want it to look this dark, which hopefully it's visible on the camera here, but you could change the blending mode on that, multiply, let's try overlay, which gives it more of a colorful blended feel and turn down the opacity a bit and you've got this cool like overall textured effect combined with this spray and grain texture. There are a ton of ways you can use spraying grain, and we'll actually be using these similar techniques in the next video for gloss and shine. 16. [Procreate] Gloss + Shine: I'd say that gloss and shine is almost a lack of texture. It's a look that you can much easier get across digitally than if you were to actually try to paint something on paper. You can use this digital soft brush that comes default in Photoshop or Procreate. You can get this hyperreal, smooth, glassy vibe. Here's some examples of it in my work. This was something I worked on with Gunner, a studio that I worked with as just using the default soft brush in Photoshop. You can obviously get away with this in Procreate as well. But as you can see, it is pretty versatile. You can use it to mask shapes out to create something that feels see-through. You can use it to create spheres. Obviously, this is something you could definitely get away with painting. However, I am just not talented enough at painting to get this very soft look and feel. I'm going to show you how to play with this gloss and shine in Photoshop and Procreate right now. For gloss and shine, I actually just really use this default soft brush, airbrush, which comes with Procreate. Obviously, that one's free. If you go to your airbrushing group and press soft brush, that's the one we're going to be using for this one. Is not really a texture like if you look at it, it's literally almost like adding a gradient or just a shading to something. If you use it in this detailed way, it can give you this cool hyperreal effect which you saw in some of the examples. You probably got to know a little bit about like lighting and shading for it to work. But it really uses it the same way you use the spray and grain technique, which is the clipping mask and the mask and just adjusting your brush size and opacity. Let's create a little bit of dimension here first. We'll mask that out using lower opacity brush, same brush but lower opacity. We can also add a highlight, mask that out. Then change the blending mode and opacity of those actual layers as well to give you more of an integrated feel. You get this dimensional field, but there's other ways that you can add detail with this soft brush. Let's start by making a shape. Say, I want to create like water or something shiny. I'll start by using an inking brush. I'll use this technical pen. Let's just say I want to draw a drippy thing. I don't know what you would call this. Just like a water droplet that's traveling down the shape, and fill that shape in. Then let's go to the soft brush again. We're going to use our masking tool to use it to adjust the opacity on this layer, selectively. Not clipping mask, just masking. Since this is a smaller shape and we're trying to get more detailed with it. I would turn down your size and mask it out that way. Usually, for water, I just play with how it looks. But usually, you're going to want to mask out the inside of the shapes and leave the exterior to have a little color on it still. Maybe it just looks something like that. But then you want to go ahead and also add some really bold highlights using the same brush. Then you could go in and even just erase the edges to give it more of that hard edge, like sitting on top of a surface feel. That's not perfect but it looks like it could be water with some work, like in my cherry illustration I showed you it took a long time to finesse it, but this is the basic technique I used. You've applied that the same way as you did the spray and grain texture. However, I don't know, I don't think we need to go back in and actually add that into this because you guys know how it goes already. I'm using basically exact same technique. This also is very abstract, so I don't know if that hyperreal look is going to look amazing with this. I honestly challenge you to go ahead and play with that. I'm very curious to see what it will look like. Why don't you try it and post it in your class project? I'd love to see it. 17. [Procreate] Dry Brush: For dry brush, this is a type of brush that you find a lot in Kyle Webster's brush. There's lots of brush packs you can find online for it. In my work, I really like using this brush. I use it for a lot of stuff, as you can see I used it in my Bath and Body Works piece here that I did for Hornet and Bath and Body Works. You can see it coming across in the water, in the streams, in this flowy curvy texture in the background. It's on the cornfields that the fox is running through here. It's in the water, and then it's also in my short film between lines. I use this brush a lot. I actually use it in combination with that gloss and shine effect a lot. I think it creates a really interesting contrast. As you can see, it's like on the bubbles here, and even a subtle bit behind the character, and then in here you can see it coursing through the water to add more of that rough texture. If I were to discuss how it added meaning to my work or purpose to this piece it creates a little bit more tension between the real and the tactile and the hyperreal and the surreal. There are some thought that went into using it, but I really like this brush, and basically, as you can see here, it's just like if you had a real paintbrush and it was dry and you didn't dip it in water first and you just went straight for the paint and maybe the paint is a little bit thickened or something, and it creates this like Reiki feel. For dry brushing we're going to be using two free brushes. The first one is default with Procreate. It's just the copper head brush in the drawing kit, and then the other one is from this Behance page provided free of charge. Someone graciously created these brushes and posted them on Behance or Behance, I'm not sure how to pronounce it, correct me if I'm wrong. But at the bottom of the page there are free samples to download. Or if you want to get this full set with a lot of options, you can download the full set on Creative Market. However, I'm just going to be using the free versions. For that one it's Arctic Brush number 12. Dry brushing is just this like basically this brush style that has like more, say you were going to use a dry brush to paint with, you would see more of the bristles coming through. Which I personally love that look because it gives you more of an organic tactile feel, which is something that I love playing with in my work. If you take this brush from the start and you could use it as literally like a line work brush almost, but if you make it a little bigger and you turn down the opacity, you get this really cool look, and a lot of times I like using brushes like this to just give everything a more rough look. A lot of times I'll use it almost not as a shading tool, but more as just like an accent. Like I'll just do something like that, and then I'll set the blending mode to multiply and turn the opacity down, and it just gives it like this subtle feel. Or you can try a different color, it gives it a really cool look. Sometimes I'll also just use it to paint with from scratch, but my work is much more graphic, I use shapes and then I put a texture on top. Personally this is how I use this brush, but I'm just going to jump right into this easy projects and demonstrate there, so maybe I just start by using the squiggle shape, and then maybe I'm using the same color from the color palettes and just dropping it over the squiggle shape for fun. That looks a little crazy, but I'm going to just turn the opacity down, so it gives it a nice little bit of interests there. Then there's other things you can do though, if you want to be more organic with it like if you were actually painting with a dry brush, you might do something more like this where you're like just directionally adding some shading. It looks pretty heavy there, so maybe you want to mask it out and turn the opacity down on your dry brush. Make sure you've got the right mask color out of black and white, I always end up with the wrong one. But it gives it a more organic shaded look there, it almost looks like crayon or something like the color pencil, but that's another way you can use that brush. You can directionally follow the shape of your shape, the contours of your shape, I suppose. Give it more of like that shaded feel or you can just slap it on anywhere in it, I think it gives it a really cool look. In some of the examples I showed you, it was also used more as like lighting and shading, which is also a great way to use it. As you can tell as I'm moving through this class, there's probably a lot of similar techniques happening, so it really just depends on how you want to use the brush, but this is how I typically will use it. I like using it in graphic shapes because it makes your really like vector looking illustration instantly go to more inviting, warm, friendly. So that's how I use the dry brush. I challenge you to also if you want, like, I think it would work pretty well on this one. Let me just add it to the leaves really quick. If you want to go with something that actually has more artistic looking shading, maybe you want to try this dry brush so I'm using the same color as the leaf so that it gives it more of like a integrated feel and I'm going to put a multiply. But I'm just going to slap it on there, and since it's on multiply mode, it will actually affect like this line of the leaf too if I put it over top of there, so I'm also going to turn the opacity down, mask it out. You get this like nice textured look. You probably can see like if you go on my Instagram and scroll through it, you'll probably notice that I have a lot of brush textures like this. I also use it selectively. Like maybe I would only use it on leaves, but it really just depends on what you want to get across in your illustration 18. [Procreate] Charcoal + Pastel: Charcoal and pastel. Pretty similar brushes in Photoshop and Procreate. They give us similar vibe in terms of texture. Some ways that I've used that in my work in the past is here in this piece that I created just for fun. I used a lot of a charcoal texture to create highlights in the clouds, to create dimension and shadow on our hero character here. Then in this Old Navy spot, I directed while at Odd Fellows. Our team used charcoal and pastel in a lot of places. Mostly it's pretty graphic, but we added a bit of warmth to the piece by adding this charcoal masked out texture in the trees. You can also see it in the buildings here. They added some nice subtle shading in with that brush. It's pretty versatile brush as well. I think it's really nice. It feels really realistic to me. Some of the dry brushing stuff doesn't always look super realistic to me in terms of making it look like it's actually made on paper, but I feel like you can achieve that here. For charcoal, I have this default with Procreate charcoal brush called 6B Compressed, which I will show you here. Go to the Charcoal's folder, it's really easy, and click 6B Compressed. Obviously, I encourage you to play around with all the other brushes that are in there. But I just like this one a lot. It's very bold. But then I can go in and mask it and edit it out. Then obviously like if I want to change the fall off, so it's not as bold, that's also an option. But I'm just going to go back to how it was originally. Also, I lumped pastels into charcoal because I feel like at least digitally they have a very similar vibe. For some reason I was having trouble. When I actually found the pastels on Procreate, there's some actual pastel brushes that come with it, they didn't feel the same as the ones I use in Photoshop, which are my favorites. The one that I found that was most close to what I like using in Photoshop, is this Oberon brush from the drawing pack. I feel like if you don't press too hard, it has a very pastely feel. But as you can see, it has the same vibe as the charcoal. I would say the only difference is the edge of the pastel is more crisp, whereas the charcoal it has more fall off, it fades on the edges. But I would use them interchangeably, I think. I probably use them in the same way that I would use my spray brushes. But personally, I'm not the biggest charcoal and pastel fan. There are other things you can do in here. In Procreate you can smudge things so they blend better, which you might really enjoy doing with charcoal and pastel. I think it looks a little bit muddy. I'm not an illustrator who uses pastels from scratch, like I said, I work more graphically. That is also something to consider. Let's just go into this hard class project. I'm going to apply it into a few places. I'm going to work with the charcoal brush specifically. I'm going to use it for some very rough and rowdy shading. Let's start with the bowl. I'm just going to work through it and meet you at the end. What I like about this is that it just looks like I'm straight up coloring with charcoal. If you use the same color or put it on multiply, it gives this harsh but intense fun vibe. Imagine you are a kid again, playing with charcoal and you're like, this looks cool and just like what had happened? There you have it folks. Charcoal and pastel. I like getting really messy with it. I thought that was really fun. It was really cool way to use it and it really complimented this line work texture really well. Obviously there's probably a ton of different ways you could use it, but I'm pretty happy with where it ended up and I'd love to see how it works for you as well. 19. [Procreate] Inking: Inking brushes are my absolute favorite. I think they're so versatile. I really love using them mostly for line work but sometimes to fill shapes and add patterns and a little bit more detail to my work. Here's an example of where I used it in a piece that I did for career in a year which was created at IV studio. As you can see, the wonderful Allen Laseter animated it using the same brush so it is a great inking brush. I'll show you what those are in a minute. I also used it for one of my other Skillshare classes for my easy-peasy palettes class. The base illustration that I provided was actually created with an inking brush that I'll show you here in a minute. Then even in your class project and the hard one, everything I drew here was used with Kyle Webster inking brush. I absolutely love inking brushes in both Photoshop and Procreate. I use them all the time. There's one that comes default with Procreate that I love. It's in the inking folder and it's called Inka. Then there's a RetroSupply brush that I really like that comes in the broken inker's pack and it's called the blotchy inker. All of them are amazing and they all actually look similar so I don't think you really need to pay for any. But I like using it in the same way that I like using the technique I showed you in the line work video. I really like inking brushes more for edges of shapes and for linework detail. They're not really great for adding shading or lighting because they're so thin. But if you go to the inking brush library and then you click on the second one, Inka, it gives you this really nice textured inking feel. Say, I wanted to create a shape out of it, it gives a nice organically filled shape which I love. Then the RetroSupply brush is really different. I'll go to the broken inka's pack, click on the blotchy inker. Then this is more about just the line itself. It gives you a really bumpy edged line, which I really like. Then say I wanted to add a hand-drawn wood pattern or texture to this oval here, I might use this blotchy inker to do that. Say I wanted to make a wood pattern. I'm just free handing that here. I don't really know if this looks right. But it gives you that more organic look and feel so that when you go in and you change it to a lower opacity, it almost looks like it's a texture built into the shape. Texture used loosely. It's more like a pattern here but a hand-drawn texture. Then you could even make this texture white. Put it on overlay or soft light mode. It's the inverted look of that. I like to use this brush a lot for detail work. We went over the edge fill shape in the first line work video. I don't think it's necessary for me to go in and show you how to do that. But I'm just going to go in and add a little bit of inking detail to this one and show you how that looks. Obviously use a couple of different types of inking brushes here. I think they're so fun to work with. Honestly, I just highly encourage you to look through all of the inking brushes that are default with the program or the RetroSupply brushes are great too. I really like this one I showed you in the beginning as well. I don't even know how you pronounce that. Thylacine brush. I think that one is so cool. It almost looks like the combination of a dry brush. I could honestly just use it in the background for a background shape. Say, I wanted the whole background to have some subtle texture, I just go in and blob this inking brush around. Then maybe I make it the same color as the background. I got to Alpha Lock and fill the layer and then turn it to multiply. Then just change the opacity and it gives you this really cool background effect. There's a lot of different things you can do with the inking brushes and they're great. I highly recommend. 20. [Procreate] Color-It-In: When I say color it in, I mean basically exactly what it sounds like. If you were to use a pencil and paper and you wanted to fill in a shape using your pencil, you would have to fill the whole thing in by hand. That's what I mean here. But with digital work, if you just fill something in with a paint bucket tool, it's going to fill it in perfectly. For this technique, I want it to appear less perfect. That's the whole point of it. If you look down at this little fire cluster on the bottom right corner, it looks like I colored it in with pencil. Then I use this technique in this piece here. I didn't put it on every shape, but like say, on this girl's sweater here, you can see I hand-colored it in, on this girl's pants, the dog sweater, and this girl's hair. It just adds a little bit more of a tactile effect. You can do this using any brush. I'll demonstrate that for you in Procreate and Photoshop. What I mean by color it in, which you probably already saw in the examples I showed you, this is more of a masking technique and a filling shape technique rather than a specific type of texture. You can pretty much use any brush for this technique but I'm going to be just using a simple inking brush. It's from the default inking package called ink bleed. You can either start by having a completely filled shape like we have here. Let's go to the oval shape and then masking out that specific shape, so not using a clipping mask and let's grab our inking brush. Then the way you can start from a filled shape is I usually just sporadically mask it out and then I use white to unmask it out. Then it leaves you with this look as if you were physically coloring in the shape. It gives you these little holes, I guess is the right term, inside your shape, these little see-through moments that look like, hey, I colored this in with my crayon or something. That works really well. You might want to combine this with a linework texture so the edge doesn't look so perfect. But another thing you can do is, this is so basic because it just sounds like, hey, make a shape and color it in, but if you wanted to just start from scratch and actually color in a shape, this will give you the same effect, it's just going to take a little bit longer. Then you could go in and you're like, wow, I want it to feel more wholly so then you go in and add that mask again and then just supplement that way. Apply that anywhere. I use this technique a lot. I'm sure people use it all the time, but it's just something I figured out on my own, in my own process, and it just gives everything a more unique look. If you use a different brush, it's going to give you a different effect. Let's use it on this one. Let's use this thylacine brush that I like so much. It's going to look totally different because it's crazy looking. That gives you more of a almost like marker look because it has a different opacity in it, so it depends on the brush you use. Whatever brush you're using will give you a different effect. But yeah, this is more of a technique. I'm going to actually apply it to this hard example that I have because I think it would work really well on here. We've already got this inking feel. I think maybe using that inking brush like this dry ink brush or something to mask out some of the shapes and give it a little extra [inaudible] would be really nice. I'm just going to do that now. I don't think you really need to do it to every layer to get it to feel like that all around. You could probably just do it to a few layers and then I would immediately have more of a hand-drawn feel. Maybe just take some of these bigger shapes, mask them out. If your brush is smaller, it's going to give you a more intricate look. That is the color it in technique. I think it's great. I also love that it makes some of your shapes a little see-through, so like the texture that's coming through from the shape behind this tomato is actually a different color than the texture getting on the right side. I think there's a lot of potential with this one. You can obviously use any of the brushes that we've gone over in this class already to do this and it's going to give you a totally different effect. Try it out. I'd love to see what you do with it. 21. [Procreate] Collage + Photographed: For collage and photographed textures, what I mean by that is literally taking a high resolution texture off the Internet or a photo you took and creating a texture out of it over your shapes. I've used this technique for pitches and for client work, but I often don't bring it up in my own work that you see on my Instagram and stuff, so I don't have too many examples of my own on my website. But you can see I took a paper texture and applied it to this silhouette here and even this handwritten note has been applied to the silhouette as if it was written on there. But I think I pretty much just took a stock image and dropped it on there. If we take a look at Pinterest, we've got collaged type put on this woman's dress and then we have a paper texture applied to the background, and we see some of that collage effect here as well. It's hard to get across what I'm about to show you through these examples. But basically, it's exactly what it sounds like. Taking a photograph and then manipulating it and applying it to your piece to create something that's unique and different and isn't necessarily using a texture brush. I think this one has a lot of great opportunities and the great thing about it is you can take your own photos of textures. Maybe you find a really cool wood pattern on your desk and you're like, I want this to be on my illustration in a cool blending mode. So you take a picture of it and you drop it in there, manipulate it, and come up with something that you haven't seen before. There's endless possibilities with this and I'm going to show you how to do that right now. For the collage and photograph look, as you've probably noticed in some of the examples, we're going to be using actual other images to create our textures. This isn't really a texture brush, but this is a technique sometimes I'll use especially if I'm trying to get a collage look. Say I want it to look like a paper cutout or something without actually cutting out the paper myself, adding shadows if I just want it to be a very basic graphic cutout look. I found this website called wildtextures.com, and it's by no means comprehensive. A lot of times they'll find stuff on Google images. But the great thing about this website is that they are free for commercial or personal use. Well, this is not a promotion for them necessarily. I just found them online and I thought they are really cool. You can grab textures from their website. They have all sorts. One of the most popular ones that I used to use all the time was paper textures. They've got some of those. They've got these grunge textures, this Styrofoam texture. Then obviously you can search say I want a paper texture. Search paper and they have 16 results for that. These are all high resolution which is great. What I love about it is you can manipulate these images just like you'd manipulate a brush. Let's just take this artistic flower paper. When you click "Download" it's just going to take you directly to a giant image of it. All you have to do is save it to your iPad as you would any other image, add to photos, and then go into Procreate and import it there. By inserting a photo. Then like you would with a texture brush, just drop it over the shape you want and clipping mask to it. Great thing about this is we can adjust the scale and size of it, put it on blending modes. This creates a really interesting texture to begin with. I love trying out the different blending modes. See how it looks. Then obviously, you could even take this shape and adjust the hue saturation. You can do whatever you want with it. I also sometimes will use a brush to mask out parts of the texture I don't like. Say, I don't want there to be a bunch of texture on the edges. I go in and erase that. You can get super custom with it. I'm going to apply that to the easy class project because there's some big bold shapes in here. I'm just going to use some different textures from Wild Textures. That's some fun texture in there. But what if I wanted to just combine it with some of the other techniques that we've been playing with? Obviously I've just been talking about one technique at a time but I feel there's endless possibilities if you can combine a bunch of different texture techniques at once. We'll just add in some spray texture and then maybe we do that colored it in technique. Maybe we add a little bit of dry brush. Just gives us a really fun, crazy look and feel. It really improves upon that basic graphic feel that I had in the beginning. I loved it in the beginning. I thought it was a really cool thing to begin with, but just getting in there, messing around, playing with what different textures you can use especially once you start bringing in those collage and photographed textures, it starts taking on a life of its own. Strongly encourage you to mix techniques as always. I would love to see what you can do; what textures you can find. Obviously, you could even take your own photographs of textures you see around your house. Maybe you like the fabric of your duvet cover or maybe you really like your dog's hair and you want to put it in there so you take a picture of that. There's endless possibilities especially when it comes to found imagery for collages and textures. However, I would definitely suggest not using anything that's licensed or that someone else's artwork. Try to stick to stock images or royalty-free images that you find online or especially your own. I always encourage taking your own photos. There are some great resources online, and I think you can come up with something super cool. 22. Experiment: What else can you make?: As you now know, there are tonnes of different texture types and techniques that can be applied to your work. But the confines of texture are absolutely not limited at this class. Adding texture to your work unlocks limitless possibilities. There are so many other ways that you can add it to your work. You can probably tell from this class that I have a pretty distinct way of working, and you know my style may be limited in a way that yours isn't. Artists with different tastes and styles probably have a totally different way of going about their own approach to adding texture. I challenge you here and now, what else can you make? Using the knowledge that you've collected from here and beyond, what are some ways that you can switch it up? Can you open up new texture doors and make up your own techniques? It would be really neat to see all of the different techniques you've learned from this class, combined into one illustration. Perhaps you'll like to use the colored in method along with the collage method. Or maybe you add some of that gloss and shine-in and see what it all looks like together. What works best for me, may not work best for you. Please, if you come up with something new you'd like to share, add it to your class project. 23. Share Your Work!: Hey, you did it. You made it through this texture class and you're hopefully leaving with a bunch of new skills and ideas. Before you leave, I would love to see what you made. It would be amazing if you could share your work by posting it to the project gallery right here on Skillshare. Share your process and Photoshop or procreate your favorite discovered texture brushes, your warm-up sheet, your final illustration, whatever you feel comfortable with. I'd love to give you feedback on your work too. Please let me know when you post your project and if there's anything that you'd specifically like me to comment on or help you with. I can't wait to see what you make. 24. Thank You!: Once again, thank you so much for taking this class. It's been a real pleasure sharing my texture knowledge with you. I may not have all of the same techniques as other illustrators, but these tips and tricks have helped me so much over the years. My work grew significantly after learning to add textures and I know yours will too. Don't forget to check out the resources tab below to access the Brush Guide, Warm-Up Sheet, and those two downloadable illustrations, if you haven't already. As I mentioned in the intro video, head on over to RetroSupply to get 20 percent off and purchase some of the brushes that I mentioned in this class. Obviously, as I've already said, the free brushes are great too and you can totally get away without paying for any brushes. But this little discount is my treat to you, so I hope you enjoy it. If you have time, I'd love for you to share this class with your friends and honestly just leave me a review here on Skillshare. It helps so much. Or even take another one of my classes. I've got a few that will probably work really well in tandem with this class, like my color palette class or my Procreate shape class. Or follow me on Instagram and TikTok. I'm just getting really salesy here. It's great. I also have a newsletter, so that's weird. That's a new thing for me. It could be fun if you sign up. Thanks again for making it this far. I'm so proud of you. I'll see you soon.