Edgy Stitch Kit: 8 Techniques to Create Standout Knit Edges | Brandi Cheyenne Harper | Skillshare
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Edgy Stitch Kit: 8 Techniques to Create Standout Knit Edges

teacher avatar Brandi Cheyenne Harper

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      1:39

    • 2.

      Getting Started

      2:58

    • 3.

      Slip Stitch Edge

      5:24

    • 4.

      I Cord: Cast On

      12:52

    • 5.

      I Cord: Selvedge

      7:50

    • 6.

      I Cord: Bind Off

      10:07

    • 7.

      Tubular: Cast on

      10:45

    • 8.

      Tubular: Bind off

      7:53

    • 9.

      Knit Hem: Cast On

      10:56

    • 10.

      Knit Hem: Bind Off

      10:43

    • 11.

      Final Thoughts

      1:11

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About This Class

Take your knitting creations from homemade to a finished product with a handcrafted feel with these beautiful knit edge techniques. 

A simple cup of hot tea, a mid-afternoon nap and knitting with a ball of bulky cotton yarn are all ways Brandi Cheyenne Harper brings rest, creativity and joy into her daily life. As a knitting guide and interdisciplinary artist, Brandi first connected with knitting as a way to build her wardrobe but soon discovered it to be a meditative art that served as proof that she could create anything she set her mind to. 

As a professional knitter with a love for modern, refined designs, Brandi will guide you through some of her favorite ways to start and finish a knitted piece and teach you how to incorporate her tried and true techniques into your work. Crafted to help you elevate your knitted creations, you’ll learn simple knitting edge methods to finish projects that are polished and beautiful.

With Brandi as your knitting guide, you’ll:

  • Knit decorative and functional edges using the slip stitch, i cord, tubular and knit hem techniques
  • Learn how to seamlessly move from the edges into the rest of your piece
  • Discover what needle size and which stitches work best with each edge technique
  • Incorporate these edge styles into your own work 
  • Make any project look neater and more modern with professional-level finishing touches

Plus, Brandi provides a downloadable worksheet with an in-depth explanation of each knit edge technique, which you can come back to again and again.

Whether you already have a few handmade knit pieces in your closet or you just started your knitting journey, you’ll leave this class knowing how to get past common knit edge roadblocks, and add beautiful finishes to your knitting repertoire. 

Beginner knitters who have already experimented with knitting scarves and blankets or intermediate knitters looking to level up their skills will be the best fit for this class. You’ll need a crochet hook, which is the same mm size as your knitting needle, a pair of double pointed needles, a standard size set of circular needles (US 6, 8, 10.5, 15) with 16 or 24 inch length, bundles of yarn, a tapestry needle and a pair of scissors. To continue learning about knitting, explore Brandi’s full Knitting Learning Path

Meet Your Teacher


My name is Brandi Cheyenne Harper. I am an interdisciplinary artist and knitting guide living in Brooklyn, NY. My pronouns are she, her, and they. Cancer sun, Pisces rising, Cancer moon. I get crabby without solitude. I’m loyal and love being home. My love language is just let me love on you, cook you nourishing meals you’ll be surprised are vegetarian, and plan a delicious time for us.

Through my work, I promote ease, creativity, and nourishing the simple joys of everyday life. I write books on how to create protective, futurist handmade knits informed by Black, queer, and feminist theory. My hope is to empower you to build the most joyous and restful life of your imagination, using knitting as the gateway for healing and community connection.

See full profile

Level: Intermediate

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Very often we fast forward through the process, through the details to the finished product. But there's so much beauty in the tiny details in the small actions that we take not only in our knitting practice, but in our life. I'm Brandi Cheyenne Harper. I made a knitting guide and artists living in Brooklyn, New York. You might have seen my name in magazines. You might have seen me on Instagram dancing on a Real, you might have picked up my book at your local yarn shop. I want things to look polished, I want things to look neat, and a lot of that lies in the finishing and how your edges look and how they come together. I'm really excited to share those techniques because I've spent so much of my career figuring out how to get those really beautiful neat edges that also look really modern and really simple. Today we're going to start with a slip stitch edge, which is really beginner friendly edge. Then we're going to look at the I-chord edging. We're going to look at I-cord cast on, I-cord selvedge, I-cord bind off. Then we're going to look at tubular cast on, tubular bind off, and then we're going to dive into the knit hem and the knit bind off. This class is really perfect for beginners who are just learning how to maybe knit scarves or blankets, or really simple hats, and you're looking for level of great knitting to separate your work from like that homemade work to their handmade work. Time to get rid of those ragged edges. Let's get started. 2. Getting Started: To get started, you don't really need much, just a willingness to mess up and a few tools that you already have in your stash. I want to encourage you to use what you have to work through these swatches. Grab the worksheet down in the class resources page, and just follow along. Some basic tools you're definitely going to need, which you might need to purchase, is a crochet hook. We're going to use a crochet hook to learn a provisional cast on that will help us create I-cord cast on edge. You definitely want to use the same crochet hook millimeter size as your knitting needle. Let's say you know you want to use US 15 knitting needles as your main swatching needle, then you want a 10 millimeter crochet hook as a compliment to your 10 millimeter US 15 needles. If you want to swatch with a US 6 for a millimeter needle, then you're going to want a four millimeter crochet hook, which I believe is a G. Then you're going to need some double pointed needles because we definitely need specifically double pointed needles for the I-cord cast on to make an I-cord. You're going to learn a lot with these two needles here. Same thing, if you're using a US 15 needle for your main body of your swatch, for your I-cord cast on, you want maybe to grab some US 15 double pointed needles. I personally never use straight needles ever. Straight needles are basically knitting needles that have a little stopper at the end, is the traditional needles that you see people just knitting on the train and they're swinging their arms about. I don't use those needles at all. I don't even have a pair. I always use circular needles. If I'm going to knit a scarf or a blanket, I use circular needles often because they're just more versatile. I could spend $20 on a pair of needles. It's an investment for some of us. I can use these needles so many different ways. If you have to pick up a pair of needles, I would say pick up a circular and a size that's really common in knitting it's US 6, US 8, US 10.5, and US 15. Some of your most commonly used needles and I will get maybe a 16 and circular, 24 and circular have those handy or trick needles if you prefer. You're also going to need some little bundles of yarn, you don't need a lot. Grab your scrap, use what you have. I will break into any new balls to swatch these techniques. This is about just practicing and getting some little samples for your future reference. Then I have a tapestry needle for weaving it ends, and also sewing a really simple seam for I-cord bind off, which we're going to need that, and a pair of scissors. This is basically all you need to get started. Grab some scrap yarn, grab some needles, grab the class worksheet down in the resource panel below. I'll see you in the next lesson, the slip stitch edge. 3. Slip Stitch Edge: First we're going to learn a really basic edge. It's the slip stitch edge, and I love this salvage edge that you can add to the last stitch of every row or the first stitch of every row. It's so beautiful when combined with garter stitch. This is garter stitch, is the stitch you'll learn when you learn how to knit. It's knitting all your stitches, knitting all your rows when you're knitting a flat scarf. Garter stitch can sometimes look really loose on the edge is very subtle, but we can get rid of that looseness in a really simple way. I'm going to show you, this is a really basic scarf with that slip stitch edge. I want to give you just another way to look at it, but you can see how it looks really tight. If I stretch it, it doesn't stretch anymore. It just looks really good. It's very clean. I want to show you how to go about creating this really beautiful, neat edge on garter stitch specifically, especially if you're a new knitter. This is going to help neaten up your scarves, your blankets, your towels, and tighten things up a little bit. I have cast it on nine stitches. I'm using some double pointed needles to swatch. You can use circular needles, you can use straight needles, you can use whatever you like for this specific edge, I'm just going to use my double pointed needles. Garter stitch is knit every row, knit every stitch. When you are knitting your first row, your foundation row is just going to be a basic knit row. I'm just going to go ahead and knit my first row. I like nine stitches, because this is not a gauge swatch. This is about practicing my edges so you can use any number of stitches that works for you. I'm using nine because it fits perfectly on my double pointed needles and it's enough where I can see it and I get a good feel for what it's going to look like in a larger piece. I have my first row works. Now to incorporate this edge into an existing pattern or into your own design work, you're going to want to slip the first stitch of every single row knit wise. If I were just to knit this row and just keep garter stitch just with no special edge, this is what that first stitch will look like. I would go into my stitch, I knit it, and then I knit the next stitch like that. It will look something like this. If I just knit it like I normally would. I'm going to go ahead and take that out, I'm going to show you what that looks like when I slip that stitch instead. Instead of knitting it, I'm going to slip that stitch knit wise. What that means is you want to move the switch over to your right-hand needle as if you were going to knit. You put your needle into your stitch as if to knit, but don't knit it, just slip it off. Then every single time you slip that first stitch, pull it nice and taut, because we really want to create that really beautiful, neat salvage edge on this garter stitch. Then I'm going to knit until I get to my end of my round and now slip the first stitch of that row. I'm going to knit just about maybe an inch or two here so that you can really see what that looks like. Your first knit always going to look a little loose and that's okay because once we slip that first stitch, we're going to pull that tight and then we'll just knit to the end of the row. You can really incorporate this edge in so many different ways. I particularly love this way of slipping the edge when it comes to garter stitch. There's other ways to slip stitches, but this is my preferred method for garter stitch. Just going to do a few more rows, we get a nice little swatch to show you. Now this is a very subtle change. The difference really depend on you and how tight or loose you knit, but it's noticeable. The difference between regular garter stitch edges and slip stitch garter edges. I'm just going to knit just quickly. Here we go. That is a slip stitch edge. So simple, very beginner friendly. If you knit your first scarfs today and you're like my edges are looking wobbly, they're looking not cute, try to slip stitch edge. Is going to neaten it up. is going to tighten it up. It's because we're not knitting, we're basically getting rid of 50% of the rows on that edge. Can remember, we're not knitting it, we're just moving it over. That's why it's tighter on the edge than it is in the body of the work, and why it looks really neat and why it looks really tight, because we're literally just getting rid of one of the rows on the edge. If that makes sense to you, hopefully you'll be able to see it manifest when you practice your own swatch. Go ahead, cast on a few stitches and practice your slip stitch edge. I'll see you in the next class where we're going to talk about the I-cord cast on. 4. I Cord: Cast On: Next, we're going to learn the I-chord Cast On. Now, I absolutely adore this cast on. It takes a lot of effort to start, but it's just beautiful. It's this really incredible edge down here. This is where this piece begins. This is a piece I called the shock collar. It's a pattern that's available on my website. But what I love so much about it is that I'm able to create this really incredible cast on. It looks really finished, really clean. Then I can transition seamlessly into this beautiful I call, salvage, which is our next lesson. But first I'm going to teach you how to do the I-chord cast on. We're going to begin with our provisional cast on. What you need is just some scrap yarn, some yarn that you can throw away after and your crochet hook. I'm going to make a slipknot, which is a very beginner-friendly technique. Most of us learn how to make a slipknot when we learn how to knit, or when we learn how to crochet. Then we want to chain a few stitches because we're going to pick up stitches from our chain. I have my tail, I'm going to throw that to the side and I'm going to wrap the yarn around my hook. I'm just going to use my right hand to pull my crochet hook and let it move easily between those two loops I have on the hook. I'm going to use my thumb and my index finger to control my slipknot, to really have some control over this technique. Then you'll use your hook to pull a loop through the loop on your hook, just like that. That is one chain stitch. If you're new to crochet, this is like learning how to cast on, so it might take some practice. I'm going to wrap my yarn around and I'm going to pull through another loop. You see how I'm using my right hand to guide my hook through and bring it through. It's from this little provisional chain stitch, I'm going to pick up stitches from this chain and I'm going to make an I-chord. It's really fun and that's a whole new technique, it's the second one we're going to learn. Now that I have my three chains stitches because I want to make an I-chord that's three stitches long, I'm all set to go. I just changed a few more for good measure. I only really need three because I want to make a three-stitch I-chord to build my cast on from. Once I have my chain, I'm going to just cut how much tail I need. You just want to give yourself like 8 to 10 inches of tail. Just enough so that it doesn't unravel. Then I'm just going to pull it up. I have my chain all ready to go. This is where you're going to use your double-pointed needles and your main color or your main yarn. I'm going to grab enough to get started. Then this is the front of your chain, and this is the back of your chain. We're going to pick up stitches In the back loops of our crochet chains and we want to pick up three. I'm going to begin at my slipknot end, so it's over here and work my way down. This is my first loop. This is my second loop. This is my third loop. I will say, if you accidentally pick up in another place, it does make things a little more difficult in the end, you'll see why. Just try your best to identify what those back loops look like. I'm going to show you a trick. So here's my back loop. If I want to make sure that that's actually my backup, I'm going to flip it to the side. What you want to see is this V. It's your actual, the front of your chain. If that's obstructed in any way, then you know you're picking up in the wrong place. This really very much looks like a knit stitch. Once I've located my back loop, I'm going to bring my needle underneath the loop, going to give myself about 8 inches of tail. I'm just going to begin picking up stitches in my back loop. Now if you've never picked up stitches, this is a new technique. What you're going to do, is you're going to wrap your yarn around your needle and you just going to pull a loop underneath your chain and you've picked up in it, one stitch. I'm going to do that two more times for a total of three stitches. I'll go underneath my back loop. I'll wrap the yarn around and I'll pull the yarn through. I knit continental. I just wanted to show you what it will look like if you knit English and you throw with your right hand. I'm going to take my needle, go to put it under my back loop, going to wrap that yarn around, then I'm going to pull that loop through. I'm wrapping my yarn around as if I were knitting. Pickup a knit is what this is called. I look at my core. I can easily identify all three of my chain stitches here and I'm all set. To make an I-chord, what you're going to do is you're going to push this through so just to the other end of your needle, what you're going to find is your tail is over on the left-hand side, right over here, and that's exactly what you want. Then I'm going to get my other needle and I'm going to knit those three stitches from my left-hand needle to my right-hand needle. You're going to see your yarn is pulling behind. We're going to knit those three stitches. I'm back at the end of this needle. Now I'm going to repeat that step. I'm going to push my three stitches to the other tip of my needle. I'm going to knit those three stitches and you can see. Look how I was pulling from behind, is what you want. Knitting at I-chord is basically knitting in the round. Because look how we're connecting our last stitch together with our first stitch in our needle. It's like a little chord. It's really cool. I want to cast on nine stitches. I'm just going to keep on going until I have a nice long I-chord. You're going to knit your chord for as long as you want it to be. Your pattern will specify how many rows you need to knit. If you need to count your roles, each little v counts as one row. I have 10 rows. Perfect. The next thing is we're actually going to cast on our stitches. We're going to pick up stitches from my I-chord. You want to pick up stitches in the top half of your first stitch. Now to identify where that is, this is my first stitch, I need to look back here to identify because I want to pick up stitches. I want to pick up the top half of this first stitch and to access it I have to go from behind my yarn. This is where I want to pick up and that's the top half of this first stitch. Once I identify that first loop, I'm going to insert my needle underneath that loop, wrap the yarn around, and pull up a loop through. I'm going to keep on doing that. Here's my next loop. Here's my next one. I'm going to do a few just so you can really see what that's supposed to look like on the right side. This is considered the right side, although it can be whatever you want it to be, but generally in my patterns, we'll make this the right side because it looks really nice and really clean. What you should see is, here's my third stitch. Look how it was completely unobstructed here. When you look at your thirst, this is one, two, three, it's completely unobstructed. If forever reason you make a mistake and you pick up maybe in the wrong place, you'll be able to see it really clearly here. You might not necessarily know exactly what went wrong, but you'll know something went wrong, in which case, you can always just take it out, back out and rip it out and start again. I'm going to go ahead and just pick up all of my stitches until I get to the last two rows of my I-chord. Here's one row, here's another. The reason why you want to get to those last two rows is because you're going to actually lose those two rows when you remove your provisional cast on and you're going to see what I mean right now. We want that beautiful three stitches on our salvage edge. When I say salvage edge, I'm talking about edges that are right at the border of a knitted garment. I want to have that same beautiful edge that I have on this side, on this side. That's why we started with the provisional cast on. So to take it all, I'm going to just, here's the loop. Here's my last loop. Here's my yarn. If you pull it, you'll be able to see it's moving. I'm going to take that out. Then I'm just going to pull it out. When you get to this point, you're going to find that you have to un-weave the scrap yarn, which is why it's helpful to use a contrasting colors so you can easily just pull out your loops. Be gentle here don't make any fast movements because you don't want to drop your stitches. It can happen. It happens to me. It's possible. If you are gently working with your edges, you won't lose them, but it can happen. It will sometimes. The key now is to get those three stitches on the needle. See how the yarn is coming out of this last stitch, I like to pull that. It's completely optional. You do not have to do this. You can put these stitches on the needle with that there, but I personally like to remove it. But if you're nervous about dropping stitches or something, you don't have to do it. I'm going to pull that tail to the back. I have my working yarn. I'm going to bring my working yarn to the front. Then I'm going to place those stitches on the needle. I'm going to tell you in the next lesson, why we're bringing that yarn to the front and you'll see why. I want to put these stitches on the needle with the pro side facing. Now, you can't really easily see pro-stitches here. Pro-stitches are basically stitches that have a little bump at the bottom of the stitch. I know that this is my pearl side, and I could use that as my guide to putting the other stitches on the needle. It's easy to show you this. I'm just going to show you this instead of rather than talk you through it. To get your stitches on the needle, you're going to bring your yarn to the front. Then I'm going to start with this first stitch. I'm going to put it on my needle. I want to put it on, let's see, like that. I'm going to gently get my tail out of my way. I'm going to go from behind. We're going from behind to pick the stitch up because we want to make sure that it's not twisted. Then the same thing is going to happen with this last stitch. Figuring out how to get this last stitch on the needle can be a little confusing if knitting is very new to you. But basically, what you want to do is you want to put the needle in such a way that you have a little cross at the bottom of the stitch and then you're all set up to transition into your salvage edge. This is the I-cord cast on. I absolutely love it. Takes a lot of work as you can see. This is worth the effort. Go ahead and grab some scrap yarn, grab your crochet hook, practice the I-chord cast on, and meet me in the next lesson, where I'm going to show you how to transition from the I-chord cast on into the I-chord salvage edge. 5. I Cord: Selvedge: We've just learned our I-Cord cast on and now we're going to figure out how to transition seamlessly into I-Cord salvage. The I-Cord cast on pretty much sets us up with three stitches on each end to work at I-Cord selvage and I love how beautiful the transition is. In order to work the I-Cord selvage, I'm going to knit the first three stitches of every row and slip the last three stitches of every row with the yarn in front. That's why when we're doing the I-Cord cast on. We need it to have this yarn in front because it will set us up for our first row where we're just going to knit three. This is a very basic beginner friendly stitch for your edge. I'm going to work garter stitch, so I'm just going to knit till I get to my last three stitches with my yarn in front. I'm just going to bring my yarn right to the front and I'm going to slip those three stitches pro wise. I'm slipping it pro wise, meaning going down in front as if I were to parole because I'm going to make sure I don't twist those stitches and I'm going to keep them in the correct orientation. I'm slipping them over and I have my yarn in front. I'm going to turn, and I'm going to repeat that same row, knitting the first three stitches of every row. You can work whatever pattern around this selvage. I'm just going to knit every single row, every single stitch between my I-Cord selvage and just slip the last three stitches of my row. That's going to work this really quickly until I get a nice little sample to show you what it's supposed to look like. Now, the one thing to keep in mind when you're working to selvage edges, it takes an inch or two to really see it form. One of the most commonly asked questions or concerns and interests have with this edge is that they don't see it yet. It's because it takes a little bit a while to really see it. When you look at it here, you're like, I don't say anything. It looks terrible. Give it a few rows. Another one is people will say, well, it looks loose to tighten up this edge and you find that it's really loose and it's not coming together for you. Knit the first stitch and then pull that stitch really tight. What you'll see is like the yarn will tighten back there for you. Remember, we're basically knitting in the round on our edge. You can knit that first stitch really tight. It'll help to bring the cord together a lot tighter. Then I can repeat that same thing that too the last three or work your stitch pattern as instructed in your pattern till you get to your last three stitches. Let's do two more rows and I think you'll be able to really see how beautifully it comes together. If you wanted to incorporate the selvage into an existing pattern, you need an additional 4-6 stitches. You can work the I-Cord selvage edge with two stitches on each end or three stitches on each end. You can technically do as many stitches as you like, but then it won't be a cord. If you add four stitches, it's not going to look like a rounded cord, not with two stitches either, but with two stitches, it just looks really finished, really refined. I wouldn't go anywhere above four, but I generally use two to three. I say additional stitches because the I-Cord cast on you can see it doesn't add. It adds sometimes maybe a quarter of an inch to your fabric. If your patterns says you need 100 stitches, I would add an additional four or six stitches to make it 104, 106. Then I'd work my I-Cord selvage. I wouldn't necessarily try and incorporate my I-Cord selvage into an existing hundred stitches because you want to make sure that your piece is big enough and that you're following your pattern as closely as possible. I-Cord selvages don't contribute significantly to the width so much that it's going to make it enormous and it can't fit you, but it can really shrink your piece in a way that makes your piece too small, if that makes sense. I'm going to go ahead and just knit one or maybe two more rows. I think you'll be able to see what it looks like. I'm going to end with a right side row. The right side row can be whatever you want it to be. I personally like this as my right side row versus this side. Where my tail is my wrong side, according to me, you get to decide. But this is my right side. I'm going to end with a right side row and I think I'm in a good place to stop. This is what you're going to see. It's just so beautiful. I love it. You're going to see your I-Cord cast on. You're going to see that beautiful edge. Look at how it comes together. It is so seamless. You really start to see it come together. You see it took me into two to really see it come together. When I look at it on the other side, same thing. I think it just looks really good. It looks really neat. When I look at this, I'm like, I don't want to call it knit-picky knitter, but anything like that where I see any looseness and I'm again knit. It doesn't look even across the board. I will manually tighten them up so that it's more symmetrical because maybe I was distracted or maybe I knit really loose at that point and that happens sometimes. I'm just going to move some of that looseness into other areas not necessary. But if you're like me, then you want to find a solution for that and there is your solution. Now we're all set. One thing I do want to show you is this is a very small I-Cord selvage on a yarn that's on a US-aid needle. You can see this is on stock in that stitch. Stock in the stitch has a tendency to curl. I just wanted to show you that this technique will suddenly stop your edges from curling. The bigger the yarn, it will literally get rid of the curl altogether. The smaller the yarn you can see it's still curl in a little bit, but it's so beautiful and it turns out to be like a really nice, neat cord, especially if you're using a smaller yarn. Something that really have fun with if you're using like a sport or a worse the weight yarn selvage that are great to add to your existing patterns and scarves and accessories. So go ahead and practice your I-Cord selvage and meet me in the next lesson, where I'll show you how to do the I-Cord bind off 6. I Cord: Bind Off: It's time to learn the I-Chord Bind Off. Now, the I-Chord Bind Off is basically the opposite of the I-Chord Cast on, at least in the way that it looks. I will introduce an I-Chord Bind Off out of the blue. I wouldn't have some other edge and then I'm going to say, I'm going to use the I-Chord Bind Off. I always use the I-Chord Bind Off as a decorative finish to an I-Chord salvage, but you can play around with it, see what you like. I personally don't like the way it looks. Let's say I'm knitting a scarf and I'm knitting all of my stitches. All of a sudden I'm like, you know what, I'm just going to do the I-Chord Bind Off the edges and the way it comes together, it doesn't look finished. This class is all about beautiful, clean, modern, almost invisible edges. I recommend transitioning out of salvage into I-Chord Bind Off. I'm going to do that. I'm going to knit the first two stitches of my row. Then I'm going to slip the next stitch, my last stitch of my I-Chord as if to knit. Going to go and net wise, which means just like that. Then I'm going to drop it off the needle. Then I'm going to knit my next stitch. Then I'm going to spass the slip stitch over like that. I've just bounced off one stitch. In order to bind off my next one, you're going to take your stitches from your right-hand needle and move them back to your left-hand needle. Now you want to do this as if to parol, meaning in front this way, if you try and take them off this way is going to twist the stitches. You want to go in from left to right into the front of the stitch and move them over. Then I'm going to repeat that same row again. Going to knit the first two stitches. Going to slip the next stitch as if to net, net one past the slip stitch over. I'm going to take my left hand needle, go from left to right and then drop that stitch over the top of my right-hand needle, being careful not to drop everything, it can happen. Drop that loop off the left-hand needle and I'll be left with that one stitch. I'm going to repeat that row until I get to my last three stitches. Then I'm going to show you how to join those II core edges together really beautifully, very seamlessly. I'm going to just move these back over to my left-hand needle. It two, slip one, knit one, pass slip stitch over. In that look like I split my yarn their happens when you're dealing with really plied yarn, meaning yarn that has multiple strands held together or loosely spun yarn. This yarn is supposed to be careful. You're going to see it really starts to come together on your right side, you see it really curve in and starts to come off. What I'm going to do is I'm just going to finish it off until I get to my last three stitches and move a little faster. Now that we are at our last three stitches, how are we going to join this together? Now, I'm going to preface this technique with a little caution. We're going to use a technique called Kitchener stitch. This is an intermediate to an experienced seeming technique that is well worth the effort to learn. You're never going to memorize it after the first two or three times. It took me years to memorize it and that was after frequent use. But I'm going to show you why it's so beautiful. We're going to go ahead and cut ourselves about 10 ages of tail. We want to give ourselves enough to solve the stitches together and enough to weave in our end. Kitchener stitches basically knitting with a tapestry needle. I love it. It's so nice. What you're going to do is you're going to have your wrong sides facing you. You're wrong sides for this technique is your pro side. It's these rows here, your net sides where you see the braid it looks are your right side. I'm going to make it so that my prosite are facing each other like that. You can see my net sides on both sides like that. You might knits here and I see my knits here. I'm going to thread my needle. The first thing I want to do is I want to join the first two stitches together, the one on the back needle and the one on the front needle. The first stitch I'm going to go into, I'm going to go in as if to pro and leave it on my needle. I'm going to go into the stitch on the back needle. I'm going to go into that one as if to knit and leave it on the needle. I'm going to go into this first stitch again as if to knit and drop it off the needle. Set up my second stitch, go into it as if to Pearl. Then I'm going to go into the backstitch a second time as of two pro drop it off the needle and get my next stitch started going into it as of to knit. Second stitch on this needle as if to knit. Get my next stitch started as of to pro. Go into this next stitch a second time as if to pro. This next stitch, get it started as if to knit. Then into this last it a second time as if to knit drop it off the needle into this back stitch a second time as of to pro and drop it off the needle. I have that memorized now like that motion of as if to knit as if to pro drop it off. That's something that took, that took me some time to memorize. I would say anytime you need to work Kitchener stitch, revisit this little lesson. It's not the easiest technique for sure because not as intuitive as a lot of other techniques, but the finishes just incredible. It's worth it. Now that I have taken my stitches off my needle, you're going to look like that looks terrible. I need to tighten it up. I'm just going to just look and see where it's loose and I'm going to pull it tight. You can do this as you're working your stitches off the needle. But I personally like to go in after the fact and knit in and out manually with my tapestry needle and it's going to just tighten it up here. Take your time. Find out where the looseness says, find out where it's giving and just pull. This little extra details, make a huge difference. We could take just a few minutes to appreciate what feels like the tediousness of what I'm doing right now. I just know that I'll look at it later and said, I did that and I took my time. It looks good. I'm going to just go ahead and quickly move this tail to the wrong side because I want to weave this end on the wrong side of my work right now is landing on my right side of my work. In order to move that behind, going to thread my needle, and then just drop that tail end somewhere back there. It doesn't really matter just as close to the tail as possible. That is the I-Chord Bind Off. You might say, well pretty, it's not really perfectly shaped. [LAUGHTER] Looking off. It generally will look like this. The magic happens when you block this swatch, when you block the scarf, when you block this blanket, if you incorporate II chord edges all the way around the piece, knowing that there's a lot of room to stretch into pool. When I watched this and I take it out of the water, if I want to be more square. I'm going to go ahead and just manually create that square look. Already you see how much there is. You see I have so much power to make changes after the fact. There we go. You can shape it as you like. You can have it be a little more square, you can have it be a little more rounded and that's something that you're going to maneuver and you're blocking process. Go ahead and practice your I-Chord Bind Off. In the next lesson, we're going to tackle the tubular casts on 7. Tubular: Cast on: Now it's time to tackle the tubular cast-on. Top three techniques in all of knitting, this is in my top three. I love this cast-on so much. What it creates is this really beautiful, rounded edge, very clean, very professional-looking. This is a sweater that I designed in collaboration with Purl Soho, and I started it with the tubular cast-on. A few things to know about tubular cast-on, it isn't easy. I rarely say this about many techniques because I think I don't want to scare people, but I would say go into this with the expectation that you're going to rip it out three times before you get it, just accept it, and know that once you do get it, it's going to look gorgeous. The first thing you need is just some yarn, it doesn't matter what yearn you use, the one thing that does matter is the needle size you use. This cast-on consists of three steps: Getting your loops on the needle, then there are two following foundation rows. I recommend for those three steps, you use two sizes smaller than your main needle moving forward. If you were using a US 8 for your main body and your pattern or you want to incorporate the tubular cast-on into your work, you're going to want to use US 6 at least because this cast-on does have a tendency to spread and flare and you want to combat that by making it tighter than your main stitch. The first thing we're going to do is we're going to grab ourselves a long tail. There are many different methods to the tubular cast-on, this is one. I like it because it's like one and done. There are other methods that take a little more prep, this one is a little more complicated-looking, but it's actually a little quicker. I need at least three times the length of the piece I'm going to knit in terms of my tail. Let's say I want to make a swatch that's about this big so I need about three times the length of the little square I want to make, and I'm going to give myself about 10 inches more. If you're making an eight scarf and you're like, how much tail do I need? You're going to need at least 24 inches of tail plus, I would say give yourself an additional 10 inches, so you're going to need about 34 inches to incorporate the tubular cast-on into your scarf project; three times the length of the piece you want in it. Once you have your long tail, you want to have your long tail in the back, and you're going to have your ball yarn in the front. I'm going to set up my fingers, use it like a C as if I'm going to touch my eyes here, and I'm going to separate one end of the yarn with my thumb and the other with my index. With my other three fingers, I'm going to hold both strands. I want to use my index finger to secure this loop on the needle. You can make a slip knot, I personally don't use slip knots often in my cast-ons because it's one element of bulk I don't need and I can get rid of it, so this is a way of doing it without the slip knot. I am going to then bring my needle down and remember securing it with your index finger, so this loop doesn't fall off. You're going to go up the loop on your thumb, around the loop on your index, and then under the loop on your thumb, and that's how you create what is called a knit stitch in the tubular cast-on, okay, that's a knit. Then we're going to make a purl stitch. You're going to start doing the opposite direction. You're going to start with your index finger, you are going to go from behind, you're going to go in front of your thumb, and then underneath your index. That's how you create your purl loop on your needle. What you'll see is what looks like a twisted knit and we're going to take care of that in the following row, and you're going to have what looks like a purl, and you'll see this little loop forming at the bottom of the stitch. That is a purl stitch. Now, I'm going to do another knit. In front of the thumb, around the index, under the sun. To create my purl, from behind an index, in front of the thumb, underneath the index. Now, that might not make any sense to you, like what I'm saying. Let me go ahead and be quiet for a second [LAUGHTER] and show you a few just to watch on your own. I'm going to work one knit, one purl, one knit, one purl. That's something to keep in mind with the tubular cast-on, is that is a knit one, purl one foundation that you're creating for that first initial row. The first stitch, for me, is considered a purl because the second one is a knit. It's purl, knit, purl, knit, purl. I'm going to work a knit for my next stitch, so it's 1, 2, 3, to purl, it's 1, 2, 3. I'm going to keep on doing that until I have as many stitches I want. I'm going to work an odd number of stitches, so I'm ending and beginning with a purl stitch, but you can work these two stitches together however you like. You can start with a knit and end with a knit, you could start with a purl and a purl. I would focus on just practicing, understanding how the knit is created and then how the purl is created because then you'll be able to start and begin in any way you like, as long as you know how they're created. Just go ahead and follow the swatch instructions I have in the Resources panel, a little worksheet I call edges and practice it until you feel good about it. Then if you still don't feel good about it, it's very natural, [LAUGHTER] you'll get it like the 100th time. I'm being so serious. It's worth it, but it does take a little bit of effort at first, admittedly. I'm just going to keep on going. I'm going to do one knit and then one purl. I just ended with a purl, and I feel good about that. You can see my tail yarn is in their front and my ball yarn is in the back, and that's what you want to see. I'm going to turn around and I'll already be locked in and ready to go to start my foundation row. You'll see your ball yarn will wrap behind and underneath your tail and you'll be ready to go. For the first foundation row, you're going to knit in the back of all your knits and slip all your purls, and this is what that looks like. I'm going to knit in the back of this loop here. At first, it is always a little loose so you can pull your tail and it'll tighten it up. With your yarn in front, you're going to slip your purls, and you're going to slip them as if two purls so that they don't twist, meaning going down in front of your stitch. Then I'm going to bring my yarn to the back, I'm going to knit in the back loop, and then slip with the yarn in front of my purl. You're going to repeat those two steps until you get to the last stitch. Back loop, slip, back loop, slip. Then when you get to your last loop, it's going to look really wild. It looks so loose, it's totally okay. You're going to knit into the front loop like you normally would. You're going to knit your last stitch but through the front loop, it's how you would normally knit anyway, you're going to knit that last stitch. That locks it in. This is what your first foundation row is going to look like. Once you tighten up that tail, it's just going to look so beautiful. You're going to see your knit and you're going to see what looks like little purls down here at the bottom. The final step is the last foundation row. How you work your salvage edge like this very first stitch really depends on their pattern or what you like. I personally like to slip that first stitch knit-wise and incorporate the slip stitch edge at the beginning of my tubular cast-on because I think it resembles a purl stitch to me, and when I slip it, it just looks really nice and tight, but it's really up to you. I'm going to slip that first stitch edge as if to knit, pull it on, and then I'm going to knit my knits, and again, slip my purls. But this time, I could just knit my stitches like I normally would through the front loop. I'm going to slip this next stitch as if to purl, knit this next stitch, slip this stitch as if to purl, knit this next stitch, and just repeat those two steps until I get to my last stitch. I slip my purl knit, and because I want to keep my slip stitch salvage edge going, I am going to knit that last loop. I personally love to purl that stitch because I think it just looks really nice. [LAUGHTER] But it's up to you, again, how you want to end and begin your tubular cast-on, it really depends on you, it depends on your pattern, but I like the end it the first stitch with a slip stitch edge and the last stitch with a purl one. That is the tubular cast-on. I absolutely love it. I like to transition into one-by-one rib, into brioche stitch, into garter stitch, into stockinette stitch. This edge looks beautiful on so many different stitches. Incorporate it as you like. The one thing to keep in mind if you're incorporating this into your pattern, use whatever needles you want, I just recommend using two sizes smaller than your main needle, and at this point, I would change to my larger needles here. Go ahead and practice your tubular cast-on at least three times and then meet me in the next lesson where we're going to learn the tubular bind-off. 8. Tubular: Bind off: Now we're going to learn the tubular bind off. Now, you can see I've worked a little bit of a swatch here. That tubular cast on is just looking so fantastic. It looks great on both sides. I'm going to show you how to work the tubular bind off, working the first stitch as a knit stitch even though the first stitch is a purl stitch. It will make sense in a second. I need three times the length of the piece I want to sew. It's going to be 1, 2, 3. Plus I'm going to give myself 8-10 inches more for good measure. You can never get it back, but you can always cut it away. I am going to thread my tapestry needle. We want to begin with a knit stitch for this bind off. If your first stitch isn't a knit stitch, the way you would make that happen, and you want to keep the formation, I want to make this the first stitch. What I'm going to do is I'm going to take my tapestry needle, I'm going to go into that second stitch together with the first stitch at the same time, and I'm going to pull both of those loops off the needle. What you're going to see is that first stitch will hide behind the knit stitch that we wanted to be the first stitch. The next stitch we're going to go into is a purl stitch. We're going to go into that stitch knit-wise. We're going to keep it on the needle. I went to my next stitch as if to knit. Now, I have to find a way to connect my first knit stitch with this knit stitch so that it comes together so beautifully this way. You see? The tubular cast on and a tubular bind off are very similar in the way that they look, except the bind off doesn't require any foundation roads. You could just literally just go in and start binding off. I'm going to go into my last knit stitch, that left leg of the stitch. This stitch has two-halves. Here's the right side, here's the left side. I'm going to go into that stitch from right to left, and I'm just going to pick it up with my tapestry needle. Then I'm going to go into my next knit stitch as if to purl, and I'm going to pull the loop through. Then I'm going to go back to my purl stitch. I'm going to go into it as if to purl, and I'm going to drop that stitch off the needle and pull it through. I'm going to go into this next stitch as if to knit, and drop it off the needle. Then begin my next stitch, and go into it as if to knit. The key to a successful tubular bind off is knowing this, you have to go into a stitch twice before it's officially bound off. If you go into a stitch one time, it's not officially bound off yet, you have to go into it twice. Another thing to remember is, the first time you go into your purl stitch every time, you're going to go into as if to knit always. That's something easy to remember is like, okay, if I see a purl the first time I go into it, it's going to be a knit always. When I go into a knit stitch, the first time I go into it, it's always going to be a purl. It's the opposite, always. The second time I go into my purl, it's going to be a purl, always. The second time I go into a knit stitch, I'm going to go into it knit wise, always. Once you get those patterns memorized, you'll find that tubular bind off is so easy for you. Let's see how that looks when we have those notes in mind. I went into it the first time. What do we do when we go into a purl stitch the first time? We go into it knit wise. The second time is going to be a purl. I've gone into it knit wise, boom, it's great. Now I have to take care of joining this last knit stitch with this next next stitch. You go into the left half of the stitch, and then you're going to go into that next knit stitch for the first time as if to purl, and you're going to keep it on the needle. I'm going to go into that stitch for the second time, it's a purl, as if to purl. These little notes are in the worksheet, so hopefully you're following along and it's making a little more sense to you. I've dropped that off because I've went into it twice already. Then I'm going to drop off my knit stitch, and get my purl stitch started. You're always going to go into a stitch one time and then move away from it, then come back to it a second time, it's bound off. You'll start to see a flow. Now I've gone to my purl for the first time as if to knit, so I have to go back and take care of joining these two knits together. I'm going to go into that left leg as if to purl from right to left, and then into that first knit as if to purl, pull it through, and back into my purl, drop it off the needle. For these last couple of stitches, I'm going to be quiet and I'm going to just let you watch it. You're going to treat that last stitch like all the stitches. You want to go into it twice. It's a purl. What I'm going to do is I'm going to go into that last knit stitch just like that. There's no knit stitch neighboring it to connect it with, so the way you finish this off is you're going to end your purl like you normally would. You went into it knit the first time, as the rule says. I'm going to go into this a second time as if to purl, and I'm going to bind it off. Pull my yarn through. This is what it's going to look like. I'm going to go ahead like I do normally. In most of my projects, is I'll go and neat up anything that looks off to me for whatever reason, the cat jumped on me. I don't have cats, but cats love jumping on people, especially when they have yarn in their hand. [LAUGHTER] For this, I'm just going to dip it into the back so I could weave it into my wrong side at some point. When I'm ready to get rid of it, anything that looks off, I can use my tapestry needle to neaten up. This is what you're going to see. When I look at this, I love it, I know that it has so much stretch. Tubular bind off does have a little stretch. If that's something that you're worried about, you can work your last two rows with a smaller needle size so that those last two rows are really a lot more tighter than what this looks like. But it's such a beautiful finish. If you have to revisit this video, definitely, I encourage you to do so. It does take some time to learn. It can be confusing, you will mess up, and it's okay. Go ahead and practice your tubular bind off. I'll see you in the next lesson where we're going to learn the knit hem. 9. Knit Hem: Cast On: Now we'll learn the knit hem cast on. It's such a beautiful cast on. It is really is. I use it often in my work. It's pretty much like a mainstay in a lot of my designs especially my hat patterns, because I love a really simple hat with a really simple brim, something that I could roll up and have a lot of fun with, nothing that is going to stand out too much, but has its own unique style. I like hats like this that are just basic stocking that stitch hats with a really simple trend and the knit hem does such a beautiful job to get these really clean edges on stocking that stitch. This is what the knit hem looks like when I'm just knitting just a few rows before I join the hem. The knitted hem is basically stocking that stitch folded in half and joined to create a simple scene. There are a lot of different ways to do this, and I'm going to show you my favorite way that creates a really seamless join. This is the knitted hem but a much bigger version, it's a huge hem. You can also just create a small core, it just depends on how many rows of stocking in that stitch unit before you fold it in half. The method I'm going to show you creates a seam that looks like this. It just looks really clean, just so beautiful. Let's go ahead and learn the knitted hem. We're going to do the little small hem and what we need is to cast on. I'm going to cast on 10 stitches just to show this technique. I like to begin with a long tail cast on because it creates a really defined edge that makes joining your seam much easier. Now you can use whatever cast on you like that's a really basic simple cast on but I like the long tail. I'm just going to quickly get 10 stitches on my needle using that preferred method of mine. Once I have 10 stitches on my needle I'm just going to work three rows of stocking next stitch starting with a purl row. I'm going to purl one row, then knit one row then purl one row, and then I'll be ready to join my hem. I have my 10 stitches here, I'm going to purl a row, knit a row, purl a row, knit a row. Now if you're like, well, I want to do a wide brim, knit as many rows as you like and join whenever you feel like it. Wonderful. I did that method and I created a wide brim for my hair bun beanie pattern which you can grab from my website, also my easy beanie pattern, also self-published pattern I have on my website. If these are patterns that you're like, I want to try the knitted hem and start with brandies patterns, we can do that. Here I am, I'm at my last row I'm just going to go ahead and purl it and they can work this same technique if you were knitting in the round, so you would just knit three rows to get stuck in that stitch in the round and then you can work you're joining row in the same way I'm going to show you right now. To join the hem we want to connect this cast on edge to these live stitches on the needle. The way we're going to do that is, we're going to take the first stitch and we're just going to slip it off the needle as if to knit, meaning we're just going to drop it off the needle like that. I'd like to just pull that first stitch tight. Then we want to pick up a stitch from this edge down here. Now this is a little confusing at first and it's completely okay. I'm going to take my needle, I'm going to bring it from behind and I'm going to pick up the cast on edge of my first stitch. When I trail my finger down, my cast on edge for my first stitch is somewhere over here. Maybe this is it. That looks like it because this is my second stitch and it corresponds to this loop. My first stitch's loop looks to be here and so I'm going to grab it. I'm going to bring it up from behind and I'm going to place it on my left hand needle. Now that I have it on my needle I'm going to knit it and then I'm going to pass the slip stitch over. I'm going to take my left hand needle from left to right and then drop it off the tip of my needle here and that would join those two stitches together, just like that. Now that first stitch is going to look a little suspect because the edge is really raw. Expect this edge to look a little row at first but once you join them all together is not going to be really crazy noticeable, especially if you're working in the round, you're not going to see this edge. Then I'm going to repeat that technique again and again until all my stitches are bound. Let me show you a few ways to do that because it can take time because of how much dexterity it takes to move your needle behind your work. I'm slipping this first stitch as if to knit and then I'm going to go from behind into the cast on edge. This is my second stitch so when I trail my finger down, I know that this is the loop I want to pick up. I'm going to pick it up from behind, put it on my needle, knit it then pass the slip stitch over, and I have two stitches joined. I'm going to show you a way maybe to speed it up because that's the way I teach it. It isn't necessarily the way I do it. I could do it faster and I'm going to show you that way because why not? You might want to wait to speed it up. I'll slip my next stitch as if I want to knit, same thing, but then when I pick up this stitch, I'm just going to go ahead and knit it right away. I'm going to pick it up from behind, I'm not going to put it on the left hand needle, I'm just going to knit it from here, like that, and then pass the slip stitch over. It's just one less thing. Now when I'm really trying to get it done, I'll even skip an additional step, I'll slip it as if I normally would, I'll go from behind pick it up, but then I'll go into both stitches at the same time and then I'll knit them together. It's the same exact thing. You can see how you can gradually graduate from slipping it, picking it up, placing it on the left hand needle, knitting it, then passing the slip stitch over to potentially slipping it, picking it up from behind like I showed you, and then going into both stitches at the same time and knitting them together. Whatever makes the most sense for you, do it and keep on practicing. Now we're going to finish off our last two stitches. I'm going to show you this because it could look a little like what is happening there. I'm going to slip that stitch like I normally would. I know that I'm going to go directly but low that stitch. Here is my next loop. I'm going to go from behind and I will say this feels tight now. Watch this stitch trying to fall off. This stitch is just waiting to fly. Be careful of it because it will come off, it has happened to me many times. I'm going to try and secure it with my thumb so that it doesn't slide off. Just be aware of it. Then I'm going to pick up my bottom loop place it on my left hand needle, knit it, and then pass the slip stitch over and then at my last stitch, I'm going to slip it. This one is not always so easy to see you. Might have to do something like this where you're twisting, you are like, where do I go? It's quite possible. What you're going to do is, I'm going to look and say, this looks like a good loop to pick up into. This is where you can really fudge. Knitting is called fudging, is called making something work. Even though it seems like it can't, you just going to fudge it and make it happen. I think this is the loop that looks like a good one to me. I'm going to pick it up up, and this is where you maneuver. The way I would do it is I would take my left hand needle, I'll go into that bottom loop and then I would knit it and then pass that last slip stitch over. That is your knitted hem. I adore this hem. Let me knit one row so you can really see what it looks like. This is what it looks like on the wrong side or the right side, depends on what you're working with. In order to cooperate the knitted hem into your pattern, you can add as many rows as you like. You can make it a big bream, you can make it a small little rounded edge. One thing to keep in mind is I recommend you go down at least two needle sizes to work this hem. If you're using a US 10, I will recommend using a US 8 for the knitted hem, and know that it's designed to be tight. If you're like, wow, it feels incredibly tight, I can't stand it, look how much it stretches. You want to account for that. You want to think about that. It stretches a lot and it's why you want to use a tighter needle. I want you to practice your knitted hem, follow the instructions in the worksheet, do something small, do something simple and I'll see you in the next lesson where we'll learn the knit hem bind off. 10. Knit Hem: Bind Off: Now it's time to learn the knit hem bind-off. I have my knit hem cast on here, and so I want to end with a knit hem bind-off to compliment my swatch and to practice. I have just some raw edges here. Depending on your pattern, depending on what your favorite salvage edges are that might be trimmed in a certain way. For the purposes of this class and this swatch, I just wanted to show you what it will look like to do the knitted hem if you were just working with plain stock in that stitch. This is an example of what it looks like. This is the knit hem cast on down here and this is the knit hem bind-off down here as well as the sleeves. The knit hem bind-off is also the stitch I'm using for the end of my sweater here. I love it. You can see how clean and beautiful it looks. It's very simple. It's not rolling, it's not totally out there. It really does blends in really nicely with most stitches and with your wardrobe. That's why I like it. The knit hem is all about stock and net stitch. The right side is the net side. I'm going to end with a knit row and I'm going to sew my seam on the wrong side of Rome. I want my cast on to look like my bind-off. I have three rows and then I joined on the fourth row. I want to fold this down so that I have three rows and then I'm joining these live stitches just to my fourth row in the same way I did my cast on. But again, you can vote this down like this and create a knitted hem bind-off. But I want to replicate my cashflow. I'm going to identify what my fourth row is, mark it off with a lifeline so I can have a really good guide to sewing this seam together. A lifeline is basically like a little placeholder. It's like a this is what you want to keep your eye on. I'm going to show you how to create one of those. You're going to thread your scrap yarn and I like to use a contrast in color, something bright, something to really distinguish it from the main color and I'm going to count four rows down. It is much easier to count one stitch in than it is to count the edge stitch because I mean, look at that. That's really hard to see. I see it, but if you are a new knitter, that's going to be difficult for you to count. I would say start with counting down, beginning with the second stitch. Each loop is one room. This is one row, right below the stitch is one row, two rows is the next loop down three-year-olds and this is the fourth row. I want to mark this entire row across with my lifeline ad that will mark my sewing line where I'm going to join the live stitches to the inside of my swatch. I'm going to go ahead and go in from behind on my first stitch, and just make sure again, I'm marking them right stitch 1, 2, 3, 4 and we're going to pull that scrap yarn through the first stitch on my edge and then over the second stitch, marking my fourth row. It's going to look something like this. When I count it down again, I have 1, 2, 3, 4. Everything above this line is my hem. When I fold it down, my hem is going to be above this lifeline and I can later take it out when I'm ready. Then I'm going to continue to weave this lifeline. Every other stitch, this is one stitch right here. One full loop is a pearl stitch. It takes time to learn how to read your work. If you don't see that yet, that's okay. Just know that one loop is one pro stitch, in the same way that 1V on the right side is one stitch. The opposite of that is one pearl loop is one stitch. I'm going to continue to weave my lifeline in and out. Again, you might want to check because sometimes it's very easy to get distracted and dropped down a row and not even realize it. Just keep your eye that you're on the correct sewing line and if you have to count down one, two, three, four, knowing that your lifeline is right below that fourth row, then that's what you have to do. Anything you want, you don't have to do anything. [LAUGHTER] This is what I recommend. Here's my last stitch and then boom, I have my lifeline in place. Time to sew my seam down. I need three times the length of the piece. I'm going to sew, I'm going to one, two, three. Give myself about eight inches of tail [NOISE], thread my tapestry needle, and I'm going to join my first stitch to my inside of my swatch. Now, this can be a little hard to see at first because it's the edge. I see it clearly. If you don't, that's okay. This is how you identify it. Here's your lifeline. I'm going to want to pick up right above my lifeline. That's for the second stitch. I'm going to try and identify what stitches right next to this one on my first stitch. I'm like, okay, here it is here and it looks like the first stitch on that row is right here. If I want to confirm that, I can count down how many rows. Here's one, here's two, here's three, here's four. [LAUGHTER] It's hard to see on the edge, but with practice you'll get it. I pulled that through. You're going to go into your first stitch knit wise and you're just going to drop it off the needle. That will join that first stitch to the inside of your swatch. Then you're going to go into the next stitch, right below the next page on the needle, which is right here, right above my lifeline and then I'll go into my next stitch as if to knit, drop it off the needle and then pull my tail through to join that stitch to the inside of the swatch. You can pull on it, try not to pull it too tight though. You don't want your hand to buckle and I'm going to keep on going. The next stitch is not marked by the lifeline, but I know here it is. The next loop is going to be this one. Now, if you're like Brandy, what if I don't want to use a lifeline? This is what it's going to look like. This would be the next loop here. That's the next stage and then this one, then this one, then this one, and then that one. With a more experience, I won't need a lifeline, you'll be able to work your seem really easily, really quickly. I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to pick up a loop for my swatch, go into those, stepped on a neural net wise, drop it off, and pull it tight. You're going to see is going to come together so beautifully there and I'm really excited to take the lifeline so you can really see how it joins together. These last two stitches, this is what it's going to look like. Here's my lifeline. I know I want to go directly above my lifeline. That's my next stitch. I go into message on a needle, drop it off and then here we go again with that edge, which again, you know, just it's okay. It won't be the end of the world who go into a place that's not what is considered correct. But let's go for it anyway. Let's see what we can do. I'm going to put it here, right here. Because it's right above my lifeline, is right on the edge and that's looking good to me. I'm going to go ahead and just go into that lasted as if to knit. I'm going to pull it tight and that will join that last stitch to the inside of your swatch. Now once you're done, you can just take the lifeline and just pull it out. If you're incorporating a knitted hem on your in an existing pattern and it's just a lot of stitches, I would recommend just cutting the lifeline of several places. It's easier to take out from different sides instead of like trying to run one piece of yarn through 100 stitches, cut it up and just take it out where you can. That is the knitted him. Let's see what it looks like on the right side. That's why I love so much about this technique. You cannot see the seam on either side. Now when I look at this, this ad, again, this is why I love salvage edges. This is a raw [LAUGHTER]. I don't particularly love it. I would trim this somehow. I don't know with the guarded slip stitch edge, I don't know, but this is all about the knitted hems, and it's always going to look a little messy. This is what edges do. They look a little dangly, a little raggedy for swatches, perfect. For garment, I play around with it. If you look at your swatch and you're like, yeah, my hem is looking a little busted, try and bring it down on either sides, but also know that it's going to really relax and the wash and if you want it to give it an extra bit, a nice finishing, you can steam it with an iron. I like to steam over a pillowcase or a paper towel because it's clean as white and sanitary and it won't damage the colors of my fabric. But that's something to keep in mind. Go ahead and practice your knitted hem, have a ball. It's one of my favorites and if you want to incorporate these techniques into your own work, go ahead and do it, swatch it beforehand though, and have fun with it. 11. Final Thoughts: We learned so many edges today. I am really so proud of you and excited for us and to see y'all incorporate, these techniques into your work. It really is going to change the game. You've made your edges just a little less raggedy, and you're going to make them even less raggedy as you perfect these techniques. We covered slip-stitch edge, we covered tubular techniques, I-cord techniques, knitted hems. We have options. So go ahead, practice your favorite techniques. Try it with little bundles in your stash first, so you don't have to make any big commitments, and then create yourself a little edge dictionary and apply them to your work in the future. When you feel inspired, when you feel inclined to neaten them up, tighten them up, and let me know how it goes. Definitely share your in-progress work in the project gallery below, and drop any questions or thoughts you have in the discussion panel, we can support each other. And I'll see you in the next class.