Blender Particles Masterclass | Ruan Lotter | Skillshare
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Blender Particles Masterclass

teacher avatar Ruan Lotter, VFX & 3D Artist

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Blender Particles Masterclass: Introduction

      1:22

    • 2.

      Lesson 01: Create Your First Basic Particle Simulation

      27:59

    • 3.

      Lesson 02: Particle Emitter Follow a Curve

      12:00

    • 4.

      Lesson 03: Particles Follow a Curve

      10:32

    • 5.

      Lesson 04: Using Collision Objects To Create Dynamic Simulations

      7:44

    • 6.

      Lesson 05: Using Forces with Particles Simulations

      9:52

    • 7.

      Lesson 06: Create Realistic Rain Using Particles

      33:21

    • 8.

      Lesson 07: Cinematic Floating Dust Particles

      20:24

    • 9.

      Lesson 08: Debris Explosion Using Particle Simulations

      19:50

    • 10.

      Lesson 09: Create Cartoon Style Smoke Using Particle Simulations

      20:26

    • 11.

      Lesson 10: Water Drops On Surface Using Hair Particles

      15:56

    • 12.

      Lesson 11: Scatter Rocks Using Hair Particles

      11:06

    • 13.

      Lesson 12: Realistic Grass Using Hair Particles

      17:58

    • 14.

      Lesson 13: Sci-Fi Structure Details Using Hair Particles

      11:24

    • 15.

      Lesson 14: Final Project - Product Packshot With Swirling Flower Particles

      28:06

    • 16.

      Course Conclusion: Thank You For Enrolling

      0:31

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About This Class

Welcome to this Blender Particles Masterclass

Are you ready to take your Blender skills to the next level? In this course, we will explore the fascinating world of particle simulations. Together, we'll dive deep into the exciting realm of particles and unleash your creativity in ways you never thought possible.

Throughout this course, we'll cover a wide range of topics, ensuring you gain a thorough understanding of particle simulations in Blender.

You'll learn how to create your first basic particle simulation, make particles follow a curve, using forces and collision objects to create dynamic simulations, how to create realistic rain using particles, add cinematic dust to your renders, populate your scenes with lifelike grass and other objects and even creating debris explosions using particle systems and much more!

Here are the lessons covered in this course:

  1. Create Your First Basic Particle Simulation
  2. Make Particle Emitter Follow A Curve
  3. Make Particles Follow A Curve
  4. Using Collision Objects To Create Dynamic Simulations
  5. Using Forces With Particles
  6. Create Realistic Rain Using Particles
  7. Cinematic Floating Dust Particles
  8. Debris Explosions Using Particles
  9. Create Cartoon Style Smoke Using Particles
  10. Water Drops On A Surface Using Hair Particles
  11. Scatter Rocks Or Other Objects Using Hair Particles
  12. Realistic Grass Using Hair Particles
  13. Add Details To Your Sci-Fi Structures Using Hair Particles
  14. Final Project: Create A Product Packshot With Swirling Flower Particles

This course is designed for both Blender Beginners as well as more experienced Blender users who are interested in using particle simulations to take their renders to the next level.

I am including ALL the Blender projects as well as Assets used during the course.
You can download the Course Assets from here: Course Assets

I cannot wait to see what amazing particle simulations you'll create.
See you in the first lesson!

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Ruan Lotter

VFX & 3D Artist

Teacher

Ruan Lotter is a VFX & 3D Artist, Online Teacher, Music Producer and Author from Cape Town, South Africa. He has worked on many short films and TV commercials for brands such as Hasbro, Lipton, RB, Ryobi and HP doing mostly camera tracking, general 3D work and compositing.

It all started in 1994 when he discovered 3dsmax for DOS! Back then it was called "3D Studio" and that changed everything... A few years later, 3dsmax for Windows was released and the world of online tutorials was born. Ruan instantly started binge watching online tutorials on a website called "3D Buzz" and dove deep into the world of 3D. Over the years he used many different VFX related software such as Adobe After Effects, Maya, Cinema4d, Modo, PFTrack, Boujou and Nuke to name a few and he fell in love with t... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Blender Particles Masterclass: Introduction: Hey, and welcome to this Blender Particles Masterclass. Are you ready to take your Blender skills to the next level in this course will explore the fascinating world of particle simulations. Together we'll dive deep into the exciting realm of particles and unleash your creativity in ways you never thought possible. Throughout this course, we'll cover a wide range of topics, ensuring you gain a thorough understanding of particle simulations in Blender, you'll learn how to create your first basic particle simulation. Make particles follow a curve using forces and collision objects to create dynamic simulations. How to create realistic rain using particles. Add cinematic dust to your renders, populate your scenes with lifelike grass and other objects, and even creating debris explosions using particle systems and much more. Finally, we will combine everything we've learned to create a final product pack-shot render with swirling Particles. This course is designed for both Blender Beginners as well as more experienced Blender users who are interested in using particle simulations to take their renders to the next level. I'm also including all the Blender project files for you to have a look at. I can't wait to see what amazing particle simulations you'll create. See you in the first lesson 2. Lesson 01: Create Your First Basic Particle Simulation: Hi and welcome to the first lesson. So as you can see, I am using Blender version 3.6, 0.0 for this course, but you can follow along in any other version of Blender. So first of all, let's begin by looking at the very basics of particle systems inside of Blender. I'm going to show you how to create a very basic particle system just to get started. And then we slowly going to be creating more complex and more advanced particle systems going through this course. So let's begin by deleting everything in the scene. So simply press a on the keyboard to select all the objects, and then press X and then click Delete to delete everything. Now we need something to emit our Particles, and that's called the Particle Emitter. Now, a Particle Emitter can be any object or mesh. So let's create something that will be our Particle Emitter. So I'm going to press Shift a to bring up the Add menu. And then we're gonna go to Mesh. And let's choose an Ico severe as our Particle Emitter. The particles will be emitted from this object. Let's move it up a bit so it's not sitting on the grid with this Ico sphere selected. Press G on the keyboard for grab, and then press Z to lock it on the z-axis. So just move it up so it's kinda sitting above the grid, something like that. And yeah, that looks pretty good. So let's add our first Particle System. So make sure you Ico sphere selected with this orange outline around it. And then we're gonna go to this Particles tab here on the side. This is where we can add our particle systems. So we simply going to click on the little plus to create our new Particle System. And here you can rename it. You can also hide it from the viewport or hide it from there render. So to rename our particle system, simply double-click on it and then we can call it maybe something like my Particle System. You can give it a name. This is just kinda to keep everything nice and neat if you have more than one Particle System in your scene. So if we press Space now, Make sure you're on frame number one, year at the bottom in this timeline. So just make sure you're on frame number one. And if we press Space, we're going to preview our Simulation. And as you can see, the particles are being emitted from this ecosphere. And they fall down because we have gravity enabled in the scene by default. So let's stop that by pressing space again. Then a quick shortcut to go back to the first frame is Shift and left arrow on the keyboard. You can also use these controls right here. So this one right here will take you back to frame number one, or you can simply just use the shortcut Shift and left arrow. So always make sure you play your simulation from frame one. If you start the simulation, maybe from frame 50 at might not work correctly because it's not calculating those first 50 frames. So always make sure you're on frame number one and then preview the Simulation. Alright, so let's go through some of the basic parameters that we can change to create our particle systems. So with our Particle Emitter selected here under Particles, this is where we're going to go through all the settings. So just something to keep in mind when we go through all these settings, there's quite a lot of things. You are a lot of parameters and it can get confusing pretty quickly. Try and minimize them every time you can. Move on to the next section. Because if you have them all open at, can be very overwhelming and also very confusing. Just going through all these settings. So I recommend you can just try and keep them minimized as we go through them. That will just make things a bit easier. So first we have the emission section, and this is where you can change the number of particles. The frame start and end when the particles are born and when they die. And then you also have the lifetime of your Particles and lifetime randomness. So if I play this back now, this is creating or emitting 1,000 Particles. And it's starting to emit the first particle from frame one. And the last particle will be emitted at frame 200. So if we change this number to maybe something like 100, we press Space again. Now it will only generate or emit 100 particles. You can see the Particles are a lot less. If we increase this to maybe 10,000, then we're gonna get a lot more Particles. So let's leave this on 1,000 for now. And let's see what happens when we change the frame start and frame end. So if I change the end to something like 20, that means it's going to emit all 1,000 Particles between frame 1.20. So if we press Space now, you can see the particles are being emitted. And then right off the frame 20, you can see the particles are not being emitted any longer. We can also make this like, almost like an explosion if we bring this in number down to maybe like three. So that means it's going to release or Emitter all 1,000 Particles in the first three frames. So that you can see we have a little bit more of a Explosion. So all those particles being emitted almost instantaneously. We can also adjust the lifetime of our Particles. So let's say we bring this down to maybe 20. They will only be on screen for 20 frames before they disappear. We can also give the lifetime summer randomness if we increase this lifetime randomness number. And now you'll see they won't disappear exactly at the same time. If we want to keep our Particles on screen for the entire duration, then we can just increase this lifetime. So currently my timeline is set to 250 frames here at the bottom. So if I set the lifetime to 250 and I set the randomness to zero, that means the particles will be on screen for a full 250 frames. So if we play that back, you will see our Particles. We'll just kinda keep on falling until we can't see them anymore, but they will still be there. So let's change our end number again to something like 100s so we don't release them all at the same time. So we get something like that where particles cannot just fall down. And then off to frame 100, you can see they stop emitting. Alright, so next we have source. And by the way, we're just gonna go over some of the basics now we're not going to cover every single parameter. We're going to touch on them during the course. So under source, you will find emit from, and you can choose from three options, vertices, faces or volume. Now by default, this is city faces, and this means particles will be emitted from the faces of our object. So each face will emit some particles. As you can see that if we change this to vertices, that means the particles will be emitted from these vertices on our object. Now to see these vertices, I'm simply pressing tab on the keyboard to go into edit mode. Or you can just use a strap down here at the top to switch between object mode and edit mode. Then if you press one on the keyboard inside of edit mode, we will see the vertices. If we press two, we will see the edges. And then if we press three, we can select the faces. So this just means that the particles will be emitted now from the vertices instead of the phases. So if we press Space to preview that, you can see that the simulation does look a little bit different. You can see the particles are actually being emitted from the vertices and not from the phases. And then thirdly, we have volume. So let's go back to the first frame. Let's change this to volume. And this means it's going to emit particles from the complete volume of this object. Now it's a little bit difficult to see. But if we switch over to wireframe here at the top you can see the particles are being emitted from inside our mesh. So Using the volume basically of the mesh. Now by default, I'm going to leave this on faces for now. That just kinda works really well. Can see they emitted from the outside faces. And let's switch back to solid view. Next we have used modifier stack. And this only means, let's say we have some modifiers on our Emitter object. So under the modifiers panel year, let's say we have maybe a subdivision surface and maybe some other types of modifiers. Then basically this means the modifiers will be applied first before the particle simulation. So don't worry too much about that. We don't have any modifiers on this Particle Emitter, so we can just leave that off. Next we have the distribution, so you can choose between jittered, random and grid. Now by default, I usually just use jittered if I go for, if I want to go for a random look. You can also try random, which is a little bit of a different type of random, very similar. And then you can also choose Grid which is very different, that kinda releases them in a specific order. But by default, icon I like to use jittered. That's very, a very random look. And I think that just works quite well. Okay, let's minimize the source and emission and let's look at some of these other parameters. Next we have cash, and this is where we will bake our simulation once we are 100% happy with the simulation. So we're not going to bake right now. So just know that this is something that we can do when we are finished or happy with our simulation. Then we can save it basically to memory or to disk. And then it won't have to calculate that simulation every time you play your animation. So that's just something to know. And then next is a very important parameter section, and this is the velocity of the Particles. Now by default, you'll see that the normal is set to one meters per second. The normal direction is the normal of each face. That face will have a direct, a normal direction going this way. All these faces facing outwards. We can actually visualize the direction of the normals by going into edit mode by pressing Tab. And then make sure you in face select mode by pressing three. And then here at the top, if you click on this drop-down, you can click this little normal display normals button right here. And this will just show you the direction of these phases. You can see they're all kinda pointing outwards. And that's just the direction or the normals of these phases. So let's able that we don't want to see that. And it's press Tab to go back into object mode. And let's see what we can do here. If we increase this number, this normal velocity, maybe to something like five. Let's play that back. Now you can see our particles are shooting out a little bit further because we increase the velocity of that normal. Let's maybe try a value of ten and see what happens. Press Space, and I can see they shooting out quite far. So let's bring that back to around maybe three. Yeah, that's looking pretty cool. And then what we can do is we can also change the velocity of the different axes. So let's say we want to shoot the particles in a specific axes or direction. Let's say we want to shoot it in the x-direction. I'm going to increase this to be maybe five. I can see the particles are shooting in the positive X direction of x-axis. I'm going to bring this normal value to zero just for now. So we can just see this a little better. There you can see our particles are shooting on the x-direction or towards the x-direction. So this red line here, That's your X axis. The Y is the green line. And then we also have Z, which is up and down. So we can also enter a negative number here. If I make this minus five on the X, Let's play that back. Now you can see it's going the other direction. We can do the same with a, Y and Z. So I'm going to set the X to zero. Let's try on the Z, maybe, maybe something like five. And I can see the particles are shooting upwards and then they fall down because of gravity. We can also do a negative number here, maybe minus five. That means it's just going to shoot down at 5 m/s. So we can also add some randomized to our velocity. So let's say we are shooting our Particles in the z-direction at 10 m/s upwards like that. But I want to add a little bit of variation. So we can increase this randomized number two, maybe something like two. And I can see our particles are not shooting up perfectly, just straight up. It's kinda going in different directions. If we increase this number two, maybe five, then you can see that effect is a lot more random. So we can maybe bring the Z back to zero, and then let's set the normal back to maybe five. Now you can see that we have some random particles or random velocities shooting out in all directions. So if we look at the difference, if we set randomized to zero, then we get something like that. And if we increase the randomized two, maybe three. And you can see it's a little bit more random. Then there's also an object velocity here. And this means that if we have a moving Particle Emitter, it will actually use the movement of that Animation to drive the velocity of the Particles. Next, we have a rotation and we're going to come back to this one in a little bit because currently our particles are just these round spheres and we won't be able to see any rotation on them currently. Just minimize that for now. Next we have physics, and this is where you can set your physics type between these different types, but I usually just keep it on Newtonian. You can also set some forces here, deflection, integration and integration. You can set the different algorithms for the physics simulation, but I usually just leave it on mid point as default. So don't worry too much about these. We might look at them a little bit later. So I'm going to minimize the physics section. And next we're gonna go to rerender, which is also a very important section. You can change the look of the Particles. So let's say we don't want these little severe Particles, but we want to use an actual object as our Particles This is where we change it. So let's create a new object in our scene by pressing Shift a. And let's create a simple cube. So go to Mesh and then click on cube. And it's going to create this cube in the middle of our scene. Now let's just move it another way. So I'm going to press G to grab it, and then x2 move it on the x-direction or the x-axis, and just place it somewhere off to the side. Now we have this cube in our scene as well. Let's rename this cube to just to keep our scene organised. So in the outliner you can see we've got the cube and the ecosphere. And I'm simply going to double-click on a cube and let's call it cube particle. Just like that. You can give it any name is just to keep things nice and tidy so we know what's going on inosine. So let's click on our Particle Emitter again. And now if we go to the render section, I'm going to change this render as Halo. Just click the drop-down, and I'm going to change this to object. Now there's a few options here, but for now, let's just set this to Object because we want to use an object as the particle. Then below that, we've got a drop-down that says object. And you, you can choose which object you want to use as the particle. So you can simply click on this box and you can select the object from this list, or you can use this little dropper, select the cube in the viewport. Now, if we play this back, you will see our particles are now these small little cubes. So we can change the scale. So if we increase this number, you can see it's increasing the scale of those Particles. And then we can also introduce some randomness. So let's just set this to one for a nice random scale. Let's play that back from the beginning. So I'm gonna go back to frame one, press Space. And I can see we have these nice cube particles coming out of the Particle Emitter. Now under objects, you can see three tick boxes, global coordinates, object rotation, and also Objects scale. By default, only the object scale will be ticked. And that means you can actually click on the cube object and you can scale it. And the particles will actually be affected by that scale. If we rotate this cube, nothing will happen because we're not using the object rotation right here. We can tick this box and then we can rotate this cube around. And you can see all the cubes or the Particle cubes are rotating as well, but they're all rotating at exactly the same angle. So that's not really what we want. So I'm gonna leave this off as default. We also have something called global coordinates. If we take this, you'll see the particles will move where our actual Particle objectives. So if I move this around, you can see the particles follow that. But that's not something we want. We want our Particles team at from our Emitter. So I'm going to disable that. Then just something very quickly. And the extra, you will see parent Particles unborn and dead. So just know that you can select if you want to see parent particles when we look at the children Particles later on, you can also show unborn. So if I take that and I go back to frame one, you can see all the Particles kinda being stuck together around the Particle Emitter. They will start to imagine fall often kind of disappear. If that's something you want, you can enable the unborn Particles right here. And the same with dead particles. So if we go back to emission and we set the lifetime of our Particles, do something like 50. Now those particles won't disappear, but they will just freeze in place. They go. So you can see that just freezing in place on their last frame, and that's what that option does. So let's change the lifetime back to 250, so our Particles stay on screen for the full duration. Then let's see what other parameters there is. Under render. You also have an option to show or to hide the Emitter. Now, if we uncheck this box, then it means that our Particle Emitter, the ecosphere, will not be visible in the final render. It will still be visible in the viewport, but not in the render. So just note that that option easier. Let's minimize a render and let's move on to viewport display. Now, you can select the showing mature as well. So if I untick this under viewport, then if I play the simulation, you can see that the Particle Emitter is no longer there, it's kinda hidden. You can see the outline of that I ecosphere. So that's just if you don't want to see the Particle Emitter inside of the viewport. You can also change the number of particles that you see. You can see this is currently set to 100 and we can bring this down maybe to something like ten per cent. If you have a lot of particles in your scene and your viewport is really slow, then this is just something that will help you with speeding up the viewport. Just note that it says Display Percentage makes Dynamics inaccurate without baking So that means we need to bake our simulation on 100 per cent visible Particles and then off to our Baikal. Once we've saved that cash to memory Autodesk, then we can bring this down to increase the speed. So that's just something to note. So another thing that you can do under view-port display is you can change the way that the particles are being displayed in the viewport. So by default, this is set to display as rendered, which means we will see the particles as they will render in our final render. Or we can change this to maybe points just to have these round points. Or we can change the two circles to have these little circles. Or we can change it to cross or axes. Now these are just kinda just how to preview them in the viewport. It's not going to change your final render, but it might help speed up your viewport if you Using a very complex Particle mesh. So that's just something to keep in mind that you can change it here under the viewport display. So I'm going to set this back to your renders so we can see our little cubes. Alright, so next let's see how we can rotate these Particles, because as you can see, they all kinda rotate it in exactly the same way as our main particle object. So let's see what we can do if I enable rotation, and let's just expand this. We can introduce some randomness to that rotation. Now let's go back to the first frame and play our simulation again. Now you can see our cubes are rotated randomly. You can also see that they stay in that specific angle. They don't change, they're not spinning really. And we can introduce some spin by enabling this dynamic box under rotation. So let's play our simulation again. And I will see the boxes will actually spin as they shoot out from the Particle Emitter. And that's kinda just Using Dynamics To calculate that rotation. We can also introduce some extra spin to our particles if we expand angular velocity, if we increase this number to maybe 20. Now you can see that our particles are actually spinning in a specific direction. Let's bring this down to maybe five. And you can see they spending a bit slower. So for now, I'm just going to set this to zero because we have this dynamic rotation on, which looks pretty cool I think, and it's very like a natural rotation. Alright, so let's minimize rotation and let's quickly see if there's anything else we can have a look at. So children we will look at a little bit later That's to create children Particles. We've got three options, none simple and interpellate nannies, no children Particles. And then we get simple, which is a few particles for each parent particle. Interpolator is something that we will use with Hair Particles later on. Just something to note right here at the top. Under our particle system, we have two options here, Emitter and Hair. And these are the two different particle types. So currently it's set to Emitter. And later on in this course we will look at the Hair Particles System. Now the interpellate it children will be used when we Using the Hair Particles System. So don't worry too much about this for now. I just want to mention that we do have this option right here. So let's minimize the children's section, and let's quickly look at the field weights. So this is where you can control the influence of these specific field or forces on the Particles. So currently we don't have any of these forces like vortex or wind or turbulence in our scene, but we do have gravity. As you can see, our boxes are falling down. What we can do is we can set this gravity to zero. Now you can see we don't have any gravity in the scene. The particles are kind of just shooting outwards and they just floating away in space. We can also introduce a negative number here. So if we set this to minus one, that will invert our gravity. Now gravity will pull upwards, which can create quite a cool effect. You can also make it something like ten. So that's will be a gravity of times ten. And I can see our particles are being pulled down really, really fast. So for now, let's just leave this on default gravity one. And that will give us our normal gravity again. So just know that we can change the influence of these field weights of forces right here. We also have force-field settings, and this is where we can add some force fields right here from the drop-downs. But we will look at a different way to add Forces to our scene at a later stage in this course. So for now, just know that you can do that there. And then we also have something called vertex groups that we will look at later as well. And this is where you can control different parts of your Particle Emitter. Let's say you only want Particles to emit from a certain amount of faces. That's where we can control it, right here, and density, etcetera. But we're going to look at that a little bit later as well. We also have textures. It's kinda similar to the vertex groups that if we want to control the density using a specific texture or the speed of our Particles, but using a specific texture. So don't worry about this too much for now. We will look at that in a later lesson as well. So for now, just play around with the basics. Create some Particles shooting out of a Particle Emitter and play around with the way that the Particles look. You can maybe try something else instead of a cube and see how that looks. And just play around until you are familiar with the basic settings that we went over in this lesson. Let's go ahead and save our project now. So press File, Save As, then give it a name yet the bottom and press Save As. And that's just going to save our project so we can use it later on. So play around hyphen and I will see you in the next lesson. 3. Lesson 02: Particle Emitter Follow a Curve: Hey, and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to look at how we can animate our Particle Emitter along a path. So let's say we have a path or a Curve, and we want our Particle Emitter to follow that path as it's emitting the Particles. So let's see how we can do that. Let's begin by deleting everything in our scene by pressing a and X on the keyboard and then click Delete to delete everything. Now let's begin by creating our Particle Emitter. So for this one, I'm going to press Shift a mesh. For this, let's create an ecosphere again as our Particle Emitter. Now we can move it up again if we want to, doesn't really matter. We'll probably move it into position once we have our Curve. Next, let's add our Particles System without Particle Emitter selected, go to Particles see on the right-hand side, and then click the Plus to create that Particle System. Now, if we play, you'll see we have these default particles coming out of our Particle Emitter, and that's exactly what we want. Let's go back to the first frame. And now we need to create a Curve object or a path so that our Emitter can follow that path. So to do that, let's press Shift a. Then you'll see Curve. Now I have a lot more options here because of Add-on installed, but more on that later. So for now we simply going to create a Bezier curve object. And that's going to create it right in the middle of your scene. You can see it created this orange line and that's our Curve object. To change the curve with it selected press Tab to go into edit mode. And now you can change these points. You can see it's got one point on this side and it's got one point on this side. And you can move them around by selecting that point, pressing G on the keyboard, and then kind of just moving it around. You can also rotate it, each of these points. Or you can even rotate or move these handles as well. So I can select this handle, press G, move it around, and kinda create my own curve. We can also extrude more points. If I select this point and I press E on the keyboard, E for extrude. You can see it's going to extrude a new point from that point. Now we can rotate this. I can also scale this to change that Curve. And I can maybe go to this point and then press E to extrude. And maybe let's just try and create an interesting looking Curve. So you can also move these points around in 3D space. So as you rotate around, kinda just position them the way you want to. Let's just create something that's a little bit interesting. So I'm going to scale that one up just to increase that curve right there. And maybe let's do one more extrusion year. Let's rotate this around and scale it up. Now we have this crazy looking both in our scene. Let's just scale this one up as well to just smooth out that corner slightly. Alright, so once you're happy with your curve, press Tab to go back into object mode. Let's first increase the resolution of our curve. You can see some of these corners are quite jagged. So I want to add more points to just smooth that out. And it's really easy to do with your Curve objects selected. Go to the data property, see on the side this little Curve icon. And then you can increase the resolution preview units right here. So you can see if I bring this down, it will be more jagged. And as I increase it at volt, smooth it out. Let's just zoom in here so you can see this better. So they can see if we bring this down more jagged, if we increase, it, just creates a smoother curve. Alright, so I'm happy with around 47. And that looks like a nice and smooth curve. What we can also do is we can scale our Curve. So just an object mode. You can scale the complete curve up if it's slightly too small, and we can go back into edit mode if we want to change any of these points. Alright, so for now, I think let's leave it as that. So now we want our Emitter to follow this curve. So the Emitter should start maybe on this side, on this side, and it should just kinda follow that curve. So really easy to do with our Particle Emitter selected. We're going to go to the constraints, Abby, On the right-hand side. And then we're going to click this drop-down and we're going to select follow path. So this is a follow path constraint. Alright, so now what we can do is we can select a target curve. So click on the little dropper. And here we're going to select our Curve object. I can see our Emitter actually jumped to the starting position. And it's got this relationship line just showing that it's linked to this curve. Now, if I play this back, nothing will happen because we need to animate that path movement or the Animation Now this is called the offset. So if I decrease this offset number, you can see that our Emitter is now following the path, but it's far above the actual curve. And that's because we moved our Emitter at the beginning. We moved it up on the z-axis. But it's really easy to fix that. We can simply just move it down. So with our Emitter selected, I'm gonna go and look at this from the front by pressing on the x-axis right here. So we'll look at this straight from the front. And with our Emitter selected, I'm going to press G to move it around. And I'm somebody just gonna move it down. So it's at the point of the start of that curve. Let's look at it from the Y side and maybe let's enable wireframe so we can see exactly where the center of this Emitter 0s. So now I'm just going to rotate around it and kinda just try and get it into place. It doesn't have to be perfect. Just so it's at the starting point of that curve. Alright, so let's switch back to Solid View. Now, if we scrub this offset, you can see that our Particle Emitter is now following the curve. So what we're gonna do, we're going to create two keyframes. Let's go back to frame one and make sure this offset is set to zero. And on frame one, we're going to set a keyframe for this value offset. So to do that, you can simply just hover over this number and press I on the keyboard for insert keyframe. Or you can simply just click this little dot next to this number and that will insert a keyframe for you. You can also see the keyframe has been created here on frame number one in the timeline. So now we can scrub maybe to frame number 100. And then we want to set another keyframe on this offset, but this time with a value of -100 or negative 100. And that's going to take us to the end point of this curve. Alright, so make sure you're on frame number 100 year, Make sure you're offset ACE2, negative 100. And then we're going to click this little diamond next to it, insert another keyframe. So now if we go back to frame one and we press Space to play this back, you can see that our Emitter is now following that curve. If I scrub through this, you will see that our Emitter is not really rotating as it's following the path. It's kinda just moving up, down, left and right. So we can change this by enabling this Follow a Curve box right here. And now if we play this back, you will see that the emitters actually rotating as it's kinda following that curve around. So if we play this back, we will get a much more natural rotation or movement. You can also not change the speed of that Animation by just adjusting these two keyframes. So I can grab this keyframe on frame 100 and press G to move it around. And I can move it to frame 200 and play that back for a slower Animation because it's not going to take 200 frames from the beginning to the end of the curve. We can obviously also increase that speed by bringing this keyframe closer to maybe, let's put it on frame 50. And let's give that applying. Now I can see it's moving really fast. Now we can go and we can play with our Particles. So let's go back to the particle tab and let's increase the number two, maybe 10,000. Now you can see we have a lot of particles being emitted and it's emitted until frame 200. You can see there we've got our frame start and frame end. Now let's say we want our Particles to stop emitting at frame 50. As it gets to the end of this curve, we can simply set this frame start and end to 50, so it's 1-50 and a lifetime will be 50. So they will all disappear when it gets here. So let's have a look. There we go. And let's increase the lifetime to 250 so that they are always onscreen. Cool. So now I can see that following our path and they've pulling down and everything is looking cool. So now we can obviously add some velocity randomness to maybe just change the way this looks. It looks very uniform. So I'm going to minimize the emission section and let's go to velocity. And let's increase the randomness here at the bottom to maybe something like maybe two. Now you can see we get it a little bit of a more random movement there. So next, let's have a look at the object velocity that I mentioned a bit earlier here under the velocity section. So if we increase the object velocity to let say one and it's play that back. You can see that our particles are being moved around as our severe or as the Particle Emitter goes around these corners and you can kinda see what it's doing. It's going to influencing the velocity of the Particles. If I set this back to zero and play this back again, you can see the particles are kind of just doing Something like that. And if we increase this to one again, you can see the difference. It's basically just taking the velocity of the Emitter and then it's applying that to the Particles. We can also set this object velocity to a negative number. So let's try negative one. And now if we play this back, you can see it kinda shooting in the other direction. So a value of one is definitely more realistic. If you want something a little bit less, we can decrease this to maybe something like 0.4. That will give us a little bit of a more natural movement. Right? So that's how easily is to have your Particle Emitter following a specific, both. Play around and see what you can create and save your project once you've done. And then I will see you in the next lesson. 4. Lesson 03: Particles Follow a Curve: Hey and welcome back. In this lesson, we're gonna look at how we can have our particles follow a path. Now in the previous lesson, we looked at how we can make the Particle Emitter moving along a specific path. And in this lesson we actually going to take the Particles and make them follow a path or a Curve. So first of all, let's start with a blank scene. And then we're going to delete everything by pressing a and X and then click Delete, so we have a blank scene. So let's start off by creating our Particle Emitter first. So shift a mesh, add for this one, we're going to go with the ecosphere again. So maybe let's just move that up a bird so we have some space underneath it and it's add our particle system. So under Particles, let's click the little plus. And now we have our Basic Particle System. Now the only thing I want to change your is the lifetime. I don't want them to disappear halfway through the animation. So let's increase the lifetime to 250, so that our particles will stay on screen for all the duration of the 250 frames. Alright, let's create the Curve object that our particles are going to follow. So in the viewport, press Shift a and then we're gonna go to curve again, and then this time Bezier. Now let's scale it up a bit by pressing S on a keyboard and just moving the mouse outwards. And then let's go into edit mode so we can add and just change some of these points around with the Curve object selected press tab on the keyboard. And now we can start moving these points around by selecting them and pressing G on the keyboard. Obviously, you can also rotate them and scale them by pressing R and S. So let's take this point, Let's move it up maybe. And let's extrude that point by pressing E to extrude another point. And let's rotate that around by pressing R. Let's scale it by pressing S. And maybe let's scale this one as well so that corner is not too sharp. And maybe let's extrude some more points here. So we have a little bit of a more interesting looking curve. So just move around in 3D space and just move these points around, rotate them, scale them, extrude them, until you have a curve that looks quite interesting, maybe something like that. Alright, Let's just increase. This one's slightly, alright, so as you can see, our curve is a little bit jagged, so let's add some resolution to that with a Curve selected. Click on the Data icon here on the side, and then let's increase the resolution to around 64. That should smooth it out quite a bit. You can see that's a lot better. Now what we wanna do is let's move our Particle Emitter so it's a little bit closer to the starting point of this curve. So there are particles. They can maybe fall down a little bit, and then they can start following the curve all the way to the end. So let's have a look at the direction of our Curve object. So select the Curve object, go into edit mode by pressing tab. Then click on this little drop-down right here at the top, and then go all the way down and enable this normal or this box next two normals. You can also increase the size. And this will just show you the direction of your curve. It's going to add these little arrows. And as you can see there, we can now see that our curve is actually going this way. And we want our Particles to start here by the Emitter, follow the curve going that way. So we need to change or switch the direction of the curve. Really easy to do that, we can simply just select all the points by pressing a and then right-click. And then we're going to choose switch direction. Now you need to do this while you are in edit mode. I don't think we can do this in object mode. Now we've gotten, so you have to be in edit mode and a tab, select the points, right-click and then switched direction. Now you can see the arrows are showing the other way or the normals. So the direction of our curve is now going the correct way. Let's press Tab to go back into object mode. Now if we play back our animation, nothing will happen. Our Particles will just fall down, but they won't be attracted by this curve. So we basically need to convert this curve into a force-field object. Now it's really easy to do. So we're going to select our Curve. And then we're gonna go to the Physics tab beyond the right-hand side. With at Curve still selected, we're going to click on force-field. And that's going to create a force field from this curve. Now, if we play this back now, nothing really happens. You can see they kinda wanna go this way, but nothing really happens. And that's because the shape is currently set to zero point We want to change this to Curve. So it's not just using one point in space, but it's using the full curve as a force-field. Just change this shape you on the right-hand side to Curve. And then we also need to increase the power of this false, because we want to attract our Particles, we need to sit a negative value right here. So let's start with negative ten. See how that works. And then let's press Space to play the animation. Now you can see something is happening. It's kinda attracting the Particles, but they just keep on falling down so it's not strong enough. Let's increase this or decrease this value to maybe -50. And let's see what happens. Now. You can see the particles are going all over the place, but they're not really sticking to the curve. And that's this number right here, the flow number. So if we increase this number, maybe all the way to ten. Now you can see our particles are sticking perfectly to that curve, and that's also not something we want. We want something that's loosely just sending the Particles around this curve. So let's decrease the flow number two, maybe three. And let's see how that looks. You can see it's still a little bit strong the flow. So let's decrease this to maybe one. So we've got a -50 or negative 50 strength and a flow of one. Let's see. As you can see, that's looking pretty cool. We can maybe just move our Emitter closer to the start of this curve. So I'm simply just going to move it down and just rotate around and position it into place. Alright, let's have a look. Now. You can also control the speed of which these particles are actually following the curve. And that is the strength mounts. So if we change this to negative 100, let's have a look. Now you can see they are moving a lot faster. We can also decrease the flow maybe to 0.5 to have a little bit of a looser flow around the curve as you can see there. And because we're going really fast, they can overshooting on the corners, which is quite nice. Let's decrease the string to maybe -30. Let's see what we get. Yeah, that's looking pretty cool. Maybe we can increase the flow slightly to one again and see what we get. It's always good practice just to play with these numbers. Anytime you change the strength, you might need to adjust the flow again. So maybe let's decrease the strength to -40 and let's set the flow to 0.8. There we go. That's giving us a nice natural flow of particles around this curve. And now we can obviously go ahead and we can increase the number of particles. So if we click on the Particle Emitter, I'm going to increase the number two, maybe 10,000. Let's see what we get. The cool thing about this as now you can click on the Curve, go into edit mode, and we can move these points around and just run our simulation. And the particles will now follow that new Curve. Obviously, sometimes you just need to readjust the curve. All we can maybe just increase the strength if the particles shoot away from the curve. So maybe let's make this -60, and maybe let's make this 0.9. So it's a little bit closer to the curve. They can see now it's following that curve nicely. Freaking out here a little bit. But maybe because this corner is quite sharp and we're moving at a fast speed. So I'm just going to make this corner a little bit less sharp. And let's run that again. Vacancy that's looking pretty cool. Alright, so that's how easily is to have your particles follow a specific Curve, play around with us, and play around with a strength and the flow and see what things you can create and what shapes you can create with your curves. And just get familiar with how to use this system. And then go ahead and save your project. And I will see you in the next lesson. 5. Lesson 04: Using Collision Objects To Create Dynamic Simulations: Hey, and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to look at collision objects and now you can add objects that will actually collide with your particles. So first of all, let's delete everything in our scene by pressing ax and click Delete. And First we need a Particle Emitter. So let's press Shift a mesh. And this time we're going to create a simple plane as our Emitter. Now, let's move it to the side by pressing G X and just slide it on the x-axis. And now we want to move it up slightly GZ and then our Y to rotate it on the y-axis. So let's maybe angled at some angle like that. Now we can also check which side is the normal side of this one-sided plane. Now an easy way to do that, just click on this drop-down here at the top and click this face orientation. And this will show you the front and back of your plane. Now we know the particles will be emitted from the blue side, which is the normal or the front side of this plane. So let's just toggle that off again. Now we can add our Particles System to our plane. So click Particles and then click that a Laplace to add our Particle Simulation. What I wanna do is I want to increase the lifetime 250 just so that they don't disappear during the simulation. And then let's go to velocity and just increase the normal velocity to, let's say ten. Let's see how that looks. Alright, so now you can see we have our stream of particles being emitted from this plane. And now we can add an object that will be our Collision Objects. Let's create a cube by pressing Shift a mesh cube. And let's move it up by pressing G and Z. Let's just move it up to about here. And let's scale it maybe on the X, all its skeleton, the y-axis suppress SY and just pull that out of it until you have something that looks like that. Now if you hit space, you can see that the particles are simply going through this object because we haven't set this up as a Collision Objects. So with this object selected, go to the Physics tab here on the right-hand side and simply click this Collision button right here to make this a Collision Objects. Now if we play this back, you'll see our Particles will bounce off from this object. Alright, so they are quite a few settings that we can change here and the Collision and particle. So we only want to look at these settings. We're not going to worry about the soft body and the cloth settings, just a Particles settings. So first of all, you've got this permeability. And that basically means if it's set to zero, all the particles will be colliding with this object. If we set this to one, all the particles will go through our object. If we set this somewhere in the middle, like 0.5, then there's like 50 per cent chance that the particles will either go through or bounce off. As you can see, if we look at this in wireframe mode, you can see some particles are going through and others are bouncing off. Alright, let's set that back to zero and X we have the stickiness. If we increase this to say ten are Particles will stick to this object, can see that kind of sticking the, they're not bouncing off, but they still flying off once they get to the bottom. Let's bring that down again. And next we have killed Particles. This means any Particle touching this object will be killed instantly. Now remember this, that option to actually see the dead particles. So we can click on our plane, go to the Particle settings, and then we can go to render extras and tick debt to show those dead particles. If we play back again, now you can see those particles are being killed as they get in contact with this object. And now we can actually see them. So that's maybe something that is usable for specific things. But for now, let's just untick this so we don't see those dead Particles. Alright, let's select our collision object again and go back to the Physics tab. So let's untick killed Particles. And then we also have damping and friction, which is also very important. So if we increase the damping amount and maybe the friction a bit as well. And we play this back then you can see we've got some friction as they falling down. So if we increase that fixed friction even more, you can see they kinda dropping down really slowly. We can also randomize these settings by just increasing the randomized parameter a. Now you can see some of them are bouncing off, some are seeking someone, like falling down. Just add some nice random variation to that. So you can go ahead and play with these settings and see how they affect your Collision. And another thing that we can do is we can also animate this object to just add some interesting results. So maybe let's add a rotation. So this Objects spins like that. So make sure you're on frame number one. And with our collision objects selected, I'm going to press I on the keyboard for insert keyframe. And then I'm going to select rotation just to insert a rotation keyframe on the first frame. And then we want to go to the last frame, which is frame to 50. You can either just scrub or you can use the shortcut Shift and right arrow on the keyboard to jump to that last frame. Now I want to add some rotation on the x-axis on this object. So press R and then X, and then just spend your mouse around the object to add a few rotations, maybe something like that. And then just click and then press I and choose rotation again. That's going to insert another keyframe on frame 250. So now if we go back to frame number one and we play this back, you'll see that we get a bit of a different result. So it's actually spinning and it's kinda shooting the Particles in all the different directions. Maybe let's just scale this object down so S and Z to make it a bit more flat and maybe a little bit more. Let's see what that does. So you can see that's looking pretty cool. Now, we can also duplicate this object, so let's duplicate it. And then with that second objects selected, I'm gonna go to the Object tab. And then I'm going to introduce some delta transformations. So let's rotate it on the X. So maybe something like that. Let's duplicate that one again. And maybe let's create one that's slightly offset like that. So change those under the Delta transformations. Now if we play this back, you'll see that we have quite a nice and interesting result. So as you can see, Collision Objects can add some really interesting effects to your particle simulations. So go ahead, add some objects, add some keyframes, animate them and see how they affect your particle simulations. Then once you're comfortable using these collision objects, go ahead and save your project. And then I will see you in the next lesson. 6. Lesson 05: Using Forces with Particles Simulations: Hey, and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to look at how to add different forces to our scene that will interact with our particle simulation. So first of all, I've got a blank new scene. Let's delete everything by pressing X and clicking the delete button. And let's start by creating our Particle Emitter. So for this, I'm going to press Shift a mesh and let's create a simple plain Emitter. Let's move it along the x-axis by pressing G, X and rotate around the y-axis by pressing R and Y. So now we can add our Particles System to this Emitter by clicking on the Particles tab here on the side and clicking on the Plus button to add that Particle System. Now let's increase the lifetime 52-50. And then let's scroll down to the velocity section. Let's increase the normal velocity to 10 m/s. Let's see how that looks. So now I can see the particles are being emitted from our plane object. So let's see how we can add different forces to the scene. So let's add our first force by pressing Shift a. And then you can go down all the way to force-field. And this is where you will find all the different forces, like force, wind, vortex, magnetic, etcetera. Now, I'm not gonna go through all of these forces. You can experiment and see what they do. But let's look at a couple of them. So the first one is just called false. If I click on that, that's going to create this falls in the center and I can move it around, but let's leave it in the center of the world for now. And then if you click on the physics properties tab here on the side, we can see the parameters of this force. So currently if we play this back, you'll see nothing really changed. And that's because we need to increase the strength of this force. So let's increase the strength to about maybe 15 and see what that does. Now you can see the force is actually pushing our particles away from this force. And that's because we Using a positive number right here for the strength. So let's make this a negative value of -15 and let's see how that affects the simulation. Now you can see the force is actually pulling on these particles. They can see that actually coming back towards that force. What we can also do is we can increase the flow amount and that will just make that those particles will flow directly from our Emitter to the force. So maybe let's give it a flow of two. Let's see how that works. And you can see that's looking pretty cool. We can even move this around and real-time and see how that changes our simulation. So just select the force and press G on the keyboard to move it around. We can also introduce some noise by just applying this number right here. And that will just add a little bit of noise to this force. Another thing that we can do is we can use a falloff for this specific force. So I'm just going to move it a little bit further away from the Emitter. And then you're at the bottom where we have the fall of settings. We have a minimum distance and also a maximum distance. So if I enable the maximum distance, but I just pull this out, you can see it's going to create this outline in the viewport. So we can see the maximum distance of that force. So that means the particles will only be effected once they enter this severe around our force. So let's just set the noise back to zero and it said the flow back to zero as well. Let's set the strength to maybe something like -50. Let's see what that does. So as you can see, our particles are being emitted and as they enter this severe, they actually getting pulled by less force. So that's just an interesting way to control the way how this force is actually affecting your Particles. Alright, so let's delete this force. Let's create a new one. Let's go to the first frame. Press Shift a go-to force-field, and let's see the wind force. So as you can see, it's going to create this little icon in the center of the world. And now if we'd play, we'll see that. And you can see we don't have a lot happening right there. So if we select our wind force and go to the physics properties, we can increase the strength of mountain. You can actually see the strength of our wind in the viewport. Now if I play this back, you will see that our particles are being affected by this wind. So we can also add some noise to that wind, and that will just add some noise to the strength. Now, you can also rotate this around if you want the wind to be in a specific direction. So as you can see, I can adjust this while actually playing back the simulation, which is pretty cool. You can obviously also animate any of these perimeters. Anything with a little dot next to it can be animated or key-frames. So just keep that in mind. So before we delete this wind, just something to note is that you can actually change the type of force right here under the Physics tab. So right at the top where it says that type of force, which is wind, you can go in here and you can change it from when To force to anything really. But I usually prefer to delete it because there are no, the settings will be reset back to default. So let's delete this force and let's see what else we have. Let's press Shift a force-field. And this time let's look at the vortex so that you can see there is our vortex false. And if we press Play, Let's just reset. Sometimes it doesn't reset the settings from the previous force. And all you have to do is go into your particle simulations and just change any of these settings. Maybe change the number down to triple nine and then just increase it by one again to get back to 1,000. And that will just reset the simulation. Now if we press Space, you can see that nothing really happens. So let's click on our force and go to physics. And let's increase the strength to around T. Alright, something is happening that's a little bit too strongly. It's decreased to about ten. Now you can see our particles are definitely being affected by this force. Let's bring this down to maybe two. And you can see our Particles of spiraling down. And then you can also set the inflow to either a negative number to have the Particles kinda move outwards. Or if you set this to a positive value that will try and pull those Particles inwards. So let's just set this to maybe to. You can see they're kind of go inwards if we look at them from the top. And if we set this to negative two, then it will fly outwards. They can see our particles are going outwards. Okay, let's look at one more force that we can use. So let's go ahead and delete this one and add a new force, shift, a force-field. And this time let's look at the turbulence force. Quite a popular forced to use if you want to create some randomness in your particle simulations. So let's see what that does. First of all, let's just reset our simulation or Particles just by changing a value. I can see we don't really have anything happening. If we click on our force go-to physics. Now we can change the strength. So let's increase the strength and see what's happening. And immediately you can see something is happening to a Particles. It's just adding a little bit of a random variation to the velocity and movements. So let's increase this to about 40 and see what that does. Yeah, Now you can see it's really all over the place. And that is how turbulence works. You can also increase the size of the turbulence. If you want bigger or smaller turbulent movements, you can adjust that here, same as the flow. Let's increase the flow and see what that does. Then everything kind of just sticks together. So I'm going to bring that down again. And if we increase the size of the turbulence, then you'll see you'll get a bigger movement for those Particles. Alright, so let's bring that down. And we can also introduce more noise at, we'll just add some more noise. And obviously we can now go ahead and maybe disable the gravity. So if we go to our Emitter, go down to field weights and disabled gravity altogether, then we get something interesting way. They just shoot out into space and we get some really nice turbulent movement in those Particles. You can also combine different forces together. So you can have a windfall, so you can have a vortex, you can have a turbulent force, and they can work together. Or you can keyframe the strengths so that they come on at different times in your animation. Play around with Forces, see what you can Create and just experiment and see what they do. Play around where they perimeters. And then go ahead once you are comfortable, save your project. And then I will see you in the next lesson. 7. Lesson 06: Create Realistic Rain Using Particles: Hi and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to see how we can create a Rain Particle System to use in any scene we like. So first of all, I've created a new project. So let's delete everything in our scene by pressing a and X and click Delete to confirm that. And let's first create our Emitter. So for the Rain Emitter, we're going to use a simple plane. So just create a plane by pressing Shift a mesh and then plane, the plane selected. Let's scale it up so it's pretty big. Now press N on your keyboard to bring up this side menu. Make sure you're on the item tab so we can see the size or the dimension of our plane. I'm going to scale it up to about 30 m by 30 m on the X and Y. So you can just type it in here. And now we know we've got a plane that's 30 m by 30 m. Alright, next we need to apply the scale. So with the plane selected, press Control a on the keyboard and then just select scale. It's always good practice to apply the scale because now if you look at your side menu in pressing N, you can see that the scale is set to one, which is correct. And it's always good when using physics or Particles or any types of simulation to make sure that you apply the scale of your Objects. Let's press N to hide this side menu again. And now we have our plane or our Emitter where our Rain particles will come from. So let's move this plane upsets above the grid. So with applying selected, press G and Z and then just move it up. So it's kinda just sitting above the plane. Now we need to ensure that the correct side of the plane is facing downwards. Because remember, our particles will not be emitted from the top of the plane, but we want them to emit from the bottom of the plane. Let's have a look at the normals of this plane. So click the drop-down, you're at the top, and then click on face orientation. And now you can see our plane is actually upside down because the rate pod is the backside of this face. So we need to rotate this around the plane selected, press R and X. And now we're going to rotate it 180 degrees. So simply just type 180 on the keyboard and press Enter. You can see the blue side or the front side of this face is facing downwards, and that's what we want. Alright, so click this drop down again and just untick this face orientation. Alright, so now we know that our Emitter is facing the correct way. And with this plane selected, let's go to the particle tab on the right-hand side, and let's create our particle system. Let's rename this by double-clicking and just typing the rain. You can call it anything. It's just kinda to keep everything nice and neat. So now if we press Space, you'll see that we have some particles coming from our Particle Emitter and they cannot just falling down. And if we zoom in here you can see we just Using these halo Particles. So for this particle simulation, we actually going to use a collection of objects as our Particles. And because we're gonna do Rain, we're going to create two or three different rain drop meshes. And then we're going to use those as our Particles. So let's do that now. So let's create a new object by pressing Shift a mesh, and we're gonna go with an Ico SVM. Now, let's just move it to the side with the ICA sphere selected. Press G, and just move it on the x-axis. So it's kinda just away from our simulation. Now let's zoom closer and see what we can create. So with this oncosphere selected press Tab to go into edit mode. And now we're just going to select this top vertices. So make sure you in vertices select mode. So you've got these three options at the top, vertices, age and phase, or you can just use 12.3 on the keyboard. So press one to go into vertex select mode and select this top vertex of the ecosphere. Next we're going to enable proportional editing. So this is this little circle yet the top. You can either click it or you can use the shortcut 0 on the keyboard. So switch that on. And then with that one vertex selected, press G and Z to move it up. And then use the scroll wheel or page up and page down on your keyboard to adjust the proportional editing. We want something that looks like a raindrop, so maybe something like this. Let's go into wire-frame and maybe select some of these middle vertices by just dragging a box around them. And then you can move them up and down and just shape your rain drop. Maybe something like that as good for our first drop. Now let's duplicate this rain drop by pressing Shift D and then press X to move around the x-axis. Now, let's change the look of the second rain drop by pressing Tab to go into edit mode and maybe just move some of these vertices around. So I'm just going to bring these down. So we've got a little bit of a different shape and maybe just select all of these. It's maybe scale that down a note that I'm still using proportional editing for this. So I'm just going to just move this down and maybe you can either just freely move it if you want to create some shapes that's not perfectly just perfectly symmetrical. Maybe that's something, maybe something like that. Let's duplicate this one by pressing Shift D and then x2, move it on the x-axis. And maybe just scale this one down completely. And let's go into edit mode by pressing Tab. And then again, just move some of these vertices around to change the shape. Maybe you gonna do some rotation as well by pressing R. So we can just kinda rotate and skew them a bit. Maybe. Something like that. You just want a few or a couple of different raindrops shapes just to ensure that they're not all exactly the same. So now let's select all of these and right-click and select Shade Smooth so that they look nice and smooth. As you can see, some of these edges are still a little jagged. So let's add a subdivision surface to all of these models. So click on the first one, go to your modifiers, this little range or Spanish on the side. And then click add modifier, subdivision surface, and maybe add two levels for the viewports. Now you can see it's a little bit more smooth. Let's do the same for the other two. So let's add a subdivision surface up that view port level to two and do the same to the third one. Alright, so now that we have our three raindrops, Let's put them all into one collection. Because we're going to use more than one object. We need to place them inside a collection so that we can reference the collection as our particle object. So select all three Rain Drops, then press M on the keyboard. And now we're going to create a new collection, such as click the New Collection button, and let's call this Rain Particles. And then click Okay. Now in the outliner, you can see that we have this new collection called Rain Particles. And then we have these three Ico spheres under that collection. You can rename these measures, but for now, let's just minimize this collection in the outliner. You can also switch this collection of by clicking this little tick box and then we don't see them, but we can still reference them. Alright, so let's select our Particle Emitter again, and let's go to the Particles settings for emission. Let's leave this as default for now. Well, let's maybe just change the lifetime to 250 because we don't want our Particles to disappear for now. We probably going to change that again once we've set up our camera. So for now, let's just leave it at 1,000. Start frame is one, and in frameless maybe to 50, so that we have something all the way through our Animation. And so if we play this back, you'll see that our particles are falling. And yeah, let's go back to the first frame. And let's change our Particles to our new raindrops. So let's minimize emission and it's go down to render. And render as we're going to use a collection this time, not an object because we're going to use that collection with a three rain drops. So let's select collection from this drop-down. And now it says instance collection. You can simply click here. And then we're going to select the Rain Particles collection. Now if we play this back, you'll see that it's actually Using our rain drops as the particles, as you can see. Now we can obviously scale them up. So let's just scale them quite big for now. We're obviously going to make them smaller, but for now just, let's just scale them up a bit so we can see them a little easier. Next also increase the scale of randomness just to add some random scale variation. And I can see our rain drops are falling from the emitter. Let's go back to frame one, and let's go back to the emission section. Let's increase the number two, maybe 5,000 for now. And let's see what else we can change here. So let's go to velocity. And here we can increase the speed of our rain drops. If they falling too slowly, you can increase this normal speed to maybe five, and that will just increase the speed going down. Let's maybe try something 20. And I can see it's falling down quite fast. So maybe something like 15. All depends on what you need. Alright, now it'd be a good time to set up our camera view. So let's create a camera in the scene by pressing Shift a. And then we're going to select camera from the drop-down. Now you can see it created this camera in the middle of the scene. So let's move that camera away from the middle by pressing G and then Y to move around the y-axis. So just move it away, maybe less four. And then we're also going to move it up. So press G and Z just to move it up slightly. Now I can see our camera is angled incorrectly at scanner looking towards that area. So let's press N on the keyboard with our camera selected. And let's go to the item tab here on the side. So here we can just reset the rotation. So I'm going to set the X to 90 degrees And then I'm also going to set the Y to zero. And then we can also set the Z to zero. So now you can see our camera is aligned perfectly with our scene or without grid. Now we can look through the camera by clicking this camera icon. And let's play this back and see what we have. Let's change the lens on this camera by going to this camera Data tab here on the side. And let's change the focal length to something like 24. So it's just a wider lens. You can see, we see a little bit more. Maybe that's too much. Let's change it maybe to 35. Yeah, something like that looks better. So if we play this back again, you can see our raindrops falling down. If we go out of the camera, you can see that we've got all these particles here at the bottom that we won't see. So maybe we can hide them. So let's go back and click on our Particle Emitter again. Now we're going to go to the Particles Settings again and into the emission section. So we want to adjust the lifetime. So we only have particles falling down until they are kinda out of the way or another view of this camera. So an easy way to do that is just to look through the camera and its space from frame one. And I'm going to pause it wants the rain drops are kinda just below the camera view, something like this. You can see we own frame 38, and that gave it enough time for those particles to fall from the Emitter to just add a frame of our camera. So we know it takes about 38 or let's say 40 frames for that one drop, that one particle to move from the top two out of view. We can change the lifetime of our Particles to around this number, but let's maybe increase it to you about 50. And then let's set the lifetime of a Particles to 50. We don't really have to introduce some randomness because they just going to disappear and we're not going to see them disappear. Now if we go back to frame number one and we press Space, you can see that our Particles will disappear when it gets here. If we look through the camera, you can now see we have our raindrops and we don't see them disappearing. Alright, next I want to add a slight angle to our rain drops so they're not falling down, just straight down like this. So let's click on our Emitter. Let's go to a Particles settings. And this time we're going to go to the velocity section. And here we want to just change the direction of our velocity. So maybe let's add some velocity on the X axis. So maybe about 3 m/s. Now if you play it back, you can see our Rain is starting to move in that x-direction. One thing to note, you can see our Particles or not angled. They are still angled straight down. So let's fix that. There are a couple of ways that you can do it, but I find the easiest way is if we go to the render section and we enable this object rotation right here. And then we go back and we enable our Rain Particles collection right here in the outliner by clicking this little box so we can see them. And now if we rotate these Particles, you can actually see them and rotating right here at the top. So if I select all these three and I press R on the keyboard, you can see they all kinda rotating like that. Now I want to rotate them, but I want to rotate them individually. You can see they kinda rotating now as a group. So we can change this by clicking this little icon here at the top, the transform pivot point. And let's change it from median point to individual origins. Now, you can rotate them individually like that. So we want to rotate them around the y-axis. So press R, Y and then just rotate them so they slightly on an angle. Now if we play this back from frame one and we look to the camera, you can see that our raindrops are now at an angle. Maybe that's a little bit much. So let's just go back to our raindrop measures and it just rotate them back slightly. Maybe just something like that. Let's look through the camera and playback from frame one. Yeah, that's starting to look pretty cool. Obviously we still going to change the size because they massive. But yeah, this is just so that we can easily see what our particles are doing. Alright, So in the outliner we can hide this Rain Particles collection again by just clicking this little box next to it. And next we can add some forces. Maybe we can add a wind and also some turbulence. So let's start with a wind force on the keyboard, press Shift a, and then we're going to go to force-field. And let's add a wind. Let's move the wind to the side by pressing G X and just pulling it this way. And then we're going to rotate it on the Y. So press R and Y and then just rotate it. You can either rotate it exactly 90 degrees Oh, maybe just add an angle like that. Let's move it up slightly by pressing G, just so that it's kinda in the middle of our simulation. Now if we play this back, nothing really will happen because the strength of this wind is not very high. So let's select this force, go to physics, and let's increase the strength to maybe around ten. Let's see what that does. Now you can see our window is definitely affecting our rain. It's pretty strong. You can see it moving. Let's decrease it maybe to around six. Let's also introduce some noise to that strength. So just set the noise amount to maybe ten. And let's see how that works. I can see it's not all moving at exactly the same velocity sideways. So that's just the noise introducing that we introduced here. So maybe let's bring the string down even more to maybe four. And let's see how that fields. We looked at the camera. Yeah, I think that looks pretty cool. Now let's add in some turbulence as well. So I'm going to create a new force by pressing Shift a force-field. And this time we're going to choose Turbulence. So it created this turbulence force right there in the center and we can increase the strength. Let's try something crazy like 20 and see what that does. So what we can do is we can click on our Particle Emitter, go to the Particles settings, and then we're going to expand filled weights. So you, we can set the influence of all these forces. So I'm going to bring down the wind to zero so that we only see what the turbulence is doing. So now if I press space again, we can see that the wind is not affecting our simulation now, but the turbulence force is affecting. So maybe let's just go back to our turbulence and increases to 50 just to see that something is definitely happening. Yeah, you can see there's definitely some turbulence. If I increase this to maybe you can do this while it's playing actually. By increase it to maybe like 150. You can definitely see some turbulence in there. So that's obviously a little bit strong. So maybe let's bring it down to about 40. Let's also increase the noise amounts, so it's not exactly the same. Yeah, I think that looks pretty cool. Now let's bring in our wind again. So on our Emitter, go to field weights and then just up this wind value to one, just to ensure that that is affecting the simulation. Let's look through the camera and press Space to preview it. Alright, I think the turbulence is still a little bit too much. So I'm gonna go and click on the turbulence, go to physics, and let's bring this down to maybe 20. You can also increase the size or decrease the size of the turbulence. You can play with this value and see how that affects the Particles. Let's have a look. Maybe I want to increase the speed of our rain slightly. So let's select our Emitter, go to the Particles settings, and then we're gonna go to velocity and just increase this normal value to maybe 25. Can see now it's coming down nice and fast. Alright, so next, before we change the size and the amount of particles, let's create our material for the rain drops. So I'm going to enable this collection in the outline again, the Rain Particles, and let's just have a look at those raindrops. So if we just zoom in here and let's give them a material. So go ahead and save your project now. And let's go to the shading tab right here at the top. Now let's select the first rain drop and click New to create a new material. And let's just give it a name. Let's just click there and call it rain drop. Alright, so currently we are viewing this in the material preview renderer, which is fine. We will probably do our final render for this, either you can either use EV or cycles, depends on exactly what you want. We'll probably do a render Using cycles just because it's more Realistic. And the reflections and the translucency and all of that, we'll just look a lot better. But for now we can just preview it in this material, preview render on this material which is zooming here, we can delete this principled BSD if node. So just select this node, press X to delete it. And let's create a new node by pressing Shift a and then click on the search field. Now, let's type gloss. And we're going to choose this gloss be SDF. Just place it there and connect this green dot to the surface. And I can see our raindrop is looking like something like gloss, which is pretty cool. You can also give it a slight color. So if we click on this color right here, you can either maybe just a slight, slight blue, something like that, maybe very subtle. And yeah, that's looking pretty cool. And then you can also adjust the roughness. If it's on zero, it's super shiny. If it's on one, it's very met or not shiny at all. And anything in-between, you can kinda just adjust it and see what you like. So maybe something like something like that, not to glossy and not to met looking. So now let's apply this material to these raindrops as well. So simply click on the second one. Click this little drop-down here, and choose that material that we created called raindrop. Let's do the same with this one. They're all using this same material basically. Alright, so let's go back to Layout, and now we can hide this collection again. And let's look through our camera. Let's play this from frame one, and let's just run it for a few frames and pause it right there. Now we can change over to either material preview, this little icon right here at the top. And then you can see the rain drops in the material preview render. But we want to render this Using cycles. So we're gonna go to our render tab and change our render engine two cycles, and then choose your device if you have a GPU. Next, I'm going to change over to the rendered view right here at the top. And I can see it's rendering and it's looking very blue, so we'll probably have to adjust that material. Let's just go to our world settings. So we can now use either a background, like just a black color. So if we bring this down, we can just see a black color or we can bring in an HDRI so that we have realistic reflections and lighting. So let's do that now. Click this little dot next to color, and then we're going to choose environment, texture. You'll see everything will turn pink because we don't have an HDRI selected yet. So click on Open and then browse to your favorite HDRI. You can either use the HDR either I provide or you can download any HDRI that you want to use. Alright, so now you can see we've got our HDRI in the scene. Let's just hide it from the viewport. So if we go to our render tab, go down all the way to foam expanded form and then just tick this box next to transparent. So now you can see we don't see the HDRI, but it's still affecting the lighting and the reflections in a scene. Next, we want to go back to our Particles settings and we want to hide the Emitter when doing the final render. So let's go down to render. And then we simply antique show Emitter. And we can do the same for the viewport. So under view-port display, also antique Show Emitter. Now if we play this back, we don't see the emitted the top. And if we do a quick little render by clicking render and render image, you'll see that we don't see that background Or we don't see that imitate the top. And we also don't see the HDRI, which is great. Alright, so I think we're ready to change the size just to make it smaller because these raindrops are massive and then also increase the amount of particles. So let's select our Emitter, go to a Particles settings, and then it's CO2 emission first to increase the amount of raindrops. So currently this is set to 5,000. Let's increase this to maybe 25,000. Alright, go back to the first frame and let's adjust the size as well. So open the render section, and this is where we're going to change the size. So let's just play it for a few frames so that we have a reference in the viewport. And now we can simply just drag this number smaller. Now you can decide how big your rain drops should be. I think that is maybe looking pretty cool. Obviously some of them are quite pretty large, but maybe they close to the camera. But something that we will enable these Motion Blur and that will just make everything look a lot better, especially these fast-moving raindrops. So I'm gonna go with something like maybe 0.05. And I think that looks pretty cool. And let's maybe do a quick little test renders. I'm just going to run it through a couple of frames. And then I'm also going to enable motion blur. So I'm gonna go to my render tab here at the top. And then you'll see there's a motion blur box that you can check. So under the Render Settings, under sampling, I'm just going to bring down the render samples by default, it's set really high to 4,096. Let's bring this down to maybe 256 samples for now, and you can enable denoising. Alright, and I think everything is fine. Let's go down to color management as well and change the V transform to standard just to get a little bit more contrast in the shot. Alright, so now we can click on Render and render image right there at the top. Or you can use the shortcut F2, and that's just going to render a still image. So we can have a look at our motion blur. Once their renders done, we can click this little drop-down here at the top in the corner and just change this to color so we don't see the transparency. You can see this is looking pretty cool. You can see our rain drops. You can see some nice motion blur. Obviously some of these raindrops are still pretty large Another thing that we can introduce is depth of field. So some of the raindrops closer to camera will be out-of-focus, and some of the raindrops further away will be in-focus, etcetera. So let's do that now. Select the camera in the outliner. Click on the little camera icon here on the side. And this is where we're going to enable depth of field. So you can simply just click on depth of field right here. And now we need to set our focus distance. I like to use the limits to see where my focus is. So expand this viewport display and then check this box limits. Now if you go out of the camera and kinda look at this from the side, I'm just going to change back to Solid View. If you look at this from the side, you can see there's a little cross here in the center. And this is our focus distance, where the camera is actually focusing. Maybe if we look at this from the side, you can see these are the Rain Particles and our cameras kinda just outside of the rain. So I'm going to take the camera and move it forward by pressing G Y. So we're moving on the y-axis and can I just move it so that our camera is inside or underneath that Rain system. Alright, and now under depth of field, we can adjust this focus distance. And as I'm adjusting this, you can see this focus limit moving in the viewport. So maybe let's set it to somewhere in the center of this particle simulations. So it's kinda focusing on that area. And now let's look through the camera again, go back to our rendered view. And now we can just have a look at the depth of field. So what we can do is we can use this f-stop number to increase the effect of the depth of field or make it less obvious. So the smaller this number, the shallower the depth of field will be, an more visible the depth of field will be, Or the bigger that blur will be. So let's bring this down to maybe 1.4 and see what we get. And everything is still looking in focus. Maybe let's bring this down to like if you see, if I set it to 0.1, you can see most of the raindrops or autofocus. And some of them are kinda in-focus, so maybe not too low, maybe like 0.8. Let's do a quick render to see how that looks like. So press render, render image, and let's just give it a moment to render. And let's just change this to color so we can see it a bit better. And I can see we have a little bit of a better looking result. Some of the you can see there's a nice big rain drop you in front that's autofocus, which is quite nice. And maybe we can increase the depth of field effect a little bit more. Let's go back and let's bring this f-stop number down to maybe 0.4. And let's do a quick render again and see how that looks. Alright, so I think that is looking pretty cool and I think we are ready to cash our simulation so that we can render it out and use it in our projects. So first of all, we need to cache it. So we're going to select our Emitter. And then we're gonna go to the Particles settings, go cash. And now we're going to simply click on bake. Now we'll see the plate will just quickly run through. Now I'd say Z or 250 frames in memory. And now we know that our Simulation is cached. So I can scrub through this freely. I can move around and I don't have to worry about simulating it every time I run it. So I can start to play it anywhere and I can just play back my simulation. Alright, so let's save our project now and you can now render your Rain Particles. So let's quickly look at the render settings. First of all, we have our samples, so we can increase this max samples maybe to something like 512th just to get a little bit more samples and less noise. And now we can go to the Output tab here on the right-hand side. This is where you set your resolution. So we simply going to render an HD version of this 1920 by 10 at. And then we can go down, we can set our frame rate here by default is a city 24. And then we've got our frame range. So we're gonna render from frame one to 250. And this is where you can set your output where you want to render that file. And you can also choose what format you want to render as. Render as individual PNG images or maybe open EX. Or you can just simply render a video file I can MOV or MP4. So I think the best for this will be if we just render either an E XOR or a PNG so that we have that transparency. And then you can overlay it onto a video or Using compositing. So I'm going to choose PNG and then make sure that you use RGBA, which will include the alpha channel, the transparency, and not just a black background. You can also choose if you want to render it eight or 16 depth. So let's choose 16 for a little bit of a better quality. Now we can set our output folder by clicking on this folder icon here. Now let's create a new folder somewhere where you want to render your project too. So I'm just gonna call this one Rain. And let's go into that folder and I can give you a files, a name. Remember this is going to render one PNG for every frame, 250 frames. So I'm gonna call this Rain. And then I'm just going to place an underscore. Because after the underscore, it's going to have the frame number like 010203, etcetera. So just adding that little underscore makes it easier to just use that when you're doing your compositing. Click on Accept, and let's do one final save. Now you can start your render by clicking render and render Animation. Now this will run through all the frames at can take some time and depend, depends on the speed of your GPU, etcetera. So just let this run through. And once it's, once it's done, you can combine all those image sequences together in your compositor. And then we will have a nice Rain render that you can overlay over footage, etcetera. So let us run through, save your project. And I will see you in the next lesson. 8. Lesson 07: Cinematic Floating Dust Particles: Hi and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to look at how to create cinematic dust particles Using the Blender Particle System. So first of all, let's delete everything in the scene by pressing X and clicking Delete. So let's create a big cube and then use that as the Emitter. So press Shift a mesh and then cube. And then we're going to scale this up quite vague. Or press N on the keyboard to bring up the side menu. Let's set the dimensions here to 3 m by 3 m by 2 m in height. So that's kinda the size that we need our Particles to love in. So let's just look at this from the side and move it up by pressing G and Z. And can I just moving it on top of our grid or the floor so we can press Enter again to hide this side menu. And now with this object selected, let's go to the Particles settings. Let's also rename this cube by double-clicking in the outliner. And let's just call this our Dust Emitter. Alright, so let's create our new Particles System, and let's just call this Dust. Now, let's quickly go through some of these parameters. So let's increase the number of particles to around 10,000. For now, we will probably increase that once we get to a later stage in this lesson. And then we also want them to be released at the same time or emitted at the same time. So let's set the end frame to one, and then let's increase the lifetime to 250 because we don't want them to disappear. And then we want to change the source instead of faces. We want to change that to volume. So it's kinda inside our cube. Now we don't want to see our actual Emitter. So let's go down to render and also viewport and disable the show Emitter just so that we don't see that in the final render and also not in the viewport. So let's just bring down the scale of our particles. If we go to Viewport Display and we just bring them down, you will obviously change this to a different particle from this halo. But for now let's just bring it down so we can just see our amount of particles. Obviously, if we play this now they will just fall to the floor because we have gravity enable, so we can disable that now as well. If we go down to fill weights, let's just bring down the gravity all the way to zero. And now they should just move out like that. Alright, let's go to the velocity section and let's just bring this normal velocity down to zero. So now our particles won't have any velocity. So if you play this back, they'll just stay in place. Now before we continue further with our Particles settings, Let's create our actual Dust Particles that we will use in the simulation. So instead of using one object or one to create a couple of different variations of Dust Particles. Put them all in one collection and then use that collection as our particle object. So let's do this now. Let's hide this Dust Emitter and let's create a new object by pressing Shift a mesh. And let's create an IPO sphere, which is open up this menu right there at the bottom and bring the subdivisions down to one. So it's just a very simple, we want to keep this Dust objects as simple as possible. Obviously, we're going to render quite a bit of them. So yeah, just try and keep them low poly. So let's just move this out of the way by pressing G and X. And then we also want to scale it down quite a bit. We can obviously scale it down once we set the Particles scale. And then let's just go into edit mode by pressing tab, select one of these vertices. And let's enable proportional editing as well. And then you can just kinda move them around. Use the mouse wheel or page up and page down to adjust that influence. And just move these points around until you have something just like a weird little, little dust particle. So let's create a few of these I'm just going to duplicate by pressing Shift D and go into edit mode and just change the shape a little bit around. Maybe this one can be maybe more flat like that. Maybe even Something like that. Just create a few different variations. You can also just maybe scale them. Just watch out when you scale them, you can see the pivot point is now Canada in a weird area. You can always just reset that pivot by right-clicking and then go set origin to geometry. And that just kinda set it in the center again. So kinda just look at the pivots and make sure they are set in the middle or somewhere in the middle. What we can also do is we can create like a little Hair maybe. So first of all, I'm just going to set my 3D cursor here by holding Shift and right-click. And then let's create a curve, shift a, and then curve, and let's create a Bezier a Curve, just something like that. Let's scale it down and just move it off to the side, something like that. And now we can go into edit mode and we can just move maybe this point around. Press E to extrude just three points, maybe. Just so we have a little dust Hair particle as well. Now we also need to give it some geometry. So with this Curve selected, go to the curves options you on the side or the Data Properties tab. And now we're gonna go to geometry and let's just see under bevel, just increase this depth. And then we get like little little pipe like that. So that'll be our Hair Particles. Maybe just make it I don't know, maybe something like that. We can maybe scale the whole thing and make this a little bit like that. And then we're just going to duplicate this one, go into edit mode and just move some of these points around. So maybe rotate that, maybe switch off proportional editing and just move them around so we have something a little bit different. Maybe. Something like that. Yeah, that's pretty cool. And it's scaled that down. Maybe let's set the pivot point. Right-click. Set Origin geometry. Same with this one, just so that it rotates around the center. And now we just need to convert these to two measures, guarantee they stole curves. So you can just right-click and then convert to Mesh. Same with this one, right-click, convert to mesh. So now you can see they are little measures. Cool. So I think we need one more of these smaller or maybe two more That's a little bit smaller. So let's just scale one down. Maybe just flatten it. Maybe something like that and then maybe one more that's slightly bigger. Let's just scale it on the X and Y by just pressing S and X or Y or Z just to change the shape. Or you can just go into edit mode and just pulled some of these things around. I think that should be fine. So let's select all of these objects, all our Dust objects, and let's move them into their own collection by pressing M on the keyboard and then new collection. And let us call this Dust. Alright, so now if you look in the outliner, you can see we have this dust collection with all these dust particles. So we can actually just hide this whole collection. And let's bring back our Emitter. And let's go back to Particles settings, then render. And now we're going to change this render as halo To Collection because we want to use that dust collection and where it says instance collection, just choose that collection that we created. Cool. So now I can see we have all these little Dust Particles and that's looking pretty cool. Obviously, we're going to tweak quite a bit stole. So let's have a look here under scale. And it just increase the scale or randomness all the way to one. So we get some nice random scale values. And then let's go to rotation and add some rotation to these Dust Particles. So let's give this a randomized value of one. And let's see if that does anything. So you can see that actually changed the rotation, but they're not going to animate or actually moving that direction. So for that, we need to enable this dynamic. And let's also give it some spin if we expand this angular velocity, and let's give this a value of 0.5. Now, if we play this back, nothing will happen because I realized we haven't given it any actual velocity. So let's just go back to the velocity section. And now this normal velocity With that we've set to zero. Let's set this to 0.01, just a tiny amount, 0.01. And let's see if that works. There we go. As you can see, our particles are moving slowly around and they also slowly spinning, and that's exactly what we want. So we need to give it some velocity for this rotation to actually work because it's Using the velocity and then it, I think it's multiplying it with this value, and that's our angular velocity. So cool, we've got the rotation sorted. Alright, so I think we are ready to add some forces to our scene. Let's add a turbulent force. So press Shift a and then we go to force-field and it's added turbulent. And then under the physics tablets give it some strength. And I think one is a little bit too much. Let's bring this down or let's just preview that at one and see what we get. Yeah, you can see that's just moving crazy. You can see Particles going all over the place So if we go back to our turbulence properties, Let's set the strength to 0.050, 0.05. Let's see how that works. Yeah, that's looking pretty cool. You can see them moving in all different directions. They do accelerate quite a bit. And there is an easy way to fix that. If we go back to our Emitter, go back to our Particles settings. And then under physics, if we expand forces, we can add some little bit of damper idea. So let's maybe add 0.05 and it see how that works at. We'll kinda just damp down on the Forces. So let's add our camera first. So press Shift a and then camera and image is going to move this with our camera. Oh, as you can see, it created our camera. They were replaced the 3D cursor with the cameras selected press Shift S and then select cursor to world origin. And then press Shift S again, and then choose selection to cursor. And that's just going to snap our camera to the world origin and then press Gy to just move the camera on the y-axis, then press N to bring up this side menu under item. Then we're just going to reset the rotation by setting X to 90 degrees and then Y to zero and Z to zero as well. Then our cameras just kinda aligned with our grid. Now we can maybe move it up slightly by pressing G Z and then GY to move it forward. Okay, now we can press N to hide the side menu and press zero to just go into that camera view. You can see we've got our Particles and are floating around. So now let's save this. Let's go to our Dust Emitter, go to the Particles settings, and now we're going to decrease the size quite a bit. So let's go to the render section. Let's bring down the scale to 0.015. So now you can see we've got these tiny Dust Particles, but I think we need to add more particles. So now we're gonna go up all the way to emission. And let's increase this 10,000 to 100,000. And let's see what we get. So yeah, that's quite intense. But what we're going to do is let's go back to our camera settings. So click on the camera and the outliner, go to the camera icon here. And let's set the focal length to something like 85, so it's kinda more zoomed in. And then we're going to enable depth of field. And now we just need to set our focus distance. So let's go to, so let's go to Viewport Display and just enable limits so we can see where the focus is. And then we just need to look at this from the side, something like that. I think we need to move our camera back slightly now. And then we can move our focus distance back to maybe somewhere in the center of this Particle Simulation. Alright, Something like that. And then we can decrease our f-stop. Let's make it maybe 1.4. And then we're also like to do is increase the blades two or set the blades to around eight. And then you get that nice bokeh with an eight-sided the octa, I think you call it like an octagon, eight-sided Bokeh, which is pretty nice. Let's save this quickly and let's have a quick preview and see if we can just get a glimpse of how that's going to look, we still need to add some materials to our Dust Particles. But let's go to our render settings quick and change this to cycles GPU. If you are using a GPU, Let's go to a world settings and just change this background color to maybe just an HDRI. So I'm going to set this to environment texture. Click Open, and I can browse to your favorite HDRI. Let's do like an indoor one. And now I'm just going to hide it from the background. So I'm gonna go to the Render Settings and go down to form, click Transparent. And you can see this quite a lot of particles. I think we need to bring the size down quite a bit. It's always just a matter of tweaking, tweaking, tweaking until you get something that works. I think Let's do 005. Might be so small. This is see if we can preview this in material preview. You can see them kind of flickering in and out-of-focus, but they are looking pretty nice. You can obviously experiment with the size, and it all depends on the size of the object to create it in that dust collection. If you created them quite big, you will have to just adjust the size. So let's quickly just set a material for these Dust Particles. So let's open this collection and let's just go to one of these Objects and just give them some material. I'm going to save my project. And with this object selected, let's go to the shading tab. Click New to create a new shader material. And let's give it a name, just call it Dust. And I think the only thing we need to change here is to set the transmission because we want our Dust Particles to be transparent because they so small they, they basically transparent. So maybe set this to about 0.7 transparency under the transmission 0.7. That's the only thing we need to set. We can keep the color white. You can maybe make it a bit more gray if that works better with your scene. And then we can also add some fog into our scene and maybe just a spotlight to visualize our Dust a little bit better. So let's do that now. Let's go into solid view. And then let's create another cube. And this will be our volumetric, our Fog basically. So let's scale that up. Let's just make it slightly bigger than our Particle Emitter. And then you can simply go to the shading tab, click on New, this will be our fog. Let's just give this a name and then we can delete this principle, BSD if shader by pressing X. And then we're going to create a new note by pressing Shift a click on Search. And this time we're just going to type volume. And then we're going to use the principled volume shader. And then you can connect this node to the volume input of the material output. And if this slows down your system quite a bit, Let's just go to our Particle Emitter and it just changes back to 10,000 for now. Because obviously if we adding that volumetric and all the particles that can slow down your computer quite a bit. Alright, so let's see how that looks like. If we look through it and I can see our fog is way too dense and is just make sure that you don't accidentally create an object inside this dust collection. I think I just did that. And so you can accidentally create a object inside there. In that object will be used as a dust particle. So just make sure you drag it outside of that collection. So let me just see if we go to the material Tabia and expand volume just to bring down the density of this fog. Let's make this 0.1, maybe even less 0.05. And I think that will actually do the trick. We still need some, a spotlight, maybe bring down the environment light. So if you go to your world settings and the strength of this HDRI, let's bring it down to 0.1. And let's add a spotlight. So go back into solid view. And let's just add a light. Spotlight, smooth it up, and maybe move it to the side. May be up and then just rotate it around the Y axes, maybe something like that. And let's increase the strength to maybe 500. Let's preview that quickly and see what we get. I just want to make this beam a little bit more like that. Then maybe increases to 5,000. Yeah, that's what I want. And then maybe decrease this even more. So we just get like a beam of light like that. And then we can also increase the radius of the slide and just make it, let's just make the radius 0.01, just a tiny radius so we get soft shadows because obviously these Dust Particles can actually cause shadows onto other objects, etcetera. So you just want to play with the size of the light source as well. And there you go. That's how easy it is to create these dust particles inside of Blender. So here is a test shot I did that. I included the Blender file with the Assets provided with this course that you can download and have a look at. So simple as that, just a spotlight and one model and just an interesting camera, move and add these Dust Particles and it just makes your shot looks so much better. So I hope you enjoyed this lesson. Save your project now, and I will see you in the next lesson. 9. Lesson 08: Debris Explosion Using Particle Simulations: Hi and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to create a Debris Explosion Using Particles. So before we start, obviously you can create a Debris Explosion by using something like rigid body Simulations. And I would recommend that you actually use a rigid body simulation on some of the bigger parts of your debris. And then you can add the particle simulations on top of that to create a more complex Debris Explosion. But you can get pretty far with just using particles. So let me show you. So we've started with a new scene. Let's delete everything by pressing X and clicking Delete. And then let's start with our Particle Emitter. And this time we're going to use a simple plane. So press Shift a and then mesh and in plane. And with the plane selected, press N to bring up this side menu on the item tab. And let's set the dimensions of this plane to 2.5 m by 2.5 m. Now we will see that our scale has been changed. So we need to apply our scale. So with the plane selected press Control a, and then click Scale to just reset that to one. Now let's rename our plane to Emitter here in the outliner. And then let's rotate our plane. So it's kinda just tilting at an angle because I want to have our Debris explode this way. Alright, so let's just maybe move it off to the side slightly by pressing G and Y. So I'm just moving around the y-axis, just slightly away from the center of our scene. We can press N Now to hide this side menu. Now, let's begin by setting up our particle system. So the plane selected, let's go to Particles. And in this lesson we're actually going to create two Particle systems on this one Emitter. Let's start by creating our first Particle System by clicking this plus, and let's call this one large debris. Now, you're just below this, you'll see Particles settings here and we can rename this as well, because we're going to basically duplicate these settings later on to create our smaller debris. So let's call this large. So we know this is the settings for the larger debris. Now, let's have a look at our emissions section. So let's leave the number of particles to 1,000. And let's change the end frame to three. That means it's going to release or emit all 1,000 Particles from frame one to frame three. And let's also increase the lifetime to 250 as we don't want our Particles to disappear. Now, let's go to the velocity section and let's set all this to zero. And the reason that we're not going to use a velocity is we're going to use a force like an explosion that will actually force our particles in a certain direction. Now we can set up our rotation in the meantime as well. So let's take a rotation and it's changed the orientation axes to normal. Let's randomize that all the way so we get some nice random rotations. And then let's take this dynamic as well. And that will just add some dynamic rotation as well. Alright, let's move this plane up slightly by pressing G and Z. So it's kinda just sitting above the plane. Now, let's play this back and see what happens. If I press Space. You'll see that our Particles will simply just fall from our Emitter. And that's because we don't have any velocity on these Particles. Now we're going to fix that using a force that will act like an explosion, that will actually explode our Particles This way forward. So let's do that now. So in the viewport, press Shift a and then go down to force-field and select force. And this will be our exploding force. Now, we want the Particles to explode this way. So I want to move this force. So it's sitting behind this Particle Emitter. So it's forcing the Particles this way with a force selected, press G and Y and just move this force on the y-axis. So it's kinda just sitting, you're behind our Emitter with this force-field selected. Let's go to the Physics tab and let's increase the strength to 500. Now we also want to keyframe this strength, so it doesn't stay at 500 all the time, but it's going to go at will drop down to zero. So make sure you're on the first frame. And then click this little dot next to this 500 to create a keyframe on frame one. And then go to frame four by using the arrow keys on the keyboard. And now we're going to bring this strength down all the way to zero and then just click this little box to create a keyframe as well. So now you can see we have these two keyframes on frame one and also unframed for and that will just keyframe our force Let's save that now. Let's go back to frame one and press Space to preview that. Now you can see we have this nice Explosion. Are Particles are exploding in the right direction and everything is looking nice. Now let's add a symbol floor that we can change into a collision objects just to see how our particles are interacting with our scene. So I'm simply going to create a plane, maybe something like that. And then we're also wanna do is as shown a stretch it out slightly. So I'm going to press S and just scale it on the x-axis, so it's an X. And then I also want to extrude this wall. So we have a wall on this side that are Particles can interact with that. So the plane selected press Tab to go into edit mode, press two to go into edge selection mode and select this one edge. And now we simply going to press E to extrude and then Z to lock around the z-axis. So let's pull it up to about this height. Press Tab to go into edit mode again. And let's apply the scale. So press Control a and then select scale. Now, if we play this back, nothing will happen because we need to set this object as a Collision Objects. So with your plane or your floor objects selected, go to the Physics tab and then click on Collision. Alright, so now if we play this back, you will see our particles will interact, but they bouncing around quite hectic early. So let's fix that by introducing some damping and also some friction on this Collision plane. So let's set the damping amount to 0.6 and let's set the friction amount to 0.7. Now, you can go ahead and play with these numbers and see what results you get. And just play around until you are happy with a way that your particles are bouncing around or interacting with the environment. Alright, so now let's move both our Emitter and the force just slightly away from this as I want to create something a bit more interesting. So are these two objects selected, press G and why to just move them on the y-axis. And let's select our plane, go into edit mode, press two for edge selection, and then select this front edge. Let's press E to extrude that and then Z to lock it in that axes. And I want to create like a door or an entryway so we can use that for our Debris to shoot through. So let's press three on the keyboard and select this face. Now press I for insert and just pull them out down until you get something like that. And now we're going to scale this insight planes. So press S and then X two scattered on the x-axis, and then press two to go into edge select mode. Select this top edge. Let's just zoom in here slightly. And let's bring this edge down by pressing G and Z to lock around the z-axis. And maybe let's do the same with this bottom one. Just move it down slightly. And now we can simply just delete this face. So make sure you on face select mode or press three, select this middle phase, and then we can press X and select faces to delete that phase. Now, let's press Tab to go back to object mode, and let's see how this works. Save your project, make sure on frame one, press Space. And let's see. As you can see, that's looking pretty cool. Particles are coming through this doorway and you can see they kinda bouncing away from the edges. And I think that looks pretty cool. Okay, so now we are ready to create our actual Debris Particles. So save your project now and let's create our debris objects. So first one, let's create a cube. So shift a mesh and cube. Then let's move this away from our scene by pressing G and why to just move it on the y-axis. Now, let's create a few random debris. So I'm just gonna go into edit mode, maybe into Vertex Selection. And can I just move these things away? And obviously you don't want them to be perfect because these are kinda Debris sections. So let's just find our little Debris piece, maybe something just like little rectangle, Something like that. It's quite tricky to do this in this way. Yeah, I just kinda something like that. Then what I will suggest is reset your origin point. So right-click set origin to geometry. And then we actually want to move our objects. So the origin is kinda at the bottom of this, this object because it will actually use that midpoint or the origin to place it on a surface. So if this origin is closer to the bottom of the object, and we'll just look a little better. And easy way to do that is going to edit mode Press tab and then select everything by pressing a, and then just move it up so you can just press G and Z and kinda just move it so that that pivot is more to the bottom of the object. You have to do this inside of edit mode. So if I press tab now and if I press R, you will see it. It's going to rotate around that bottom point. So it doesn't show you do that for all the little debris pieces. So now you can just move it back to its position. And let's duplicate this one by pressing Shift D. And let's just change it a little bit around. So go into edit mode. And I'm simply just gonna kinda move these points may be around. So we have something a little different. Maybe move this. We have something like that. And then I'm going to reset the origin to geometry, go into edit mode, maybe look at this from the side, and then we can just select everything, move it up so that pivot is kinda more at the bottom of that piece of Debris. Alright, so let's duplicate this one as well. Shift D, and maybe let's just scale this one, scale on the y-axis. So S and NY and maybe sx2, bring it down maybe a little bit. And yeah, that pivot point is looking alright. So let's duplicate this one again. Maybe let's rotate it on the Z, and then let's scale it on the X. And what else can we do? Maybe let's take these four points and scale them down. So it's maybe something like that. Maybe scale it down as well, just to get some interesting little Debris shapes. Now, let's reset the origin to Geometry, going to edit mode, press a, and then just move it up. Just so that pivot point is kinda setting at the bottom. Alright, let's maybe create one or two more. So let's duplicate this one. Maybe let's just scale it in the Y axes and maybe in a Z to create like a flat canopies. Maybe let's move these two points, outer butt and then maybe back. Alright, let's set the origin to geometry, go into edit mode, select everything, look at this from the side and just move it up. Alright, let's maybe rotate some of them as well so they're not all pointing in the same direction. Alright, let's maybe duplicate this one. And let's scale this one. Maybe in the, in the Z. Yeah, maybe something like that. He can maybe move some of these points around. Maybe let's scale that in, maybe something random like that. Alright, let's set our origin liquid this from the side, go into edit mode, press a, and just move everything up slightly. Okay, Another thing that we wanna do is we want to apply the scale for all of these Debris Objects. So select all of them, press Control a, and then click Scale. And that will just ensure that our scale is set to one. And that will just make everything work better. Alright, So now we can add all of these into a collection. So select all of these Debris, press M, New Collection and let's call this Debris large. Alright, so now we have this collection with our large debris pieces. Let's save our project and let's click on our Particle Emitter. And let's go to our Particles settings. And then we're gonna go to the render settings because we don't want to use these halos. We want to use a collection, and then we want to use our Debris large collection. Another thing that we want to take your ease, our object rotation and that's just going to use that random rotation that we gave it in the viewport. Alright, let's press Space and see what we get. And as you can see, our particles are super tiny, so we just need to increase the size or the scale. So under the Render Settings, just increase the scale. And here you can just adjust the scale until you are happy. And then also remember to increase the scale or randomness all the way to one, just to add some nice scale variation. That looks pretty cool. Alright, let's go back to our first frame. Let's press Space and see what we have. So yeah, that is looking pretty cool. Alright, so let me show you how easy these to create a little bit of a more complex Particle System. So what we're gonna do is we're going to duplicate this Debris large collection and create smaller debris that we're going to use On that same Emitter. So easy way to do this in your Outliner. Right-click on this Debris large collection and then simply click on Duplicate collection. And that's going to create a duplicate of that collection with all the objects inside. So let's rename this new collection to Debris small. Alright, now let's select all of these objects under Debris small, and it's just move them away so we can see them because they currently sitting on top of these other debris pieces. So let's press G and why to just move them away. And now we're just going to scale them down. So just press S and simply just scale them down We can also change this pivot or the Transform Pivot, yet the top two individual origins. And then we can just scale them like this. So scale them down nice and small. And then we also want to apply this scale. So with all of them selected, press Control a, and then select scale. Alright, so now we have our two collections, Debris large and Debris small. Okay, let's save our project. Let's go back to the first frame. And now let's go back to our Particle Emitter. So select this large Debris Particle System, then click on this little drop-down and select Duplicate Particle System. Now you can see it created the second one. So let's rename this one, double-click, and let's call this one small debris. Now, very importantly, even though we have to particle systems, they both Using the same settings here at the bottom that says large. You can see if I click on both of them, they've got the same settings right here. So what do we wanna do is we want to duplicate the settings as well. So make sure you select your small Debris Particle System. And then we're going to click on this little icon right here. And this is going to duplicate the large settings. So click on that. Now we can see the new settings called large.001. So let's rename this to small. And now you can see if we click on our large Debris, it shows our large settings and small Debris shows the small settings. So now we can go and customize the small Emitter settings to our needs. So let's go down to the Render Settings and then under collection, let's change this from Debris large to Debris small or right? And I think that's all we need to change for now. Let's just make sure we On the first frame, save your project and in press Space to preview that. Another thing that we want to do is let's go back to the emission section of our small debris, and let's increase this number 1000-10 thousand, so it just add 10 there. Go back to the first frame. And let's play that back and see what we get. Now you can see we have all these smaller pieces. So just something to note is we can set a different seed value between these two Particle systems just to ensure that they are slightly more, slightly different and more random. So let's give the small Debris a see just a random seed value like that. And now if we play this back, you can see we have our small debris. Now we can maybe make it a bit smaller as well. So let's go back to the render section where we selected our Debris small collection. And maybe let's just bring the scale. You can play with the scale here and see exactly what you need. We can maybe even increase this number to 20,000. Let's see how that looks. Go back to the first frame, press Space. And I can see we have all these nice small, smaller pieces of Debris bouncing around. So there you go. As you can see, it's really easy to add some cool particle explosions are debris explosions in your scene. Play around with us, see what you can create, save your project. And then I will see you in the next lesson. 10. Lesson 09: Create Cartoon Style Smoke Using Particle Simulations: Hey, and welcome back. In this lesson, I'm going to show you how to create some Cartoon Style Smoke Using Particles. Now we will look at how we can change the scale of these Particles over time by using textures. And then we're also going to look at how we can fade out our Particles Using material nodes. So I've got a new project here. So let's start by deleting everything in the scene by pressing a X and clicking Delete. Let's start off by creating our Particle Emitter. So let's press Shift a mesh and let's choose an IPO severe. So let's scale down our Emitter slightly. And then let's just apply the scale by pressing Control a and choosing scale. Now, let's add our particle system by going to the Particles section you on the side and clicking the plus button to create our particle system. Now for this we only want 50 particles. So let's enter 50 next to the number. And then we also want to change our frame duration. So currently our frame duration is 1-250. So let's change at the, at the bottom 1-100 only, we only want 100 frames. So in our particle settings, Let's change the frame start and frame end to 1.100, so our Particles will only be released during this duration. Let's also increase our lifetime to 100 as we don't want our Particles to disappear. Now, before we go any further, let's create our actual particle. So let's press Shift a mesh and let's create another Ico, severe. But this time let's bring down the subdivisions. So this menu that pops up here in the corner, just expand it and let's bring down the subdivisions to one. So we're going to create this low poly Smoke Style Animation. Let's move this particle just out of the way by pressing G and X to just move it away from our Particle Emitter. And let's maybe scale this down slightly as well. And let's apply the scale by pressing Control a and scale. Now, Let's also rename this in the outliner. So let's just call this particle. And let's call this one our Emitter. Alright, remember to save your project. Now let's go back to our Particles settings and let's expand the velocity section over here. So let's set the normal velocity to zero as we don't want our Particles going in all directions, we basically just want our particles to go upwards. So let's set the Z velocity to five. Now if we play this back, you can see that our particles are shooting up and then they falling down because of gravity. Now, let's go to the rotation section and enable rotation. Let's expand this. And then let's set the randomized value to one. Let's also take Dynamic for some Dynamic rotations. And then under angular velocity, Let's change the axes to random and then set the amount to one. This will just give us a nice random spin to our Smoke Particles. Okay, so let's minimize the rotation section and then let's go to render. And we want to render Using our particle that we created. So we're going to set this render as to object, and then we're going to select our particle from the drop-down here. So let's have a look and see what happens if we press Space. You can see our particles are tiny. So let's just increase the scale to maybe around one point to this will be our Smoke Particles. Alright, so as you can see, our particles are quite large. Don't worry too much about that. We will still adjust that using the textures. Then we also don't want to render our Emitter. So under the render section, just untick this show Emitter. Alright, so let's minimize their renders section and let's go to field weights. And we want to bring our gravity down. As currently can see, the gravity is quite strong and it's just kinda pulling our Smoke Particles down. Let's set the gravity to 0.3. Let's see how that works. And I can see our Smoke is kinda slowly falling down, but it looks a lot better. Next we want to add a wind force so that our Smoke particles are going to the left of our scene. Let's create a force by pressing Shift a and then go to force-field, and we simply going to add a wind force. Now let's move this wind force on the x-axis by pressing G X and just kinda move it forward. And let's rotate it on the Y. So press R and Y and can I just rotate it so it's an angle pointing towards our Smoke Emitter. Now with this windfall selected, go to the Physics tab and let's set the strength to something around eight Let's play that back and see what we get. And I can see our Smoke is kinda moving in the right direction. You can obviously play around with a string of the wind and set it to something you are happy with. What we want to do next is we want to change the scale of these Particles over time. So we will now Smoke Particles to start out quite small. And as they move upwards, we want to increase the scale of these particles. So we can do that by using textures in our particle system. Let's go back to our particle system, and now we're gonna go down to textures, just expand textures. And now we're going to create a new texture by clicking this new button. So you can see it created our new texture. And to go to that texture settings, you can use this little shortcut button right here, show texture in Texture tab. Or you can simply go to the texture panel here on the right-hand side. So I'm going to use this little shortcut here to jump to the texture settings. And this is where we can choose what type of texture we want to use to influence the scale of these particles. So right here at the top we see type. This is where you can select all these different types. And you can go ahead and play with these and see what they do. For this demonstration, we're going to simply use a blend texture. As you can see, this is almost just like a gradient. And you can also change the type of gradient over year from linear and all of these different settings. We're going to set this to easing so we get a little bit of a better gradient. Next, under the mapping section here, we want to change the coordinates from generated two strand or particle. And that's just gonna give us more control over our actual Particles. Next, let's go to the influence Section year. As you can see, you can influence all of these different parameters by using this gradient. So we want to influence the size or the scale of our Particles. So untick this general time and then let's take scale. And instantly you can see something happening in the viewport. You can see our Particles start out very tiny and they get bigger over time. So as you can see, if we play this back, are Particles start out very tiny and they get bigger and bigger as they move upwards and to the left. You can also change this size influence to just kinda adjust how much you want those Particles to be, to be influenced. Basically, I'm going to set mine to one for now. Let's just pause our particle system right here so we can kinda see this. And now we're going to minimize this influence section. And let's go to the colors section right here. Next we're going to take this color ramp and expand this. And this is where you can control this gradient. You can use these handles to control how it's influencing your Particles. I can bring this white section back to make the particles grow bigger, more quicker. I can bring this black inwards to change how the Particles actually begin. I want the Particles to be slightly bigger at the beginning. And an easy way to do that is to change this black value to something more gray. So just select this black handle at the beginning right here, and then click on this black color and then you can just bring it up slightly. So if we set this all the way to white, you can see our Particles. We'll start off very large. And if we bring this down all the way to black, you can see they will start off as very small. So we're going to set this guy in the middle, maybe somewhere around here. And you can control this exactly the way you want. So now if we play this back from the start, you can see our particles are being emitted at that size and they grow bigger as they move along. Alright, let's save our project. Alright, Next we're going to look at materials and how we can actually control the color of our Particles and also the transparency of our Particles. I'm going to show you how you can change the color over time. So you can start off with a certain color particle and then you can change that color over time. And then I'm also going to show you how you can use that same factor to determine the transparency of your particles, which is something that you can do a lot width. So I'm going to select our particle in the viewport and then I'm going to go to the shading tab right at the top to set our material. So very importantly, we need to change over to the cycles render engine because some of the nodes that we're going to use is only compatible with cycles. So let's go to our Render Settings here at the top, and let's change our render engine two cycles. I'm going to set mine to GPU. And then right at the bottom, if I scroll down all the way to color management, I just want to set the view transform to standard. So we just have a little bit more contrast and saturation So now we can change this to render view here right at the top. And you can see we have our Particles. So currently we using a default gray world environment or background color basically. So let's change this so we can see our Smoke a little better. So if you click this little drop-down here at the top, you can untick this scene world. And then it will just use the standard kind of material preview environment just so that we can see the Particles a little better. With our particle selected. Let's create our material by clicking this new button. And let's just call this Particles. Okay, so we're going to leave this principled BSD F shader and also the material output. And let's create a new node by pressing Shift a and then click on Search. Let's type particle. And then we're going to choose this Particle info node and just place it over here. So this node gives you a lot of information that you can actually use, such as the age of your Particle, the lifetime, location, size, velocity, etcetera. So really powerful things that you can do with this node. So what I wanna do is I want to create a math node. And then I'm going to show you how you can determine a value 0-1 for the lifetime of your particle. So as you can see, we've got the Particle age right here, which is the frame number of your Particles as the particle is born at, we'll begin at age one on frame one, and then it will progress to frame 100 or age 100. Then the lifetime is the lifetime of the particle that will stay the same. And remember, we set this lifetime to one-hundredth. So an easy way to get a percentage is to just take our H value and divide it by the lifetime. And that will give us a value 0-1 that we can use for things like the color and also the transparency. So it might sound a little bit confusing, but let me show you. First of all, we're going to create a math node. So shift a search and type math. So let's select a normal math node. And then we're going to change this to divide because we want to divide these two numbers. So the top one we want to connect our age, and then the bottom one we want to connect the lifetime. So this means it's going to take the age value and it's going to divide it by the lifetime, and this value will be the result. So next, let's create a color ramp node, shift a search and just type color. And you can place it right here in the middle. And now we can connect this value to the factor and this color value to the base color. Now if we look at our Particles, you can see they starting off quite dark and they go more white at the end. And we can adjust these colors by just changing this black and white value. So if I click on this black here at the bottom, I can change this to maybe like a red orange. And that will change the color of the Particles at the beginning of our as they being emitted from this Particle Emitter. Then we can change the white to anything else. We can maybe make it pink. You can see now it's going from orange to pink. And you can also adjust these handles to adjust how you want to change that gradient or how you want to influence the color of these Particles. I'm going to make it from orange to a gray kinda color. Maybe just take out all the saturation. We can maybe take out all of that. And just something like a, just a gray color like that. Because what we're gonna do is we can have these particles come out. They will change color and then we're going to fade them out as they get here to the end. Now let's see how we can use this same value that we created or that we calculated by using the age and the lifetime to influence the transparency of our particles. Now it's actually quite easy to do. So let me just expand this or make this full screen so you can see the nodes a bit better. So what we wanna do is we want to create another shader. So press Shift a search and type transparent. And we're going to use this transparent BSD F, which is a shader on its own. And we're going to mix between this principled BST F shader and this transparent P, S D F shader by using these values that we calculate it. Now we need a mix shader node to mix between these two shaders. So let's create that now by pressing Shift a search and type in mix. Now very importantly, we need to select the mix shader because we're going to mix between these two shaders Now let's place this node right here between our principal BST F and R material output. And then let's also connect this transparent to this mix shader as well. Now if we go back and we'll look at our viewport, we can use this factor or this mix shader to mix between complete transparency. As you can see, they're all complete opaque by just using this factor value. This is where we will basically connect this value that we calculated here. So to mix that we need another color ramp. So I'm going to create another color and by pressing Shift a search and type in color, then select Color Ramp, and let's just place it above our other color ramp. Now, let's connect this value to the factor. And then we're going to connect this color output from this color ramp to our mix shader factor. So let's just move this out of the way to make things a little bit neater. So let me just maybe move that there so I can see it's using this color ramp to control this mix shader that's mixing between the transparent shader and our orange and gray base, base color. So now if we go back and see what we get, you can see that our Particles are becoming more and more transparent as they go towards the left. We can control this by adjusting this new color ramp. So if I bring this black value in, you can see the transparency is getting less and less. And if we bring this back and we bring this white value inwards, you can see that's affecting the end of this transparency. You can choose exactly where you want your Smoke Particles to cannot disappear. So I'm going to set it to around here. Now, just a quick side note. I noticed sometimes if you're using quite a lot of particles, you might get some black artifacts when doing this transparency setup. Now, I'm not sure if this is a bug or maybe just something on my Mac, but I did find a workaround. So if you see any, I think we can actually see one right here. If I zoom out. So I think I can see a little artifact right there. So if you get that, let me show you how to fix that. So under the Render Settings here on the side, if you go to light paths, you simply need to click these little dots on this right-hand side, and then you choose full global illumination. Now this will just increase the number of light bounces in your scene. That will usually just fix that error. You can also leave this on default and then just increase this transparent max bounces to something like 32. And that should also resolve it by just increasing the transparent. But I usually just change this to full global illumination and it sets everything to 32 max bounces. And that usually works great. So now if we go back to the layout and we change this over to render, you can see our particles are fading out nicely. I'm just going to change our lighting to not use our scene world, but using the default Material background just to see our Particles a little better. Now we can go ahead and bake our Particles. So I'm gonna go to the Emitter and go to our Particles settings. Then let's go to cash and simply click on bike. Alright, so now you can see our particles are cached so we can just scrub the timeline to view our creation. And as you can see, let me just play that back. You can see our Particles of fading out right around here, which is pretty cool. So as you can see, using textures and doing some math, Using the material nodes can give you some really, really powerful results. Because you can change the size or the scale of your Particles over time. And you can also use that age calculation to do different things with your Particle materials. You can see I simply just parented my Emitter to this little toy train model and it works pretty great. So I'm also including this train model in the asset section. So you can have a look at that Blender file if you want to use it. So go ahead, play around with these textures and these material nodes and see what you can Create. And I will see you in the next lesson. 11. Lesson 10: Water Drops On Surface Using Hair Particles: Hey and welcome back. In this lesson, we're gonna look at Hair Particles and how we can use Hair Particles to create water droplets on a Surface. Now, the difference between the normal Particles and Hair Particles is basically, Hair Particles will be generated on a surface or a volume of vertices, just as normal Particles, but they will be stuck to that specific location. So they won't fly off the object as normal Particles do, if that makes any sense. But let me show you what I mean. First of all, let's delete everything in our scene by pressing a and then X and click Delete. So let's now create an object that we can use as the surface where we're going to place these droplets. So let's create a simple soda can. Press Shift a mesh and cylinder. And let's expand this, Add Cylinder window you at the bottom. And let's increase the vertices to 64. So we have something that's a little bit more smoother. Now with us objects selected press Tab to go into edit mode, then press 32, go into face select mode and select this top phase. Then move it up by pressing G and Z and just move it up. So we have something that looks like a soda can. We can also move it up so it's above the grid. By pressing G and Z, I can just placing it right there. Now let's change the shading so we don't see these faces. So simply right-click on this model and select shade auto smooth. And that will just give us a nice smooth view and render. Let's also apply the scale of this object. So press Control a and select scale. Let's call this our soda can. Next we need a droplet or a water drop that we're going to use as our Particles. For that we can simply add another ecosphere. So I'm going to press Shift a mesh and then I ecosphere. And let's just move this to the side by pressing G and X. So let's rename it in the outliner. We can just call it drop. Now, let's press Tab to go into edit mode and then press one for vertex select mode. And then let's also enable proportional editing. Now we can just look at this from the side and select this bottom vertices and bring it up by pressing G. And then you can use the mouse wheel, oh, page up and page down just to create like a flat surface where this water droplet will sit on the surface. You can also bring this top vertex down slightly, just squishing it down. And then let's just make this so it's not perfectly round. I'm looking at this from the top, and I'm just selecting some of these vertices and Using the proportional editing to kinda just squish them in. Maybe something like that. Can maybe bring in the top a little bit, little bit down, even maybe until we have something like that. Now let's duplicate this to create a few variations. So I'm going to press Shift D and then press X to move it along the x-axis. And maybe let's just rotate this one on the z-axis. So I'm pressing R and Z. Let's maybe scale it down slightly, go into edit mode. And let's just move some of these vertices around so it's not exactly the same shape as the other one. Let's do it one more time. So I'm going to duplicate this one, Shift D and then X to move around the x-axis. Let's go into edit mode and maybe let's just bring this one, Make it a little bit more flatter than the other ones. Maybe, maybe let's bring that in and maybe also just kinda move it around so it's not exactly the same shape. I'm also going to rotate it on the Z. Now I just want to apply the scale of all these water droplets so you can select all of them, Control a and then apply scale. Now let's place them all in a collection. So I'm going to select all of them, press M New Collection and let's call this Drops. Alright, so now we have our Drops collection in the outliner. And we can use that to place our water droplets across this object. So with the can select it. Let's go to our particle settings here on the side, and let's create our particle system. So obviously you can see by default it's going to create a normal Emitter particle. So if we press Space, you'll see particles being emitted from that object. But that's not what we want. We want to use Hair Particles. So you can see you've got these two options, Emitter and here. We simply going to click on this button right here. As you can see, we now have hair on our can. And if you presuppose, nothing will happen. Those Hair Particles, we'll just stick to that location Okay, So obviously we don't want to render Hair Particles on this object, but we want to render those droplets. So let's go to the render section here under the Particles and changes from render as path to collection because we want to use our Drops collection. So choose collection. And then where it says instance collection, let's choose Drops. Now you can see our Drops are being placed on the scan object, but it's not looking great. So if we go back to the emission section and source, you can see it's currently being emitted from the phases. And if we select our soda can and press Tab to go into edit mode, you can see that it doesn't have a lot of phases, has got these long faces on the side and then obviously also the top and bottom phase. So we need to add more faces so that they are more places to place these droplets on the can. So let's add some loop cuts. So I'm going to press Control or Command R to create a new loop cut and then simply increase this number of cuts until you have something that looks like that. You want these small little square faces. So now you can see we've got all of these little tiny faces and that's where those droplets are going to be placed. You can also increase the number of faces on top and on the bottom if you want to do that. So I can simply Shift-click to select both of these faces, then press I to create an inset like that. And then I again, I again until you have a few faces that you are, or the amount of faces that you are happy with. Now let's go out of edit mode by pressing Tab, you can see the Drops are more randomly placed around our object. But as you can see, the Drops On not rotated correctly, they kind of sticking out on this side. So let's see how we can fix that. So an easy way to do this is to rotate these drop objects in edit mode to change the orientation. So let me show you what I mean. Let's select our first droplet press Tab to go into edit mode. And then we're going to select all the phases. So press a to select everything. And now we can simply rotate it and see which way we need to rotate it. So this is placed on our object correctly. So let's begin by pressing rotate, and then let's try the y-axis first. And as you can see, I can rotate it and it doesn't really align to the right angle. So let's try are an X to rotate around the x-axis and now we're getting something. So if I rotate it all the way to this angle, and if you look at the top of this screen right here where it says Edit Mode. If I rotate that again, you can see the value right here at the top. So if I want to rotate it around to this angle, you can see it's got a value right at the top of -90. So let's just type that on the keyboard -90, press Enter. So now this droplet is actually orienting correctly. Now let's do the same with the other two droplets as well. So let's select the second one. Press Tab, press a to select all the faces and then RAX. And it see that's not the right rotation angle. So let's try are and why? Now you can see that's rotating in the correct axes. So if we look at this value here at the top, I can see we need to rotate this about 90 degrees. So I'm going to type 90, press Enter, and I can see that droplet is also positioned correctly or rotated correctly. So let's do the same with a loss droplet. So click on the lost small droplet, press Tab, press a to select all the faces and it's rotated around the x-axis. You can see that is the correct axes and we have a value of 90 yet the top. So I'm just going to press 90, Enter on the keyboard. And now our droplets are rotated correctly around our object. Another thing we can do is we can change all these droplets from shade flat to shade smooth. So I'm just going to select this either shade smooth or auto smooth. I think let's go with a Shade Smooth. And I can see they are nice and smooth. We don't see the faces. And let's select our can objects and go back to our Particles settings. So let's go to their renders section and let's decrease the scale of our Drops. And then also increase the scale randomness all the way to one. So we get like a nice random scale. We can also increase the amount of droplets if you go to the emission section You can increase the number of particles. So maybe let's make this 5,000 for now. And we can also change how it's distributed. So currently it's set to jittered. You can change this to a random. Sometimes that gives a little bit of a more random result, but you can play around with these and see what you get. You can also antique this random order or tick even distribution and see if you get any better results. Now, let's see, we can add some random rotation to these droplets. As you can see, we don't have a rotation section under the Hair Particles. But to show that we just need to take this advanced box. I'm not sure why they still do this, and not just keeping the rotation section here by default. But if you take this advanced, then you will get access to the rotation tab. So let's go ahead and take this rotation box and expand it. And what we can do here is if we leave this orientation axes to velocity and Hair, we can increase this phase value. And as you can see, our droplets are rotating. If we set this or if we change this value, set the phase value to one, and then we can increase the randomized phase, randomize that rotation so they're not all rotating the same amount basically. So this is just a nice, easy way to change the rotation of these droplets to be more random. Okay, let's create a simple material for our Drops. So I'm going to expand this Drops collection in the outliner, select the first drop, and let's go to the shading tab. Let's change our renderer two cycles. So I'm gonna go to the render settings, change the render engine two cycles. Let's set this to GPU, and let's set the color management to standard as well, just to get that more contrast look. Now let's change this to render view. Let's change our scene world to just use the material preset. Now select the first drop and let's click this New button to create our material for the Drops. Let's give this a name as well. Let's just call the drop or water drop. And what we want to do is we want to delete this principled be SDF shader selected, press X. And I can see we don't have any material on that drop. So let's create a new node by pressing Shift a search. And we're going to type in gloss. So we're going to use this gloss be STF shader for our droplets. Now we can simply connect this BST F2, our surface. And now you can see we starting to get that nice gloss transparent look. We want to assign the same material to these other two drop objects. So simply select the second drop. Click on this little drop-down here and choose drop. And let's do the same with the third one, selected and choose drop. Now you can see they're all using the same material. If we change the color of this material, they all will change. So we can maybe give this like a very, very slight blue saturation. Maybe like a 0.070, 0.05, maybe just to give a slight Britain. You can obviously change this any way you want to. And you can also change the roughness. If I increase the roughness all the way to one, these droplets will be very mad looking. And if we decrease this all the way to zero, they will be almost mirror-like, so they will reflect a lot of light. So maybe let's set this to 0.1. Then what we can also do is we can increase the light bounces. So if we go to our render tab here on the right-hand side, and then we expand light paths. And then we can set this to full global illumination. That usually just looks better on any transparent objects like gloss or liquid at we'll just give you a better render. So maybe let's give our can a material as well. So I'm going to select our soda can, click New. And maybe for this one, let's just create a metallic looking object. So I'm going to change the base color to a little bit more of a gray. And then let's increase metallic all the way to one. And we can also play with a roughness to see how rough or smooth we want that metal to be. And yeah, let's go back to the layout, changes over to render. And let's click on this drop-down to disable seen world. So we're just looking at the default material, HDRI. You're going obviously add your own HDRI to preview it like that. But sometimes I just prefer to use the non sealant seen world, just this default to preview it quickly. So play around with these Particles settings play around with a number of droplets you see and also the scale of your droplets. And also change the material and see what you can create. Remember to save your project. And then I will see you in the next lesson. 12. Lesson 11: Scatter Rocks Using Hair Particles: Hey, and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to look at how we can Scatter Rocks Or any other objects across a Surface Using Hair Particles. But then we're also going to control the density using white painting. Let's start by deleting everything in our scene by pressing a X and clicking Delete. Now, let's create a few rock Objects. Now you can obviously import your own Iraq measures, or you can create them using add-ons. But for this example, we simply going to use some Ico spheres. So press Shift a mesh and then I ecosphere. And let's just move this off to the side by pressing G X. So we have a deer on the side. So let's go into edit mode by pressing tab, and let's enable proportional editing right here at the top. So now let's take some of these vertices and kinda just move them around, increasing the proportional editing by using your mouse wheel or page up and page down. And then let's just move some of these points around so we get something that looks almost something like Iraq. Let's duplicate this one by pressing Shift D, and then you can press Shift Z to move it on that same plane. Let's go into edit mode, and let's just move some of these points around. Memoryless Scatter down slightly first. And we can also rotate it around and then go into edit mode and then just move some of these points around. Let's create another one, Shift D, and then Shift Z to move around the same plane. Let's rotate it on the Z by pressing R and Z. And then maybe let's scale it slightly, go into edit mode and then move some of these points around. We just want a few variations. So let's do one more shift, D, shift Z, maybe let's rotate it on the Z by pressing R, Z, Scatter down, go into edit mode and moving some of these points around. As you can see, my pivot point is also underneath these objects, so they will sit nicely on the surface. To change the pivot point easily, you can just select the object, go into edit mode, select everything by pressing a, and then press G and Z to move your object without moving the pivot point. So you can look at this from the side. You can just move this up until that pivot point is kinda setting at the bottom of this rock object. So do that for all the rock Objects. Now let's select our Rocks press M, New Collection, and let's call this Rocks press. Okay. Now you can see all the rock Objects are inside of this Rocks collection. Alright, so let's create our surface where we will be placing these Rocks. For that we simply going to create a plane, press Shift a mesh and plane. And let's scale it up a bit. So it's about, let's make it 10 m by 10 m. Let's also apply the scale by pressing Control a and scale. That reminds me to also apply the scale of our rock Objects. So select all the rocks and then press Control a and select scale to apply the scale. Now select the plane object, go to the Particles tab, press Plus to create that new Particle System. And we want to create another Hair Particles System. So select Hair and then you can see the normal path air Objects. So let's go down to the render section and changes from path To Collection. And then we want to instance our Rocks collection. And I can see we have our Rocks scattered across the surface. You can see they are not aligned or rotated correctly. So we can fix this by individually rotating these rocks. So simply you want to enable the object rotation year under this collection section under render. So that means if we tick this box object rotation, it's going to use the rotation of these objects. So let's select our first rock, and I'm going to press R Y and just rotate them and you can see how they change on our surface. So again, if we look at this number here at the top of the viewport, I can figure out that we need to rotate this rock at 90 degrees on the keyboard. Just type 90 Enter and I can see that one rock is rotated or aligned correctly. Let's do that with our second rock. Some just going to select it here, press R and Y. And you just want to see which sometimes it won't be on the y-axis. Sometimes you have to go RX and see, okay, that's not the correct alignment. Let's try RY. And you can see we can place them flat on the ground by rotating if I'm looking at the number yet the top 90 degrees. So I'm just going to type 90 Enter on the keyboard. And now that rock is also aligned correctly Let's do it for this rock as well. So I'm going to rotate around the y-axis, and that's also 90 degrees. And finally the last rock, let's rotate also on the Y, and that's also 90 degrees. Now you can see all the Rocks are aligned correctly on the surface. So before we look at the wait painting, Let's add some random rotation to these particles. So let's go to the Particles section and now we're going to enable this advanced again to get access to the rotation tab. So let's take rotation, expand that. And all we have to do is increased phase. As you can see, they're all will rotate exactly the same. So increase the phase 21. And then we add some phase randomness by just increasing this to all the way to two. And I can see the Rocks are rotated randomly. Go ahead and save your project now. So next we can select the plane object. And then we're going to go to the Data Properties section here on the side, this little green triangle. And now we're going to create our vertex group. So simply click on this little plus and you'll see it's going to create a new vertex group here. Let's rename this so we just keep track of what we're doing. I'm gonna call this Rocks, and that will control the density of these Rocks. Now what we can do is we can go back to our particle system. And then I'm going to scroll down to vertex groups, expand that and you can see you can control the density, the length, the clumping, all of these extra parameters by using different vertex groups. So we want to control the density with the vertex group we just created. So I'm simply going to click on this box next to density, and I'm going to select that vertex group called Rocks. Now you can see nothing is happening in the viewport because we need to add some white painting to that vertex group. Now before we can add some white painting, we need to add some extra faces to this plane. If you select this plane press tab, you can see we only have this one big face. So we can simply right-click and select sub-divide and just expand this little menu here at the bottom. And let's increase the number of cuts to something like 50. So we get all of these faces on our plane. Now press tab again to go back to object mode. Now with this vertex group selected, we can go to this drop-down menu right here at the top of the viewport. And we're going to change this now to white painting. Now you can see we can start to paint on this. Let's undo that and let's adjust the white here at the top. So let's increase our brush size by pressing F on the keyboard and just moving the mouse sideways. So that will increase or decrease this brush that we're going to paint with. And then it can also adjust the strength here at the top. So if you want to, if you want to paint 100% string, you can set this to one, or let's bring this down to about 0.5, like 50 per cent string. Now you can simply just click and drag and paint your weight painting. So obviously we can now see the rocks being scattered cross this plane. Only way we have a weight value bigger than one. So let's say if we set this, wait, but all the way to zero and we set the string to one, we can kinda erase these Rocks just by painting blue again. And then if you want to paint in the Rocks again, we can set our way to one or maybe to zero point something and bring the strength down. And obviously it can increase the radius. You can either use this slightly at the top or just that if shortcut. And then you can simply just paint in those Rocks. This will give you a lot of control to exactly place your Rocks into our direct your scene where you want those Hair Particles to be. So as you can see, I can add more Rocks in the middle of this plane. And then I can bring down this wait and paint darker blue on the edges to remove the Rocks from these areas. You can obviously then go back to object mode. And under Particles, you can still control the amount of particles year by the emission section. So if we make this 100, so as you can see, they will still be scattered around those wait, painted areas. So maybe let's increase this to around 250. And then we can obviously go down to the render section and we can change the scale of our rock CIA. And we can add some scale or randomness as well. And then you can simply go back, select a plane, go back to white painting. And you can start painting and place the Rocks as you wish. And as you can see, this will just give you so much control for controlling the density of these particles. Placing a Rocks Or any other object across a Surface. Go ahead and play around with a white painting. See what you gain, Create, then save your project. And I will see you in the next lesson. 13. Lesson 12: Realistic Grass Using Hair Particles: Hi and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to look at how to create Realistic Grass Using Hair Particles. And we're also going to look at wait painting, how to distribute or place your growth on an object. And then we're also going to look at Using children Particles, as well as dynamics Using Forces. So let's get started. So first of all, I've got a brand new project and let's delete everything by pressing a X and then clicking Delete. Next, I've created a Blender file that you can find in the Assets with this course. And we're going to import or a pinned some of those Grass objects that I've included. Now just a quick note, these Assets are available on the epic mega scans collection so you can get it from there. So I didn't create these Assets, but you can obviously either use them or you can create your own Grass Assets to use. So let's see how we can import those Grass Objects. So click on File and then append and then browse to the location where you downloaded the Grass collection blend file. Double-click on that Blender file, and then double-click on the collection folder because everything is already inside a collection in the spleen file. You'll see there's a collection and also grass. So we're going to import or append this Grass collection selected and click Append. Now you will see at we'll import these Grass objects into your scene and it will, can I just place it off to the side? We can maybe move it a little bit further away because I think the plane where we're going to place our Grass might be a little bigger than this area. So with all these gross objects selected, press G, X and just kinda move them a little bit further away from the middle of the scene. So if you look at the outliner, you can see we've got all these Grass objects and they inside this collection called gross. So you can either just minimize this or we can actually switch it off completely so we don't see it in the viewport, but we can leave it on for now. Next, let's create the plane object where we're going to place our grass. So press Shift a mesh and we're going to create a simple plane with a plane selected press N to bring up this side menu. And we're going to set the dimensions of X and Y to 15 to create a nice big plane for us to create our Grass on. Let's apply the scale. So with a plane selected, press Control a, and then select scale just to set the X, Y, Z scale back to one. Then press N to hide that side menu. Now let's subdivide this plane so we have more faces to work with. So with the plane selected, press Tab to go into Edit Mode, then press 32, go into face select mode, and then right-click and choose sub-divide. Now we're going to sub-divide this quite a bit. So just expand this little menu here at the bottom. And let's set the number of cuts to 50 and then press Enter. Now you can see we have all these faces to work with. What we can also do is just create some slope to this. So just select some random phases by holding Shift and then enable proportional editing right here at the top. Then with these faces selected, press G, Z to move them up and then use the mouse wheel or page up and page down to just kinda increase this area just to create a little bit of uneven surface. Alright, so press Tab to go back to object mode. And let's set this to shade smooth by right-clicking and then Shade Smooth. Ok, so now we're ready to add our particle system to this plane with a plane selected. Let's go to the Particles tab here on the right-hand side and click the plus sign to create our particle system. Now let's call this grass. So I'm just going to double-click here and call this grass. You can give it any name. Next we want to use Hair Particles. So simply click on this hey button and you will see that we have these Hey paths on our Surface. Now, let's leave the number of particles at 1,000 for now, we can always adjust that a little bit later. Next, let's go to the render section. So I'm just going to minimize this emission section, go to render. And we don't want to render as paths, but we want to render our collection of gross Objects. Select collection here. And then where it says instance collection, this is where we're going to choose our gross collection. Now you can see something is happening. We do have some gross, but the scale is very tiny. Let's increase the scale here. And you can see we get our gross Objects. And then we can also introduce some randomness by just bringing this scale randomness all the way up to one. Maybe let's set the scale to around 0.5. Let's see how that looks. Now we're also going to make use of children Particles. So this will be a lot more dense in our final render. Now what you can do is if some of these Grass Objects or too big or too small, you can actually come to our collection here and you can scale some of these objects individually. As you can see it, we'll just kinda scale those objects in the scene. So let's say, for instance, this object fields a little bit too big. We can scale it down, and it will only scale that one object on this plane. If you see that some of your gross Objects are orienting incorrectly if they may be lying flat or if they upside down. So you can simply come to our collection Objects, click on one of these objects, and then you press Tab to go into edit mode. And then With all those vertices selected by pressing a, you can rotate. It may be around the y-axis. So praise or why you can rotate it or, or Z and just kinda align it to the correct orientation. And as you can see, the Particle System is actually updating. So I hope that makes sense. And then once you're done, go back into object mode, and then you can click on this plane again. Now, let's add a bit of a random rotation to this. So in our particle settings, Let's click Advanced right here at the top to enable that rotation drop-down. And then we're going to take this rotation and we simply going to increase the phase and also the Randomize. And I can see our Grass Objects are rotated a little bit more randomly. Now, let's see how we can use children Particles to increase the amount of gross we have on our plane. So let's scroll down and go to children, and we simply going to click on interpellate it. Now, as you can see, we have a lot more Grass objects in our scene. And you can also see under the children's section, we have a display amount and also a render amount. So the render amount is set to 100 and the display amount that's displayed in the viewport is set to ten. So this is just something to keep in mind that this will look completely different if you render it, it will have a lot more particles. So what you can do is you can increase the display amount to 100 to show all the particles in the viewport. But that can obviously slow down your viewport quite a lot. So I'm going to bring the display amount back to about 50 maybe. And maybe a little bit less. It's still quite slow. So maybe let's bring it down to ten. You can obviously go to the emission section and you can change the number of particles right there at the top. So these will be the parent Particles. And then for every parent particle, that's going to create 100 child Particles. So just keep that in mind so you can obviously play with that number and see how that affects the scene. So I'm going to leave the emission number on 1,000 for now. So under the children's section here, under interpellate, it maybe let's change the render amount to 50. And let's quickly look at that by changing the display amount of 50 as well. And I think something like this looks quite nice. So I'm going to leave the render amount on 50. So this is the result that we will get in the render. So now we can bring our display amount down to ten just to increase the speed of our viewport. Remember to save your project. Now there's a few things we can do under this children's section. As you scroll down, you can see we've got potting, clumping, roughness, and kink. Now these are just some settings you can change the way that the children Particles are placed on the object. So for instance, if we go into the clumping section and I bring down this clumping, can see how those particles are kinda clumped, been clumped together. So these are just kinda some parameters that you can change. You can play around with them and see what they do. Maybe the roughness, you can increase the uniform roughness or the size of that roughness. And we'll just give you a little bit of variation for these children Particles. Next, we're going to use wait, painting to distribute our gross objects onto this plane. So let's go and hide our Particles for now. So with a plane, objects selected under Particles here right at the top where we have our gross Particles System. Just click this little monitor icon to hide it from the viewport. Now with the plane selected, click on this Data tab, you are on the right-hand side. And this is where we're going to create our vertex group that's going to have the white painting information in it. So let's click on this plus to create a new vertex group. And let's call this grass. You can call it gross density. But for now, let's just call it gross. Now with this plane objects is still selected. Let's click this drop-down here at the top. Then select white paint. Now you will see we in that wait painting mode. And this is where you can set your weight at the top and the radius of your brush and also the strength. So I'm going to set the way to one. And I'm simply just going to add some Some of that year. So simply just paint. You can use F2, increase the brush size, and you can also bring down the strength to make the painting slightly less arche. So you can just paint around if I bring maybe that down to, maybe just add a little bit of green, maybe something like that. And you can also set the weight all the way down to zero to paint blue, which will be areas where there will be no grass at all. So blue is basically zero density and red is full density. You can take this all the way up and maybe draw some red in here. Alright, so we can always come back and change this. So for now, let's click this Drop-down again and choose object mode. Now if we go back to our Particles settings and we go all the way down to vertex groups. This is where we can set the density Using the vertex group we just created. If you click here, you can see there is our vertex group. And if I selected, we just need to enable or show our Particles again by enabling this little monitor right at the top. And instantly you can see that our gross Particles are now only growing in those areas that we painted. I can now select the plane object again, go back to this data panel here on the side, and then change this back to white painting. Now I can simply just go ahead and I can paint wherever I want and add some grass. They can see it's updating in real time. So this is pretty nice just to kinda add your grass. So maybe I have like a river or a stream flowing in the center. Then we can maybe just bring that down and just paint that area where we don't want any grass. So I have some FUN and just paint your gross wherever you want to have your gross Particles. And then once you are done, you can change back to object mode. So currently if we play this back, nothing will happen as we have not enabled a dynamics in our particle system yet. So let's do that now and see if we can add a slight wind to our grass. So click on a plane object and let's go to a Particles System. And you're at the top, you'll see Hair dynamics. Now we can simply just enable this and let's expanded because the default settings, if you play this back now, you will see that the gross will rotate in a really weird way and it will kinda lie flat because of gravity. That's not really what we want. So let's go back to the first frame. And what I want to do is I want to increase this pin goal strength under the Hair dynamics. So by default is set to zero. So let's set this to one. What this does is it will try and keep the shape of our Hair Particles that will be more difficult to bend that Hair Particles down. So this will just make our Particles bend and move a little bit less. So yeah, just set this to one. And now if we play this back, you can see it's still rotating weirdly, but we can make some more changes. So let's get down to field weights and let's bring the gravity down to 0.2. And if we play this back now you can see we have a little bit less movement, but it's still kinda spinning around non-weird way. Maybe let's go back to our Dynamics, Hair dynamics, and let's increase the pen goal strength to three. So that will make our Particles even stronger or stiffer and they won't move as much. So let's have a look. And you can see how that's looking pretty nice. As you can see, our grass is kinda moving around, but let's add a force to be able to control this a little bit better. So in the viewport, press Shift a and then go to force-field and select turbulence. Now this turbulence false, we'll just add a little bit of a random movement to our grass. So let's just move the turbulence force up slightly by pressing G and Z is just so that we can see it. And with the turbulence selected, go to the Physics tab here on the side. And here we can set the strength and the size and the noise amount for this turbulence. So by default this is set to strength one. Let's increase this to around four for the strength, the size of the turbulence we want quite big. So let's set this to 500. You can obviously experiment and see how this affects your grass. And then we also want to introduce some noise. So let's set the noise amount ten. Alright, let's see what we get. See if I play this back, you can see we definitely have some nice movement in the grass. You can obviously decide if, if it's moving too much or too little. So you can just go to your force, the turbulent force, and maybe bring down the string to like 0.5 if you want less movement. And then also just remember to click on your Particle System. And sometimes you just need to update the number of particles just to reset that Particle System so it shows you the correct results. You can also change the seed amount here just to kinda give you a little bit of a random noise effect. Once you're happy with your dynamics and with a forces, we can always go back into this white painting, an add or remove the gross as you wish. So this is just a really nice System to easily just kinda odd direct your scene and kinda move things around exactly where you want it. So let's do a quick render to just see how gross is looking. So I'm just going to place my view angle around here and then I'm going to create a camera. So press Shift a and then select camera. Now what we can do is click on View and then Align View. And then we're going to choose a line active camera to view. And that's just going to snap our camera to our current view. So you can obviously press G and you can move the camera around a bit. But let's say we want to take a stole from this angle. Now, let's go to our render settings and change our render engine from E v2 cycles. And then I'm going to set my device to GPU. Then let's go to the world settings to add an HDRI for our lighting. So click on this little dot next to color, then choose environment texture, and then click on Open. Now, browse to your HDRI folder, or you can use some of the HDRI is provided with this course. And I'm just gonna go with this driving school for K. So open that. And now we can change over to the render view right here at the top. So as you can see, our gross is looking pretty cool. But remember we're not seeing all the children Particles in the viewport. So let's change back to Solid View right here at the top. And the see all the Particles we need to actually do a render. So I'm somebody going to click on render and then render image. Alright, as you can see, the grass is looking really cool. And yeah, this is just a really nice system for scattering objects across a surface. So play around with us, see what you can create. Remember to save your project. And then I will see you in the next lesson. 14. Lesson 13: Sci-Fi Structure Details Using Hair Particles: Hey, and welcome back. In this lesson, I'm going to show you how to easily Add Details To a sci-fi model or building or anything really Using Hair Particles. So let's begin by deleting everything in the scene by pressing a X and clicking Delete. Now, let's create our Structure or our building model where we're going to place these Details on. So let's create a new cube by pressing Shift a mesh and cube, and let's just move it up so it's sitting on top of the grid. Suppress GZ holding control. So it's snapping to that grid and just move it one up so you can see the cube is now sitting perfectly on this grid. So let's scale it now by pressing S and Shift Z so that we only scaling on the X and Y. So let's just bring it out a bit, maybe something like that. And then before we start editing this mesh, let's just apply the scale by pressing Control a and selecting scale. Now, let's go into edit mode by pressing Tab and then press 32, go into face select mode. Now let's select this face and let's move it up by pressing G and Z, just something like that. Now let's press I to create an inset and just move the mouse so it's something like this. Then let's press E again to extrude. Then let's press it again and extrude again. Maybe let's move this face up even more. So press G and Z and just move it up until you have something like that. Now let's press E for extrude again, and then immediately press S to scale that out. And then press E and extrude upwards, right? So let's add a few loop CATIA by pressing Control R. And you can use your mouse wheel to increase the number of cuts, or you can just use the slider year on the side. Let's create like three loop cuts. With these loop gets selected. Let's press Control B to bevel them and just pull them out slightly. Now let's extrude these faces inwards by pressing Alt or Option and E. And then you're going to select extrude faces along normals. And this will actually extrude them either outwards or inwards. So let's create something like that. I think that's pretty cool For our basic bolding Structure. Now, let's create our Particle mesh. Now for this, we simply going to create a basic cube. So press Shift a mesh and cube, and it's just move this cube out of the way by pressing G and X just to move it along the x-axis. Alright, so that's gonna be our particle. So let's just rename this two Particle, and let's rename this one to bolding. Remember to save your project. Alright, so now we can start setting up our particle system. Let's click on our building structure. Let's go to the Particles Settings tab. You're on the side. Let's click the Plus button and let's call this Details. Now we're going to use Hair Particles for this. So click here to enable the Hair Particles System. Now, let's go to the render section and change render as from path to Object because we want to use our cube particle object as the particle. So where it says instance object, Let's just click the and select our Particle mesh. Alright, so now we can see our cubes are being placed on our building structure. Let's just change the settings to make it look a little better. So let's go back to our Particles settings and let's enable advanced by taking this box here at the top so that we get access to the rotation. So let's enable rotation, and let's change the Orient axes from velocity here to normal. Now, let's increase the phase amount. And as you can see, our cubes are rotating on the structure. And let's leave the randomized Phase on zero for now, we can always come back and add some random rotation later if we want to. Now, let's go back to our render settings and let's just adjust the scale here and let's increase the scale of randomness all the way to one. Now that we get a little bit of variation in size. Next, we're going to enable children Particles. So let's minimize this render section and then let's go to children and click interpellate it. Now let's change the amount of children to ten. So just sit there, render amount it ten, which is the same as the display amount. That means we will see exactly the same amount of particles in our render as in the viewport. Now we can also go back to the emission section. And here we can increase or decrease the number of parent particles. So you can choose a number that kinda looks right for your structure. But I think something like this looks pretty cool. Now let's set up our lighting and other materials. So first of all, let's go to our render settings and change our render engine two cycles. I'm going to use my GPU year. And then right at the bottom, expand color management and set the view transform to standard, just so that we get a little bit more contrast in our render. So now we can go to the world settings and click on this little dot next to color to load in an HDRI Let's click on environment texture and then open. Now you can go ahead and use any HDRI you want. But I'm going to use this nice overcast sky HDRI and then click Open Image. And now we can change over to the render view right here at the top. Now let's go back to our render tab. And then under foam, we want to set this to transparent so that we don't see our HDRI in the background. Now, let's add some materials to our Particles. Now select the Particle mesh, which is this cube that we created. And then we're gonna go to the shading tab at the top. Click on New to create a new material. And let's just call this particles. So now we can obviously go in and we can change the color right here. But I wanna do something a little different. I want to assign a bit of a random color to all of these cubes, or at least three different colors, but I want to assign them randomly to our Particles. Now an easy way to do that is to press Shift a and then click Search and then type object. And we're going to select this object info node, place it here, and then we're going to create a color ramp node. So press Shift a search and type in color and then select Color Ramp. You can place that node right here. Now we can connect the random from the object info into the factor of our color ramp and then the color into our base color. Now already you can see something is happening. We're getting this gradient between white and black. And that's because we have this color ramp and we can actually adjust these colors right here. So what I wanna do is I want to change this from linear to constant. So it's kinda not fading between these colors, but then we can add multiple colors and it will use either of those three colors. So press the little plus here to create a new color. And I'm simply going to just drag these sliders around, click on this second one, then you can set the color you at the bottom. So I'm going to set the second one to a gray color, maybe like 50% gray. And then this color you on the side, I'm going to set to a lighter gray. Maybe something like that. You can obviously go in here and adjust some of these colors just so that we get these three colors in our scene. So that's looking pretty cool. And now let's go back to the layout and let's change over to render view so we can see our Particles. And then let's go to our Particles settings. And then under emission, let's increase the number of parent Particles to 2000s. Alright, I think that looks pretty cool. And then we can also give a material to our base object to the actual building itself. So an outline, I'm going to select the Bolding. Then I'm going to go to Shading and then click New to create a new material. Let's call this bolding. Now for the building, I'm simply going to just give a base color. So just a kinda dark gray base color. We can maybe add some metallic value to that as well, and then maybe bring down the roughness just slightly. What I also wanna do is our Make some of these Particles a little darker. So if we click the Particle year in the outliner, I just want to change some of these colors around. So this lighter gray, I'm just going to bring down a little darker, maybe some way here. And in this middle gray, I want to bring down even further. So it's maybe something like that. Alright, let's save our project now. And now I can go back to your Particles and under the render section, you can play with the size or the scale of these Particles. Maybe let's make them slightly smaller and see how that looks. Yeah, So as you can see, that is looking pretty nice. Now, if we zoom in here, you can see that we have all of these cubes and everything is looking really nice. But what we can do now is we can actually go and just add some details to our Particle cube. All of those details will be transferred to our building. So let's switch back to Solid View and with our cube objects selected, press Tab to go into Edit Mode. Then press 32, go into face select mode and select all the faces by pressing a. Now let's create some insects. So press I twice on your keyboard so that you get something like this. Can I just pull this in? And then with these faces selected, press Alt or Option E, if you're on a Mac and then choose extrude faces along normals. Now you can just kinda pull them in, don't pull them to four, maybe something like that. And then just click to accept that. So now we've created some extra details on our queue particle. And I can press Tab to go back to object mode. Now, if we look at our building, you can see we have all these extra details because we added that to our cube. We can maybe increase the number of children particles. As you can see, we have some open spaces here. So let's select this building and go to a Particles settings. And let's go to the children's section, and let's just increase this to 20. Some setting the display amount and the render amount of 20 so that we can see what we're gonna get. Final render. Alright, let's switch over to render view and see what we have. Alright, so as you can see, it's really easy to add some interesting details to your measures are to your buildings Using Hair Particles. Go ahead and play around and see what interesting details you can create, save your project once you're done. And I'll see you in the next lesson. 15. Lesson 14: Final Project - Product Packshot With Swirling Flower Particles: Hey, and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to take a look at everything that we've learned throughout this course. And we're going to create our final project, which will be a Product Packshot With some spiraling flower particles going around it. So as you can see, I've got a brand new project. So let's start by deleting everything in the scene by pressing a aches and clicking Delete. So I've already created a product that we can use in this scene. So you can simply append it from the Assets provided. So click on File and then append and then browse to the Assets and find the bottle dot blend file. Double-click on that, and then double-click on Objects, and then select the bottle mesh and click Append. So as you can see, it's just a very simple product that I modeled that we're going to use in the scene and it should import into the center of your scene. Next, let's create our Particle objects that we will use to spiral around our product. And for that we simply going to use a plain press Shift, a mesh and plane. And let's just move it off to the side by pressing G X. Let's scale this plane down slightly, so set the dimensions to 0.6. By 0.6. We can always adjust the size, but for now, let's set it to 0.6 by 0.6. And then with this plane selected press Control a to apply the scale. So now I can see the scale is set to 111. You can press N to hide that side menu. And let's add our Flower material to this plane. The plane selected go to the shading tab. And let's just create our first flower particle material by clicking the New button here. And let's call this flower one. So now we can create an image texture. So press Shift a and in search and just type image and select the image texture from the drop-down and just place that node anywhere in this area. So now you can click on Open and then browse to the flowers folder in the Assets provided and select the Flower one dot PNG. Click Open image to load that in. And now you can simply connect the color to the base color. As you can see, the flower texture appears on this plane, but there's still a few things we need to do. As you can see, it's not transparent on the edges. Let's create our mapping node so we can move it around. So press Shift a search and type mapping and place that node right here, and then you can connect a vector to the vector. Next, we also need a texture coordinate node. So press Shift a search and just type, see you and you'll see texture coordinate. Let's place that right here. And now we can connect the generated to the vector. So now we can use this mapping node to adjust the location of our texture. So just adjust these values slightly until the flower is nice and centered on this plane. Now on this image note, you can also change this repeat to clip. And that will just prevent the texture from tiling if you move this around. Alright, so the next thing we can do is connect the Alpha from our image texture node into the alpha of our principled be STF. I can see this. We'll just kinda turn black in the viewport. But if we switch over to the cycles render engine, we should be able to see that transparency. So let's go to our Render Settings here on the side and change our render engine two cycles. I'm going to choose my GPU device. And now we can change over to the render display by clicking this icon here and the top corner. Now you can see everything around our flower is actually transparent and that's exactly what we want. Next, let's bring down the specular and also increase the roughness. You can play with this, but I prefer to have less specular and also make it more rough says not reflecting as much. And then another thing we can do is we can connect the color to the emission. So if I zoom in here, you can see our color goes into this emission section. That will just create a nice bright image that won't be affected by any lights or shadows. Okay, let's rename this plane in the outliner to Flower one. And let's duplicate this to create our second flower particle. So press shift D and then just press X and kinda just move it on the x-axis. So it's sitting next to our first flower. Now we need to create a new material for this particle, but we can actually duplicate this material and just change our texture. So to do that, you can click on this little two right next to Flower one, and that will just create a new duplicate material. Now I can see the name changed to Flower one.001. So let's just change this to Flower two. Now, if we zoom into this image texture node, let's just reload a different PNG. I'm going to click on the little folder and then I'm going to choose flower to unclick open image. Now you can see it's being cut off slightly. So we can go to the mapping node holding Shift and just make some adjustments to these values, that X and Y value to just center our flower onto that plane. So you can go ahead and add another particle if you want to. But I'm just going to do two for now. In the outliner. Let's rename the second one to flower to a. Now we can go back to the layout section. Alright, so what we can do now is we can add both of these planes into their own collection. So make sure you select both of them. Press M on the keyboard, New Collection, and let's call this flowers. We will use this collection in our particle system. Next, what I wanna do is a spiral curve around this product. So we can use that to control the way our particles will flow. Now, to do that, I use a little add on that comes with Blender. So all you have to do is go to Edit and Preferences, and then go to the add-on section. Then we have the search bar. You can simply type in Curve. And then you will see an add-on called add Curve extra objects. So simply tick this add-on to add it, and then click on these three lines at the bottom, and then click Save Preferences. So this will give you some extra Curve options to work with. So let's close this down and let's create our Curve. So in the viewport, press Shift a finger a Curve. And now you will see all these extra options here that we've added via that add-on. So we're gonna go to curve spirals, and then we're going to add a logarithmic curve. You'll see something like this in the viewport. And now we can expand this little drop-down or this menu on the site to get to all of these parameters. So first of all, let's increase the height just by changing this value right here. And then we can also increase the amount of turns. Maybe let's set that to three and then bring the height down again, something like that. And then we can also set the radius here. Maybe look at this from the top and just ensure that the radius is just bigger than our product. And maybe something like that. We can maybe extend the height slightly because we will probably move this curve down so our particles will start kinda underneath our product. So just increase the height until you have maybe something that looks like that. You can also increase or decrease the steps just to smooth out this curve. So I'm going to set my steps to 64. Alright, so now we can click anywhere in the viewport to create that spiral and just press Tab to go back to object mode. Now with our Curve objects selected, let's move it down. So press G and Z, you can just move it down so that we are looking at the center of the spiral. So our Particles will begin here at the bottom and it will go around the spiral and kinda just go off-screen at the top. You can also scale the curve if you want to make some more adjustments just by pressing S and maybe x0 to scale it in the z-axis, or you can scale it on X and Y as well. I'm going to scale it slightly on the Z. So I'm pressing Z and kinda just pulling it out a little bit further. And then we can move it slightly down again until we have something like that. Okay, let's go ahead and save our project. Now we can create our Particle Emitter that will be imitating the Flower Particles. For that we simply going to use a plane. So I'm going to press Shift a mesh and plane. Now, let's move this plane down by pressing G and Z, and you can just move it down. So it's close to this beginning point of our spiral. So I'm just going to move it over to that side. So G and X, just to move it over Selim, the middle of our plane should be quite close to that starting point of the curve. Doesn't have to be perfect, just kinda get it close. We can maybe even move it down slightly so the particles will have some time to be emitted and then follow the curve. Let's make this Particle Emitter slightly smaller. So I'm going to press N on the keyboard to bring up this side menu. And let's set the X and Y dimensions to 1.3. Alright, so just slightly smaller like that. And now we can also apply the scale by pressing Control a and choosing scale. Alright, so let's press N to hide that side menu. And with our Emitter selected, let's go to the Particles tab here on the right-hand side. Now let's click the Plus button to add our particle system. You can rename it. So I'm just going to double-click and call it flowers like that. And let's change some of these parameters. So let's bring down the number of particles to 200, and let's increase the lifetime to 250. Now if we play this back, you'll see our Particles will just simply fall down because we have gravity enabled. So I'm gonna go back to the first frame and then under our Particles settings go all the way down to field weights and set the gravity to zero. Alright, so now if I play this back, you will see that our Particles will simply just move up And that's because we don't have any gravity and we've got some velocity in that z-direction. Now under our Particles settings, Let's go to velocity, and let's set this all to zero as we don't want any starting velocity on these flower particles. We can maybe add some slight randomization just by increasing this randomized value here at the bottom. So I'm going to set mine to 0.2. Let's see how that looks like. You can see now our particles are kind of just moving out into space. So before we forget, let's add some random rotation to our Particles. So I'm going to tick the box next to rotation and just expand that. And then I'm going to set the phase 21 and I'm going to increase the randomized phase all the way to two. We can also take this dynamic box to add some dynamic rotation. Now if we play this back, we won't really see any difference because we are using these little halo Particles and we can't see them rotating. So let's go to the render section under our Particle System. And instead of renders halo, let's change this to collection. And then we're going to choose our flower collection year next to the instance collection. Now if we play this back, you'll see we have some tiny plane Particles that's coming out of our Emitter, but they're really small. So let's increase the scale to 1.5 and set the randomness to one. Okay, so let's play that back. I can see our flower particles are kinda just floating around in space. If we change over to the render view, you can see all the pretty flowers. Alright, so the next step will be 0s to get our Particles to follow this curve Objects. Now, before we add, are forced to our Curve Objects. Let's press N to bring up the side menu. And let's quickly see if we need to apply the scale of this curve. So if I select this curve, we can see the scale is 11 and then it's got a weird number here. So that tells me I need to apply the scale of this curve. So press Control a and then select scale. And now it's, everything is said to 111, which is perfect. So now we can press N to close down that menu and with our Curve selected, let's go to the Physics tab here on the right-hand side. Click force-field. So as you can see, it created this force here in the center. And what we wanna do is we want to change the shape from point to Curve. And this means it's actually going to use the Curve object as our force. Now, if we play this back, you'll see our Particles will just fall down and go into some weird direction. And that's because our force or our Curve force has got a strength of one, which is a positive strength number. So we're going to bring this down all the way to negative 25. And that means our curve will attract our Particles. Let's play that back and see what we get. So as you can see, that's looking pretty cool, but it feels like the particles are flying all over the place and they're not really following the curve too closely. So we can fix that by adjusting this flow value. So let's increase this flow value to 0.6, and let's try that again. Now you can see our particles are closely following our Curve object, which is exactly what we want. At the end you can see they can go all crazy because once they exit the curve, they don't really know where to go and they just get attracted by the curve again and they fall backwards. But we're going to fix that soon. So what do we wanna do is we want to create an object that will actually kill our Particles once they reach the end of this Curve object. So let's create a plane for that. Shift a mesh and in plane, Let's move it upwards. So G and Z, Let's scale it up by pressing as you can make this pretty big. And then we're gonna just kinda move it down. So it's just sitting above the curve. So you can see the curve is kinda sticking through this plane. Gz just kinda moving it up, so it's just above that Curve. Now, let's apply the scale of this plane. So Control a and scale. And then on the physics tab, Let's click Collision to make this plane a Collision Objects. And then all we have to do is take this kill Particles button. And that means any particle that comes into contact with this plane will be deleted. Basically, it will just disappear. Let's see if it works. So if I play this back, you can see our particles are streaming that way and as they get to the plane, they should simply disappear. Yeah, that's basically once the pivot of that particle gets to the plane, then it will be deleted That's just to prevent them from falling back down. Now, let's create a camera so we can set up our composition. So press Shift a and then choose camera. And I'm simply just going to move it backwards. So press G and Y and just move the camera back on the y-axis. So you can see our camera is oriented slightly off center. The camera selected press N to open the side menu. And let's set the X rotation to 90, set the Y to zero, and the Z also to zero. So now you can see our camera is pointing directly forward to our product. Let's move the camera up slightly by pressing G and Z, just so it's not on the floor. Now let's look through the camera and press N to hide this side menu. And I can see that is what we see through the camera. So let's move the camera up slightly and maybe let's just tilted down. So press R and then X and just tilt it so it's looking more kinda something like that. The thing is we don't want to see this plane here at the top. So just make sure that's not in the shot. With a camera selected, we can maybe move it back by pressing G and Y and just sliding it around like this. We can maybe move the camera up slightly. And I was thinking maybe to add a camera animation just of the camera kinda starting of clothes and just slowly moving back, revealing our scene. So let's go all the way to frame 250. And then I'm going to set a keyframe on the camera. The camera selected press I and location. Now let's go back to the first frame. So I'm pressing Shift. Left Arrow can just use a timeline to go back to frame one. And then with the cameras still selected, press G and just move it closer to our product. We can maybe move it slightly down. So I'm going to press G and Z, just kinda moving it so it's something like that. Now press I and location to add a location keyframe on the camera. Now let's play this back and see what we get. Okay, so that's looking pretty cool. Just one thing I wanna do is these two keyframes that we added on the camera, actually using a Bezier curve. So it's kinda starting off slow and then speeding up and then slowing down at the end again. So to fix that, just hover your mouse pointer over the timeline area right here. Press a to select both keyframes, right-click and then goto interpolation mode and choose linear. So linear, we'll just give us a constant move so it won't speed up and slow down. So just choose a linear. Now if we press Space, you can see that our camera move is a lot more constant. So as you will see once I start playing this animation, it takes a while before we can actually see our first Particle. You can see we only see it around frame 50 or frame 60, then they come into frame. So let's adjust our starting frame of our particle simulation. So let's select our Emitter in the scene. We can actually just rename this Emitter. I see it's still plane in the outliner, so I'm simply just going to rename that to Emitter. So with our Emitter selected, let's go to the emission section. You're on the right-hand side. And here you can see we have our frame start and our frame end. This is where our Emitter, we'll start emitting particles at frame one, and then it will end emitting particles at time 200. I want to bring that down even further and we can actually use a negative frame number here. So I'm going to set the frame, start to frame negative 70. And then I'm going to change the end frame to frame 50. So this means it's going to start emitting particles at Frame negative 70, and it's going to end the meeting Particles at frame 50. Let's see what we get. Some I can see on frame one, we can actually see our Particles. So maybe we need to dial this in slightly better. So let's change the frame start to -40. So let's also set the end frame to frame it and let's see how that looks. So to refresh your Particle System, just change the number of particles and let's just change it back to 200. And that should kinda just reset our Particle System. Remember to save often, and let's press Space to preview that. Alright, so once you are happy with your Particle Simulation, Let's bake our particle simulation to cash. So under the Particles settings go down to cash and then simply click on bake Now if you play this back, you'll see that our Particles will begin a lot closer to the animation. You can see them swirling around and then hopefully they should all go out of frame. If you're particles are not really following the curve, you can always go into that Curve, force and increase the flow value right here. Just remember to rebate your Particle Simulation. Another thing that you can do is you can maybe bring down the skill plane that's killing the Particles at the end. So you can maybe bring it down if it's not really working too well. The role depends on how the particles will move. So if you need to adjust it, just move it down slightly and then rebate the Particle System. So let's look through the camera and see what we have. Let's pause it right here. And let's change over to render view. So as you can see, the particles are now spiraling nicely around our product. So let's add some nicer lighting to our scene. So let's go to the world settings and then click this little dot next to color. And then we're going to choose environment texture to load an HDRI. Click on Open, and then browse to your HDRI folder and use anyone you want. I'm going to choose a little forest scene, maybe this one. Let's see how that works. Now what we wanna do is we want to go to the render tab, go down to foam, and then just click this transparent so we don't see the HDRI background. Another thing under render settings, if we go all the way down to color management, let's change our view transform to standard just to get a little bit more contrast. So let's look through our camera to just see our shot once more. And let's just do a quick playback urine render view just to get an idea of what we get next, what I wanna do is I want to add some depth of field. So let's select our camera. Go to our camera settings here on the right-hand side. And let's tick this box next to depth of field. Now for the focus objects, I'm going to use our product. So simply click on the eyedropper and then just choose the bottle object as your focus objects. You can obviously manually adjust this if you want to, but for this shot, it should work fine. Now we can also adjust the f-stop number here. We can bring this down to maybe one to just add more of a blur effect for the objects closer and further away from the camera. So we can even bring this down further, maybe 0.4. If you want more blur in the Particles closeted camera, you can adjust this and see what you like. Now, let's go to our world settings and increase the brightness of our HDRI as it does feel a little bit dark to me. So I'm going to increase the strength here to, to, just to get a little bit more light into the scene. Now let's go back to the first frame. And what we can also do is before we start our render, if we go to our render settings, we can enable motion blur right here. Now this will just give us a nice motion blur for those flower particles. So I would suggest you enable motion blur right here. Now let's have a look at our render settings. So expand sampling. And under render, this is where we're going to set our maximum render samples. And for this something like 256 or maybe five-twelfths should be more than enough. And then I also want to de-noise this. So I'm going to take that and then I also want to increase my light bounces. So you next two light paths, you can simply click on this little drop-down menu and then select full global illumination. Now remember we don't have any background in our scene. So if we're going to render this, we will basically just get the bottle product and our Particles on a transparent background. Then you can use your editing software or your compositor of choice to add a background into the shot. So you can either go ahead and add your background inside of Blender to have an actual plane that can cost some shadows and reflections. Or you can simply render this as its own layer and then add your own background later on. So that's what we're gonna do. I'm going to look through the camera and I think we are ready to start our render. Let's just play through this one more time to kinda just see if everything is picking. Okay? Also preview this in real time just by going into solid mode. And you can see, we can just see the movement of the Particles a bit better. Let's look at our output settings. So click on the little Output tab here on the right-hand side. And at the top you can see the dimensions are the resolution. So for this, we simply going to go with one in 20 by 1 h at. And then we're going to scroll down to output. You can choose a folder where you want to render your animation to. So you can simply click on this folder and then browse to a folder on your computer. And let's give this a name. So I'm gonna call this product Animation. And then I'm going to place an underscore. Now the reason I'm adding an underscore is because we're going to render an image sequence and it's going to add the frame number like 010203, just off to the word Product Animation. So that's kinda just to keep it nice and neat. Then click on Accept, and now we can choose our file format. So for this render, I'm simply going to go for a PNG, but feel free to use a open the XOR multi-layer if you more familiar with that format. So somebody going to select PNG and then make sure you select RGBA so that we get that transparency or that Alpha channel with our PNG, make sure your frame range is correct. So we're going to render from frame one all the way to frame 250. That is perfect. And once you are ready, save your project, and then simply click on render yet the top and then render Animation. Now, this will start rendering your Animation. And as you can see it, we'll go through all those samples and it will save all those PNG files in the folder you specified. Then you can make use of your favorite compositing application. We can even composited year inside of Blender. So let us run through, remember to save your project. And I will see you in the next lesson. 16. Course Conclusion: Thank You For Enrolling: And we've come to the end of this Blender Particles Masterclass. I really hope that you enjoyed this course and that you've learned a lot. Feel free to share your final project renders with me so I can give you feedback. Also, please let me know if you have any questions as I will gladly assist, kindly rate and review this course as it really helps me to create more courses just like this one. All the best with your Blender journey ahead and have FUN creating amazing particle simulations. Thank you and goodbye