How To Draw Heads & Faces Workshop: Drawing Portrait, Profile & Three Quarter Views | Clayton Barton | Skillshare
Drawer
Search

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

How To Draw Heads & Faces Workshop: Drawing Portrait, Profile & Three Quarter Views

teacher avatar Clayton Barton, Harness the Power of Dynamic Drawing

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      0:31

    • 2.

      Portrait View Of The Male Head

      49:24

    • 3.

      Portrait View Of The Female Head

      30:36

    • 4.

      Profile View Of The Male Head

      19:45

    • 5.

      Profile View Of The Female Head

      15:20

    • 6.

      Three Quarter View Of The Male Head

      30:42

    • 7.

      Three Quarter View Of The Female Head

      29:25

    • 8.

      Assignment

      2:00

  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

1,179

Students

10

Projects

About This Class

Would you like to consistently draw heads and faces that look correct?

This class teaches you how to do exactly that, by taking you through the step by step, method of construction for the portrait, profile and three quarter views of the head - with real time demonstrations that you can actually keep up with.

By the end of this course, you'll know how to sketch a proportionally accurate foundation for your head drawings, plot out the placement of the facial features and define the shape of the head from these standard points of view.

Here's what the class covers:

  • Front View of The Male and Female Head
  • Side View of The Make and Female Head
  • Three Quarter View of The Male and Female Head

The portrait, profile and three quarter views of the human head and face are perfect for learning the basics. You'll get a foundational skill set for drawing heads, that'll aid you even when drawing drawing them in perspective, on more dynamic angles.

Whether you're a comic book artist, illustrator, concept artist or fine artist - you'll benefit from taking this class if your goal is to draw great looking heads.

This class is designed for you to be able to follow along at your own pace, sketchbook and pencil in hand, so that by the end, you've drawn up your own front, side and three quarter view headshots. If you actively engage with these lessons, and put what you learn into practice, you should see real results by the time you're done. 

What are we waiting for? Let's draw some heads!

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Clayton Barton

Harness the Power of Dynamic Drawing

Teacher

Often I’m asked how long I’ve been drawing. The truth is I don’t remember a time when I wasn’t. I was like any other crayon wielding kid, the only difference being that I never let go of that yearning for artistic venture.

I still remember the walls being filled top to bottom with the felt tip scrawling’s of an artistically fiery five year old. Maths books filled with cartoons instead of numeracy, English books littered with more pictures then poetry. It went on and on and it never stopped.

My first love was Comic Books, my second was Video Games. Realizing that I wanted to build a career in both I spent most of my late teens immersing myself in constant study, practice and improvement to harness my skills in multiple fields. It was a ... See full profile

Level: All Levels

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
    Exceeded!
  • 0%
  • Yes
  • 0%
  • Somewhat
  • 0%
  • Not really
  • 0%

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hey, it's Clayton in this class, you're going to learn how to draw both the male and female head from the front side and three-quarter views. Specifically, we'll be focused on learning about the proportions of the head. It's basic overall construction and also the placement of the facial features. Not to mention how they're drawn from the standard points of view. Alright, let's jump straight into it. 2. Portrait View Of The Male Head: Let's just jump straight into it here. To begin with, we're going to be drawing the front view of the male head. So I'm going to start out with a very lightly drawn circle. This circle will ultimately provide the foundation, the basis for the cranium of our head. This is a really great place to start when it comes to drawing the head because it gives you a visual representation of how large the head will be on the page where it will be positioned. And even though we're just looking at a circle here, it actually holds a very important piece of information which is exactly that the placement and the size of the head. So if you are going to be drawing the head of a character in a comic book panel. That's something that you want to know, especially if you've got multiple characters in there. So just by the size of this circle alone and it's positioning, we can work out where characters are going to be and how large they will be in comparison to one another or in relation to one another. Once we've got the circle drawn, it's time to establish the axes of the head. And because we're looking at the front view, an eye level representation of the front view. We're just going to place it straight through the top and the bottom. Next, we will lay in the horizontal guideline that wraps around the belly of the sphere that try to make this as neat as you possibly can. Use a loose grip on your stylus, press down lightly. And then that way, when it comes to refining some of these lines, you'll be able to easily do that with a slightly darker outline that knocks all the light, roughly drawn lines back and makes them less noticeable. Once we've got the horizontal guideline drawn in, we'll lay in the vertical guideline. And this vertical guideline that runs from the top of the sphere to the bottom is going to represent the front of the face, the middle of the front of the face. So when we started to turn the head in space, this line that I've just laid in will actually indicate to us what direction the head is looking in. And so will the horizontal guideline as well. Although that'll usually be showing us whether or not we're looking up at the head or looking down at the head. Next time we are going to chop off the sides of our sphere. Now I'm just going to draw those in, but try to remember that ultimately the height of the side planes should equal two-thirds of the cranium. So overall length. The reason that I like to do this by eye is because sometimes when you're measuring this out to the exact specifications that it's supposed to be out according to the luminous method, which this is actually based on this construction method. I find that it just doesn't always lead to the best result. I think that in the end, although these methods can really help you out, you've got to develop your artistic intuition. You've got to develop your eye to know what looks good and what simply doesn't look good, what's not going to work. One of the most difficult things about drawing the head in the front view is ensuring that it's symmetrical. So what I want you to do once you've drawn in the side planes. Because I want you to go ahead and just make sure that the center line here is actually situated in the middle. Okay. I think mine is pretty spot on, so I'll leave it at that. I'm going to erase away these off cuts that are left from adding in the side planes. And then we'll continue on here. Now, I'm going to drop the face down from the middle line to the chin. I'm going to place it about here. Now keep in mind that if we're looking at the top two-thirds of the head, which you can find by simply drawing a line from one side of the side planes to the other boats at the bottom and the top. What we wanna do when we're dropping down the face is essentially drop it down one more third. Now that is the standard, the standard Loomis method would tell you. For me, I like to simply just drop it down as far as I think it needs to come. Sometimes that changes. Sometimes either side that I've either got to take the face backup to be higher or I've got to make it even longer. And it depends on the kind of head that you ultimately want to draw in the stylistic representation of them that you want to have within your work. So just keep that in mind that if you want, if you find that your heads are just either too long or too squash looking, then keep the two-thirds in mind at the top. Drop it down one more third to really nail that correct measurement. And then once you've got that sorted, simply go ahead and start to. ********, bend the rules to get the desired result that you're after. This is the way in which I normally work. I don't bother measuring out the thirds. I just tried to drop it down to what I think it's going to be. And then I draw in the jaw line at a drawing the jaw line, what I'm first going to do is create a middle or a vertical guide line that runs down the middle of the side planes. That'll show me where the sides of the head would be. Remember that when we're looking at the head from the front, the reason that we're able to see a foreshortened representation of the side planes is because, well, the face is actually narrower than the back of the head. So we get this very foreshortened. Put in perspective. Visual of those side planes. Of course, because we know that the jaw line actually comes back to sit at the middle of the side view of the head. We need to know where the middle of the side view is going to be in order to draw in the jaw line. So once I've got that placed in, I'm going to drop the jaw line down. And remember that because we're drawing a male head here, this is where one of the key considerations going to need to be kept in mind in order to actually make it look like a masculine jaw line. And the first key consideration is to ensure that the corners of the jaw just that little bit sharper, that little more chiseled and square than they would be on a female character. So rather than rounding it out, we're going to leave it quite sharp. But a very reasonably sharp corner there. If we wanted to make this head look more meat head ish, like a buff dude or hokey looking character. Then we might actually bring the jaw line out so that it's, it's, it's the opposite of tapered. It actually widens at the corners. Now I don't want that. I actually want a character that looks, I guess you could say, would be the standard for a male character rather than a big buff meet head looking bruit. This will do once I've got the corners of the jar established, which you'll notice almost aligns with the bottom of the sphere there that we initially laid in. I'm going to bring the jaw line down to the chin. And keep in mind that one of the other major distinctions between male and female heads is going to be the broadness of the wideness of the chin. And for a male head, we do want to keep that fairly broad. What do the same thing on the opposite side of the face. You'll notice that I'm adding a little bit of extra shape to the bottom edge of the jaw that I'm drawing in here. And that's just to give it some character. Now, again, I think that the length to which I've drawn the phase down to, I think that it's working really well and that it looks pretty good. But keep in mind that there are times when I start adding in the facial features and I simply think that it ends up looking too long or too short and I will customize it, I will change it up. So that's why it's important to always make sure that when you're working, especially a desk, this foundational stage, keep it light, keep it loose, and know that everything is subject to change. That's the point as to why we're coming up with these foundations. They're supposed to be the rough blueprint. Sometimes that blueprint is going to be a little bit off and you'll need to make corrections. So don't always stick to the blueprint if it's simply not working. Okay, great. So we've got the jaw line lady in. We've got the cranium, established that on a very basic level completes the general shape of our head. Now it's time to plot out where the facial features are going to be. Now if we take the distance between the brow line and the chin and then we divide it in half. That's where we're going to find the nose. I like to make sure that i'm, I'm making those connections throughout the face that are making those associations. So that when I start to turn the head and space and represented on a different angle, even though it's going to be foreshortened, finding the positioning of the nose is still fairly easy because I go, Okay, well, I know that it just sits between the joy and the chin. And so even when it's for sure and that's going to be an easy anchor point to establish. Next up. When we're looking at the distance between the nose and the chin, were able to find them out by dividing that space up into thirds. So I'm going to add a line here. I'm going to add a line there. Now you'll notice that those thirds are unequal, so I'm going to undo that or how? I'm not just going to leave them there. I'm going to actually make some corrections. I don't usually get this right first time around. Sometimes they'll go to do the wrong thing in order to do the right thing. So also be sure to keep that in mind that it'd be very, very careful to get these proportions correct. Do not skimp on the amount of attention and time that you give to doing so. You'll find that you're able to get ahead. That looks correct, that looks accurate. Certainly take the time to make sure that those thirds are equal and that the noise really is placed in between the brow line and the chin. So we've got our thirds placed in there. And I still think actually that I could raise that top third up a little bit more. Remember, even though we're making these measurements, if in the end the mouth looks like it's sitting too high or the nose looks like it's sitting too low. I'm going to make the adjustments that I need to make in order to make the two make it look correct. Okay, Wonderful. So we've got the nose figured out. We've got the mouth placed in there. Next up. It's time to lay in the ears. Now remember that it's the top third, by the way, in this area below the noise that we are going to be placing the mouth. Okay, so let's get those ears drawn in. Now the ears are quite simple. We can just go for a very general shape here. And the key things to keep in mind is that the top of the ear will align with the brow. And the bottom of the ear will drop down to the nose. And that'll give us the full length of the ear now as far as the width of the year. Well, that in a very similar way to the side planes is going to be a foreshortened representation of the general ear shape because they do angle outward somewhat. So I was still able to see the interior ear anatomy even in the front view. It's just a very, very squashed and very, very skewed in comparison to when we're observing the ear in the side view. Okay, great. So we've got most of our facial features figured out as far as where they're going to go. The final facial feature, in fact, that we need to place in is a very, very important one. It is of course, the eyes. The eyes are going to sit right in the middle of the head. Again, a very, another very easy way to figure out where they support they're supposed to sit. So if we take the top of the head and we take the bottom of the chin, and then we divide it in half, which I believe that it'd be about here. This is where our eyes are going to be placed. Just underneath the brown line. Again, depending on your style, those eyes may sit a little bit higher, they may sit a little bit lower. It really is completely up to you. You know, you think about an enemy head for example, or a manga head. And you'll notice that their proportions d2 are far away from what we're covering here in the Loomis method. And so stylistically, those proportions and the shapes that you pick for your characters is completely up to you to start with this, if it's all you've got, for sure, use it as a base, but then branch out and really make this method your own. Except what I'm going to do is placed in the hairline. Now the hairline will run on the top of one side plane to the other, right across the head. You'll notice that my site side planes aren't completely level, so make them level if you need to. I'm just going to draw it straight across and pretend that they're level. There we go. I don't get a perfect and that's completely fine. That is just the nature of being a comic book artist. I think that's the conclusion I've come to because nothing really works out 100% of the time. Right? Once we have got the hairline placed in, let's run the neck. Now this is another key difference between men and women is that men will typically have a little more muscle mass around their neck. Especially a fit man. Simply because That's the way that their bodies are designed. So we'll draw in the neck here, and they've also got larger trapezius muscles as well. So the trapezius muscle usually I look at the midway point of the bottom edge of the jaw and I know that if I draw a line down like so from that point, that's usually where the trapezius muscles are going to begin. Now this is a heads workshop, not a neck workshops. So I'm only going to be showing you minimally what you need to think about when it comes to drawing in the neck. But I do think that the neck is still very important for heads because it can change the vibe of the head very much So, especially when it comes to drawing men and women. Now keep in mind, of course, there are different representations of the head beyond just male and female. You've got a lot in between. You've got younger looking people. You got people of different genders and different sexes and whatnot. And there's a large variety of different sorts of heads that you can work with. So keep in mind that all of these proportions and all of these head shapes. You can change to suit your needs. We don't have time to cover all of them, of course. But the idea is to give you the standard ones so that you can push and pull those, those basic measurements that we've come up with here to create something which is more unique. Okay, so we've got our basic head Foundation established now. And by the way, in the later lessons of the workshop, what I'll be showing you is how to throw this out the window and completely customize the head in order to come up with something very different. So we need to know what the standard defaults are to begin with in order to give us a place to start. Once we've got the foundational head generally drawn in, it's time to establish the facial planes of the head planes. Now, I'm doing this in a very basic and simple level. Okay? Not to the degree where you would you'd be able to I guess, like the head effectively. I'm mostly do this to just get fairly simplified understanding of what their heads geometry consists of so that I can just turn it in space a little bit easier to figure out where the face will sit in comparison to the side of the head and that kinda thing. It helps me to be able to turn it around inside 3D space mentally inside my mind so that I can project it down on a page a little bit easier. So I'll place in the side planes of the face. Now, in this division actually separates the front of the face from the side of the jaw there. Once I've added this, these n, Again, you can see now where the face area of our character is going to be thanks to these planes. And this becomes especially important because later on when we start to view the head from above or below, what's going to happen is that we're going to see this general area where the face is going to be. Let me shade it in very roughly for you. We're going to see how that starts to foreshortened, how it starts to shrink or stretch, depending on the foreshortening that's applied to it in the viewpoint representation that we're going to be presenting it on. Wonderful. So this completes our foundational head model planes and all. Next up, let's go ahead and actually draw in the facial features. So I'm going to start with the eyes. I always like to start with the eyes because they are the windows into the soul. And so, because we pay the most attention to them, they intrinsically tend to have more importance placed upon them, even for us artists. So for male eyes, I tend to keep them fairly small actually, and that is a stylistic choice. I'm a bit of a nineties fan of comic books. And if you think about artists like Rob life field or max over history, you may or may not be familiar with their work. They used to draw very small eyes for their characters that were set far apart. So I'm going to go ahead and draw out some small eyes. Something like this will work well. And I'm just going to start out with the outline now, as I said before, if you do nothing else, in order to practice drawing eyes, simply use this shape and draw it over and over and over again. We've got a line here for the NRI, a line here for the outer. I. Put a line for the top, slightly curved. And when we've got a line for the bottom of the eye-opening, see that it curves up and around to the duct. Now, that basically consists of 1234 lines. Practice that basic shape and what you can do once you've got that shape down, you can very easily start placing in some darker lines around it, some eyelashes in order to bring more attention to the eye and embolden it and really bring it through to completion. Even with my male characters, I like to indicate some eyelashes. And it really depends on the distance to which you're looking at the head. Sometimes you'll find that you're just going to darken up the outline rather than actually define individual eyelashes simply because you may not see them from a distance. I'm going to go over the top of the eye that I've drawn up here. Real quick to show you how it might look when completed. And I'm refining the shape here, of course, as I go over the top of it, just to really polish it up. But that's about as the amount of additional definition that I would give it. So let's do the same thing to the opposite side of the face will lay an I in here. And it's going to be an exact mirror representation of what we drew up on the left-hand side of the face. So we'll get the opening generally drawn in using our four-line, very basic shape that we've been learning about. It. I just loved this, simplifying it down because it makes us so much more easy and because it's thinking about it in a very non-complex way, it makes it a whole drawing experience so much more enjoyable. Because all of a sudden you're not overwhelmed. You're not really overthinking anything and you're not guessing. I think having to guess, leaving this stuff up to chance every time you put pencil to paper, it can be a real problem. It can be discouraging because you don't always get a consistent outcome from doing that. So what we were trying to create for ourselves as a default library for the facial features. And of course, the, the fundamental edge structure itself so that we can focus on the more creative aspects later on of what goes into a memorable looking face. Okay, so we've got our other eye-opening place down there now. I'm going to just as with the other one, embolden it a little bit, indicates some subtle eyelashes on the sides. Now keep in mind if you do thicken up the eyelashes on your male characters, they'll tend to look a little bit more feminine. That's completely fine if that's what you're going for. In fact, sometimes you can, you can add thicker eyelashes or darkened eyes. I outlines to villain characters, male or female. And that will tend to work pretty well actually. Some reason, I've found it does anywhere. You think of GFR from a Latin, for example. Okay, Cool. We've got the eye-opening placed in. Now let's go ahead and draw in. I'm going to yeah. Okay. Let's go ahead and draw in the pupil and the iris. I was going to leave that till later, but I think we can draw it and now I'm going to start out with the iris. I'm going to very lightly just sketch that in there. Then I'll lay in the pupil. And what else I can add to the pupil is a reflection within the eye. That reflection, specular highlight will give the eye a wet look to it, which the eyeball tends to have. Certainly don't want dry eyes because that'll make them heard. So it will do that for both eyes. And again, one of the biggest challenges when it comes to the front view, the head is just maintaining that symmetry, not just within the shape of the face, but also the placement of the facial features and their shape. Now, usually what you're going to find is that you want to have an eye width between each of the i's. And so looking at mine, they're probably set a little too far apart. So what I'm going to do is I'm actually going to erase this one and I'm going to move it in. And the reason that I'm taking the time to erase it rather than just making a selection around it and moving it in Word is because I want to show you that it's actually not that much of a big deal to just redraw something in their incorrect it, it's totally fine. It's, it's certainly worth going back and correcting things if you see they need correcting. Don't ever just leave it. Because if you just leave it, you lose out on a very valuable lesson. But even more than that, the outcome of your work. Well, in my opinion, it's only as good as its worst aspect. And so the reason I say that is for your sake because you'll always be able to see the mistakes within your work even if other people don't. And so her make sure that you fix them. Otherwise, they'll always be there when you look at it. At least that's my philosophy, so I'm sure you can relate with it as well. I know that one of the worst things in the world is when I go back to an old piece of artwork and it just, it's, I knew that I could have done better, but I didn't. I was lazy. Never be lazy with your work. Value. The fact that you're able to do something that most people can't do very well, which has actually draw especially faces in this case. We've got that shape drawn in there for the I will redraw back in iris and the pupil. Little reflection and see that that really took no time at all. Now, you also want to bat an eye width between the eyes in the ear, the outer ear as well. At least that's the way I'm gonna try like to measure it. But sooner or later you won't need to really measure anything because you'll just lay it down on the page a little look right, or it won't. Next time what we're going to do is draw in the eyebrow. And the eyebrow. Like the eye, is made up of four sides, essentially, maybe with a fifth corner. But what you'll notice is that on men, typically the eye brows will be set down lower on top of the eyes and they'll also be a bit thicker. So what I'm going to do is start off by drawing in the bottom edge of the eyebrow. Taking it down from the actual initially established eyebrow guideline, setting up closer to the top of the eye. And then I'll draw in the top edge and the outer edge. Once again. If we go over here to the side and do an example of the eyebrow, if you just practice this shape alone, you'll get used to it's general structure. You'll notice that even though it's four sides, those sides are actually quite curved. While the edges or the corners are left very sharp rather. Okay, so that's the shape that you want to practice. That's the shape that you want to capture as accurately as possible, because it all really comes down to shape. Ultimately as far as the solidity of your drawing and how good it's actually going to look. Everything is really dependent on shape. If you capture a good shape, it doesn't matter what you add into the interior of that particular element. It'll look good. You think about those more simplified styles that really don't have a whole lot of rendering applied to them or anything like that. Getting manga would be a really good example. I mean, even get very complex styles of monger of course, but you get what I mean, like sometimes it's just the silhouette alone that really makes a piece look amazing. So we'll do the same thing on the other side of the face. Boring in that eyebrow. Sitting at very low down to the eye. And I'm also adding in that additional corner on the bottom edge. To finesse the shape a bit. I'm going over the top of the outline of the eyebrow here to define its shape with a further amount of vividness. And then after I've done that, I'm going to start placing in some eyebrow rendering. And this eyebrow rendering is going to represent the clumps of eyebrow for on the, I give it some texture and some additional, I guess you could say value because the rendering that we will be placing in here will actually darken the tone of the eyebrow to an extent. Now because we're dealing with here, essentially, we want to make sure that we make it look as natural as possible. And the way in which I do that is I tried to ensure that these render lines aren't too uniform, that some of them are sitting close together and some of them are sitting close apart. Now that dark rather close together and far apart. So I'm trying to mix up the amount of distance that I'm placing between them. And in generally ungrouping some of these lines together, separating others. The idea is that we want to also, as far as their direction is concerned, comb the eyebrow rendering back into the into the direction that the hair is supposed to be flowing in. So you'll notice that actually combing it back toward the end of the eyebrow. We'd go wonderful. So we've got our eyebrows store on in them mixed up. Let's go ahead and place in the noise. Now. I'd like to drop the bottom of the nose and just below the noise guideline that we've placed in rather than sitting right on top. So usually I'll start out with a very simple line on the dark side of the nose. Say Look, my light source is coming from the top-left. Well, that would cast a shadow on the bulb of the nose. So that is what I'm representing here with this single line. And again, I'm dropping it just below the point at which I establish the positioning of the nodes initially. Next up, I'll draw an a nostril straw look a little bit like this. Natural opening. And then I'll leave it at that. And I'll place in the other nostril, the dark side of the tip of the nose. And that's really as complex as a hey, I make the base of the nose. This is where most of the detail, mostly articulation of the nose is going to come into place. So over here to my left-hand side of the head, if I was to draw out the base, that knows, he is the most simple way of doing that. The openings on either side. Now, if the light direction is coming from the top-right instead, well, I would simply placed this contour, this line on the opposite side of the nose. So it would start here. I draw in the nostril opening on the light side. And draw in the nostril opening on their dark side. Because what's actually happening in this area is we're getting a slight shadow contour being created from the bulb of the nose, which anatomically it looks a bit like that. As far as the underlying cartilage is concerned. Again, just something to keep in mind. Those which will help you to draw the nose accurately. It's very stylized looking nose, of course. You may have your own way of drawing noses that works for you, that captures the look you're after. You don't necessarily have to draw in my style, but I am showing you how I executed for sure. Next up, what I do is I add in a little bit of an indentation around the top of the bulb of the nose. Like so. Ends. I'll also add in another one on the opposite side. Just to indicate on an extremely subtle level the anatomy that's happening within that region of the face. Then I'm going to start to add some subtle rendering around the eyes and the brow, where it leads into the top of the nose. So I'm going to drop a line down from the underside of the brow, which intersects with the front of the eye and the inner area. And I'll do that on both sides. I like to tackle both sides simultaneously because again, we want to maintain that symmetry. And if I do something on this side, I want to do it as soon as possible on the opposite side so that I don't forget. And I'll add in some subtle, I like to double up my lines sometimes. And all that that really means is if I lay in one line, may lay in another line right next to it just to give an appearance of thickness. You'll notice that I did that with the indentations of the nose and the dark side. Again, it's just one line and then another line just to create an indented appearance or look of thickness to a single contour. Next up, I'm going to indicate the eye sockets by drawing a very light and subtle line. Now, this is an extremely light line. Keep that in mind. I'm barely touching the stylus as I draw that in, but it is enough to indicate an indentation within the form. Okay, great. And I may add in a subtle line here as well. One that's not doubled up just to indicate the eye socket on that side. And that's really all that you need to add in to the male face. Now if this was an older looking character, one that was a little bit more chiseled. Or sometimes if you add too much detail to a face that can actually cause it to look. You could almost say unattractive or, or disturbing in some cases, a lot of the time with monsters, for example, or villains, you'll notice that they have a ton of detail added into their face. I tried to keep it as subtle as I can now for somebody who loves rendering as much as I do, that can be tough sometimes and I often find that I overdo it, which is why I intentionally tried to hold back as much as possible. Wonderful. Now that we've got the nose and the eye is drawn in there, let, let's place in the opening of the mouth. What's so cool is because we've already plotted out the placement of these facial features. We really don't have to think about it. There's no guesswork that goes into it anymore. We figured it out. And so now we can completely focus all our brainpower on just drawing the facial features accurately rather than trying to figure out the proportions of the head and where they need to be positioned. And we freed up mental RAM by putting in the planning first. Alright, so we've got our mouse opening here. And I'm just going to start from the middle. You get out into the corners of the mouth. Now, I should mention that the width of the nose is going to be about one eye width as well. So it's going to sit directly. Between the eyes and as far as the length of the mouth. Well, I like to bring the corners out to line up and just short of the middle of the eye. Okay, and I'm going to do that on both sides. So it almost, almost lines up with the pupil and the iris or the middle of the eye. So if I was to draw this up over here to the side of my head, Again, I start out with the middle of the mouth, which has a little dip in it, right in the middle of the top lip that I draw out the corners where I draw out the rest of the mouth, leading them into the corners. This actually determines the shape of the mouth trajectory of its opening. Sometimes it can be sad, sometimes it can be happy. And ultimately this contour here is going to represent that either all. Once I've got the opening of the mouth drawn in, I can start to draw the outline of the lips and I'll do it up here in this larger example just so that you can see it really easily add in a little indication of the top lip outline right at the top in the middle. And then I'll add in light outline indication of the lips outline toward the corners of the mouth. And then placing a much darker outline fraud the base of the bottom lip. And that's because a lot of shadow tends to collect underneath the bottom lip as it leads into the underside plane of the mouth, muzzle, which ultimately connects onto the top of the chin. And sometimes you may add in, once again a little bit of an indication to the outline of the bottom lip around the sides. But I really don't make it any more complex than that. Or to find on that, especially on a male character. Because again, defining the lips is more of a feminine attribute that you would add into your female heads. Because women tend to look, tend to wear makeup. Lipstick starts as mascara, which is the reason by the way, for them doing that is to accentuate those facial features, the most expressive facial features on the face. And so it's, it's actually a really good thing to add in there if you want to draw attention to the features of your female characters. For our dude's though, we really don't want to focus on that. We want to focus more on shape. Anything else. So I'm going to add a little indentation up here at the very top of the mouth. I'm going to darken up the corners of the mouth opening and lead the outline of the top lip down into those corners. Same thing on either side. And then we'll place in that nice dark outline into the bottom lip. And we can add in some rendering directly underneath it. Just to show you that indeed the anatomy within that area does recede into the top of the chin. And now I'll play C an, a subtle indication of the bottom lip outline. The bad. Does it? Great. Next up, let's draw in the anatomy of the ear. Just going to outline the shape of the ear a little bit more. And I'm going to basically just copy what you see me doing here to begin with. Because when we jump into the facial features lesson, I'll be going over the ear anatomy and much, much more detail. Now. I'm inviting you to learn it in the same way that I learned at which is just a copy what you see and redo that many times over, as simple as that sounds. So we start out with the outline, with the outside shape of the ear. And then we've got some interior anatomy going on. And one of the first areas that you're going to see when it comes to observing the anatomy of the ear, is this, it's almost like the inner frame of the outside shape of the ear that you're placing in, which actually leads into a Y shaped piece of cartilage. And in this view, that's going to be extremely foreshortened. Now we'll get a better look at the interior anatomy of the ear and the side view, most definitely. But for now, we're going to be looking at a very skewed, very squashed appearance for the ear anatomy. Next up we've got this other line that that completes the Y-shaped piece of cartilage, which will lead up into the ear opening cover. Then we've got the ear hall that actually sits just underneath it. And then the reason that this is a y-shaped piece of cartilage is because it's got a little indentation in the top, a little dip that will articulate there as well. Great. Next up, let's do the same thing on the opposite ear. So you kinda get extra bang for your buck when you're drawing the front view of the head because you're doing everything twice over your drawing the eye to eye or so, you're drawing a note, the nostrils twice over, the ears, twice over. So we'll start out with the basic year shape. And then we'll draw in that interior frame, which partially makes up the Y-shaped piece of cartilage, leads down into the ear lobe. And then we've got the interior of the Y-shaped piece of cartilage will draw that down into the ear opening. There's a few bumps along the way, of course. So we want to add in there to the ear is a very organic looking, strange piece of anatomy that we're adding to the head. Probably the most complex of the mall, but also one of the less observed facial features, which is why the eyes and the mouth, even though they're fairly easy to draw, can be quite difficult to capture completely accurately, sometimes jus 3. Portrait View Of The Female Head: Alright, so let's move on to drawing up the female head from the front view now, let's male head his jaw line. It's probably a little bit sharper than I actually would normally do. But I guess it's serves as the example that I was trying to present anyway. Okay. So female head going to start out very much the same way that male head started with, you guessed it, a circle, sphere. And I'm going to lightly sketch that out. Again. It's, the sphere is a very wonderful warm-up techniques that really gets you going with the head. So thinking about drawing a head in its entirety right off the bat is something which makes you a little bit nervous, gives you a bit of stage fright. But if you break it down step-by-step and you go well, it really just starts out with a circle. Well that's not too hard to draw. That's not going to be too stressful. It takes the pressure off. So if you're procrastinating about drawing a head, just start with the circle and then before you know it, that circle is going to snowball into a full-blown head. Alright, so we've got the axes established now. Let's draw in the horizontal guideline that wraps around the belly of the sphere, dividing it up into four pieces. Much like you might slice up an apple pie or a small pizza. Try to make those quarters as equal as you can possibly get them. We've got another vertical guideline that all run from the bottom of the sphere down to the bottom. That's going to represent the front of our face. And then we will chop off the sides. It will take those in a decent amount. From the side view. Of course, those planes would actually be completely circular. But because we're looking at a foreshortened representational them in the front view, they become very narrow ovals. Once we've drawn them in there, we'll add a vertical guideline that runs from the top of them to the bottom, showing us where the side of the head would be. Then we are going to drop this middle line here that represents the front of the face down to where we think the chin should sit. Now once again, as I mentioned with the male head, you can of course measure out the top two thirds of the face by drawing a line from one side of the head to the other, starting at the top of the side planes and then drawing another one at the bottom. Again, if I was to actually go ahead and demonstrate that for you, we can draw a line across the top of the cranium at the very top of the side planes. And we can do another one at the bottom. This would be one, two-thirds, and then we simply drop the chin down one more third, which I think I'm actually going to do here. That would give us the full length of the face with the proper measurements. Sometimes you can just eyeball it and that's completely fine as well. That'll work out just just the way you want it to. Usually. If you do need to adjust it, that's totally fine. Just adjust it as needed. This is all very customizable. Push it, bullet, squash it in whatever way you want. Think of this foundational hedge structure as Plato, essentially. Alright, so once we've got the length of the face established, let's go ahead and draw in the jaw line. And because we are drawing a female head here. Well, what does that mean as far as the Julian is concerned? It means that the corners of the jaw are going to be much more softer and curvaceous. While at the same time, the sides of the jaw are also going to be tapered inward. More they're going to have at an angle applied to them are more steeper angle applied to them as opposed to the male jaw, which comes across as a lot more square. So we're going to start with the sides of the jaw line, pulling them in. And then once we get down to the corners, which as I said, I like to usually align that with the base of the sphere. I'm going to keep the corners of the jaw nice and curved. And then bring the bottom edge of the jaw down to the chin, which will be narrower. So the chin of a woman is not as broad as the chin of a man. So what we end up with, if you really wanted to simplify it down, the differences between men and women as far as the jaw is concerned, is men square looking jaw while women have. A triangular looking jaw on a very symbolic level. Okay, Wonderful. So we've got our draw, a line drawn in. Excellent. Let's go ahead now and pull it out with a facial features are going to sit. And here's the thing, the proportions of the head don't really change at all, regardless of whether or not you're drawing a man or a woman. Woman. So we take the distance between the brown line and the chin and we divide it in half. That's where the noise is going to sit. And if we divide the space between the nose and the chin into thirds, one, 23, that gives us the positioning of her mouth. And their mouth opening will sit on the top third. The top of the chin will sit on the bottom third. Sometimes you're going to lift or lower that depending on how their face is looking as you draw in the facial features. But I think that's going to work out just fine for us. Next up, we'll place in the ears. The top of the ear is going to line up with the brow. While the bottom of the ear will sit on the nose line. The distance between the brow and the noise equals the length of the ear. I am drawing in the general shape of the ear here, but it is a foreshortened representation of its full shape, which we will get a much better look at when we're looking at the profile side view of the female head. Okay, fantastic. So now we've got the ears drawn in and let's get the eyeline established. You take the top of the head, the bottom of the face, we divide it in half. That's where our eyeline is going to sit. So I think that would be about here. Going to the eyeline in-links, running it from one side of the head to the other. Next, we'll get the hairline stablished. Morning a line from the top of one side plane across to the other. Then we've got the head planes. So we're going to add a diagonal line that runs from the top or the brow down to the eyeline on either side of the face. Then we'll create another division between the front of the face and the side of the jaws, which run along the cheekbone area and around the sides of the mouth. I'm keeping that nice and curved. And on a male character, this would be usually if I was going to wear, I would define the cheek bones of the character. But on a lady character really these guidelines are only going to serve the purpose of giving me that basic three-dimensional representation of general structure. Okay, next up, we'll draw in the neck. Now this is another key difference between men and women. The neck on a woman is going to be thinner or less muscular, less of a tree trunk. So it's going to have some, some elegance to it that you just can't see them in a male head. The trapezius muscles are also going to be much lower, less puffed up. As I mentioned in the previous lesson. The female head shares in common with a younger looking head, is some of these characteristics, which is the smaller neck, the softer features. In order to get a more mature looking woman well, you then you may start adding in some of those more masculine attributes. And the neck isn't completely symmetrical right now, so I am going to bring it in just a bit. That symmetry can be quite difficult to capture sometimes. So always be wary of it. Always be paying attention to it. Wonderful. So we've got the basic structure of the female head now drawn. It's time to place down the facial features. And the eyes are pretty much going to have the exact same shape. It's just that they're going to be a little larger, slightly larger anyway. However, they're not going to be that much bigger. So don't go too crazy. With the size of the eyes. We're going to start out with the NRI place in the top. And we'll draw in the bottom. And you can see that rather than making these eyes wider, I'm actually making them longer. Opening the eye more essentially. I'm going to do the same thing on either sides of the face, just establishing the opening of the eye before I started going in and adding in the eyelashes and all of the other details and really bringing that high through to completion. The reason that I want to sketch both of them out first is just so that I can get the positioning correct, the amount of space between them accurate, as accurate as I can get it anyway. And if it ends up being inaccurate because I haven't really gone ahead and refined anything. I can just erase it and start again if needed, without having invested too much time into it. But that looks about right to me. So what I'm going to place in now is some eyelashes, and I'm going to make these eyelashes are quite large and brushy, which will bring additional attention to the eyes, but also make them look more feminine. And keep in mind that you're going to have different kinds of eyes for different kinds of characters or something male characters do have eyes that are less wide and actually more, more closed with a greater glare and they look a little bit more, well, less cute, you could say, like wide eyes tend to look more innocent, whereas sincere looking eyes tend to be closed a little bit more. And so, depending on the sort of vibe you want your character to have, you want to play around with the different visual interpretations and associations that you can incorporate into your art work that other people, onlookers are going to relate with. Because make no mistake. Especially in comic books. What we draw is all visual communication. And so we want to make sure that the interpretation that our readers or viewers have, what it is we're showing them matches up with our Aaron tensions. We want to get the ideas to come across and are very clear way. And that's why as cliche as some of these decisions you might make when it comes to presenting male and female characters. Cliche is really just a bucket of pre grouped ideas that everybody can relate with. And so incorporating them into your work is certainly not a bad thing. In fact, if you try to do anything too new to unique, that is unfamiliar to the audience, they'll tend to shy away from it. They'll tend to not find it as appealing. Unfortunately, I wish that wasn't the case, but it does tend to be. And you'll learn that not only with comic book, but in all forms of entertainment, that tends to be the case. People generally don't like to think too much. They don't want to sit there and try to work out what it is you're showing them. They want it to be as clear as possible so that the message gets across in an instant. So always be thinking about the clarity of what it is you're drawing. Whether it be a face, whether it'd be a full-on character. But it especially with faces where most of the attention is going to be placed with someone who is looking at a character. You really want to incorporate the message as clearly as possible right from the get-go, because the head, the face, is the first impression of your character. And if you want to leave a good first impression, a memorable first impression, then you really want to nail it as, as much as possible. So you can see that I'm actually outlining the eyelashes before I go ahead and fill them in. So I'd suggest you do the same thing. Again, break it down into steps. Establish the eye-opening first, and then draw in the eyelash shape around it and then fill it in. I think that capturing a good shape for the eyelashes of your characters is certainly worth paying attention to. And in giving the time. As I said before, it's shape is everything when it comes to stylized comic book artist, especially with the added no amount of rendering or detail, will actually help to make your artwork look vivid and look, look solid. You've got to have that shape. You've got to have that strong silhouette because that's what people take in first. Visually, they only pick out the details later on. I have had a general overall taking in of what it is you're showing them. Great. So we've got the outline of the eye is now drawn and we've got the eyelashes placed in around them. Next up, we'll draw in the iris and the pupil. Going to try to make these eyes. So I'm thinking one slightly bigger than the other here. So I'm going to go ahead and just give this one some extra width. There we go, a little bit of tweaking. That's a game. Alright, so it would run the iris and the pupil. Starting with the iris. And you'll notice that I'm not sitting in the iris right in the middle of the eye. I'm actually setting it up underneath the eyelid somewhat. Rest because the top eyelid is always going to rest over the ice somewhat. What does the same thing on the opposite side? In fact, if you were to place the iris and the pupil right in the middle of the eye. What would happen is you'd get a very surprised looking character, is when someone's surprise, their eyes widen, that upper eyelid comes, sits higher and reveals more of the eye. Okay, Wonderful. So we've got the iris and we've got the people placed in. Now let's build out some of the anatomy around the eye itself. I'm going to place in this line here that intersects with the top contour of the eye-opening. And I'm going to draw another line above that. And that's what's going to create the top eyelid essentially right here. We'll do the same thing on the opposite side. And it's good to show the top eyelid of a female character sometimes especially if they are wearing some form of backup like eye shadow, for example, you can really, with the help of a colorist that in enhance the feminine quality of the head. Next up we'll draw on the eyelids, eyebrows. Eyebrows on a woman are going to usually sit a little higher and be less bold, less brushy. There'll be thin up. Now in funnily enough, in fashion these days are thinner eyebrows isn't necessarily in Still, in comic book art being a stylized format. You want to get those visual associations as established as possible within your characters so that you can enhance them and really push the idea of what it is you're showing. And so if we're making the male characters eyebrows nice and bold and brushy, then in order to create a distinction between your female characters in your male characters, then you want to do the opposite on a woman. Once again, you'll notice that if you do give your characters secret her eyebrows, which is totally and absolutely fine. If you're doing that for your female characters, they are going to have a more masculine appearance associated with them. And that may not be the case for you. You may look at them and go, Hey, you know what? I think it still looks like a female character, but it's not just about what you think. It's also about how your audience is interpreting what it is you're showing them. So no matter what it is you're drawing, try to always keep that in mind. So just as with the male character, we were drawing out the overall shape of the eyebrow first, giving that a nice defined and vivid outline. Then we're drawing in the more subtle render lines to indicate eyebrow texture. And for combing those eyebrow strands back in the direction that we want them to be flowing on the eyebrow. Next, let's move down to the nose. Once again, if my light direction is coming from up here, then I'm going to cast a shadow on the tip of the nose based upon that light source. So I'll start out with a lion that drops just below the positioning of the nose that I established in the foundational stage of his head drawing. And I'll draw out an opening and nostril opening, the nose. And remember that the width of the nose should equal the width of an eye. So it's sitting right in-between the eyes here. I'll do the same thing on the opposite side of the nose tip. Alton knows bulb if you will. Placing in another nostril opening. Next up, we'll lay in a slight indentation to show the top of the nose bulb. And some indicates some of the anatomy around that region of the nose. And then another little subtle indentation on the opposite side. As far as female noses go, I'm pretty much not going to add in any additional detail there either. On a male, as I said, I might go ahead and articulate some of the anatomy around the bridge of the nose and whatnot, but not here. Not with a female character is otherwise, as I said, it just ages them or causes them to look more masculine than. You may want your female characters to look, or it can simply make them look more blemished. And we might add a little bit of a Nika detail here just around the bottom edge of the eye socket. But that's about it. You're going to get rid of some of some of these rendering up here. Okay, Wonderful. So that's the nose, the eyes, and now what's left is the mouth. So we'll start out with the opening of the mouth. Right in the middle there. We got that dip. From the dip will pull out the corners of the mouth. You'll notice that the darkest area of the outline of the mouth opening is in the middle. And also add the corners. I'll thicken up the outline again and make it darker. So I am applying some line weights here. And although line weight is, is just a variation thickness along the contour of the lines that you're laying down. So in some areas it's going to be thinner. Some areas it's going to be darker. As I said, usually when it comes to the mouth, I like to really a nice dark line happening right around the middle. In-between the middle and the corners are usually send it out as you can see here. Now, another major difference between men and women is the boldness or the apparent boldness and definition of the lips. We want them to look plump. I want them to look juicy. I used to draw really thick lips on my female characters funnily enough. I've actually seen them out a little bit over time to give them more of a realistic look rather than a stylized look. So we got this little dip in the middle, right above the middle of the mouth opening. Then I'm going to pull that back into the corners of the mouth, creating the outline of the top lip. And I'm going to do that on both sides. It's I've done that. I'll lay in a line for the bottom lip in place in some rendering underneath it. I'll also outline the bottom lips somewhat around the sides as well. Now what you can do is add in some lipstick or imply that there is some lipstick there with some additional rendering. The way in which I go about that is I just start laying in some cross hatches on the lips. Now you don't have to do this. You really don't. If you look at the art of Michael Turner, for example, he'll leave lives of his characters just bear like this. And that will work perfectly well. I'm me because I'm a bit of a render feigned and I love adding in those details. I will usually try to darken them up with some rendering. I still try not to go overboard, of course, you can also add in a reflection to the lips as well just to make them look wet and shiny, similar to the eyes. Okay, Great. So that's the mouth of our female character looking pretty good. Next up, we'll tackle the ears. Will focus on defining the outline of the ears first, creating a nice vivid shape for them. Before we start to tackle the interior anatomy. We've got the outside frame established now, let's draw in the inner frame. She's going to curl back inside the ear. And we've got the Y shaped piece of cartilage that leads down into the ear lobe. And then the interior contour. That y-shaped piece of cartilage which leads up into the ear opening. The ear hole itself right underneath that would do the same thing on the opposite side. Now, again, curling that interior E for airframe back into the underside of the wedge-shaped piece of cartilage. I call it a Y shaped piece of cartilage, as you'll see. I call it that for a reason. And it's especially in parent when you're drawing the erupt from the side. But you could also think of it as like a wishbone or twig. Once we've got the ears drawn in though, it is time to define the outer shape of the head and really polish that up, bringing the head through to completion. Once again, I'm going to curl the sides of her head around back into the top of her ears here. Just so that we don't have this weird dome shaped going on. Okay, great. Next up, I'm going to outline the top of her head. A nice dark outline around it. And again, what I'm adding in here is essentially what you might think of as a line weight. The certain areas that you're going to want to really thicken up over others. And it's a stylistic choice. It just add some additional interest to the line that you're laying down onto the page. So especially down here where we're leaving it down into the back of the ears. We can see can it up a bit? Around the top? Again, we can think in an up a bit. And it just makes everything look. It takes it to that pro level. I remember when I first started incorporating line weights, it was a total game changer. It completely changed the way in which my locked never went back. Okay, So now we'll define the jaw line here. You don't have to click completely covered out. You can also, you can still add some sharp lines. It's just, you're adding a few more there to fill out the sharpness of the jaw line. And some people, they add a very sharp jaw line to their female characters and that works sometimes very well to like. For example, Mark Sylvester, ease out work. Another very well-known comic book artist. He uses very sharp Joel lines for his ladies. And it looks great. I love it. So it just depends on your style, although a lot of the time and what works best for you. Finally, we'll darken up the outline for the neck, going back over the top of it. And that completes how female head as observed from the front. So what we're looking at is the front view of the female headed and the male head. Differences between them. A few that are very distinct and will either make your head look more feminine or masculine depending on what it is, you're intending to capture all your drawings. So just keep them in mind and also focus on learning the proportions of the head from the front view. Especially because not only do you see where the facial features land on the head, on the vertical axis? So how far down or how high up the facial features of place, but you also see how far apart they are. So the eye is how much distance is sitting between them, and the width of the nose, the width of the mouth, that kind of thing. So it's something to certainly take note of and study and practice, practice, practice. 4. Profile View Of The Male Head: Now let's draw up the profile view of the male head or the side view of the male head, which is also known as aka. But it starts out in very much the same way as the front view, which is the basic circle to begin with, which we're likely going to draw down onto the page. Take your time to get this circle as circular as you can possibly get it. If it looks like a squashed pancake or it looks like a balloon that's had all the air sucked out of it. Then you want to try to neaten that up and recollect is that it looks more like a bowl, perfectly round ball. Now it won't be perfect of course, but to try to do your best. Okay, fantastic. Next step, what we're going to do is I'm going to reposition this head here. So it's a sitting a little lower. Next up we're going to place in the axes. That's just going to be, well, this head will be rotating at an eye level view and straight up and down. So it's going to be spinning vertically. Rather than on an angle. Next up, we're going to divide this head up in the quarters, slicing it up like pumpkin pie or an apple pie or really any kind of pie that you're like. We've got a vertical line and we've got a horizontal line that will both intersect in the middle of the circle. Next, we're going to place in the side planes of the head. And here in this particular view, we're going to get a very good look at the full width of those side planes. And you'll notice that in fact, what we end up getting is a smaller circle sitting inside a larger circle. Keep in mind of course, that the side planes of the head here are going to be a height that equals two-thirds of the overall height of the cranium. If you need to measure those out, then by all means do so. I've showed you how to do that plenty of times over now. So I'm not going to bother in this example. But it should look like a car tire essentially. At this point, the foundations for your side view profile shot of the head should look like a car tire. When you reach this step. That's how I like to think of it as any way or a really thin donut will work just as well. Next up, we are going to drop the middle of the face down to where we would like to chin to be. And because the head is looking in this direction, or I'm intending for it to look in that direction. In the example here, the front of my face is going to start from here. Dropped down all the way down to the chin should be. I'm going to drop it down to about there. Now again, just use your eye for this. If you don't necessarily want to measure it out using the method I was teaching you before. The side view can be very tricky in terms of capturing the correct length for the face. And so that's why I like to use my eye for it rather than actually measuring it out because I find that it just comes out too long locking. But even if I was to measure out these two-thirds, what you'll notice is that 123 thirds is that I've taken the chin down about an additional third anyway, so it is the proper length that it should be really. And over time, what you'll notice is that you become very good at judging exactly what these proportions should be anyway, just through practice and through recognizing via the repetition that you've gone through what it should look like on the page. Okay, so once I've got the length of the face established, I am now going to draw on the jaw line. Now this is really important. The jaw line is going to start in the middle of the head. That's going to drop pretty much straight down. There'll be a slight angle to it. And right when we get to the bottom of the sphere, we're going to reach the corner of the jaw, which will shoot us off in another trajectory down toward the chin. We go next up, we're going to draw in, well, we're going to start plotting out where the facial features are going to sit. Now, just, let's make a note here with the jaw because we are drawing a male head. What does that mean? Well, we want the corners of the jaw to be fairly sharp, and we also want that jaw to be quite square. Okay, keep that in mind. It's important for male heads in order for them to look masculine. Next up, we're going to take the distance between the brow and the chin and then divide it in half. Usually this will also be the second, third, the heads of the faces overall length. But I find it just much easier to divide the distance between the brow line and the chin into two in order to find where the nose should be sitting. Next up, we're going to divide the area between the nose and the chin into thirds. So one, make sure that those thirds are as equal as you can get them. This is really, really important to keep in mind, okay? If you don't nail the proportions of your heads than sum is going to look off. So really pay attention to where you're placing these facial features, ensure that they are proportionally correct. Alright, next up, we're going to draw in the eyeline. Eyeline, of course, sits at the midway point of the overall length of the head. So it's going to be about here, I would say. Wonderful. Next, I'll draw the ears. Top of the ears is going to align with the top of the brow. And the bottom of the ear will align with the nose. And what you'll notice is that the shape that we were using to outline the ear in the front view has now been stretched out and is not any longer foreshortened. This is why the side view is the very best anatomical representation of the ear that we're going to get. Once we got the ear drawn in, it is time to actually shape both the face in the facial features. Because as it turns out, a lot of the heads outline, especially around the face area, is going to be defined by the facial features and the varying extrusions and recessions that we see coerced by the structure of the skull in the facial features combined. One of the first major ones that you'll notice is of course, the brow as it comes in. And then transitions at the iron line into the nose. So it changes trajectory angles inward into the face and then protrudes back out into the nose. Because we are drawing a male character here, that noise is going to be fairly straight. Remember that in our front view, the tip of the nose actually falls just below the positioning of the noise that we estab, established during the foundational stage. Now, once we've drawn the outline of the nose, we're going to take the contour into the lips. So this is basically the outline of the face that we're drawing here, while at the same time we're also drawing the facial features. So it will lead this line into the top lip and then back out into the bottom lip, and then back into the underside plane of the mouth muzzle, which will then transition into the chin. And that's for the most part, some of the key facial features now defined. Now we also wanna go ahead and start shaping the skull a little bit. And what I mean by that is that the skull is it's not really this much of a dome. Okay. It's, it's actually not that round. We're going to bring the top of the brow in somewhat. Lead the line-up into the forehead. Then as we continue the contour around into the top of the head are actually going to flatten it out a little bit. So we're almost going to shave some of the head off. Now this will change its overall length ever so slightly. But that's actually fine in this view because what you'll end up seeing on the human skull is that indeed the back of the skull is actually longer than the width of the skull. Okay, When we're looking at it in the front view. So bring the back of the skull down. Once we get to about this point just above the brown line, we're going to bring it back in. Okay. And what you get is this much the sharp point of bone at the back of the skull which ends up running down into the back of the neck. So a lot of the side profile view of the human head is defined mostly by outline. Then of course you'll have the eyes that you'll place in later on. But for the most part, this is getting this outline right. That is the most important aspect of it. Then of course we've also got the neck. So let's lay the neck in here as well. Now what most people find is that when they're drawing the profile view of the human head is that although start out with the cranium, it'll be a completely round bowl that leave it as a completely round bowl, which is the first problem. They don't flatten it out on top, which is an issue. I don't flatten it out too much, but flatten that out just a little bit to, to capture the correct shape of the skull. But the other major problem that they run into is they'll drop the face down too far. And so you won't have the amount of width at the face needs to have in the side view. So just keep that in mind if your face is looking like it's too long and the side view lifted up a bit because that'll give it a wider appearance. And do that on the foundational level. Don't try not to do it later on after you've already added in the facial features because that'll just be extra work for you. And then of course, after that, go ahead and flatten out the top of the skull and try to really get that width happening. That why that's happening within the side view that so often is not captured when we draw it, but it makes sure it's there. Otherwise the front of the face can just tend to look a bit squashed and that's certainly not what we want. And of course it's just a matter of drawing out the facial features, cashing their outline and making sure that is as correct as we can possibly get it. Okay. So let's wrap this head up. Lay in the eyes. The eyes are going to come back and they'll land at this point here. So I'd say that, oh, come back a bad as far as that side plane, the edge of the side plane about here. That doesn't have to be exact. Sometimes you might pull them back further than that or you might leave them more toward the front of the head. It depends on the character and certainly in real life, this varies from one person to the next. Excel will draw on the eyebrow. You can see that the eyebrow actually pushes back beyond that side plane, which is totally fine. It may not be accurate, but it looks good. I usually I usually bring it back a little bit further and that tends to work. I'll add in some texture for the eyebrows just to describe the fairness of them. I'm going to tweak the shape here just a bit to really describe the form that the eyebrows are sitting on in this area of the skull. In fact, we'll draw in the top edge of the eye socket and also define the upper eyelid as well while we're at it. Then we'll draw some eyelashes in CIS or around the eye-opening. Some very small ones because we are drawing a aloud here. And then of course the iris and the pupil. The pupil is going to sit back inside the iris. Next up, we'll draw in the nostril, which will sit about this point and then come back to the front of the eye, or roughly the front of the eye. So if we were to draw a diagonal line down the front of the eye, that's where the back of the nostril would sit. We can draw a little indentation, a little nick of detail there just to show the recession that sits around the nose ball, but the tip of the nose, if were so inclined, it's not needed. I like to add it there just for that additional little bit of definition within the underlying anatomy. Then we've got the mouse opening. Just as before. I'm going to start with the front of the mouth. The mouth. Take it back to the corners. And again, that's going to come back to pretty much aligned with the eye. And I'll slightly outline the lips. Not to boldly, but just enough to indicate them. I might even pull it in his chin a bit more. Like it's coming out a bit too far. They're going around outlining the rest of the face, making it darker. Try and really get that polished finish to it. Just refining what I've already laid down onto the page here. Then finally, let's tackle the ear because the ear is really an important feature when we're looking at the side view of the head, It's the first opportunity that we get to see the anatomy of its interior very, very clearly. So I've got the outline, articulate it. Now it's time. Once we've got the general shape place down onto the page, I want to start to draw on the interior frame, which is for the most part going to run around the inside of the outer shape. It's going to follow it down into the ear lobe. And what we end up with is this shape. I like to think of it as official book. Right? Once we've got the fish hook drawn in there, we can then go ahead and place in the interior of that foot facial nerve which will ultimately be the It'll it'll make up the bottom portion of the Y-shaped piece of cartilage, the main piece of cartilage that we see within someone's ear. Go ahead and lead that line down into a little bump that's going to hook up at the end. Then look back round to sit on top of the ear opening. It's got a little tail. Then we'll draw, will continue this piece of cartilage back into the ear as well. And add a little bit of an indentation or recession in the top of the Y-shaped piece of cartilage separating it into two. And that's where the y symbol comes from there. Now again, you can think of it as a wishbone. You can think of it as a twig. But it essentially looks like this. Okay, cool. Once more, we can thicken up the outline around the ear, polish up the presentation that we've got our head and bring it through to completion. There we have it. That is the side profile view of the male head. Now let's move on to the female head. 5. Profile View Of The Female Head: Now let's go ahead and draw up the profile view of the female head. And a lot of what we've done here for the male head is going to be quite similar. So it's good because it gives us an opportunity to recap on some of the information that we've learned about previously. And repetition is never a bad thing whatsoever. So once again, we're starting out with our old friend, the circle, which we've become very well acquainted with so far throughout these lessons. As I said, I'm telling you by the end of this course, you will be very good at drawing spheres. If nothing else. The foundation of the human head lay in the axes and a toothpick right through the top. We'll divide it up into quarters, just as before, with a horizontal guideline. And a vertical guideline, which represents the center of the middle of the head in the profile view. Once that's done, we'll cut off the sides, leaving us with what would resemble, at least at this point within our foundational head model, a doughnut or a car tire. But really it's just, it's the little circle inside of a bigger circle. Pretty easy to remember. Next up, we're going to drop the face down to the chin. So we'll draw that out here. And I think I'll bring my chin down to about there. Actually, you know what? Maybe about here instead. That looks pretty good to me. Then we'll draw the jaw line down to the corners of the jaw, curving it out because we are drawing a female head here. And that's one of the key distinctions that separate a male head from a female head. We're going to curve that right down into the gin. Remember that we do want to try to capture a decent amount of width here for the face. Now I'm also going to go ahead and actually bring back the bottom of the chin to create a nice curve to the front of the face for our female character here. And especially for female, you do want to bring the chin back ever so slightly, not necessarily so much that they end up with an overbite. But it can tend to make them look. Again. It can tend to enhance that feminine aspect of them. Whereas when you, when you push the jaw forward, what you end up getting is something which, you know, it looks a little bit like this kind of a caveman appearance. And so if you want to push the feminine aspect of a head, well, you do, you do somewhat the opposite thing, right? You push the door back. Again, don't give her an overbite because that's probably not something that you're after either. But it's about keeping these things subtle. Alright, Once that's done, let's go ahead and plot out with a facial features or, you know, the drill at this point, we'll take the distance between the brow line and the chin divided into two halves, right in the middle there, that's where our nose is going to sit. Then the distance between the nose and the bottom of the chin, we would now divided into thirds and on that top, so that's where our mouth is going to sit. So we want to take special note of that one. Next we will drop in the ears. Top of the ear is going to align with the brow. The bottom of the ear will sit on the nose line. Next, we'll establish where the eyes will sit, which is midway point of the overall length of the head. So that'll be about here. And now we'll start to, well, we can start to outline the facial features. So again, it's somewhat of a different approach that we're taking here. With the side view of the head. We didn't really need to outline any other facial features in the front views. So this has a little bit new for us, right? But it's actually kinda cool because we're really just defining a silhouette, an outline here for the facial features rather than needing to actually draw them in separately. In fact, you'll notice that the nose, the mouth, and the chin, and the brow, they all share this a single line, which is pretty amazing. Let's do the same thing here with our female head. And what you're going to notice, especially with the noise, is one of the most. Another very prominent difference between male and female heads, which is the curvature of the nose, especially the noise bridge. So we're actually going to curve the noise upward here and then bring it back in the mouth. Hey, So that's something that I tried to add to my female characters just to make their nose look a little bit more cute and adorable. You'll notice that we've got this nice swooping curved to the female nose, whereas the dude's knows it's a little bit more angular and straight down. So again, everything is translated into a certain softness when we're looking at the female head, at least everything we did on the male had previously. Now, once you've got the nose bridge of our female nose defined, and again, I'm just gonna do some tweaking. You'll find that you probably end up tweaking your female heads much more than your male heads. Just because they need to be exact. Whereas male heads get away with a little bit in regards to how they are presented, but will lead this outline down into the mouth just as before. The top lip there, which will lead down into the opening, and then the bottom lip, which will lead down into the chin and backup into the jaw. Alright, wonderful. Again, you can notice that already we've got a very feminine looking face here just with the outline alone. Once we've done that, we're going to start to add a little bit more shape to the upper region of the skull. So the other thing here is that rather than giving a bit of an indentation to the brow where we're just going to have it curved straight up. Then we'll flatten it out on top, just as we did before for the male head. And then we'll bring it back around. Sit just above the horizontal guideline. Bring back the skull to meet the neck. And you'll notice that we're bringing it back quite far this time around because just like with the front view, the neck is going to be less midi list thick, less muscular on a feminine character than it is on a male character. And there we have it. So always remember that the shape of the head and the features and the way in which you represent them are going to determine exactly how feminine or masculine your heads look. Okay, Beautiful. Now let's go ahead and just move these down lower. Ahead and draw in the facial features of our female character. Remember that the eye is when presented on this side, I really just a slice of pie, right? Or a doorstop, if you will. Whatever you find most useful to think about when it comes to drawing them on a simple level. And that's exactly what I start out with. Then also thinking about the size of the eye as well. I don't want it to be too large, I don't want it to be too small. Draw a little line that runs up into the underside of the eye socket. And we'll give her some nice big thick eyelashes, which are going to fan outward toward the front of the face. I'm outlining the shape first. That's what I would suggest you do as well. Try to capture good, solid shape for your eyelashes before you start filling them in. We'll do that for boys. The bottom eyelids and the top eyelids. Once we've done that, let's the iris and the pupil. And in a little bit of a reflection. Now of course the eyebrows. And we're going to make the eyebrows nice and thin, elegant looking, bringing them back down behind the eye. And we'll add in some texture, some eyebrows texture rather. Just to indicate that indeed the eyebrows, rather than being painted straight on fact made of eyebrow for wanna give the impression that if we were to run our fingers along this lovely ladies eyebrows, which would be kinda weird. But still if we were to do so, it would feel like hair. That's what we're visually trying to show here. Once we've got the eye is drawn in, it is time to then establish whether nose opening would be. So it will draw in the nostril. And remember where in order to find where the back of the nostril would be with simply drawing a diagonal line downward from the eye. Next up. Let me go ahead. And the thing that you want to remember with the nostril opening is that it's actually going to start more forward toward the front of the noise and then come back into the face. Now we'll draw a little recession in the top here is to describe the anatomy of the noise bulb will drop in the opening of the mouth. The little little fatty bit in the middle of the lip there that we've dropped down. And we've got the sides of the mouth which lead back into the corners, which pretty much aligned with the middle of the I pretty much. And then we'll establish that. Define the outline for the lips themselves. Around the top and around the bottom. Lead in a little bit of reflection to both because you want the ellipse to look nice and shiny and wet, especially when you're talking about a female character. Stylistically, it just looks good. There's a lot of stylistic decisions that I make when it comes to drawing characters in comic books, of course, you'll find that you pretty much do the same thing. But in your own way, there's this certain stylistic choices that you may make that I just wouldn't make. And that's what will make your eyes look unique. It's important to embrace that. It's okay to be different. You don't have to be exactly the same as one artist to the next. Okay, next up, let's draw in the ears. Okay, So once again, in order to get good at drawing the ears, There's no easy way to say this, but he had just got to practice it over and over again. So start with the outline, the outside shape of the ear. Get that down. Ex step is to draw in this little curly bit that runs along the inside, the inside outline of the year, I guess you could think of it as the inner frame. It's going to run down into the ear lobe. By the way, everybody has their own way of drawing ears as well. So that to complicate things. I initially learned how to draw ears inappropriately from Dragon ballsy because their ear anatomy was very wrong. And so I learned how to draw E is wrong first, but you know what, somehow it still looked okay? Which just goes to show that no one really pays attention to ears anyway. Alright, so we've got our Y shaped piece of cartilage drawn in there. Let's place in the ear Hall. Then we've got the recession at the top of the ear will get that drawn in. And voila, that is our ear completed. Now the final step is to polish this presentation up. We'll go around the outside of the head first up, starting at the top. And really defining the outline that we would like to have in the final presentation. This is where you want a steady up your hand and make sure those lines are looking nice and neat and tidy and clean. That's the key. Alright, there we go again flattening out the top of the skull there. I remember don't flatten it out too much because otherwise you'll shift the height of your head to a point where it's, it ends up messing with the proportions and placement of the facial features. Remember you want your eye is to always be as close to the middle of the head as possible, at least when you're drawing an idealized head. If you're flattening it out too much on top will then they will in fact appear higher in the side view, which is, may not be the desired look that you're going for. Okay, so now what I'm looking forward to doing here is just defining the jaw line there a little bit more. We've got an angled a little bit and we've also got an angled back to take the jaw line now from the corners into the chin. Staff will outline the neck. That pretty much completes the side profile view of our female head. 6. Three Quarter View Of The Male Head: Now it's time to draw a three-quarter view of the female and male head. We'll start with the male head. Okay. So just like with the front view and the side view, we're going to start out with a circle for the three-quarter view. And although this looks very, very similar to the previous two views that I've demonstrated here. There's going to be a significant difference very early on. And that is with the guidelines that actually will wrap around the sphere. And you're about to see what those are. Just a moment after I've drawn out this circle. And c, I take very special care with my circles. I tried to make them as circular as I possibly can, as accurate as I can. Because I find that if I can nail the circle on the Vietnam, just leads to a better outcome for my head's in general. So pay attention to or don't underestimate the circle. It's deceivingly important to get right. Now we'll place the axes in just as we did in the previous two viewpoints. Now this is where things get interesting. So we are going to establish a center line that runs from the top of the sphere down to the bottom and establishes the front of the face. Essentially. Except this time, rather than running straight up and down in a straight line, it's going to curve around the surface form of the sphere. It's actually following along the surface of the sphere here as we draw it down to the bottom. And what you'll notice is that it's curving in the direction that the head is looking in. The apex, I guess you could call it, of the curve, is positioned to the right. And that's the direction that our head is looking in, at least as we're looking at it. So that's the vertical guideline. Now we'll lay in the horizontal guideline. However, keep in mind that if this head was looking down or up, then e2 would also be curving in the up or down direction. Wonderful. See that that's in, on a bit of an angle there, so I'm going to undo it and keep it straight. I've got a horizontal guideline placed in there, wrapping around the belly of the sphere and ultimately representing where the eyebrows will go on our head. Next, we'll chop off the side planes. Now, this is where things also start to get a little more interesting. Because what we're going to do in order to figure out how wide the side plane should be, is we look at how much space we've got here on the far side of the face or the far side of the cranium at this point because that's all that we want to work with. So I'm looking at how much space is on the far side of the cranium. And I want to make sure that as I lay in the side planes, we leave an equal amount of space on the side that is closest to us. However, it will be slightly more space since the closer things are to us, the bigger they get. And so that means that the width of the side of the face, which is closest to us, is going to be a little wider than the far side of the face. So we can add a little dot there just to signify whether middle of the far side of the face would be and how far into it we want outside plane to come. Judged. Judging. Based on what i've, I've established here. I'm going to draw out that side plane. You can see that it looks symmetrical, even though technically there's more space here on the side of the face which is closest to us. Due to the foreshortening. It still looks as though this line here, the center line of the face is sitting in the middle. So this is what makes drawing the head and these dynamic perspectives just a little bit more difficult is all of a sudden you've got to take into account for shortening. That can be tricky. It can be elusive as to how to go about it and what estimations you need to make in order to nail it. Because unfortunately, unless you're some mathematical genius, you're just not going to get it right 100% of the time or exact. And even if you were to get it exact that it wouldn't necessarily lead to a better result. Anyway. You've got to develop your artistic eye with this stuff and use your best judgment while observing what you're drawing through it. Once you develop it enough, you'll find that you do end up with better and better results. But for now here what we're left with is our cranium structure. Now, what I'm noticing is that it looks as though this horizontal guideline is maybe sitting just a little bit too high. So I'm going to drop it a bit ever so slightly. You can see it's just a smidge too high there. But I'm a perfectionist, so I worry about such differences. Alright? So once again, I'll do another little example up here. In order to find out wide side planes overhead should be in this view. First, establish the middle of the face. Take a look at how much space you've got on the far side of the head. And then assuming that you want an equal amount of space on the other side of the head. Use the amount of space you've got on the far side of the head to judge how far forward you need to bring that side plane. Like so. Alright, hopefully that makes sense. Sometimes it's a little bit hard to explain, but that's why combine explaining with demonstration. Alright, we've got our cranium now figured out. So let's erase these two little dots and dropped down the front of the face to where we would like to chin to sit. Now remember we can measure out the top two-thirds of the head if we want to 12, and then drop it down another third in order to find the full length of the face. That's totally fine. That'll work out for most people. I'm going to eyeball it. I like to keep it all natural. So I'll drop the chin down to about here, which is probably going to equal the final third anyway. Lay in a vertical guideline that runs from the top of the side plane down to the bottom. Then we'll place now draw a line. Because we are drawing a male character here. We are going to give the sides of the jaw less of an angled trajectory, keeping them a little bit more vertical with a slight angle to them instead. Then we'll after we've laid that down the sides of the jaw, down into the corners of the jaw. We will then place in the final bottom edge of the jaw, leading it down into the base of the chin. We want to give some broadness to the chin since we are drawing a male head here. Now, as for the far side of the face, this is where things tend to confuse. This is where things get, tend to get confusing for most of us. Because what are we supposed to put here? Are we trying to define the outline of the jaw? Are we defining the outline of the face or are we doing both? Well, it really depends on how far away the head is turned from us. Because it can be both. It can be one or the other. Sometimes it really is going to be determined by the amount of rotation that has been applied to the head. In this case, what I'm going to do is I'm just going to start out with a very light, very, very loose outline for the jaw. And then later on, if I decide to add in a cheek bone or the mouth muzzle, or the form of the chin in order to articulate that shape a little bit better. Then, so be it. But for now I'm just going to add a very light outline there, just to close off the face shape for now. Once I've done that, I'm going to establish where the nose would be placed, which is between the brown line and the bottom of the chin. I'll lay that in there. It looks pretty good. Next up, I'm going to divide the distance between the nose and the chin up into thirds. Again, take your time to really make sure all of those thirds a shared out equally with one another. Once we've done that, we'll place in the ears, top of the ear. Is it going to allow with the align with the brow line? Here will land on the nose line. Again. Make sure that when you're drawing the ears, indeed, they do line up with these two very important anchor point for the brow and the nose. Once we've got the E is drawn in, we will lay in the eyeline. Eyeline is going to sit at the midway point of the overall length of the head. Now, if you're ever in doubt as to where the eyes need to go, just simply draw a line from the top of the head down to the bottom of the chin. Then using your best judgment or a ruler, if you feel like you need to simply divide that line in half. And that will give you the positioning of the eyes. There. We have it. At least when looking at the head on an IR level. Once we got the eyeline drawn in. In the neck. Now I'm going to bring the back of the head again just a little bit here behind the ear. And then drop the back of the neck down from below the year. Then drop the other side of the neck from under the chin. We can draw on the trapezius muscle as well. Of course. That completes our, our basic head structure. The only other thing we really need to add into this is of course the head planes, so let's not forget about them. And that for me includes the hairline most of the time as well. So we'll draw that in from the top of one side cranium plane to the other. And we'll draw in a diagonal line that runs from the top of the browser down to the eyeline on either side of the head here. Then we'll draw another division that is going to separate the front of the face from the side of the face. Bring that down to the jaw line like so. And we may see the same thing happened on the far side of the face. This is where I start to bring the cheek bone out just a little bit. We start to see those forms overlapping on top of one another. So the front face forms, overlapping essentially on top of the side face forms and obscuring them just a little bit. Awesome. So now we've got our foundational head model done and dusted. Going to enlarge it a bit. Giving us more room to work with. Here we go much better and we can see everything much more clearly. Now without further ado, let's go ahead and place in the facial features starting with the eyes. Now, when it comes to positioning the eyes in the three-quarter view, remember that we're positioning them along this line here. That the width of them and the space between them is going to be somewhat foreshortened. So we wouldn't get our red pen out here. We could place the width of one I hear, the width of another eye here. And that would give us a fairly accurate representation of the sizing of the eyes and where they need to be positioned. So keeping that in mind, let's go ahead and start drawing them out. The first thing that I'm going to do in order to draw them is I'm just going to outline their opening. Am I going to be using a very similar basic structure to what we started out with for the front view. So we've got the NRI. Look at the outer array. And then we've got the bottom edge, and we've got the top again equaling four lines. Well the eye all up. We'll do the same thing on the opposite side of the head. I like to think of the front of the face is just being a plain. Really. That plane is going to force shorten. Again if I was to simplify what I'm talking about here are as planes and concern. I think of the face is just being a flat plane. Sometimes that plane will have foreshortening applied to it. If we're looking down onto it. That foreshortening is going to be pushed in a different dramatic direction if it's turned further away from us. Right? So you can start to even add the facial features, those planes in order to get an idea as to, you know, how the face would look on these different angles. Right? So it just depends how you think about it ultimately, but that's how I what I'm thinking about as I'm placing in the different facial features, especially the eyes since they are sitting along this phase plane that I'm explaining. Okay, once we've got the opening of the eye is drawn in, it's time to lay in the eyelashes. Now remember it's a male head, so the eyelashes aren't going to be too extravagant. Just enough to darken up the outer edges of the eye and give them some emphasis. These are probably slightly bigger eyes than I would normally give a male character. But I think it's still works pretty well. Usually I don't, I don't draw randomly looking male characters. Usually they will kind of mean. And so big bold eyes don't really suit that particular vibe that I usually like to capture within my characters. So. And it can be very, very subtle as well. At times. It seems you add into the facial features and a facial structure of your heads to make the character feel a certain way. Okay, cool. So once we've got the outline of the eyes established, it's time to place in the pupils. And the IRS. I'll start out by outlining the pupil, the iris first. I'll place the pupil inside of it. And a little bit of shine to make the eyes look nice and wet. And again, those eyes are looking to beautiful to me. So I'm actually going to erase them really quickly and have another go at them. Yeah, that's looking much better. So I'm actually going to close them up a little bit and make them look a little bit more intense. Looking too friendly. I can't have my dude character is looking too friendly. Okay, that's better. So again, there was nothing wrong with the eyes that I drew in previously. Just stylistically, they weren't getting the right, right feel across for me that I wanted this character to have. So, you know, sometimes it's not a matter of drawing things wrong. Sometimes things can be perfectly fine. It just depends if the message is getting across in the right way as I was talking about before. That's the most important thing. Okay, next up, I'm going to draw iris and the pupil back in there. Great. Now I'll draw in the eyebrows. And remember that for the eyebrows, we want to keep them nice and thick for a male character. So I'm sitting them down lower on top of the eyes as well. Whereas on a female character they would probably sit much higher. I'll run my pencil around the outside of the eyebrow shape once more, just to define it. Once it's defined, I'll then lay in some very light render lines to indicate texture. And further like tactile appearance. Combing those eyebrow fors back in the direction that I want the eyebrows to flow. Again, this just prevents the eyebrows from looking like they're painted on. You could also fill them in just for solid black if you wanted to or some other solid color at some artist opt for that and it looks really good. Stylistically, you'll explore all of these different options for your own work and hopefully ideally settle on one at some point. Alright, once the eyebrows are drawn in, let's go ahead and place down the nose. Now, just as with these basic examples over here, the nose is really just a wedge that sits onto the front of the face. And so that's exactly what I'm thinking about when I draw it in here. Now, I'll actually define the tip of the nose first. But at the same time, I'm essentially drawing out an invisible line down the brow and into the base of the nose as I lay it in order to find its positioning, its proper positioning. So I think the tip of the nose will be found about here. Bring it up a little bit. Drawer in the nostril opening. Sometimes you can define the bridge of the nose on this angle. It can work quite well. Just because now with the noise is somewhat turned away from us. But at the same time, you can also leave it as a broken outline. So I'm just going to do some erasing here to get rid of the construction lines and that we can see things a little bit better, see what's going on. I'm going to redraw in that nostril opening. And I might just redraw the noisy and completely altogether at this point. Sometimes if something just isn't working out the way that I want it to work, I will completely erase it and start again. Hey, that's a little bit better. I'll darken up the top of the nose bridge and I'll darken up the bottom applying those line weights, but then I'll just leave it as almost a broken outline In-between those points. The reason I do that is just for stylistic purposes, like it just tends to look good. Because the further away that head is rotated from us, the more defined that nose bridge outline will become. But for now I think that works quite well. Next up, we'll draw in the mouth, starting with the middle of the mouth opening and then drawing it out into the corners. And just as with the front view, the corners of the mouth are going to stop just short of the middle of the eye. And in fact, I think I've actually drawn the nose down just a little bit too low in this example. So once again, I'm gonna get rid of it. And I'm going to lift it up. Again. The point is not to avoid mistakes, they're going to happen. You can avoid them. So don't be afraid of making them. But I think the, the point is that you want to always make sure that you make your best efforts to fix them and to be able to spot them in the first place. That's the biggest challenge because you can't spot the mistakes to fix them, then that's when you're in a real a real spot of trouble. All right. There we go. Then nose is looking okay. I don't like it as much as my previous known as butt. We've used Snow's wasn't positioned properly. And again, I just want to move it back with the transform tool. I actually want to erase it. Show you that if you're working traditionally, that's exactly how you deal with it. Next up, I'm going to draw the bottom of the bottom lip, placing a darker outline around the base of it. Because you'll find that a lot of shadow tends to collect underneath that area. So it does warrant a darker outline to give it that depth. Once I've got that place tin, it's time to define the shape, the outer shape of the ear. So it will go around the outside of it with a darker outline. And then placing the interior anatomy. Now, we already have an idea as to what the interior anatomy of the ear looks like in the side view and in the front view. And now we're going to see an in-between foreshortened representation of how the ear anatomy now looks in the three-quarter view. But we'll approach it and very much the same way, starting with the outline of the ear and then working our way around with the interior frame. Leading that down into the ear lobe. We've got that sorted. We'll bring that y-shaped piece of cartilage, lead it down into the bottom of the ear. You would a little bump, a little hook at the end. Leave that up into the ear cover, opening, opening cover rather. And then this other bit of cartilage that leads into the inside of the ear will draw that back in. And then add the recession to the top of the Y-shaped piece of cartilage. That just about wraps up out here in testing. So now all that's left to do is to refine and define the outline of our head shape. And the first place then I'm going to tackle is none other than the far side of the face because this is the area that warrants the most amount of attention. In my opinion, I have the most trouble with that. Many other people have trouble with this area too. So let's talk about it for a moment. What we'll do to begin with is bringing the underside plane of the brow into the outer corners of the eye. Alright, Thanks. From there we will drop down the top of the cheek bone and then lead said cheekbone into the face. And this is where it's going to meet up with the mouth muzzle. Okay, That's this little bit here. That muscle that wraps around the mouth will out lightly outline it. Eating it down into the chin. And that's exactly what we'll define next, is the bottom of the chin. Now of course, we can still see a little bit of the the jaw on the other side of the face. So we'll drop that in. Going to be peeking out from behind the mouth muzzle. It's looking pretty good. And then we'll lay in a darker outline for the bottom of the chin. And you can see that's the hardest part of the three-quarter view. Head completed. I'm just getting this part right is really tough on a male head. Especially because you do need to articulate the cheekbone and the mouth muscles and all of that other jazz. There isn't a female head. You can just join all of this stuff together into a smooth cheek, essentially because they usually have more fat in their cheeks with less defined bone and muscle underneath it, apparent on the surface of the face. Now we'll continue our refined darker outline around the rest of the jaw line, bringing our male head further to completion. The only other thing we really need to do is go around the top of the head now, polishing it up, making it look real quick. In fact, I'd probably even bring the forehead just a little bit further forward here. So there we go. Now finally, we'll complete the neck, giving it a slightly darker outline as well. Then we can call that done. Next up, we're going to move straight on to the female three-quarter view. 7. Three Quarter View Of The Female Head: Now let's draw the female three-quarter view head, starting once again with a circle. I know I know these circles are getting pretty old at this point, but you use to them because every time we go to draw ahead, we're going to start out with this circle. And that's actually what makes it really, really easy to draw our head. Because circles are very simple and easy to think about. And as long as we can start with them while it makes, it makes the whole process so much more easier because we're just building off of this circle here. As I mentioned previously, if you've got an entire illustration that has tons and tons of heads in a row, tons and tons of people. You can start out with just a bunch of circles composed within that panel or within that page. And you can very quickly figure out how big all of those heads are going to be and where they're going to be placed just with those circles. Certainly use it to your advantage and get good at drawing circles for goodness sake. Because they are, they are important. They're going to help you out big time, especially with heads. And isn't it cool that just because we're drawing a female head here as opposed to a male head. It's not a completely different process. It's pretty much the same approach that we've already taken. Imagine if it was completely different, how much we would have to remember. So it's actually, we've got some very fortunate similarities between the male and female head that we can certainly take advantage of. The differences are truly just minor ones at the end of the day anyway. Once we've got the axes established, we will then draw in a horizontal guideline that wraps around the belly of the sphere. And I know we replaced in the vertical guideline first to last time around with the male head. But it really doesn't matter the order of events and how they unfolded this point. You can use whatever you can place down, whatever guideline you want around the sphere to begin with. In fact. Next we'll draw in the vertical guideline that will represent the front of the face and thus the rotation of the head and the direction it's looking in. And see there that it's curving along the surface of the sphere. That's what we want. Remember, the side planes, health, how do we figure out how wide they are going to be? Where we look at the amount of space we've got on the far side of the face as opposed to the side of the face that's closest to us. Then we simply bring our side plane out to the point where we've got an equal amount of space visually on either side of the face here. Now sometimes you are going to want to chop off some of the far side of the face as well. Because in this example, the three-quarter view of the head is actually looking a little more toward us that in the previous example with a male head. So there'll be a few changes here, but that's not a bad thing actually because of all, we'll see some of what those minor differences consist of. This particular demonstration. Alright, great. Let's get rid of some of those off cuts. Now. Take care of these two little dots. We don't need those anymore. Then we will drop down the middle of the face to the chin, establishing the length of the overall head. Remember that if your head's coming out way too long, either measure them out properly using the two-thirds method and then dropping it down one more third from the cranium. Or just simply if you find, if you find that your heads are just too long in general, didn't really pay attention to that and remain conscious of it. So the next time around you can intentionally make sure that they don't drop down so far. Hey, getting the length of the face right is pretty darn important. So it's something to certainly pay attention to. Once we've got the chin drawn in there though, it is now time to get the jaw line established. Now the jaw line on a lady or female character is going to be more curvaceous and softer looking. Won't be as chiseled and won't be as square as what we've seen on our male head. And the chin also wouldn't be as broad either. So this applies no matter what if you were looking at the female and male head in, these differences will still be maintained. All right, so we're very lightly outline the far side of the jaw as well. The side of the face that's furthest away from us. See that I've just I've tried to indicate what might appear to be either the cheek or the corner of the opposite side of the jaw or both. And that's sometimes I don't even know what's going on. I just kinda drop down a line that looks good and then read you get later on. Alright, once I've got the basic setup for my foundation's ready to roll. It's time to blot out the facial feature placement. So I'm going to take the distance between the brow line and the chin. And I'm going to divide it in half where the nose should be positioned. Then I'll take the distance between the nose and the chin and divide that into thirds. So at this point you should be memorizing the proportions of the face Quite, quite clearly without any effort because I'm repeating it a lot and it's probably may even be annoying you a little bit that I'm repeating it so much. But I think that it's worth repeating because it helps you to remember and it means that you won't really have to think about it. It'll be like replaying inside your mind. Hopefully every time you sit down to draw a head, it'll make it much easier to end up with a structurally sound head that's with the correct proportions. That's the, that's the idea anyway. Next up we're going to draw in the ears. Say it with me. Yes, the ears, the top of the ears are going to align with the brown. Bottom of the ears are going to align with what? Yes. The nose. That's right. Okay, cool. I should, I should give you all a quiz at the end of this lesson on proportions. I'm sure you'll pass with flying colors, no doubt. Next up, we're going to place in the eyes, they sit at the midway point of the overall length of the face. So make sure that they're sitting in the middle of your head. They look like they're too far up. They look like they're too far down. It probably means you have them positioned them properly. Hey, great. Next, lay in the hairline and will establish the facial planes, at least the basic ones. So we've got apply a plane division that will run in a diagonal trajectory down from the brow line to the eyeline. Do the same thing on the opposite side as well. Then we'll draw in a division that will separate the front of the face from the side of the face. And we'll do that on both sides of the head. Actually. If you are working digitally, become friends with the undo button. I'm very good friends with the undo button. I I hit it all the time. You don't have to get it right every single time. I know some people advocate for trying to hit that Undo button as little time as possible, but I've already mentioned before, I don't think that necessarily leads to the best result. I think you have to read, tweak and modify things as you go in order to achieve most optimal presentation possible. That's just my philosophy though every artist has this. Alright, next up, let's draw in the neck related character, we are going to be drawing a much thinner neck, sleek and neck. That makes her look generally elegant and very feminine. Remember, this could very well be a male character that we're drawing here, just with a few more feminine characteristics and that would totally be fun. And is it spiderman is pretty buff looking character anyway, but I could imagine him being a younger Peter Parker being drawn in this very much the same way. A teenager, whether male or female, might be drawn in this way too. So again, just things to keep in mind. Usually the oldest someone gets, the more defined the anatomy will become across their face until it starts to get into old age where all of that anatomy becomes wrinkly and very sunken eyes at that point, which also has its place as well depending on the age of your character. But we've got the foundation for our female head. Now established. Next up, let's start placing down the facial features. And again, since we've got this foundational model ready to roll, it's a, we don't have to think about the proportions anymore. We can just start drawing in the facial features, focusing on their shape. And and trying to get that right. Yeah, then just taking it one step at a time, optimizes the process and helps us to distribute our mental RAM evenly without exhausting ourselves, without overwhelming ourselves. So we're going to draw out the outline of the eyes here. You'll notice that I'm working very lightly. Far I will have slightly less width. The eye that's closest to us. But this head is looking a little more toward us at this, in this angle. So that's not a probably a complete three-quarter angle, but it's close to it. The bit of a halfway a crossing between the front view and a three-quarter view, I would say. Once we've got the outline of our eyes drawn in, it's time to really lay on that mass car DRA, mascara thicken up those eyelashes. Now it depends, sometimes I'll draw a female characters that don't have a whole lot of mess scour or very thick eyelashes at all. And other times I'll really push the thickness of the eyelashes two crore and attention. You can add a lot of different kind of fashion variables to the design of your character in order to get them to stand out, in order to add to their culture or whatever your story consists of and however your character fits into it. No makeup is one of the ways in which we express ourselves as human beings to dress is one of the ways in which we express ourselves as certainly in order to get your characters expressing who they are. Given that we're working with a visual medium, it only makes sense to give thought to such things. That's the fun part, right? Especially when you get to design your own characters, will do the same thing on either side. Once again, I'm outlining the shape of the eyelashes before filling them in. So not just scribbling them in there. I'm being neat with it. Don't scribble. Okay, we don't wanna be scribbling. We want to keep our lines nice and tight. We want to make our lines purposeful. Laying them down onto the page with energy and gesture. It's intention. Don't make your lines make, make them strong. And what you'll find is that you're drawing really comes together in a much more solid way. Beautiful. We've got some gorgeous looking eyes here. You'll notice that I'm splitting off some eyelashes from the main shape that I had previously established. Sometimes you wanna do that just to give the eyelashes are much Brush your appearance. You can see the significant difference between the eyes of the male, in the eyes of the female here. Really the only difference is, is that the female has bigger eyelashes and slightly wider eyes. Open eyes, I guess. Next up we are going to placing the top eyelid. Indicate underside ridge of the brow and where it meets the way the top eyelid actually folds in underneath the upper edge of the eye socket. Once again, I would check with your colorist or you can even shade it in yourself. The eye shadow you might add to this region of the eyes. Before we jump onto the eyebrows, Let's actually draw in the iris and the pupil. Start out with the outline of the iris. The pupil adding some shininess, a bit of a reflection in the eye just to get that wet appearance. Wonderful. Next up, we'll lay in a shape, a very basic shape for the eyebrows. And remember that on a female character, the eyebrows are going to sit slightly higher than on a male character. They also won't be as bold. There'll be a bit more thin as well. And as you practice this, what you'll notice is your liner will loosen up inevitably. But it'll be precise. And that's really the place that you want to get to. Because as your linework loosens up, but it becomes more precise, you'll find that it has more energy in it. And it's that energy that we want to capture most. That's what makes a drawing look alive. So it's going to capture people's intention, attention and engage them. So it's going to stop them in their tracks. So many artworks they lack that life to it. And if you want yours to have life to it, you've got to try to get to a point where you become completely comfortable drawing this stuff. You're always going to think about it. You're always going to make important considerations with your art. I think that ultimately you will find yourself in a place at some point if you really stick with it, where you become less stressed about it. You're not guessing as much. You're really just rather than thinking about getting it right and what the destination is going to look like. You'd just be become completely submerged within the process. And you're really along for the ride, you're really there for the journey. And that's great. You almost, at some point you almost get thrust into a trance when you really find that you're enjoying what it is you're doing. You're not thinking about it. You're just you're watching it come together before you. It's a fantastic feeling. And in the beginning it's a hard place to arrive at. I know it took me a long time to get to that point because I was always a perfectionist, always being my worst critic. And really being hard on myself as, as far as not being satisfied with what I was able to come up with, I was always looking for that next point of perfection. And honestly that can be a good thing that can serve you to an extent. But certainly if you're trying to be a perfectionist for too long, it can hold you back after awhile from your true potential. So we've got the eyebrows drawn in. We've got the eye is established. Now let's go ahead and lay in the nose. Now you'll notice that we gave the bridge of the nose what our mail carriers are very hard edge. We're not going to do that so much on our female character. Because again, that would cause her nose to look to find we don't want that. And once again, we're going to drop it just below the nose line here just a bit. And also we're going to keep in mind that rather than drawing it in the middle here, like I was just about to do. We want to think about the trajectory of the noise. End. It's blocked formation. And so the point of the nose, the tip of the nose would actually probably be about here. Okay, so we'll lay in the base of the nose there with a slightly darker outline. Then we'll draw in the nostril opening, which will sit about there. And you might see an indication of the other nostril openings on the opposite side of the nose. But it'll only be very small. Most of the nodes will actually obscure the opposite side of the opposite nostril, our side of the face. And once we've got the tip of the nose is drawn in, what we can do is we can define the outline of the tip of the nose on the dark side. And we'll leave it at that. And we'll add in a little line here just to show the recession of the nose bulb and where it meets the outside of the nostril, that little corner section. And then we'll customize will sculpt out the shape of the noise here with the eraser. Tweaking it ever so slightly. I like to try to give my noses angular shapes sometimes. Really depends on the style that you're going for and how you interpret these facial features, honestly, that's how I like to do it. And sometimes I'll change things up as well. Like I think this is a slightly different no shape to the shape that I gave the male nose. I'm going to keep on tweaking it here just for a moment. Again, it's not working for me, so I'm gonna get rid of it altogether and redraw it back in. I think that's a little better. Leave it at that. Now let's draw an ellipse. So we'll start with the middle of the lips. Again, dropping them down, dipping the middle of ellipse down into the at least the top lip, into the bottom lip. Drawing it out into the corners of the mouth, going to sit just shorter, the midway point of the eyes. Then we'll draw in the top lip. Again still with a fairly broken outline at this point until we draw in some lipstick or render in some lipstick rather. And we'll lay in a darker outline for the base of the bottom lip, where we would see some darker shadows collect in that region. Then the little indentation just underneath the bottom lip where it leads into the top of the chin. Now let's go ahead and add in some reflections to the lips and render them out just a little bit. Adding a darker tone that will add some contrast to the lips and just darken them up. Again. Contrast typically is going to be a beauty factor within a face. The more contrast there is, the more aesthetically pleasing that face will appear to be. I don't know why that would be, but it seems to certainly be the case where they're being comic book art or in reality. That's what beards do on men, is they add contrast to the face. They helped to shape the jaw. B, it is like a man's makeup. Okay, so we've got the outside shape of the ear now established. Let's go ahead and now place in the interior cartilage of the ear. Leading this big Y shaped piece of cartilage down into the bottom region and then back up to cover the ear Hall. Pushing the top of the Y-shaped piece of cartilage to create that little recession. And that pretty much wraps up the facial features for the female head. You'll notice that of course we can't see the opposite, opposite ear on the far side of the head because it's being completely obscured and hidden. On this angle. And less the ears were really, really big and sticking all the way out. You simply just wouldn't be able to see it. Now all that's left to do is to define the outline on the outside of the face. And once again, we'll start with the underside plane of the brow, bringing that in to the eye, and then back out again to the cheekbone area. We've got a few options here. If we were to just go ahead and bring the cheekbone in like that, well, It's going to look too masculine, so we don't wanna do that. Instead, what we wanna do is very softly indicate the cheekbone. And then lead that in. Sadly, the side of the jaw. Noun, and then down into the chin area and the surrounding muscle that wraps around the outside of the mouth. And then didn't run a base of it, the chin. It's getting a bit tongue-tied there. We have a drink of water, heating that outline in around the base of the chin. And then up into the sides of the jaw. Us a nice defined representation of the jaw line. Once again, if you look at the corners of the jaw, It's not completely curved. There is some fairly hard lines there, but rather than just being square, I have tried to soften up to an extent. Sometimes if you round everything out, even on a female character, he can start to steal some of the energy away from the line, so just be wary of that, keep it in mind. Next up. We'll lay in an outline for the head. And I'm going to keep the forehead. And where it leads into the upper region of the brow. Barely rounded, slight little dip. As they joined together. Once more, I'm trying to make this line as clean and as defined in well-polished as possible. I mean, I could make it more polished. I could just create a new layer and go riding over the top to really make these lines super, super sharp, but that's unnecessary for the demonstration. So you can repeat these head studies over and over again until he could become completely comfortable drawing the standard views. And not just being, not just copying what I've done here, either being able to do it on your own. So try to get to that point, right? Practice these standard head views throughout the coming week, throughout the coming weeks if needed. And really try to get a handle on them. Learn them off by heart as if you're learning a script for a play. And that'll be very important in the long run, especially when we start to move into the more difficult views of the head you want to have underpinning foundational knowledge of not just the basic structure, but also these primary viewpoints so that you're familiar with the proportions. And once again, the reason that you want to be so familiar with them is because when it comes to foreshortening, those proportions are still going to be intact, but you'll need to be able to foreshortened than the scale. So they'll still be relatively correct, just they will be skewed in lots of different ways. But nonetheless, that does complete our demonstration for the three-quarter views of the male and the female head. 8. Assignment: Hey, thanks for watching. I hope you enjoyed the class and that you've got a ton of value out of it. Now, maybe you've been following along and in front of you. You've drawn up a front side and three-quarter view of the male and female head. And I applaud you for that. You've really applied yourself throughout this class and hopefully you're seeing at least some results from going through these lessons. But what's really going to hit all the information of imparted to you home is repetition and practice. So for the assignment of this class, even though you've possibly already gone through the lessons and put pencil to paper, is I'd like you to rinse and repeat the process because that's what's going to build your confidence. And it's also going to give you unconscious competence. In other words, hopefully, at some point after enough mileage, you'll be able to nail the proportions, nail the foundations, and get those facial features placed onto the head accurately without even thinking about it. It's just like memorizing a script. It's like writing words, learning how to write for the first time. After awhile, you don't even have to consciously think about it. Well, drawing works in very much the same way. So that's your assignment for this class. Start filling up your sketch book, dedicate entire pages to the front side and three-quarter views of the male and female head. And what you are going to find is that it becomes easier and easier and easier for you to the point where you don't even have to consciously think about it anymore. Not to mention, the end result is going to look better and better and better. That is my wish to you and what I really want you to get out of this class. So good luck and until next time, keep drawing.