Botanical Drawing for Beginners: How to Draw Simple Flowers | Sharone Stevens | Skillshare
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Botanical Drawing for Beginners: How to Draw Simple Flowers

teacher avatar Sharone Stevens, Watercolour, Illustration & Lettering

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      1:50

    • 2.

      Supplies

      1:47

    • 3.

      Drawing Tips 1: Inspiration & References

      3:18

    • 4.

      Drawing Tips 2: Anatomy & Structure

      2:42

    • 5.

      Drawing Tips 3: Simplifying Shapes

      6:50

    • 6.

      Drawing Tips 4: Petal Shapes

      5:39

    • 7.

      Drawing Tips 5: Petal Perspective

      3:49

    • 8.

      Drawing Tips 6: Petal Folds

      5:50

    • 9.

      Drawing Tips 7: Shading

      3:48

    • 10.

      Drawing Tips 8: Details

      2:29

    • 11.

      Dandelion Part 1

      3:36

    • 12.

      Dandelion Part 2

      11:20

    • 13.

      Cosmos Part 1

      6:52

    • 14.

      Cosmos Part 2

      9:51

    • 15.

      Cosmos Part 3

      8:17

    • 16.

      Cosmos Part 4

      11:06

    • 17.

      Anemone Part 1

      6:31

    • 18.

      Anemone Part 2

      8:29

    • 19.

      Anemone Part 3

      9:37

    • 20.

      Anemone Part 4

      6:43

    • 21.

      Daisy Part 1

      7:16

    • 22.

      Daisy Part 2

      7:18

    • 23.

      Daisy Part 3

      7:09

    • 24.

      Daisy Part 4

      9:34

    • 25.

      Echinacea Part 1

      5:30

    • 26.

      Echinacea Part 2

      6:46

    • 27.

      Echinacea Part 3

      6:40

    • 28.

      Pansy Part 1

      5:31

    • 29.

      Pansy Part 2

      8:47

    • 30.

      Pansy Part 3

      6:55

    • 31.

      Pansy Part 4

      4:05

    • 32.

      Tulip Part 1

      4:57

    • 33.

      Tulip Part 2

      10:42

    • 34.

      Daffodil Part 1

      7:00

    • 35.

      Daffodil Part 2

      6:42

    • 36.

      Daffodil Part 3

      5:26

    • 37.

      Daffodil Part 4

      4:30

    • 38.

      Daffodil Part 5

      8:38

    • 39.

      Poppy Part 1

      5:31

    • 40.

      Poppy Part 2

      5:58

    • 41.

      Poppy Part 3

      6:46

    • 42.

      Poppy Part 4

      6:57

    • 43.

      Hydrangea Part 1

      6:15

    • 44.

      Hydrangea Part 2

      9:39

    • 45.

      Hydrangea Part 3

      8:27

    • 46.

      Hydrangea Part 4

      11:08

    • 47.

      More Inspiration & Conclusion

      4:07

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About This Class

Would you love to learn how to draw simple flowers for relaxation or for fun projects, like making gift tags or decorating your bullet journal? This class will show you how to simplify flowers to make drawing easy and fun. In this class, you will learn how to draw dandelions, cosmos, anemones, poppies, tulips, daffodils, echinacea, daisies, pansies and hydrangeas.

Sharone is an artist and author of "Watercolor for the Soul". She loves to draw and paint for relaxation and joy; her mission is to show you how simple and accessible creativity can be and how much value and meaning it can bring to your life as well.

This class is suitable for absolute beginners and anyone interested in learning how to draw simple flowers.

What you will learn:

  • Tips for drawing flowers: Sharone will give you some of her top tips for finding inspiration and references, simplifying the shapes of the flowers, drawing them from different angles and adding folds into your petals, and adding dimension and texture with simple shading and details. 
  • How to draw 10 specific flowers: You will learn how to draw a dandelion, cosmos, anemone, poppy, tulips, daffodil, echinacea, daisy, pansy and hydrangea from different angles so that you can create your own designs and compositions.
  • How to use your flowers in fun projects: Sharone will give you inspiration and examples for how to turn your flowers into beautiful gift tags, bookmarks, greetings cards and decorations for your journal. 

What you will need:

  • All you need to take this class is a pen or pencil, eraser and a piece of paper.
  • Sharone's Pens: Sharone will mainly be using Pigma Micron pens, sizes 02 and 005 throughout the class. 
  • Sharone's Paper: Sharone will mainly be using a sketchbook with 150gsm white cartridge paper. For the gift tags and bookmarks, she will be using either Mixed Media paper or Strathmore Bristol card.

Resources and more inspiration:

  • Check out Sharone's other doodling and drawing classes on her profile here!
  • Subscribe to Sharone's emails here for a regular dose of creative tips, motivation, inspiration and more.
  • Follow Sharone on Instagram @sharonestevensdesign for more creative content.

Meet Your Teacher

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Sharone Stevens

Watercolour, Illustration & Lettering

Top Teacher

Hi! I'm Sharone - a watercolour artist, author, illustrator and modern calligrapher.

I love teaching and inspiring others to be creative. My mission is to show you how simple and accessible creativity can be, and how it can add meaning to your life by bringing you joy and relaxation.

My first book - Watercolor for the Soul - was released in 2022 and I am so proud of it! This is a dream book of mine, filled with simple and beautiful projects for beginners, plus lots of tips for painting for relaxation, that I am so happy to share with you.

I currently have 22 classes on Skillshare that I hope will inspire you and support your creativity!

For more from me, find me on:

Instagram My blog Subscribe to my emails

See full profile

Level: All Levels

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, I'm Sharon Stephens and I am an artist and author specializing in watercolor illustration and modern calligraphy. I love creating for joy and relaxation and my mission is to help you make art or relaxing and fun part of your life as well. In this class, you will learn how to draw a variety of beautiful flowers, which you can draw or doodle just for relaxation, or you can use to decorate everyday things like your journal, homemade greeting cards, gift tags, or bookmarks. I will show you how to break your subject down into easy steps so that you can have fun with your drawings and enjoy the process. This first section, we'll give you a foundation for understanding how to simplify your flowers and how to draw them from different angles, which will allow you to create more interests and dimension in your artwork. We will then focus on 10 different flowers. The dandelion, the cosmos, anemone, daisy, achalasia, pansy, tulip, daffodil, puppy, and hydrangea. I will show you how to draw each of these step-by-step in real-time with variations to show you how to draw them from different angles so that you can have the confidence to go away and create your own projects and your own composition. All you really need for this class is a pencil and some paper. You may also like to use some fine liner pens like I will be using, and I will talk you through my supplies in more detail at the beginning of the class. I hope you're feeling ready and excited to dive into drawing some beautiful flowers with me. Grab your supplies and let's get started. 2. Supplies: As mentioned in the introduction what you really need to take in this class is a pencil and some paper. But you may also like to use some fineliner pens if you have them. For paper I'll be using a couple of sketchbooks with plain white cartridge paper. For the fineliner pens I will mainly be using Pigma Micron pens. You can buy these pens in a set with a range of sizes from 005 which is the finest, to 08 which is the thickest. In the class I will be mainly using a size 02 for the outlines and a size 005 for the shading and details. I will also be using a size 08 to color in large areas like in the pansy. These are all waterproof pen so you can use them with watercolor as well if you want to. I like to use the smallest size pens because the finer lines make my flowers look a bit more delicate. But if I want to create something a bit bolder then I might use one of the thicker pens instead. It's just a personal preference so have a play around with the different sizes. I will also be using a pencil which I encourage you to have for when we sketch our initial shapes and also an eraser to adjust your sketches. Throughout the class I'll be showing you some examples of some of the projects in my journal and some gift tags, bookmarks and cards. The journal I'm using is a scribble and dot bullet journal with dotted pages. For the gift tags and bookmarks I tend to use either mixed media paper, watercolor paper or Bristol card which are all thicker than the cartridge paper I use in my sketchbooks. For the cards I've used some pre-bought blank cards. Now we can move on to some drawing tips. 3. Drawing Tips 1: Inspiration & References: In this first section, we will be laying the foundation for simple botanical drawing with some tips for how to get started and how to approach your subjects. Some flowers can be quite daunting to draw, so hopefully this will help increase your confidence by giving you a process to fall back on for future drawings as well. There is so much inspiration that we can use for drawing flowers. When you're first getting to know your subject, it's always useful to work from a reference. This may be a real life flower or a photo. The big advantage of using real life flowers is that you can really get a better feel for the flower, you can look at it from different angles and you can see the different parts of its structure and anatomy. Another big advantage is that it allows you to make your work unique and completely your own. It can feel easy to copy other people's art work, seeing how they've turned the subjects into a drawing or a painting when you're starting out. Other than the obvious copyright issues with this, it also restricts you from growing as an artist and improving your own observation skills. For real life examples, you can find these in your garden, out in walks, in a florist or a garden center. I like heading down to my local florist to see what seasonal flowers they have in and buying a few single stems to draw. Florist are also a great source of information for how they combine the flowers into an arrangement, what flowers work well together, and what compositions they use. I don't usually like to pick flowers when I'm out and about, but just by looking around more and seeing them, observing in their own natural habitat can really improve your inspiration and understanding of the flowers. Of course, it's not always possible to find real life examples of your flowers. They may be out of season or just not locally available, and so photos are another useful resource for references. You can find plenty of photos of flowers on the Internet, on Pinterest for example, or even just by searching on Google, or you can use reference books. I have a few gardening and flower book that I like to look through for some information or inspiration for my flowers. The advantages of using photos, either your own or from books or from the Internet or another source is that the image is flattened, which can be helpful for beginners. It can make it easier to turn the flower into a drawing. Just like with a piece of artwork, you need to be aware of copyright, of course, when copying from someone else's photo. When using photos, I like to look at a number of different examples of the same flower. I can get to know it better. Also then I can pick and choose different elements of it, that will translate well to the paper. You can, of course, take photos yourself to refer back to. I tend to take photos of flowers if I see them on a walk or when I'm out and about. As I said, I don't like to pick them. Instead I usually take photos from a few different angles to understand their structure so that I can recreate them when I get home. It can also be good to take photos of any buds or leaves if they have them, if you want to add them into a composition. I like to keep a photo album on my phone dedicated to botanical inspiration, which I can say the more to and then refer back to. 4. Drawing Tips 2: Anatomy & Structure: Understanding the basic anatomy and elements of flowers is going to really help us when it comes to breaking down our subject so that we can draw or doodle them easily. Some flowers can be quite complex and daunting to draw, and in this class we want to be able to simplify them so that we can take it one step at a time and enjoy the process. When I start drawing a new flower, I always like to know a few basic things about it to help me with the drawing. The things to look for with a flower are the petals, and these are usually the most recognizable part of a flower, and can come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes and colors. We'll be looking at these in much more detail in a couple of videos. You can also look for the sepals, which are the outer part of the flower that encase the flower bud as it grows, protecting it. When the flower blooms, these sepals may transform into what looks like just the rest of the petals on the outer edge. For example, a tulip looks like it has six petals, but it actually has three petals on the inside surrounded by three sepals on the outside. Some sepals are smaller and green and you can find them at the base of the flower once it has bloomed. Here you can see them at the base of a cosmos flower. You can also look for the reproductive parts of the flower, which are found in the center of the flower, and this is where the flower produces pollen to attract bees. Some flowers have both male and female reproductive parts, and some just have male or female. The male parts are called stamens, which are made up of anthers and filaments. The anther sits at the top of the filament and is where the pollen is produced, and we can draw these quite simply as an oval shape on top of a line or two parallel lines. The female parts are called pistils and are made up of the stigma and the style. The style is a long tube and the stigma sits on top and receives the pollen. We also have the stem and the leaves of the flower. We won't be focusing too much on the specific leaves of each flower within this class, unless it really adds something to the drawing of the flower like with the tulips. Bear in mind that with a lot of flowers, there are many different varieties of the same flower and some can look quite different to each other. When looking for references, do some research to find features that appeal to you. Don't worry about getting everything perfect or realistic, especially when drawing for joy and relaxation. We can take note of the distinguishing features and create our own drawings from there. The main thing is that we're enjoying ourselves rather than feeling the pressure to get things completely right. 5. Drawing Tips 3: Simplifying Shapes: Once you have your references or the information you need to draw your flower, I always recommend starting by breaking it down into its basic shapes to start with and we'll be doing this throughout the class with each flower. First, I like to identify the overall shape of the flower, which you can then sketch in pencil as a guide for your starting point. If you're looking at the flower from a top-down view like this, this may be a circle for the outside shape with a smaller circle in the center. Here is an example of a cosmos and a poppy from this angle as well. If you're looking at the flower from a slight angle; so now I'm just tilting this flower, the oval-shaped turns into more of an oval because we can see less of it and the center becomes a bit more of an oval as well from this perspective and moves a bit lower down inside that bigger oval because the petals come up. Here's an example of another cosmos and an anemone from this tilted angle. If we keep turning this flower for a side view, the center moves to the bottom and we can no longer see it because it's inside those petals; it's now hidden, and the base of the flower comes into view and now these petals form more of a semicircle shape. Here you can see this with an Echinacea flower and a cosmos from the side view. For the Echinacea, we can use a rough semicircle for the cone head and a larger semicircle for the petals with a curved bottom. For the cosmos, you can see we can use a large semicircle for the petals and a smaller semicircle for the base. It's really useful to start observing your subjects in this way, breaking them down into their most simplest forms and taking the drawing step-by-step because it makes it so much easier for us. We can start by practicing sketching these shapes using our pencil nice and lightly so that we can erase them later on once we've finished our drawing. This practice is especially useful if you're new to drawing just practicing drawing those types of shapes; the circles, and the ovals, and the semicircles. We'll start with a fairly big circle for the outside and then I'm just going to add a smaller one in the center. That is an example of a top-down view. Obviously, with each flower this is going to change and this circle might be bigger, or might be smaller and even the shape might be different, but this is just an example of starting with a quite a generic flower shape like a daisy or a cosmos. We'll be using these a lot in this class because we're focusing on simple flowers. From a tilted view we can use more of an oval shape, and then again like I said before we want to have the smaller oval in the center sitting slightly below the center. If this is a center line, we can have this about here. If we had this in the middle and the petals coming out of it, it would just look very squashed and quite flat. But because petals tend to come upwards from the center, this will make it look more realistic and dimensional. Again, we can do it a smaller oval and this is if the flower is tilted even more. Again, just practice. You can practice these from angles as well because a lot of our flowers are not going to be flat like this. I'm adding that smaller oval in play at that center doing this from the other direction. You can see these are sketchy lines, I'm not trying to create a perfect shape here. Then from the side view, we can draw in a semicircle. You might have a slight curve to the top where it might be quite straight and then if it has quite a permanent base, then you can add in a smaller semicircle there. Again, you can do this from an angle just to practice. Keep practicing sketching out these shapes as much as you need to until you feel comfortable doing this. It can be useful to just grab a large piece of paper and just practice. Being able to draw the flower from different angles like this is going to make your drawing so much more interesting and dimensional especially if you want to include multiple flowers in a drawing because it's going to add a lot of movement as well. If you think about where the stems are coming from in this top row, the stems are going to be coming straight down. On these ones they can curve round. This one would be straight. Again I'm just adding that curved stem imagining where that will sit, and that's going to add a lot more movement to your drawing. This is an example of the starting point for our flower drawings keeping it easy, like I said, giving ourselves a guide to work with. This can take away a lot was daunting elements of drawing a complicated flower taking this first step and making it simple. The goal is to make it easy for ourselves here and we can use our eraser as much as we need to, so we're happy with our shape. But remember it's just a rough guide, we're not trying to create perfect circles or ovals. 6. Drawing Tips 4: Petal Shapes: So now let's focus on petals. These come in different sizes and shapes depending on the flower. You can draw these differently depending on how simplistic or realistic you want your drawing to be. So using this Cosmos as an example, we can start at the base of the petal, where it joins into the center of the flower. This is where the petal is at its narrowest. Bring it up, curve it round, and then bring it back down. So this is the base of the petal where it meets the center and it's always the most narrowest here. So I've used a fairly smooth line here to create this shape, which is great for a quick simplified drawing or doodle. If we want this to be a bit more realistic, we can pay more attention to the edges and those organic lines. So if you have a look at this Cosmos flower, you can see that that top edge in particular is not particularly smooth. It's got more dips in it. So we can practice just waving your pen or pencil slightly to create this more organic, wobbly line. So then, let's try this on the petal itself. So we're keeping the sided is fairly smooth. But as we come up to the top, we can add in these depths and bring it down. Just try this again. So coming out, curving round. We can practice these from different positions as well. So looking at the bottom petals starting, so saying the center is here, we'll start with the narrowest point at the top, bring it around, and adding in those lines. So just practice different types of petals making these edges quite different because once it's all together, it will look really nice, and it will look much more interesting if the shapes are slightly different than if they're all the same. Unless of course you do want to create that simplistic Doodle, which is absolutely fine as well. So this is a fairly rounded petal for the Cosmos flower, which is quite a typical generic petal shape that you would think of. Some flowers have longer, thinner petals like the daisy. So again, we can recreate this with a smooth line starting again at a narrow point, bringing it up in a curve, and bringing it back down. But if you look a bit closer at the petals, you'll see that it has those dips at the top. So then we can just practice adding a few of those in. It's something quite simple like that. You can make your overall drawing look much more interesting. Again, we can try this from a different position. So with the center here, you can of course, try these from the side. So other flowers like the hydrangea can have shorter, rounder petals, which come to a bit more of a point. So for these, will go out a bit more, will come up. It has a fairly soft point at the top, and then comes in again to that narrow point. So imagine this is the center here. So these tend to have smoother edges. Practicing these different shapes can also inspire you when you're just doodling or making up your own flowers looking at the different types of shapes that you can use. So other flowers like the poppy have much floppier petals so we can be a bit flair in using organic lines for these. So say for example the center was here, we can just come out and practice being flair with our lines using less structured shapes. 7. Drawing Tips 5: Petal Perspective: Heading back to our guidelines now and looking at the top-down views, which is this circle at the top left. If we look back at this cosmos, all of the petals are a similar shape and size and fairly flat-looking, which makes it pretty easy to draw. Using these two circles as our guide, we can then use a line to represent the direction of each of the petals and for this one, it's quite straightforward. It's just a very straight line, so we will just add in those lines for however many petals there are and where we want the petals to sit. For the tilted flowers, we would need to pay a bit more attention to the direction of the petals, so using these guides is really helpful for this. As I said before, the petals tend to curve upwards. If we use straight lines here, the flower is going to look quite flat, so these curves will give the flower more dimension. These petals at the top may go straight up, but the petals at the side may curve upwards and these ones below will curve as well and then this may come down again. You can just practice thinking about how these curves will sit. This will obviously change depending on the flower but generally petals tend to curve upwards. You can practice adding these lines in. With this side view, I can add in these curves and as we get towards the center, it'll be straighter and then curving in the opposite way on the other side. We can also see from using these guides that the shape of the petals have changed once we move from this top view to this tilted view. Underneath this center now, we have less space to draw the petals in, so there's a smaller gap here at the bottom than there is here. These petals are going to be shorter. If we go back to this daisy, as we tilt the flower, we can see less of these petals at the bottom and they get a lot shorter and change their shape. These side petals may get a bit thinner because, again, we can't see all of them. Going back to our petal page, whereas on a top-down view, the petal may be quite flat like this. Once we tilt it, it may become quite shorter because that's all we can see. On the side petals, so if this was on a top-down view, we would see all of the petal. But then if we tilt it, this may become thinner. Again, going back to the guide, this is really useful because it's going to roughly show us how long that petal should be, the same with the side one. 8. Drawing Tips 6: Petal Folds: Moving on to a fresh page. As these petals gets shorter or narrower at an angle, we can start including some folds into some of them. You may not always see folds in your reference photo, but it can be nice to add in some times in your drawing to give more of an illusion of perspective and make it look a bit more interesting. Starting with the outline of one of these shorter petals, the simplest way to add in a fold is just to add in an extra line inside. I'm going to start at the edge, trace over that line, curve upwards, use those organic lines and then dip down and curve back in. You can see here and here is a curve which meets the outer edge. It just helps it fly more. Then this space here becomes up fold. The petal is then folding upward slightly towards us. You can practice this with different shapes of petals. Adding in the folds inside. I just practice this a few times to get used to it. You can add different size folds. This one is much bigger than this one. Then when you're drawing the petals at an angle, you can add this fold on this lower edge here. Again, just curving it so it smoothly joins into the outer edge. If we wanted to add a fold that goes outside of the shape, it can be easier to start with a line that represents the center of the petal so we can see how it's curved. If the petal started from the center here and then curve towards the right. This is the center line of that petal now, then below this we can draw the outer edge of the petal. Starting quite narrow where it joins the center, I'll draw the center in so we can visualize it. I'm going to bring this down, make it a bit wider. Then I'm going to come up and cross over this central line, bring it down, and then join it up with this line. This is the fold. Then bit below here, you can join in the other line. This is the petal curving round and this is the fold here. Let's just practice that again. This is the center, this is the way we want our petal to curve. Starting quite narrow, bringing the petal out, crossing over and then joining it back. You're basically creating a loop like this and then adding the other edge in. You can change the size of the fold by changing where you're crossing over this line. If I crossed earlier and then put this in, it's a much bigger fold to that petal. If I cross later, I just gave it a little fold, just slight fold at the end. Let's practice this in the other direction. Just drawing that center circle and then the center line of your petal curving upwards towards the left. Start this side. Remember narrow in the center, bring it out. Crossing over, touching that tip and then bringing it down so it joins up quite neatly. We want this to be fairly smooth. Then below this edge, can come out and then bring it back in. You can practice this a few times, creating different sized folds. This is going to be a larger one and then here I'm going to create just a small fold at the very end. 9. Drawing Tips 7: Shading: To give our petals more shape, and dimension, we can add some simple shading to them. For my shading, I always use a fine pen. If I've been using a border pen for the outline, I might drop it down to a size two or even finer to give it some contrast, and delicacy. We can keep practicing at the moment using our pencil just to get the movement right at this stage. I like to use flicking lines for my shading, so you can practice just dragging your pen across the page, and then lifting it up so that the line gets fainter, and tapers off. Practice these different lengths, and then also practice these with slight curves as well. The closer these lines are together, the darker the area is going to look. To help give the petals more shape, and dimension is best to use curves instead of straight lines for the shading, and to make them almost parallel to the outer edge of the petal. If we start with a basic petal shape, so this is a narrow base. We want the curves at this side to be parallel with this, and to edge. I'm going to flip that round, and then on the opposite side, curving that way round, and then in the center, so just off to the left of the center, I'm going to do a long one, curving up. Adding in these slight curves, and varying the length of them is going to create a nice bit of shading. You can see these come together towards the base, which makes it look a bit darker. You can always add in some shorter lines just to build up that darkness as well. I like to add in some of these lines on the top edge as well, especially if there's a dip, you can just bring it down slightly. Again using those curves, it's just going to help give the illusion of that dimension, and show the shape of the petal. If the petal was at an angle, a side view petal coming in, for the middle line, we could have this coming upwards, it shows that the petal dips down, and curves upwards, and then curving round at the edges as well. We might want this to come around that way. Again, I'm just going to add in a couple of lines at the top just to help give it that shape. I'd add a few more here, to give a bit more shading. We can try another petal, so if this one was at the base of a tilted flower, so it's fairly shortened, so this curving lines would come out parallel to the edge, curving round, and the center, curve towards the direction of the outer edge as well. Adding a few more flat shading, and then I just add in a few lines at the top as well. 10. Drawing Tips 8: Details: Now we can practice some mark-making, which will allow us to add some of the smaller, more delicate details to our flowers. This can help us add texture and those finer details like the stamen in the center. We can use small marks like dots. If we have the center, these are usually fairly textured. Some of them have quite close stamen together. We can use these dots to create a texture. Then making these dots closer together on one side and making them lighter further away from each other on the other side is going to help give it that rounded shape. Because these circles in the center, they're not flat they're curved, which means that the light is going to hit it at one point, making it lighter and creating a shadow on the other side. If this has the shadow, we want this to be darker on this side. We want more dots. As we move to this side, which is lighter, will have less dots. That is just going to help us create dimension in that shape. We can also use small see curves and M curves to create the texture in the center points. Again, if we start with a circle, we might find that the texture looks like there's lots of little bumps. But again, we're keeping it lighter on one side so we'll have less of them. Then they'll be more dense on the other side, making it darker. Then you can also add in some hashing to add in a bit of shading as well. I'm just drawing quick lines like this to make it darker. That's the end of the first section. I really hope that's been helpful for you in laying some foundation. Now we will move on to our flowers. The first flower that we will be drawing is the dandelion. 11. Dandelion Part 1: We're going to start with the dandelion, as it is such a simple flower to draw to get us started. The seed head of the dandelion is a bit different to the other flowers that we're going to be drawing, as it doesn't actually have any petals. But it can be a really nice one to doodle or draw. This is the final piece that we'll be drawing for the dandelion so we'll be keeping it quite simple with just one version, and a few stems floating off towards the right. Before we get started, I wanted to show you some more examples that I've done. Here is a simple gift tag that I made using this flower. This only took me a few minutes, so it was really easy to make. It can also be a nice addition to greeting cards. Here I used a finer pen for more delicate look with two dandelions, both with a slightly curved stem to show some nice movement within the piece. It's also a fun one to do linear sketchbook just for a little bit of relaxation. Again, creating that movement across the page with those curve stems so they're all going in different directions, and they're all slightly different heights with a few random stems floating off at the top. Throughout these videos, I'm going to use two sketchbooks. One for some practice elements, and then one for the actual flowers where we can also look at a little bit of composition as well, using the entire page, so that I can demonstrate a bit more of a finished piece for each flower. I'll be flicking between the two sketchbooks, but you can use whatever you have to practice these flowers. The main thing is that you're practicing and learning without being too precious. Don't get caught up in trying to create something perfect or finished at this stage. Before we start the dandelion, we can just practice a couple of the stems. The ones on the outer edge, we can draw from a side view like this. They're just half full, and then the ones in the center, we can draw lines all the way around. This will help give the overall flower a bit of dimension as well as the whole head is curved. Here I've done two examples to show you the difference in delicacy when you're choosing which pen you want to use. This first one is a 08, so it's much thicker, and you can see there are less lines. This one is a 005, they're both Pigma Micron pens, so you can see this is much delicate. On the overall flower, it will really transform the finished piece. I'm going to be using a 02, which is still fairly delicate, but not quite as delicate as the 005. To practice these, we'll just start with a line and then start with the outer one. Have it slightly curved up with a flaky line, and then just bring it around to the other side. These are for the outer edge. Then we'll just practice one which is more central, so we can have these flaky lines all the way around. 12. Dandelion Part 2: To start the Dandelion, just grab your pencil and we can start by sketching out a circle for the overall guide. I'm just going to have this fairly central on my page and I'm just going to have this stroke coming. If we mark a point in the center and I'm going to have the main stem curving off to the side slightly just to give it a little bit of movement. Because this is such a simple flower, I'm just going to go straight to my pen now. I don't feel the need to draw in all of those lines in pencil first, but it's completely up to you if you want to do that. I'm going to start by just making the center dot very prominent. Then I'm just going to work my way around the edge, making some dots. These are where the outer seed heads are going to sit. You don't have to do it this way, you can draw the lines and then add in the ends. But I like to do the end, the edge and then fill in. Then we can start with those slicky lines going outwards. This is a really nice one for relaxing with because it's a lot of the same repetitive lines and work. You can focus on your breathing, focus on relaxing and some nice relaxing music. Once you've completed them all the way around, you can connect each of those heads to the center with a line. Now we've done the outer edge, we can fill in these gaps to split each pair with the same side view. They don't have to sit exactly in the middle, you can have some which overlap to make it look a bit more natural. Also move your paper around as much as you need to so that you're comfortable. Now as we move to the center, I'm going to start to add in some of those full heads, so let's start with the dot in the center and then use those slicky lines all the way around this time. You can see I'm not trying to keep these two uniform. I'm moving up and down a little bit to fill in wherever I see a good gap where they might fit in well. I think I'll just add in a few more a bit closer to the center. You may not need to draw lines for all of these ones because there were so many lines going in now. Then just when you're happy, just pause, take a step back, have a look at it. See if there are anymore gaps that you want to fill in. If there aren't, then we can draw the stem in. I'm just going to use a single line for this because this is quite a simple drawing. I'm going to start from the center and just follow that pencil curve down to the bottom of the page. Then finally, I'm just going to add a few of these stems, these seed heads that are drifting off at the top of the page in the top corner off into the wind. I'm going to have one curving up to the left. Make this a half. I may have one curving slightly to the right and then maybe one down here. I'll give my pen a few minutes to make sure it's completely dry and then I'll just remove those pencil lines. That's our Dandelion finished. I hope you've enjoyed it. You can continue to experiment with different styles of this using finer or bolder pens to make it more delicate or more of a simple doodle. Here's a reminder of some of the example projects you can use it for that I showed you earlier. In the next video, we're going to draw the Cosmos flower. 13. Cosmos Part 1: Cosmos flowers are so beautiful and probably the closest to the classic or generic type of flower that I love to doodle. They have eight delicate petals that usually overlap a little with a central disc and sepals that sit underneath. This is the finished piece that we'll be drawing for this flower, which allows us to practice the cosmos from three different angles. The front view or the top view, the tilted view where we can still see that center, and the side view. We'll also add in a couple of these buds, which can be really nice to add into the composition. Again, to show you a few more examples, here is a simple gift tag I made just using that tilted view and a bookmark using two of the flowers, so the tilted view, that front view, and then a few buds added in. Like I said, cosmos are one of my favorite flowers to draw. You'll find quite a few of them in my sketchbooks. Here are a couple of pages from my sketch books. Here I've done a few cosmos from different angles, side view, tilted view, the front view, and adding in those buds, varying the height to create a nice composition. Then here I've just drawn one of the cosmos and then added in some of those really simple leaves that we practiced in the leaf doodling class which can add a nice contrast to the flower. We have already practiced the shape of these petals during the practice session, so we won't spend too much time on these, but we can just quickly practice the oval shape just to remind ourselves of how to draw them. I'm going to use my zero too. Again, you can start with your pencil and then go over it in pen or whatever you choose. For the petal shapes, start at the narrow base, curve it round, and then add in those organic lines at the top and then bring it back in. There are a couple of examples. These petals are where we can add in those nice folds, so if we do a petal that is coming downwards, bring it out to the narrow point. We can add in organic line, the fold with those curves bringing in. For the central disc of this flower, this is where we're going to be using those C or M curves to create that texture. You can practice those again. Then for the side view, we'll also be adding in the sepals, which will be able to see underneath. As the stem of the flower comes up, we can add in a few pointy sepals at the very base of the flower. We can also add in a couple of simple buds to our composition which can look nice, keeping these quite simple, so I'll start with the pencil just to show you. This is an egg shape. It curves around the bottom, bring it up, do a bit more of a point at the top, and then add in the stem, and then adding these sepals, and then you can also add in a line, and one off to one side which is a petal folded in, and then go over that with your pen. We'll do a couple of those in the final piece, and I'll show you how to add the shading as well to those. With your pencil, we can just map out my layout first. I'm going to start with a circle for the top view, and I'm going to have my flowers I think, coming slightly from the left of the page. Starting with the top view circle, then I'm going to add in an oval and this will be the tilted view. Then at the top I'm going to do the side view which is going to be more of a semicircle. If I draw in the stems, so I want this one to curve off slightly to the left. This one will be curving more, so bringing it over, and then I'll bring this one, and this will sit behind this front flower. I'm going to add in a couple of buds, we've got some nice space here. We have this overlapping sitting at the front and roughly drawing in that egg shape for the bud that we just practiced, and then I think I'll help bring one up here, curving off to the left slightly. This looks quite good, I'm quite happy with this layout. If you want to carry on playing around, just use your eraser and your pencil to just get these initial shapes. But I'm happy with the movement of these stems, and we've got enough space in-between. We can clearly practice each of the different angles of our flowers. 14. Cosmos Part 2: We'll start with the top-down view, just this circle one and we're going to draw that circle in the center for the central disc. Then the cosmos has eight petals. We can then map out roughly where these lines will be. We can draw a halfway mark and then have four on each side, roughly. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Take out the halfway lines, but don't get confused. Then you can either draw these in with your pencil first and go over with the pen, or you can jump straight to your pen. I'm just going to start by drawing this circle a bit more in the pencil, so I know where to start my petals. I'm just using this jaggedy line to give the illusion of that texture. Now, I'm going to go to my size 02 pen and draw in the petals. But again, if you're more comfortable, do these first with your pencil, then you can go over with your pen. Starting with the narrow base, curving round, bringing it up, adding in some organic lines, bringing it down. You can have some of these petals overlapping. You can have some space in between them as well, which makes it look more natural. What I would do is I would just do a couple of petals which are not sitting next to each other. Otherwise, if you go around one by one, you'll end up with them all overlapping on the same side. I'm going to start with this one now. I'll bring that down. Now I'm going to go with this one. I'm going to make this a little bit narrower, maybe. It's just touching that one. Then I think with this one, I'm going to have it sitting maybe slightly underneath these two. I'll start a bit narrower at the base, bring it in, so it's curving up. I'm going to just follow the pen round. If you're using a pencil, you can actually draw this in because you can erase it later. I'm following this round, bringing out, drawing the top, bringing it back round. Again, following it round and bringing it in. I'm going to do the same with this one. Then I think this one is going to sit underneath. Then I'm not going to have it touching that one, so I'll have a little bit of a gap. I've got my outline of my eight petals there. Even though this is a top view, you can add some folds in if you want. I might add a small folding in a couple of places just to add some interest to the piece. Maybe just a small one here as well. Then I'm going to move to that center. I'm going to go over this outer edge first. I'm using lots of small C curves for the edge. Then I want to create a dome shape with the central disk. I want this left bottom side to be darker than the top right side. I'm going to use these C curves and make it quite dense on that bottom left side. Then as I move up to this top right side, we can make it lighter. We're creating more space in between all of these marks. As you get to the outer edge, you can add in a few more. Then I'm just building it up on that lower left side to make it even darker. It's just lots of C curves on top of each other. Now I'm going to draw in the stem. I've already drawn this in in pencil. Always check your pencil lines. Once you've started drawing in some of the elements in pen, it may have shifted a little bit. You just want to check it still works and this one looks like it does, so I'm going to follow that down with a slight curve with my pen and then do another parallel, and a lot of it sitting behind this petal, so I'm not going to draw that in. Now, we've got our main outlines. I'm going to switch to my finer 005 pen for the shading because I want this to have a little bit of a contrast. I want this to look a little bit more delicate. I'm going to start at the base of each petal. Remember, we just want to curve these and make them parallel with that outer edge. Then go up at different heights to give that sense of dimension within each petal. Then at the top where it dips down, we can add in a small line as well. As you get to either edge, remember to just have those curves parallel with the outer edge. On this fold, I'm going to start from the outside edge and then just flick it up. As it moves around, I'm going to go up as well. Straighter in the center. Remember, you can build up the shading at the base with small lines as well and that will just make it darker. Make it look like it's going in slightly towards the center. We can also add a little bit of shading to the stem, particularly at the top where it sits under that petal, just to help distinguish it. Then I'm just counting some dashing lines on the way down. 15. Cosmos Part 3: Now we can move on to the tilted view. We've got our oval shape. It's leaning towards the right. The next one we want to do is draw the central disc. Remember we're going to keep this below the halfway point, and this is going to be a smaller oval. Then we can map out where those eight petals are going to sit and the direction that they're going to go in as well. We can half this again and then draw some lines where the four petals are sitting either side. Remember these will come up slightly. Then again, if you feel more comfortable, draw these in pencil first, particularly as these are a bit trickier because we're going to add in some more folds and they're different shapes and sizes. Start with this bottom one and I'm going to add a folding here. This one is going to come underneath this one a little bit. Maybe come round a little bit more as well. This fold can sit about there. This is going to be one on the side view, so it's a bit narrower. Now we've got a four lower petals with the folds in. I'm really just using the pencil to map them out roughly at this point and we can tighten them up once we go over them with pen, or if you want to keep in pencil, you can just go over again. I'm going straight to my pen now, my 02. I'm going to start again with the center. Again with these see lines around the edge to show that it's not smooth. Then I'm going to just start drawing in those petals over the top of those pencil lines and perhaps adding in some more organic lines particularly around these top edges where I've just roughly mapped out with the pencil. I'm going to leave a slight gap in between these, so these petals aren't going to be touching. Just to give it a bit more of a natural look. I've got my eight petals mapped out now. We can do the central disc, similar to this one. We want to keep this bottom left side darker and the top right side bit lighter. We can start with those. Then I'm just switching it over and making them more darker as I get towards the bottom. Make sure these transitions from the light area to the dark area is fairly gradual. That's going to help give it that curved look as well. Now I'm going to draw in the stem. Remember to check the positioning in case it's moved. I'm going to work from the center. I want this bud to sit in front. I'm going to leave a gap here, and then I'll fill it in later. That's going to give plenty of space for that bud to sit in front. Now for the shading, I'm just moving to my 005. Again, I'm going to work from the base and just remember to curve these petals up. These petals are going to have even more curves in the top view. If we start on this left side petal, I'm going to curve this quite a lot and from the top as well. Under the right side this is going to curve around to the right. It just helps to show the direction of the petals then. Move your paper around as you need to. This one is slightly curving up. This is going to have a left curve. Now we can just add in a little bit of shading to these folds as well remembering to follow these outside lines. Now we have our tilted view of the cosmos, we can work on the side view. 16. Cosmos Part 4: With this side view, we already have our semicircle shape and we want to add the sepals into the bottom as well. I'm going to do these in pencil. We can have a small flat semicircle that we add on, and then just draw in these long sepals. Then join them down to the stem. Then bring that down to wherever the petal sits on the lower flower. With this side view, we're not going to be able to see all of the petals. I'm just going to curve this down slightly. We're not going to be able to see all of these petals because it's from a side view. Some of them are going to be hidden. We can maybe have four or five that we see and then we can have the tops of a couple of them peeking through. These are going to curve around with this semicircular shape. I'm going to do four lines and then roughly draw these in with a pencil. Then you can just add in the tops of the petals that would be peeking through. Moving to my size two pen, I'm going to go over these sepals first. Then we can start drawing in these petals. Remember those organic lines at the tops, and then bringing it curving in so it's narrower at the base. Then we can just add in some more peeking through. Now we can also just follow this stem down, and draw in where it goes to the bottom. You can see with mine this is shifted over slightly. Now I'm going to move to my 005 pen for the shading. Then I'm just going to add a little bit of shading, just using dashy lines into the sepal as well to distinguish this by making it darker from the rest of the flower. I'm not coloring it in completely, I'm just adding small dashy lines and then a little bit down the stem as well. I've just realized we didn't add it into this one, so we'll do that now. Now we have our three views. We can add in our buds. We have the two buds. Going back to the pencil, we can just refine these a bit more. We can first check the placement, check we're still happy with them, because now we've finished our flowers, we know what that will look like. I'm going to keep this one here. I think this is quite a good position for this. Then add in the sepals. Then draw that stem coming down. Then I'm going to shift this over slightly to the right so that I can fit those sepals in front of this flower stem. The stem is sitting in front of this one, but then it's going behind this one because I've already drawn the end, which is fine. Once you're happy, you can move to your pen and then just go over these lines. Then I'm going to go round this bud and bring it down a bit sooner. That's that petal fold, and then bring it out a bit more and then bring this stem. I'm going to have this sitting behind this one. I'm leaving a little gap. Then we can just draw this one in. Just going to fill in these lines where there are some gaps. Now, move to my 005 to add in the final shading to the buds. Then we start at the top and just use those curved lines at different lengths to bring it down on both of these petals, adding a little bit more shading to that right side so you can distinguish between the two. Then do the same from the bottom. Bringing it up using those curved lines, making it a bit darker on this side. Then again, just adding shading with those small lines for the sepals and the top of the stem. I'm going to do the same with this bud. These curved lines from the top, making it a bit darker on this side. Then shading in the sepal in the stem. With these stems because they're crossing over, wherever they sit behind I'm just going to make them a little bit darker so they stand out a bit more. The darkness will just send that area back in the image, and it will bring the lighter area a bit forward, making it look a bit closer. Once all the paint is dried, we can remove our pencil and then have a look at our finished piece. Those are our cosmos flowers finished. We've got the three different perspectives which we know now how to draw, and a couple of buds added in. If we're doing a bigger composition, we know that they can look really nice just to add a little bit of extra to our drawing. Here's a reminder of some of the examples I showed you earlier on, which will hopefully give you some more inspiration for how you can use them. In the next video, we're going to learn how to draw the anemone flower. 17. Anemone Part 1: The anemone is a beautiful flower with really striking features. There are a lot of different varieties of anemone flowers in various shapes and sizes. We're going to focus on a six-petaled version. And in the center of this flower is a mount of pistils surrounded by a crown of stamen. So this is a finished piece we're going to be drawing with the three different views. Again, the front view, the tilted view, and the side view. We'll also be including a couple of simple buds. This is a lovely flower to decorate your journal with. Here is an example of one of my cover pages for July, where I've used a couple of tilted view, this is a side view, and a couple of buds again. And here's a simple gift tag just using that front view, so keeping it really simple. And then a final example is a greeting card I made. I drew these flowers onto some card and cut them out, and then I just added in some really simple leaves and stuck them all on. The petals of the anemone are a little bit rounder. Again, with the organic lines at the top, you can just make them a bit rounder than the cosmos. We'll again be using some of the folds. Then for the center of the anemone, the central disc is actually quite smooth. If we're looking at it from a side angle, instead of using the texture with the C curves and the M curves that we use for the cosmos, we can just use dots for this, and this is going to keep it looking really nice and smooth. Again, what we'll do is create that dome effect by making these marks fewer and further between to make it look lighter in the top right corner, and then making them denser as we go down in the bottom left. The anemone also has a lot of stamen which are a really striking feature of the flower. These will be surrounding that central disc. We can just draw these with a simple line and coloring in the anthers which sit on top. You can also do this just by drawing that and then adding your shading outside to the petals to make it really stand out. It's up to you how you want to make your flower look, and you can play around with those ideas. We can also draw buds in with our anemone into our composition. These are a similar shape to the cosmos, but we won't be including the sepals in these ones. Quite straightforward, just that egg-shape with the stem and then we'll add the shading in as well. Okay, so for the flowers, for the anemone, we're going to do the same views as we did for the cosmos. We'll do the top-down, the tilted where we can still see the center, and then the side view, and then add a couple of buds in. I'm using my pencil again to sketch out where the placement of each will be. I'm going to start with my top-down view, so this is the circle, and to add an oval facing off to the left and then the side view will be facing off to the right so that we're going to come down into the center for this one. Then I'm going to do the side view which is going to be more of a semicircle. I'll just draw the rough stem coming down. This one is going to be curving off. I want this to sit on the left over here, so I'm going to tilt this a little bit back the other way. Then this one will come down. Then we can add some buds. I'm going to add one either side. Then I'm going to add one a bit higher so it's not too symmetrical. I might make this a bit lower. I'm just going to bring this down slightly. Play around with your guides and your positioning as much as you want to. I'm happy with that. 18. Anemone Part 2: I'm going to start with this top view, so the circle, and then we can add in our central disc another circle, fairly large. This is just a central disc, and then we can draw the stamen around this. Anemone has six petals and these are quite large, quite rounded, and they tend to overlap. So we want to see as many gaps like we do in the cosmos. So we can divide this up and then just add three marks on either side, roughly where they'll sit. There are six marks now for my petals. I'm just going to bring these out, curve them round, adding these dips and bring it back in. Make this one a bit bigger. Now I'm going to make zero to pen and I'm going to draw in the center. Then I'm going to go over those petals. We can draw that stem almost coming down in a straight line. So let's fill in the central disc now with those dots. So again, keeping it darker on the bottom left side, making them more dense and together we'll come back and go over this even more. Then as we move over to the top right, just making them sparser, a bit lighter. Then as you move back over, make sure it's a gradual transition between this darker area and the lighter area. So for this darkest area on the very left bottom we actually add some hashing. So just some little dashes which are going to fill in some of these areas and just keep going until it looks quite dimensional. I'm building up this left bottom edge. So it's almost a solid black in some areas to make it look really dark. So I'm going to switch to my 005 to do the shading on the petals before we do the stamen. So remember your curves and then I'll just add it in a few of these curved lines from the top, especially where the petals dip in and anywhere that it's going to help give it that illusion of shape. I'm just going to add some shading to the top of the stem as well. So going back to my Size 02, because I want these stamen to be quite bold. I'm now going to go around this edge and just color in these dots that is going to be quite a few very close together. These are what make the anemone really recognizable in comparison to some of the other flowers. You can make these more dense in some places by just adding a few more and then we can go in and just draw some lines connecting these to the center. I'm not going from each one, I'm just drawing some random lines just to give it that illusion that they're all connected. That is our top view, complete. 19. Anemone Part 3: Next we can draw the tilted view of the anemone, which is this one on the top left. We have our larger oval. Now we can just sketch in that smaller oval for the center. We'll be keeping this below that middle line. Then we can just mark and roughly where these six petals are going to sit. I'm going to have one coming straight down here, then two coming up slightly either side. Then the final one above. I'm going to sketch these in roughly with my pencil as well. Some coming out. I'm probably going to do a fold on this one. Then this is going to overlap this one. I'm going to bring this out and then bring this underneath so we can't see all of this one. Then the same for that. Do this top middle one next. Then some folds to these ones. Just check you're happy with your sketch and adjust as you need to. I think I might have made this petal down slightly. Now I'm going to my size, there were two. I'm going to start drawing these and I'll start with that center circle. Now I'm going to go to the central desk and start drawing in these dots again, remembering to keep it darker on this bottom left side. Then as I move upwards, I'm just moving those dots slightly further apart. Then I'm just going to keep going over this until it's as dark as I want it to be. I'm using more dashy lines now just to fill in some of these gaps on that bottom left side. We can draw the stem now as well. Remember just to check the positioning. If you need to, you can draw it in pencil again. I might actually do that. I want this to come down because I want it to sit on the left side of this. Like before, I'm going to do the shading first and then work on those stamen over the top. For the shading, I'm moving to my 005 pen. I'm working on these curved lines. For these folds I'm just making them parallel to that fold as it goes up and as I move around, moving straight up and then coming back the other way. Back to my 02 now. I'm going to draw in all of these stamen. I'm going to have some overlapping the central disc slightly, because I'll be sitting in front of it. They're coming a bit further out on the sides due to the angle. Just pause, take a step back slightly and have a look to see if you need to add anymore in. It can be so easy to get lost in your drawings or your paintings that it's good to just take a step back and look at it overall to see if you need to add anymore or make any changes. Now I'm just going to add in those lines randomly to join the anthers up to the center. Now I'm just switching back to my finer pen, my 005 to add a little bit of shading to this stem. Making it fairly dark underneath, which is going to help that stem look like it's sitting further back than this front petal. A little bit here as well. Then just more of those dashy lines, particularly on the left, to help give that stem some dimension. That is our tilted view complete. 20. Anemone Part 4: Now let's move on to this side view of the anemone. We already have our semicircle. Here we'll be able to see probably about three of the petals. We can sketch these in. I'm just going to draw the line further direction of them. I'm going to have one in the center here, and then the two on either side will be a bit more hidden. Then we can add a little bit of the petals on the other side as well. Then if you haven't got that stem drawn in, you can just draw it in again. Moving to my pen, I'm going to add a dip. I'll show you in pencil first to this the base of this petal. It's an upward step, which will just help show how it will join the stem. This view is quite straightforward. We don't need to worry about the center because we can't see it. Now we can just add some shading to those petals. I'm adding in lots of extra small lines at the base just to make it darker to show that it goes underneath. Then I'm just going to add some shading to the top of this stem. Then on this lowest stem as well, particularly to that left side again. Now it's just the final two buds to draw in. I'm going to go back to my 02 going to keep these really quite simple. The focus is on the main flowers. I'm just going to follow this egg shape but round and then draw in this stem. These ones are sitting behind the other stems and the same for this one. That bud went a bit wonky, but I'm not worried about it. You just have to remember we're drawing things in nature which are never perfect so don't get caught up in trying to do everything perfectly. Switching to my 005 I just add some shading to the tops and bottoms of these buds to help give it that curve. Then to the stem as well, just as we did before, making it very dark underneath. Then adding a little bit more of those dashed lines, particularly on the left, all the way down. Here where it sits behind those other stems, you can make it darker and that will push it back slightly in the overall picture. That's our anemone finished. Once the pen has dried, once we're happy we've left it a few minutes, we can just take all of the pencil away and we're done. If you enjoyed this anemone, you can keep practicing these angles, perhaps experimenting with different ways to do the stamen, like I showed you at the start, keeping them white for more contrast, instead of coloring them in and looking at different projects that you can use them for. Like for those simple gift tax bookmarks, greeting cards, or in your journal. In the next video, we're going to learn how to draw the daisy. 21. Daisy Part 1: Daisies are common and popular flower, which I couldn't leave out of this class. They have a fairly simple structure, they have a lot more petals and the other flowers we've drawn so far, and can range from an average of 15 to 30 petals per flower with a central desk. Here is the finished piece that we'll be drawing and again, we're going to be drawing a daisy from three views. We have the front view, the tilted view, where we can still see the center and then the side view where we can see the base. We'll also be adding in a few buds as well. This is a great flower to do though, here's an example from my sketch book, playing around with those different angles and varying the height of the flowers to create a nice meadow like composition. Here's a simple gift tag as well, using the tilted view. I also like to use really simple versions of this daisy in my journal. Here's an example where I've added it into the corner of this page as a decoration. These are simplified by making them smaller, using less petals and adding less details. Here's another example of using a really simplified version of the daisy in my journal, just creating this bottom border along the edge. The daisy is a birth flower for April so it can be also great to use as the feature on a journal cover page for that month or within that month's layouts, or for gift tags for people with birthdays in April. There are a couple of bits that we can practice for the daisy. As we practiced earlier the daisy has a slightly longer thinner petal. Starting from a [inaudible] point, go up and then when you get to the top, can add in a couple of dips. When we're drawing the daisy at an angle, those lower petals are going to be much shorter. If we started at this narrow point again, they might only come that far down when the flower is really tilted and the ones slightly at the side, at the bottom they're going to be a lot shorter. The central disc has a lot of texture, like the cosmos, so we'll be using those C curves again to create that texture. At the base of the daisy when we're drawing the side view we'll have this kind of cup, then I can draw in all these pointy bit and the petals are going to come out from that. You can practice simplifying that and then also we can include buds as well with these daisies. That's going to have that cup with these dips and then it'll come up into that kind of egg-shaped top where the petals will be. As we'll be doing the three views, the top view, the tilted view, and the side view. We can arrange these in our composition and we've done a couple of different ones are ready. One kind of coming off to the left side for the cosmos. One coming up from the center for the anemone. Feel free to play around with these clusters of three. Here is good practice to have a go at experimenting with compositions and positioning of the flowers. I'm going to do these coming up from the center again. I'm going to have the top view over on site to the right [BACKGROUND] and then I'm going to have the tilted view at the top [NOISE]. Then I'm going to have the side view so it's kind of bending downwards. It will be facing downward slightly. To add in that small semicircle for that cup that we just practiced as well. I'm going to add in these stems, so working from the center to make sure it's lined up. This one is going to crossover, go round. Then I'm going to add in some of those buds as well, which are very small. They got one up the top everyone here. Then I'm going to have one lower down as well. On this left scientist keep it balanced. I'm going to move this one up a bit higher. Again, play around with yours as much as you need to do. You're happy with your pencil guides. It's a nice tall composition now. 22. Daisy Part 2: Starting with this top view lets draw in the center. Because there are so many petals, I'm not going to map them all out. I'm actually going to go straight to my pen for these, but do feel free to carry on working in your pencil first. I'm going to start by just going over this circle with those C curves to make sure that we've got that textured outline in. Then I'm just going to start with the top petals so keeping these narrow. Adding these tips in. Turn your page as much as you need to. I'm going to do a few randomly and then start drawing the ones around that sit underneath so they're not too structured or uniform. You can have some which are slightly different shapes. Here you can see this is curving up a little bit, and it will just add a bit more interest in the overall piece, having them slightly different. Now, I'm going to start drawing some that sit behind the other petals. It's nice to take your time with these. Can be really relaxing. Just focusing on these pen strokes, not feeling like you have to rush at all. I'm happy with how many petals I've gotten there. Now, I'm going to focus on this center disc. Again, with the C curves keeping it darker, more dense on the bottom left side, so that it shows that it curves round. As we move up to the top right, draw them in slightly further apart so that there's more white showing through on that top right. Then just make it even darker with some dashing lines on the bottom left. Now, we can draw a stem in. Just make sure it lines up. Then I'm going to switch to my 005 for the shading. Some nice long lines work well, slightly curved for these. Then we can add in a little bit more shading for the petals that sit at the back. Push them back a bit more. I feel like this shading is so simple, but it really transforms your drawing. Then just add a little bit of shading underneath to the stem as well, making it darker directly underneath that petal, and then adding the dashy lines all the way down, particularly on the left side. 23. Daisy Part 3: Now let's move on to this tilted view at the top, which is our oval shape. We'll start by drawing in this center circle, which is an oval for this tilted view. Remember, keep it fairly low within that big oval. Then if you wanted to, we can actually draw some of these petals in first because the shapes will differ to these ones. They'll be shorter and the directions will be a little bit more curved. On the side, we want to go upward slightly. It will roughly be like that. We'll have some shorter petals. Here I'm not actually going all the way to this edge because I want to add some more petals underneath because we've got lots of petals here which overlap some are sitting further up and some are sitting just underneath. I'm going to make these longer as they come out at the angle and then add another one underneath here. We can make these fair bit longer as we move to the side. I'm not going to draw them all in, and that gives me a good starting point. I'm just going to take away that center one underneath. Moving to my pen now, I'm actually going to start with this bottom petal. I want it to overlap that central disk slightly. I'm going to bring it up a little bit higher than that oval. Then bring this down. Same with this one next to it. Then we can draw the rest of the oval in. That just helps to show that these petals are sitting in front of that central disk. I'm going to carry on with these petals that are slightly underneath. Don't feel like you need to follow your pencil lines exactly. You can see I'm actually changing this slightly as I go along. I'm just using them as a rough guide for where the petals could sit. Pause, take a step back, have a look, see if you need to add any more petals in. I'm quite happy with how mine looks. I'm going to start working on this central disk now. With this side view, I want this to sit further forward. I'm actually going to wait to join the stem until I've done this final side view flower. Switching to my 005, I'm going to start on the shading. Again, with those very long lines, making the ones further back slightly darker as they join into the base, which helps to push them back. Then curving these round and then curves on either side here. Sometimes the pencil lines can get in the way when you're doing your shading so you may want to remove them before you start doing the shading so you can clearly see what you're adding in. I'm just going to go over some of these areas now, particularly in the center, to add a little bit more depth. Just adding in that darkness by going over some of these lines. That's going to really help the flower look like it's dipping in at the center. 24. Daisy Part 4: For the side view now, I'm just going to adjust this a little bit and refine it a bit more. Bringing up this cup and then you can draw nice, pointy bits as well. Then we want these petals to come outwards. It might not sit exactly within this semicircle, which is absolutely fine, I will have the rough direction at these petals. I think I'm going to bring this down a little bit lower as well. With my 02 pen, I'm going to draw in this cup first and then I'm going to draw in the stem. I've brought this up too high with the pen, so I'm going to have to bring it down, curve it around a little bit more because I want it to sit in the middle. That's fine. If you want to, you can draw some of these petals end first, particularly the ones on the outer edge just to get that positioning and the direction. Then I'm going to fill in the rest of the pen. I'll go over these first. Now I can just add a few petals that are sitting towards the other side so you can just see the depths at the top. Once you have all the petals that you want in, we can go and add in our shading. I'm going to just take out these pencil lines so I can see a bit clearer because I've got quite a few. Starting with this base, I'm going to do a fair amount of shading on here because it is actually darker than the petals. Then it will just add a bit more texture as well. Then I'll do the shading on the petals so there's long lines. Then the shading on the stem. I'm going to color this in quite dark to really give it some contrast then add these lines. I'm just going to head back to my 02 now to draw in the stem of this tilted flower which is sitting at the back. Then just add some shading into that stem as well. Now we have our three flowers, we can do the buds. The first thing I'm going to do is check the positioning. I'm still happy with where these are. I think I'm going to move these two lower ones slightly. I'll take out the rest of the pencils later. I've got this one up here, which I'm fairly happy with. I'm going to make this one a bit higher and curving over slightly. I'm going to bring it around. I want it to cross beneath the other stems so it looks a part of the drawing. Then this one will be a bit lower down. I'm happy with the positioning of the three of them. We can roughly draw in the base now with the zigzaggy lines and then move to the 02 to finish drawing them in. Then I'm just going to add in the final shading with my 005. Again, like the psi flower, I'm just going to add in a bit more shading to this base, coloring in the very top of that stem to add that contrast, then add some curved lines to the bud. Once your pen has dried, just remove the pencil line and then that's our daisy finished. Here is a reminder of some of those extra projects I showed you at the start for how I've used a daisy in more projects, which I hope will give you some extra inspiration. 25. Echinacea Part 1: I love Echinacea flowers as they are such a distinctive and striking flower with a large central cone head and downward facing petals. For this flower, we're going to be drawing these two angles. This is the finished piece that we will draw the side view and then a slightly more tilted view where we can see those back petals, which are really nice to add into a composition, to add a little bit of variety. This is one of my favorite flowers. You'll find this a lot in my journals and in my sketchbooks. Here's an example of a page in my sketchbook and you can create some really nice compositions and pieces by varying how these petals sit a little bit. Even though these are all at the side view, you can change some of the petals, so some of them maybe tilting upward slightly. These are curving upward slightly, and then these ones are coming down more. They all look slightly different. Here's another example from one of my sketchbooks. This is a slightly more simplified version. Just using single lines for the stems and adding less details into the cone head and using a few less petals. Here's an example of a simple gift tag I made with this flower as well. It's coming off from the left slightly, and because this is a nice tall flower, it can work while on bookmarks. Here is another example that I made where I added in just a couple of really simple leaves. Finally, just to show you some decorations of these Echinacea, I added into my journal for a weekly layout. Again, as you can see, there's a really simplified and I've already cut down on the details here. These didn't take very long, they just really fun, simple doodles to add in. The petals on the Echinacea will be a similar shape and size to the petals from the daisy. They'll be long and fairly narrow coming to that narrower point where they meet the cone head. They'll also have that tip at the end. These petals will be facing downwards or to the side and some of the ones to the side, we can add a slight curve into them. Flicking them up slightly at the end just to add a bit more interest, but they can also curve around. It can be nice to vary the petals like this just to make the flower look a bit more interesting and natural. For the cone head, again, we'll be creating that texture using those C curves and they'll all be facing downwards as we'll be drawing the Echinacea from the side. Finally on the stem for the Echinacea, we can also add in these tiny hairs. Just using tiny flicking lines on either side, which gives it a nice bit of texture as well. Starting with our pencil to draw our guides, we're going to do two Echinacea; one from a complete side view and one from a slightly tilted side view. I'm going to start with one up here with a semicircle, having a curved face, and then adding in that semicircle for the cone head. This one is going to curve off slightly up to the left, and then I'll have another one down here. This one making that top curve less deep and then having the bottom a bit deeper, bringing that round a bit deeper than the top and then curving this stem around. This cone head is going to sit within those petals within this bigger shape, because we want some of these petals to be seen at the back. Semicircle with another curved base. Once we've got our rough placement and rough shapes, we can go back and refine these. I'm still using my pencil. I might make this one a little bit bigger, this cone head, and then just bring that curve at the base down as well. I'm going to make this a bit shorter. 26. Echinacea Part 2: Now I'm going straight to my 02 pen. I'm going to do the outline of the cone head first with that texture, so using those C-curves to create that dome. Then doing the same underneath. Now we can start adding in the petals and feel free to do these in pencil first. These ones will come pretty much straight down and then they'll start to come out. We start with one in the middle, adding these tips in at the end, curving round and then bringing it up to a narrow point. I'm going to add one here now and then bring it around. Then I'm going to add one more at the edge. I'm going to curve this up slightly, so it goes outside of that guide, and then start on the other side. Now we can fill in the gaps with a couple of sitting underneath. This one is going to be underneath here. Not all of these petals have to be touching. I'm going to do another one on this side. That sits behind there. Then I think I'm happy with that. I'm just getting back to my pencil just to make sure I've got the stem in the right place. Starting from the middle of the cone head, I'm going to come down, and just draw that in with another parallel line at the sides. I'm going to go over that with my pen. You can see to get that smooth line, I'm pulling my pen down the whole page. I'm not moving from the wrist. I'm moving from the shoulder instead, and that creates a smoother line. That's something we practiced in the introduction to doodling class. Now we've got our outline. We can draw in the texture within this cone head. We are using those upside down C-curves. Then again, we want to create more darkness on this lower left side and lightness on this top side so it looks like the light is shining on. That is going to help create the dimension within this shape. I'm going to add a few in ready with some gaps in-between. Then as I move down, I'll make them closer together. I'm just going to start going over these ones in the bottom-left corner to make them even darker. Trying to take away more of that white space. Then I'm just going to add some dashing lines to fill in more space along the bottom. The more contrast you have between this bottom-left side and this top right side, the more is going to stand out and the more curved it will look. I'm happy with that now, I'm going to move to my 005 pen for the shading of the petal. As with all the other petals that we've done, just make sure you follow these curves down. Keeping these lines at different heights as well. Then I'm just going to add some more at the top to make it look like these petals are curving inwards. Adding more depth with that darkness. Then we can do some from the bottom, particularly where the petals dip in. Then add some shading to the stem, making it quite dark underneath this petal here. Then just bringing it down particularly on that left side, leaving that white stripe on the right side to help give that stem some curves as well. Then we can just add in these small lines for some hairs down the stem. They don't have to be uniform, just spread them out randomly. That's our side view completed. Now we can move on to the tilted view. 27. Echinacea Part 3: If we start with these petals at the front, pretty much similar to these ones. Then as we move around, we go up slightly. Then for these back ones, they're going to be quite a bit shorter because we can't see them all. Then as we come back around this side, we can make them longer again. Then I'm just going to move that stem slightly over. Moving [NOISE] to my pen, again, I'll start with this outline of this cone head and then draw the petals in. Now I'm just going to draw that stem in. Let's do the markings in the cone head [BACKGROUND]. Then just build that up on this left lower side. Then again, just make it darker using more shading. Now I'm going to switch to my finer pen [NOISE] for the shading of the petals [NOISE], just like before. Then just add a little bit more darkness next to the center with some shorter lines. Particularly if there are some petals that sit underneath another one. Just add like here, you can just add that darkness in as an extra shadow and then just the lines from the ends as well. Then finally the stem. Because I've got a fair amount that sits underneath these petals, I'm going to make this very dark to distinguish it from the petals. Then bring it down and then add in those small [inaudible]. Now we have finished our echinacea. We can just erase the pencil lines. We're finished. I hope you've enjoyed drawing these echinaceas with me. Here's a reminder of some of the projects I showed you at the start to give you some extra inspiration for how you can use this flower in your projects. 28. Pansy Part 1: Pansies are a lovely, uniquely, recognizable flower with five rounded petals. There are three petals that sit next to each other at the bottom, and then two slightly larger petals overlapping at the top. There can be a single color, have lines coming from the center, or have a bold dark center. Here's the finished piece that we'll be drawing with three views; the front view, a tilted view, where these petals are slightly folded, and then a side view or slightly behind view, where you can see those sepals at the back. Within this piece, I've chosen to add in those really dark markings in the center of the petals, but you can also do these in a few different ways. You can just add in some shading, keeping it really simple, or you can add in some of those bolder lines. Like I said, there were a few different versions of the pansies which are really nice to draw. But I feel like these ones are the most recognizable, so I thought we'd start with those. Here's an example, gift tag, I've used using the pansy, keeping it really simple. I simplified the center a little bit more than how we'll be doing them in this class. I just used a circle, and instead of those bold markings, I just added a little bit more shading. This is also a nice one to turn into a bookmark, just using a single flower, keeping it really simple. Again, I've just added in a couple of simple leaves. Finally, just to show you an example of a card I've made. I actually drew this on a separate piece of white card, and then cut it out, and stuck it on. You can see I've used a front view, and then the side view is towards the edge, to give the bouquet some dimension so it looks like the flowers are curving round into a bunch. For the petals on the pansy, the bottom petal is like an upside down heart shape. It goes round, and then you bring it in a little with a dip, and then bring it around to the center. The other ones are quite rounded as well. You can make these edges a little bit more natural by waving the pen slightly, because these petals on the pansy, they're quite delicate. Just by having it a little bit less smooth is going to look more delicate. For the center, if you were doing a doodle, you can just keep it really simple with a circle. We could keep that white so it stands out in contrast to the rest of the flower, or you can draw these two teardrop shapes with a little circle underneath. I do this a bit bigger so you can see again. These to sit next to each other touching. Then there's a semicircle underneath. We'll do three angles for the pansy, but the main angle that you will probably use in most of your drawings will be the front view. But it's nice to just know how to draw the other two so that you can include them in any compositions, particularly if you want to draw a bunch of pansies in vase so then you can have a few at the sides going off in different directions. We will start in the center with a circle for the front view pansy. Then off to the right, I'm going to do an oval. This is going to be a tilted view. Then I'm going to do a slimmer oval on the left. This will be a side view where we can see the base. I'll just draw the stems down. For this middle one, it's just going to come straight down. This tilted view is going to just curl round and sit next to that. Then the same for this. Side view is going to come around. I'm going to move this center stem over slightly so they're not touching. 29. Pansy Part 2: For our front view, let's start just by marking out where the center is with a small circle. Then we're going to draw in the bottom petal, which comes out to the side slightly and then curves down, comes around, dips in, and then comes back up. Then we have two petals either side, so you can go up slightly curve it round, and then bring this down underneath that bottom petal. Do the same on the other side. Then for the top two petals, they're going to sit slightly above this circle. They're going to be a bit bigger. For the first one, we'll start over at the top of the left petal. You can do this either side. You can also trace your pencil along or at this in roughly from the center, just to make sure you're getting the shape right. I'm bringing this up and round and then down, that's going to come in there. Then another one that's going to sit behind this. So again, bringing this round. Moving to my pen, I'll start with the center, so again, we can keep this as a small circle, or we can do these teardrop shapes over the top and then add in that semicircle underneath. Now can go over these lines, making them a little bit more wobbly, a little bit more organic. Which will help give the illusion that this petal is really delicate. Same for these just wobbling that pen ever so slightly. Now we have our five petals drawn in. Let's do the stem coming down from that center. For the features of the pansy, we can just add the shading onto the petals or we can add the more distinguished dark markings which make the pansy more recognizable. You get different versions of these, so it's up to you which one you choose. We know how to do the shading, so I'm going to show you how to do the darker versions. So it's just on these lower three petals. We can start by outlining it. You can use your pencil for this or just use your pen. I'm just going up and drawing jaggedy lines with my pen. I'm going to fill this in. I'm not touching the edge of the petal and then I'm going to do this on the lower petal as well. Bringing it up the V-shape. If you have a boulder pen now, you can switch to that to fill this in. I'm using my 08 now and I'm just going to fill all of this in. Just going to make this a bit wider. So now that's filled in, I'm going to switch to my 005 to add some shading. Because these petals are quite delicate, we can add quite a few lines coming in from the outer edge and then also from the center going through that black area. So just making sure to curve around with the shape of the petal. Then for this petal which is sitting behind, we can add a bit of darker shading in this area, which is going to push that back, make it look like it's sitting behind a little bit more. Then again, those lines on the outer edge, particularly where it dips in. Then the same with this one. Then for the stem, shading underneath, bring it down and then carry on on the left side. That is our front view complete of the pansy. 30. Pansy Part 3: Now we're going to work on the side view. I'm actually going to move it over slightly more, give it a little bit more space between that and the front view flower. With my oval, I'm going to mark in where the center is roughly, and then we can draw in this bottom petal again fast. It's going to be a bit more squashed, a bit narrower because we're not going to see as much of it. Then this right petal, that can come out, so we'll see a little bit more of that. Then this petal we'll see less of because it's on the, so we can bring that underneath. We can also add some folds into these two, which will help make it look like it's more an angle. For these bottom two, we can actually have these, so they're coming outside this circle again to the back. Perhaps adding another fold and then add the other one quite small on the other side so we can just see it. With my size 2, I'm going to start with the center, making those center elements narrower than before. Then bringing that outside edge of the petal down. Then adding that folding. Then this one I run the left, so coming up slightly, and bringing it down and adding that fold in as well. Now this petal on the right and add this fold in here as well, which helps to make it look like it's more on a side angle and then the last petal there. Just check your stem, the positioning going out from the center and then bringing it down into a curve and then we can draw the outline of these markings. This one is going to be much bigger because we can see more of that petal. This one is going to go slightly underneath that fold and then come out there. I'm switching to my 08 again now to color these in. Back to my fine art 005 just to add in the shading again, so starting from the center going through these black lines and then also you bring it up round the edges. Remember to curve with the outline of the flower or the petal. Then for these folds, just one edge, making it parallel with that curve, coming round, bringing it in straight as you get to the center and then curving back the other way. Then adding in that dark bit of shading for those back petals which sit behind. Then finally the shading on the stem. That's our tufted pansy complete. 31. Pansy Part 4: For the final side view, we are not actually going to see the center features. We're just going to see the back almost. We can draw in the sepals here. If we've got our stem coming in, can add in those long pointy lines for the sepals at the back. Then going to starting from the center, I'm going to draw in the back of that base petal and bottom petal, and then adding these top two because they're at the back. Then just add in one more for one of the side petals. The petals are delicate so they can get a bit floppy, especially when they're bending over. You can be a bit freer with the way you draw these as well. I'm actually going to bring that sepal out. Starting with the 02, I'm going to start with the sepals and then bring the stem down. Now I'm just going to go over these petals. This one is quite simple because we don't have the added features. We can just add in the shading so I'm going to start with the sepals and just shade this in using hash lines just to make it a bit darker than the petals. It distinguishes itself and stands out a bit more. Then we can carry on down the stem as well just on that left side. Then with the petals, I'm just adding these lines for the shading. Now we can remove our pencil lines. [NOISE] There's are our pansies complete. I hope you've enjoyed drawing these pansies with me. You can continue to practice and play around with the different features. We added in those dark markings on the petals but you can try leaving them out or adding a few bold lines onto the petals instead. Here's a reminder of some of the examples I showed you at the beginning of the video which will hopefully inspire you to create more. 32. Tulip Part 1: Tulips are one of my favorite flowers. I love their shape and the beautiful colors as they come in during the spring. They just make me feel happier just looking at them. They have three petals on the inside and then three sepals on the outside, which look the same. It looks like they just have six petals, and then they have long leaves clustered at the base. We tend to see and draw tulips from a side view as the flower stand upright, so the stamen in the center are usually hidden. This is the final piece we're going to be drawing for the tulip with three versions at slightly different stages of bloom. From more closed, where you can just see two petals to much more open, where you can see all six of the petals. We'll also be adding in some of these two leaves that cluster at the base with a couple of them folding over. Here's an example of a cute little card I made using these tulips, keeping it really simple, so this didn't take long at all. Here's an example of a gift tag I made using three of the tulips. Again, different stages of bloom. Then because this is a nice tool flower as well, it's a nice one to add into a bookmark as just using a single flower with those leaves. Then finally, just an example from my sketchbook using a variety of the tulips. Some of them have the main petal in the middle, some of them have the outer petal showing first, and then some are more closed off and some much more open with those stamen peeking through. You can add a lot of variety into the drawings of tulips by changing how the petal sit, so it's another nice flower to experiment with, perhaps just filling a page of different versions. If you happen to have some real-life tulips as a reference, you can just turn them around slightly and draw the way the petals sit at different points. Let's start by practicing a couple of the shapes of the petals for the tulips. We're going to come round and come up to a bit of a point and then bring it down. If this is on the outer edge, it may be more curved round like that. With the tulips, we can also add in the leaves because they were really nice additional feature to add in. If we have the stem, we can add in the leaves in front of or behind or next to, they're clustered around the base. An easy way to position your leaves is just by using a line. We can draw them going straight up or we can have them flopping over. Then we can just lean where that leaf will go with a nice curved line. With this one flopping over, we can bring that up to the edge and then draw in the rest underneath, and then we can refine our shape as we need to. We're going to draw three different versions of the tulip at different stages of it blooming. These are all going to be from the side view. We'll start in the center with quite a wide cup-shape, semicircular shape. Then on the left we're going to have more of a teardrop shape. It's going to be tilted slightly to the left. Then on the right we'll have a narrower cup-shape, semicircular, and that one is tilted to the right. We can bring these down with the stem. [NOISE] 33. Tulip Part 2: For the petals starting on this left one, this is going to be fairly closed. Starting at the bottom, I'm going to bring it around to the top , a bit of a point, curve it round slightly, so I'm leaving a gap for that second petal to sit and then bringing it in. Then near the top, I'm going to come up, dip down, curve it round and that's going to be the second petal. This center one is open much more, so I'm going to start by drawing in the biggest petal that we can see in the center here. Then have two either side, which we can just see the side of, and then we can add in a couple of back petals that we can see as well. Going to bring this down, make it a bit longer. On this side, we're going to see the two outer petals on the left and the right, so I'm going to bring it up in the center, curve it round, dip it in a little bit, curve it round the outside. It'll slightly overlap, so I'm going to bring this around on the outside as well. Then through those two petals we'll be able to see a couple more petals. We can quickly sketch in our leaves as well where we want those to sit. We can have one or two coming off from the base, which looks quite nice. I'm just going to start by drawing a line to represent where these will go. I'll have one flopping over on that side and then one straight up. I'm just going to have one in the center and then another one there. If you're happy with how they look, we can start filling these out. I'm just going to draw in where these leaves, which would form. I'm going to bring them slightly off the bottom of the page as well. Actually both of these are going to sit behind the stem, I think, and then this one will sit in front of this stem and it will wrap around so you won't see that bottom edge of the stem. I'm just going to make this leaf a bit higher and then have this other one coming from behind as well. I'm actually going to make these two a little bit longer. Now I'm going to move on to my 02 and draw these in, adding in these nice wavy lines. Now I'm going to draw in any of the leaves which are sitting in front, so this middle one is going to be sitting in front, so both of those leaves are sitting behind the stem and I think I'm going to make both of these sitting in front as well. Now I'm going to draw in the stem. This stem sitting in front. I can draw this all the way to the end of the page and then add in these leaves sitting behind. Now we have all of our outlines. I'm going to erase the pencil, and then we can clearly see where we can add some shading. With my 005, I'm going to start with the petals and add these curved lines upwards to start with, adding in a few more at the face. Then also bringing them down from the top. Then on this other petal I'm going to add a few more in, so it looks a bit darker. Then on the stem, make it quite dark underneath and then bring it down on the left side. For the center, start with those curves and then bringing it down from the top as well. Then on the outer petals, making slightly darker to distinguish them again and then adding that darkness at the top of the stem and then bringing it down. Then adding these curved lines for the final flower. Then we can add some shading to these leaves as well, so where they curve over, I'm just going to add in some lines and then from the tip as well. Then underneath, we can make this a bit darker as well. Still remembering to curve it round into the direction that the leaf is going to help with its shape, and I'm going to bring some down from the top. You can just add in some random lines as well to give the leaves a bit of texture. Then the same with this folded leaf, making it darker underneath. [BACKGROUND] Now, just take a step back, see if you need to add anymore shading anywhere. Those are our two leaves finished. I hope you've enjoyed them. Here's a reminder of some of the projects I showed you at the beginning for some extra inspiration for more drawings. 34. Daffodil Part 1: Daffodil is a lovely bright yellow flower that shows us that spring is on its way. It has a fairly unique structure with its trumpet shaped center surrounding the stigma and stamen, and then six petals on the outside. We'll be drawing the daffodil from three angles. The front view where we can see the stamen in the center. A tilted view where we can see more of the edge of this trumpet shape and then the stamen peeking out. Then a side view where we can see this trumpet coming out through those petals and also this sepal at the base. We'll also be including some of these lovely long leaves and a couple of the buds because there's such a unique shape for the daffodil. Here's a simple gift tag that I made just using a tilted view of the daffodil. Then the daffodil is a birth flower for March so it's a great feature for a journal cover page. Here is an example of one of mine. For this, I simply drew around a circle and then mapped out where my three flowers would sit, so that all at a slight angle and they all come down to the circle slightly. I then added in the leaves and the buds, again, just overlapping this circle a little bit and then drew them all [inaudible] and then filled in the circuit in black to add that contrast. The daffodils petals are fairly rounded and then they come up to a bit of a point, so we can just practice their shape and bringing it down to the narrower part which meets the middle. Then we have this trumpet shape in the middle, which has this frilly edge. We can either do this fairly simply, so just with a wavy line, keeping it quite simple. Or we can do a bit more realistic, bringing these curves round a bit more. Adding in lots more of these frills. It depends how much detail you want to go into. With the center, we'll be able to see that from the front view and the tilted view. From the front view, we can just draw in a few circles to represent those stamen and then when they're coming up from the tilted view, we can draw them more as the tubes that come up as they meet this edge, which we'll see a bit more as we draw them. We can also draw in buds of the daffodil, because they're quite unique so they have long wavy soft lines. Bring back down into the stem. We can add another bud in here, and this is usually darker. We could add a lot of shading in here and then add the stem underneath. Those are just a few of the elements that we'll be using with our daffodils. With our pencil, we can map out our layout. Will have the front view, the tilted view, and the side view and then we can add in some of those buds and a couple of leaves as well. I'm going to start with the front view, so a circle, very central, a higher higher than the center and then we'll have the tilted view as an oval on the right side and then on the left side, we can have the side view. This will be a semicircular shape for the petals and then we can add in that trumpet shape for the center of a daffodil. Going back, once you're happy with the main positioning, we can go back, so for this top one and then going to sketch in the center and then on here, is going to be off-center. Another oval, I'm going to leave a little bit of a gap on that side so we can see the petals and then the base of this trumpet shape is going to come underneath. Then we can just map out where their stems are going to sit. Then I'm going to add in a couple of buds so I'll have a bud maybe coming over here so adding in that long petal, I have another one coming up through here which will sit behind. Then we can just add in a few leaves. At the moment, we can just add some lines where we think they might fit in nicely and then we can refine those a bit later. I'll add in another one coming up here, and maybe one more reaching up here. 35. Daffodil Part 2: Starting with this top view, we can refine this circle in the center. We're going to use those wavy lines and again, add as much detail as you want to these so they can just be simple up and down waves or you can curl them round a bit more. Then the daffodils have six petals, so we can just mark out where these are going to sit. Then because we can't see where the petals join the base of this trump, because the base of this trump is a bit smaller, these are going to be fairly wide where we start. The petals are not going to be really narrow and then we can bring them up to that point and bring them down. These will all be slightly overlapping each other. I'm going to make this one a bit bigger so it overlaps here. Then for the center, we can just draw in these circles for the tops of the stamen , six of those. Switching to my 02 pen now. We can just go over these lines. I'm alternating these petals slightly so they don't always overlap at the same point. This one now sits beneath these two. I might do this one next. Then I'm going to do the stamen. Now we can switch to our finer pen, 005 for the shading. Starting with the center, we can add a fair bit of shading. It's all going to point towards the center. Whenever there's a dip in this frilly edge, we can bring it down and then we can always add a bit more. Going round as well at the edge. These are slightly shorter than the other ones. But just add to that shading. I'm going to leave the stamen with white centers just as the outline. Then coming from the center, I'm going to add some shading and it's going outwards. Now we can do the petals. We'll follow the curve of the outer edge round and then bring a few lines down from the top as well. I'll just do the same on each of them. Then we can always make it darker around these edges as well. That's going to help distinguish the petals from that center. Particularly for the petals that sit underneath, we can make these darker where they join. I'm going to leave the stamen till the end because I want some of these buds and possibly leaves to sit in front so we can draw those in first. 36. Daffodil Part 3: So now we can move on to this tilted view of the daffodil. So again, starting with this center, I'm going to draw this frilly edge, and then just refine the base of that trumpet a little bit more. Then we can draw the direction of the petals. So we can have one out here, and they are curving up slightly, and then we can draw those in. So you can see these two are slightly narrower because they're more on the side. But these two here, they're a bit wider because we can see more of them as they're on the outer edge. Then we can draw the stamen in. I'm just going to do a few lines and then add some circles at the top. [NOISE] So now I'm moving to my 02 pen and I'm going to start by going over this frilly edge, and then bringing this trumpet base in. Then we can go over these petals. Now we can go over this stamen. Switching to my 005, we can start the shading. With the base of this trumpet we can just have some lines going upwards and then make them darker. At the base is some shorter lines, and then also bring them down as well. Then on the inside, any better dips in, we can just bring that down towards the center. Then just add a little bit more shading around the edge as well. [NOISE] For the petals we'll do the same. So curving up in the direction and then adding a bit more shading where they join the center to give that real depth of them curling in and joining. [NOISE] 37. Daffodil Part 4: That's our tilted view done as well. Now we can move on to our side view. Using the pencil first, we have this trumpet shape, so we can go over this. We're just going to see one edge of this, and then we can bring it in a bit more. We're not going to see all of this trumpet because some of the petals are going to be covering it. We can bring a petal up here, and then curve it round as well. We'll probably see about four of them. Then we can start sketching these in. I'm going to make this a bit higher. Then we can also draw in this sepal which will cover a little bit of the bottom petal as well. That joins into the stem. Going to the size 02 pen, I'm going to start by drawing over the sepal, and then the petals. This one at the edge is going to be really quite narrow because it's just a side view. The same on this side. Then we can draw in this trumpet and go over this edge. With a size 005 now, I'm going to draw in the shading. We don't have to worry about the center because we can't see it on this side view. It's just bringing down those dips towards the center, and then adding in a bit more shading at the top. Doing the shading on the petals, so curving it around as usual. Then when any petals sit underneath anything, just adding in that extra shading to give it a little bit more depth to push it back. Got quite a few pencil lines in here. Once I take them off I'll just double-check that all my shading, I've got enough shading. Then for this sepal, I'm going to add a bit more color because it's a bit darker, its got a bit more texture to it, and it's got these little lines down it. And this will distinguish it from the stem as well. 38. Daffodil Part 5: Now we have our three main views. We can go back to our pencil and just check on the rest of the layout. I'm still happy where everything is sitting. I can start to go over these buds now. Making these a bit more defined, bringing it down where it joins the stem. Then drawing that stem down. Then we've got another one here. Bringing that in to join the stem as well and adding another little bud. This is where we can decide which of these are going to sit in front of which. I think this part I want to sit in front, so that stem will go behind and so will this bud that will go behind both of those. This is going to come down next. Also sitting behind that front bud. This is going to curve around a bit more. Then we have a leaf that's coming off here, so I'm going to draw that in a bit more and that can sit in front, so it's going to cover up a bit of this stem here. I'm going to draw this round flip it over and bring this back up so it joins and then I bring it down on this side. We have another leaf going up here. This is just a straight one and this can sit behind. Actually, I might make this sit in front of these two stems just to cover them up and make it a bit neater. Then we've got one more leaf coming out which I will put behind, that can just curve over slightly. Going to my pen now, I know that this bud is sitting in front, so I'm going to do that first and then this leaf is also fairly in front. This is the next one. This is why I like to switch between my pen and pencil whenever I need to because it just really helps you map things out a bit better. We can join these stems. Then we have this bud coming up here and this stem. I'm going to add a line in there and that's where this sepal stalks, curve this stem round and then we can add in this leaf sitting behind it and to make this a little bit narrower. Then we've got that final leaf that we can draw in which is at the back. We've got a fair bit going on there so I just need to add in the shading now for these buds and anything on the leaves. I'm going to remove all my pencil lines because I no longer need any of those guides anymore. [NOISE] Now I've removed the pencil lines, I'm going to my 005 pen to add in the shading. I'm going to start with these buds and add some long lines in for the texture of the sepals. It gives them a bit of a contrast from the flowers themselves. Then you can add in a bit of darkness where it joins the stem to distinguish it and then add in your shading down the stem and carry on with the other stems as well. Then we have this other bud, so I'll do the same here with these long lines to create that texture. Then for this leaf that's folding over, I'm just going to add some shading underneath and then from the tip as well and then here just to help it show it's spreading over and also from the base. We've also got this sepal here. This small part shall add the shading too and then the start of the stem. Then we've just got the two more leaves which I'll just add a little bit of shading and texture to. I think we're pretty much done, so just take a step back, have a look at yours, see if there's any extra details you want to add, any bits you want to stand out more, so then you can just add a little bit more shading like I'm doing here. I'm pretty happy with that. I hope you're happy with yours too. 39. Poppy Part 1: The common poppy is a bright red, easily recognizable flower with four big floppy petals around the center, which has a central disc and then lots of dark stamen. This is a really fun one to draw as you can be quite free and organic with the petals as they are less structured. This is the finished piece we'll be drawing for this flower. We'll be drawing this front view, a tilted view where you can still see the center and then a side view and a few buds as well. Here's an example of a simple gift tag I made just using one poppy and a few buds. This can be also nice for adding two simple greeting cards. Again, just using a single flower. Then it's also a fun one to add your sketchbook, because you can just play around with all of these different petals and the different angles of the flower. We've got a couple that are tilted, these two are more face on, then this is a side view and then obviously adding in those buds at different heights. Poppies are also the birth flower for August, so are a great feature to use within journal cover page for that month. I've got a couple of examples of how I've used them in my journal. Here I've just used the side view for a couple of flowers. It's really simple, just took me a couple of minutes to add these in but they make a really nice decoration. Then here I've added it into a weekly layout. Again, I've used a couple of different angles and I've really simplified the center here and I've added in some shadow using my gray pen. I've made these slightly different but they're still recognizable as puppies. As we practiced earlier, these poppies have these lovely floppy organic leaves. We can be much freer with our pencil lines here making no flow much more. We can just practice that kind of movement again. Then for the center it tends to have a circular center. You can draw these lines from the center all the way around. We'll also add some shading to this and then lots of stamen like the anemone gets quite dark, so I'm just drawing lots of dark marks and would do that all the way around. Then you can also join these up to the center. Just like with the akinesia, we can also add some of these small flicking lines to the stem for some small little hairs. Then we can also draw in some buds, which look really nice as well with the poppies and they tend to bend over so it kind of this egg shape and then you bring the stem up and curve it down. We'll add a couple of those into our drawing as well. We're going to have a top view, a tilted view, and then a side view, and then a couple of buds in this one. We'll start with our circle, I'm going to do this over to the right slightly. This is for the top for you and then I'm going to have the tilted view at the top. Tilting off to the left, have a side view maybe coming down here a little bit. Then I think I'm going to have a bad coming up here and then maybe another one off here. I'm going to just tone these stems now and then just check, all looks okay. I'm going to move this over slightly, I think, and then bring this over a little bit as well. I can see there. [NOISE] 40. Poppy Part 2: We can start with top view now, this circle, and then add a smaller circle in the center. Then the poppy has four petals. So we can just start with one. These organic lines, bring it roughly to the edge. Don't worry about going outside of it. I'm going to have a larger petal that comes underneath. Then one that perhaps starts under this one, bringing it around to the center. Then one over here. I might add a bit of a fold into this as well. So going to my size 2, I'll start by going over that circle in the center and then just going over these petal outlines. Now I'm going to add that detail into the center. With these lines coming out and then add the stamen in around the edge. These are quite dense. It's quite a dark center in the poppy. I'm just going back over and filling in some of these whites paces as well. Then you can just draw the lines in connecting them. So many of them, you don't need to be exact. I'm just drawing lots of flicking lines. Get the suggestion that they're all joined rather than joining them in one by one. Now [NOISE] I'm moving to my finer 005 to add in some shading. Start with the center and particularly around the edge. I'm just going to use lots of flicky lines from the outer edge. This is going to help give it that dome shape. Then we can add some shading to our petals. So using those long lines, curving them around, and then also adding any lines, particularly where the petal dips in on the outer edge. Then misfold, I'm adding that shading in. It follows the curve of that top line. Going back to my 02, I'm going to draw the stem in. Starting from the center, checking that pencil line, still lines up, I'm going to draw a new one. I'm using the 005 to add in these small hairs along the stem, and then I'm just going to add in that shading as well. That's our first poppy complete. Now we can move on to the tilted view. 41. Poppy Part 3: For this tilted view, I'll start with the circle in the center, which is going to be a bit more of an oval now. Now, it's tilted. Then we can think about where we want those four petals to sit. I want quite a big one facing us. I'm going to draw this curving round like that and then going to have another one coming off to the side and that's going to come underneath. Have a big one. This is going to reach outside that circle, which is nice because we don't want to keep to that oval shape or that circular shape completely when it's such a lovely, organic natural structure that this poppy has. Again, I've put that underneath and I'm going to add a curve, a fold into the side of this one. I'm actually going to draw this bottom petal going over that center. It looks like it's folding towards us. Then we can only see half of this center, which I think will look quite nice. There are so many ways you can do this. You can just take a whole page and just play around with your pencil in ways that these four different petals can sit and it can be really fun to do that. You don't even have to look at a reference for that. You can just move them around, make them a bit floppy, make some bigger, smaller, and it will still work. I'm going to start with this bottom petal and then go over the center and then drawing the rest of the petals. For the center, we can draw these lines. I'm just going down slightly from the top as the center point and then bringing them all down. Then we can join the stamen. I'm not going to have any over this base petal. They're just going to all be inside. We can probably draw a couple over the center but mainly they'll be around the outside. Just going over a bit more to make it a bit more dense. Then I'm going to join them up to the center. Where is my 005 now? I will start with that shading in the center so bringing it up from the bottom. These little lines working my way around and then we can bring in the shading for the petals. Curving this round and then, same direction, bringing it up from the other edge. Then this petal is curving inwards. I'm going to draw a line upwards to show that it's dipping in, in the center before it comes down here. Then again, this one is dipping in as well. These lines are going to come up and then for this fold, I'll just do the shading as normal following in that edge. I'm going to add a bit more shading to this inner edge of this base petal. It looks like it's curving in a bit more. Then I'm going to add some darkness just here as well I'll put a bit more shadow. Anywhere that sits underneath something else and just add a bit more shading. It's going to help with the dimension. [NOISE] Because we've got this side view poppy to do, I'm going to wait to draw that stamen until we've finished. 42. Poppy Part 4: The side view of the poppy is really quite simple. I'm not going to use my pencil for this one, but you can if you want to. It's just going to have two petals showing. I'm just going to start near the stem, bringing this round, making it nice and curved, and then bringing in. That is one petal. Then the other one, I'm going to start about halfway from the other petal, bringing it up slightly, curving in, and then bringing it around, and then drawing that stem. It's really as simple as that. Then I'm just going to switch to my other pen to do the shading. Going to darken this area here where this petal on the right sits slightly underneath, and then do the stem, bringing it down on the left side, and then adding in those small little hairs. That was really simple. Just took a couple of minutes. We can go back now and draw in the stem of this tilted view. Starting from the center, just follow that line down. Then whilst I have this pen, I'm drawing the buds, and then we can come back and do the shading for the stem and the buds together. Just check you're happy still with the positioning of where you have your buds, and then just draw them in. I'm going to follow this down, and then add this one in over here. I think I'm going to add one more in over here just to keep it balanced down, so fairly low. This can come up and just sit behind this stem. Going back to 005, we can just finish shading everything in. I'll start with the buds with those curved lines, so we're keeping these really simple, adding that darkness to this top of the stem to distinguish it, and then just bringing that shading down on the left side, and then adding in those little flicks of the pen for the hair. Just randomly, you don't need to make them too uniform. Make this a bit darker underneath here. Then finally, we've got the stem as this tilted view. Nice little hairs. I just realized I didn't add these onto here as well, so I'm just going to go back. Take a step back, see if there's any more shading, any more details you want to add and if you're happy with it, you can just take off your pencil lines. That's all poppies complete. I really hope you've enjoyed drawing these poppies with me. Is a great flower to loosen up with playing around with the different shapes of those petals. If you find them tricky or feel like the shapes are just not working for you, then I recommend just looking through lots of different photos online of poppies and filling a page with sketches of the way they sit so you can get more comfortable drawing them. Sometimes it can feel easier to draw petals on more structured as you know how they should look, but I do love how you can vary the poppies petals so much more with these organic shapes. Here's a reminder of some of the projects that I showed you at the beginning to give you some extra inspiration for drawing more of these. 43. Hydrangea Part 1: The hydrangea is a beautiful large bloom made up of lots of clusters of petals. It may look quite daunting to draw because of this, but don't be put off. Because once we break it down into steps, it's actually really quite simple and can be a really relaxing one to draw because of the repetitive nature of drawing each of these clusters. This is the finished piece that we'll be drawing in this session. We'll be drawing a nice big bloom of clusters and adding in the stem and two simple leaves underneath. Here are a couple of extra examples of the hydrangea. This is for a gift tag, and because it's quite small, I've kept it really simple. I've simplified it a little using less clusters and less details on the leaves, so using smooth lines instead of jagged lines. Here's another example from my sketchbook, which was really relaxing to draw one evening just on the sofa. I've got three of these flowers and then a few leaves underneath. I really like the way these leaves contrast with the delicacy of the flowers because we can keep them so simple. Finally, here is a cover page in my journal for August, which is when these flowers tend to be in bloom, so it's a great time to add into your journal layouts. I made this one slightly different by giving the stems some contrasts, by coloring it in, and then also coloring in the centers of each of these clusters just to balance it out with that darker stem. As you'll see in the finished pace, we'll just be drawing simple circles and leaving them white in this paste that we'll be drawing together, so you have the option of doing either. For the petals of the hydrangea, they're funny rounded and then they come to a bit of a soft point. You can just practice that shape. For the practice bit here, I just want to practice some of those clusters from different angles. We'll start with a circle. These will be the top view of the clusters, and these will mainly be in the center of the flower. We'll start with a small circle in the center. They have four petals each. Bring the first one round, and have another one underneath and then one on either side. I'm just tracing the paper with a pen, so join up to the center and doing the same on the other side. For a tilted view of these clusters, we'll start with an oval. We can draw in that center circle a bit lower down and then the top petal as normal. Then this base petal is shorter. We can always add in a bit of a fold here if we want to. Then the side petals will curve up slightly. We can make this even narrower using a narrower oval to add some nice variation into the whole piece. Again, putting that circle further down and making that bottom petal just a bit flatter. It's changed shape quite a lot from this petal and then the top can be the same. Then these ones on the side, they're quite narrow as well. For more of a side view, you start with the oval again. This time we won't be able to see the center because this bottom petal is going to be curving upwards a bit more. We can draw this in like that. Then that top petal is going to peak out above it. Then we have the side petals. We'll use these ones at the outer edge of the hydrangea. That's really going to help give it that domed effect, which will be really nice and you can play around with these petals as well. There's lots of other ways you can do them so they're not as structured. If we draw another oval, start with that circle. Then that'd be about enjoying that bottom petal. We're doing the side petal and that can go underneath slightly. Then the top one. Then we can have this other side one curving up a little bit more and maybe adding a fold. Moving the petals around like that it's just going to make it look much more natural. But you can also just keep it simple just by using a couple of these and that's still going to help give it that perspective. 44. Hydrangea Part 2: With a pencil, we're going to sketch in a guide for the whole flower first. We want a large oval shape. Then we can add in a fatty thick stem in the center. Then you can also add in a couple of leaves. We'll just map these out roughly for now. We'll add a smaller one coming off to the left to a point. Then another one on the right, which is going to be overlapping this stem. It's going to be a bit bigger and bring that round so it will meet. That's just a rough guide at the moment, we can work that out a little bit more later. For the clusters of the petals, as I said, we want the top views in the center, which we can see more head on, and then the ovals, the side views and tilted views around the edge. That's going to help give it that curved effect. What we can do is just start by drawing guides for where each cluster will sit. Some starting with circles in the center. These can be touching or overlapping slightly. Then as you move to the outer edge, you can turn them into ovals a bit more. This is a fairly wide oval. Then they can get a bit narrower as you reach the edge. Don't worry about leaving some small gaps like this because we can just fill them in with odd petals at the end. Once you've filled in most of the area, we can start drawing our petals in. Don't worry about filling everything because like I said, we can fill those in at the end. Feel free to keep using your pencil to draw these in. I'm going to switch to my 02 because it's going to be easier for you to see. Because I've done this quite a few times, I'm much more comfortable with how to draw these petals as well. I'm just going to start in the center with these top views. Starting with a small circle and then drawing in the petals. Moving to the one next to it. Carry on. They might overlap, which is absolutely fine. Going to move this circle a little bit closer. So they do overlap. [NOISE] I'm going to bring some of these circles down a bit more so they're more overlapping to fill in these gaps. This petal, I'm not going to make it overlap. I'm actually going to push it against this line. So it looks like it's squashed in. Then this one can sit underneath. Got a fairly big gap here, so I'm just going to draw in another one and how that sitting underneath the rest? Another fairly big gap here, so again, I'm just going to draw that center in and the petals around it. Just tracing over the paper to see where they would join up. Add one more circular in here. Again, you don't need to follow the guidelines completely because your drawing will evolve so just go with it. I think that's most of the central rounded view ones. I might add one more in here because this is still fairly close to the center. Then we can start adding those oval ones, and so using those three or four tilted and side views that we practiced. 45. Hydrangea Part 3: Now as we're moving to the outer edge, we can start using those tilted inside views that we practiced. I'm going to add one in here. I'm just bringing that line down to meet up with the other flowers, so again, it looks a bit squashed in [inaudible] adding a bit of a fold. Then these side ones can go upwards a little bit. [NOISE] This is where I start not keeping to those guides as much. I'm just working with what I've got in filling in these gaps. Here I'm going to add that side view, so I'm going to join that bottom petal first, then the top petal peeking out and adding those side petals. Add another side view here and a really thin base petal here. If you find it easier, just move your page around so that you're not drawing the clusters upside down. I'm going to move this one down. Then to keep that rounded edge, I want to have some [inaudible] flatter. I've created a new edge for myself which is below this original guide. I'm just going to redraw that bit in now to keep it a bit more consistent, just takeaway that top bit. I want a fairly narrow one here as well from the tilted view. Adding a fold into this one because I've got a bit more space making it a bit less tilted. The nice thing about these is that you can be quite free with them. You don't have to make them really neat because these petals are going to be squashed and they are going to move around quite a lot. As long as you follow that rough structure, they're still going to look really nice. I'm going to add a fold into this side petal here. Maybe this one as well. This is a side view and that's the top petal peeking over the top. I think I filled in most of the edge now. I might add another one in here just to bring that out to the guideline a bit more, so it looks a bit more even. We do have a few gaps in here. But what I want to do first is add in the shading of the clusters that we've already got, so we can clearly see where they are. That's going to help define each cluster and distinguish them from everything else. I'm just going to take away the pencil lines now just from the flower area leaving in these leaves below. Now we can see a bit more clearly where all of our lines are. 46. Hydrangea Part 4: With my 005, I'm going to start with the shading and all I'm going to do is add some of these curved lines flicking up from the center into each petal. Keeping it really simple. This is going to really help distinguish the petals and the clusters from each other and transform the whole drawing. Then from the side view clusters, just make sure you do the shading from the base and then up above for that back petal. Once you've added in all of the shading to the existing clusters, we can then see a bit more clearly where we've got some gaps. I'm just going to start from the center and work my way out. If there's a big gap like this, you can draw in another circle and roughly add in where these petals would sit. Or you can just add in a point for a petal as well. In the smaller gaps, that's what I'm going to do. This is a bigger gap, so I'm going to add in that center, so we can see a few more of the petals. Same here. This is a bigger gap. This is a smaller one so I'm just going to add a couple of petal shapes in there. Now as you get to the outer edge, just make sure these are all filled in. It doesn't have to be exact. In a few of these places I'm just adding the tips of petals in. Don't overthink it. Can just be a few little lines that you're adding in. Here I've got a bit more space, so I'm going to add in that center. I'm just adding in some curves to break up some of those bigger white spaces, so it looks like there's petals sitting underneath. Once you're happy just grab your smaller pen again and then just work your way through adding any shading to any of those bits you've just added in. Don't worry about catching them all. Really just if any white spaces stand out that you want to fill in a bit more. I'm pretty happy with that. Once you've finished and you're happy with yours as well, we can move on to the leaves. Now that we have our flower filled in, we can just check if we are happy with where these leaves are sitting. I'm just going to go over those a little bit. Bring this up and in so it comes round and then going over that stem. You can keep these leaves really simple, just with a solid outline. Or you can make the edge slightly jagged which case it would just come up, go back on yourself and repeat all the way along. The same from this set. Come up, go back on yourself to a point and then come back out to the edge. Then just keep doing that until you get to the end. I'm going to go over that with my 02 pen now. The same on the bigger leaf, and then tour over the stem line. Then finally with the leaf, I'm going to keep these really simple because I want the focus to be on the main flower. I'm just going to draw a curve in the center for the middle of the leaf and it's going to point towards that corner. Then we can remove our pencil lines and that is our hydrangea complete. That was our last flower. I really hope you enjoyed it and discovered that it wasn't as daunting as you may be thought. 47. More Inspiration & Conclusion: Now that we know how to draw all of these beautiful flowers, we can keep practicing our favorites, looking at different references and also at looking at applying the process of simplifying them to any other flowers. As a bit of a recap, remember, the first step for drawing your flowers is to find your reference, or ideally references, and then if necessary, you can do a little research into the typical structure or anatomy of that particular flower to help you. As it's not always clear to see from a photo all of the different parts of the flower, so this can really help your understanding. Then is about simplifying the oval shape, and sketching out a guide to simplify the subject, it can be easy to feel daunted when approaching something new, especially on your own, but if you concentrate on taking these small steps to make it easy for yourself, and asking yourself, what is the next smallest thing I can do to move myself forward rather than jumping in at the deep end and trying to sketch out details right away it will make it so much easier. Once we have our guideline, then we can start to sketch out the biggest areas of the flower, for example the petals, and continue on adding more detail, and then shading, and then any extra elements that we want to add. Now we know how to draw so many beautiful flowers. There are so many ways that we can use them in projects. I've shown you some examples as we've been going through each flower. We can decorate homemade gift tags with our flowers, and add them to presence for friends and family, and this can be a simple individual flower or a pattern or an arrangement. We can make our gift tags any size we like. If the present is quite big, we can make the gift tag bigger, and vice versa if it's small. I like to make the circular gift tags which I cut out using punches or some simple rectangular ones that I cut out by hand. We can also make some beautiful bookmarks using the flowers, and as we have more space with these, there are so many different designs that we can create, and these are another lovely way to share your art with friends and family if you want to give them as gifts. But they're also really nice to use within your books at home just to get you inspired, and feeling creative in your everyday life. We can create beautiful greeting cards with the flowers. Again, we can give to friends and family, and we can draw these straight onto the cards or cut flowers down to make a collage. There are so many different designs we can use from race with some lettering inside to bouquets and other arrangements. We can use our flowers and our journals. Whether this be decorating a bullet journal or if you keep a personal art journal for your bullet journal, there are 70 ways you can add these flowers in from big designs on your cover pages using race or arrangements or borders around the edge within a layout. Or just using them as quick little additions to decorate the page that just take a couple of minutes. These are just a few ideas for ways that you can use your flowers, but there are so many more as well, like decorating envelopes, note book covers, creating your own affirmation cards, decorating plane wrapping paper, and so much more. I would love for you to share your work from this class in the project section here on Skillshare. Please do leave me a review. These are so encouraging for me to see and to read, and also really helpful for other students who may be thinking about taking the class. If you're on Instagram, you can tag me in any work you share at sharonstephensdesign. If you'd like to see more of my classes and more of my work, I have lots more classes here on Skillshare, both in doodling and drawing and in watercolor, and I also have a watercolor book that is great for beginners, and for learning how to use watercolor to relax, and that's called Watercolor for the soul. That's it from me for now. I can't wait to see your projects. Happy drawing.