The Guitar Players Guide to Minor Scales | Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy | Skillshare

The Guitar Players Guide to Minor Scales

Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy, Your personal guitar teacher

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26 Lessons (1h 34m)
    • 1. The Guitar Players Guide to Minor Scales

      2:16
    • 2. What is a minor scale?

      2:59
    • 3. Creating a minor scale on one string

      5:39
    • 4. Creating minor scales across 6 strings

      9:04
    • 5. Minor scale position 1

      5:27
    • 6. Minor scale position 2

      3:54
    • 7. Minor scale position 3

      3:37
    • 8. Minor scale position 4

      3:50
    • 9. Minor scale position 5

      2:42
    • 10. What is a pentatonic scale

      3:43
    • 11. Minor pentatonic scale position 1

      2:59
    • 12. Minor pentatonic scale position 2

      2:27
    • 13. Minor pentatonic scale position 3

      2:07
    • 14. Minor pentatonic scale position 4

      2:11
    • 15. Minor pentatonic scale position 5

      2:36
    • 16. What are the minor chord tones?

      2:39
    • 17. Minor chord tones position 1

      2:01
    • 18. Minor chord tones position 2

      2:13
    • 19. Minor chord tones position 3

      1:33
    • 20. Minor chord tones position 4

      1:57
    • 21. Minor chord tones position 5

      1:41
    • 22. Tips for practicing minor scales

      4:54
    • 23. Diatonic chords for minor

      6:32
    • 24. Must know guitar lick

      4:05
    • 25. Pentatonic creativity guitar lick

      5:23
    • 26. A Minor Blues Lick

      5:40

About This Class

Are you interested in learning how to play your minor scales? Then you've come to the right place. 50% of all songs you're probably going to play will be in a minor key. So why not understand the music theory behind what makes those songs so great. This course was designed to teach a you how to play any minor scale, pentatonic scale, or minor chord tones in any key anywhere on the neck. This material is absolutely essential to becoming a good guitar player.

What will you learn in this course?

  • The music theory behind the minor scale

  • How to create minor scales going up the neck and across the neck

  • How to play the minor scale in any key anywhere on the neck

  • How to play the minor pentatonic scale in any key anywhere on the neck

  • How to play the minor chord tones in any key anywhere on the neck

  • Great practice techniques for these scales

  • Diatonic chords in minor

I've included a copy of my scales book.

  • A digital copy (PDF) of my scales book called "Basic Scales A study of the Ionian and Aeolian Scales". The book is 85 pages long and has charts for the following

    • major scales all over the neck in all 12 keys

    • major pentatonic scales all over the neck in all 12 keys

    • major chord tones all over the neck in all 12 keys

    • minor scales all over the neck in all 12 keys

    • minor pentatonic scales all over the neck in all 12 keys

    • minor chord tones all over the neck in all 12 keys

Why should you buy my course?

  • My name is Chris Rupp and I'm the founder of the GuitArmy.

  • I've been teaching guitar full time for over 19 years.

  • I have taught more then 30,000 individual private guitar lessons.

  • I teach guitar students online all over the world.

  • I have a bachelors of music degree from the world renowned Berklee College of Music where I studied with some of the best guitar players on earth. 

  • I created a successful line of guitar instruction DVDs that sold very well and garnered the attention of the "As Seen on TV" folks.

  • I love teaching guitar and helping students become better musicians through the guitar.

  • I will answer your personal questions and help you with learning the material in this course.

Why should I take your course and not just learn from YouTube?

You can try to learn guitar from YouTube but eventually you'll figure out there's so many videos out there is very hard to put the information together in a coherent way. I have students come to me all the time that are tired of watching random guitar videos on YouTube and don't know how to put the information together. With my course you will get a systematic way of learning your minor scales.

Do I have to be a great guitar player to benefit from this course?

No! This course is more geared towards beginner and intermediate players. There's a lot of information in this course so take you're time learning the material. You will have full lifetime access to the course. 

Transcripts

1. The Guitar Players Guide to Minor Scales: - Welcome to the Guitar Training Camps course. We will be learning how to play in practice your minor scales. My name is Chris and I will be teaching this course. I'm a graduate from Berklee College of Music, where I received a bachelor of music degree. I'm also the founder of the guitar training camp in the Guitar Training Camp online, where I teach guitar students online all over the world. I've been teaching guitar students in person and online since the year 2000 not given more than 30,000 individual private guitar lasts. I created this course to help guitar players understand and learn to play the minor scale, the pentatonic scale and the minor chord tones all over the neck in any key. If you wish to write songs improvised, create melodies. Playing a ban than the information in this course is essential. By the end of this course, you will be able to play any minor scale pentatonic scale or minor chord tones in any key anywhere on the neck. The course of design first to teach you the music theory behind the minor scales. Then I systematically go through each of the five positions of the minor scale the pentatonic scale in the minor chord tones. There are many pdf's for all of the material in this course, so you will get plenty of resource material to assist you. The ideal student for this court is a beginner or intermediate guitar player, that which is to expand their knowledge of guitar and take their playing to the next level union requirement for this course is that you should have a guitar and be willing to learn . Feel free to check out the course description, and I look forward to seeing you inside the course. 2. What is a minor scale?: when you're listening to music. There are two main types of scales that are typically being used to create music. Those two scales are the major scale or the Ionian scale in the alien scale, which is commonly called natural minor. Because the minor scale is so prevalent in today's music, it's very important that every guitar player is able to play the scale in any key anywhere on the neck. So what is the natural minor scale? The natural minor scale was just a Siris of seven notes separated by either half steps or whole steps. Now let's take a minute to learn the pattern of the minor scale in a minor scale. There are seven notes. Eso. You have to understand that there's a pattern or, if you do, is follow the pattern of half steps and whole steps. And that pattern is whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, and then another whole step back to the root. So now it's creating minor scale, using that pattern of whole steps and half steps, So I'm choosing to start here on G. I could start anywhere on the neck. Any note doesn't matter. but I'm going to start here on G. So we're gonna create a G minor scale. All right, so I'm gonna play this game. I'm gonna go up the whole step. Then I'm gonna go up 1/2 step thing. I have to hole steps, whole step whole step. Then I have 1/2 staff, then a whole step and then another holster. I should mention that. What a whole step is is uh, five starting here on this g to play a whole step, I would go up two frets we're down two frets If I needed to go down a whole step, if I needed to go up 1/2 step that I would go up just one friend or down one front. So a whole step is two frets apart and 1/2 step. Is anyone front part? So let's go ahead and recreate that G minor scale going up the neck again. We'll start here on G. We're gonna go a whole step and 1/2 staff. Whole step, whole step. We have 1/2 step, Theun. Two more whole steps, a whole step, and then on another hold on, that would be a G minor scale being played to going up the first string. Almost every genre of music uses the minor scale, so every guitar player has to learn the scale. Certain types of music rely heavily on minor blues, rock, country, indie, heavy metal and pop, to name a few. The bottom line is to play guitar well. You have to know how to play the minor scale and understand the music theory that goes along with it. If you understand the minor scale, the pentatonic scale, the chord tones and the diatonic chords, you're well on your way to mastering the minor scale. 3. Creating a minor scale on one string: in this lesson, we're going to create several minor scales going up and down the neck, using the pattern for the minor scale. Let's take a look at how to do that. So now I'm going to show you how to create a minor scale going up and down the neck, starting from any note on the neck. I think it's really important that you learn to do this on one string before you go ahead and start just memorizing these random patterns, which are probably not gonna make any sense to U. S. So I think it's important that you learn how to create the scales going up and down just one string and then learn how to create him going across the strings. And then I think it makes more sense than to move on to the actual position so you can start memorizing all the finger rings. They'll have more meaning and make more sense to you. It will be a lot easier for you to learn the last lesson. I talked about how to create a minor scale use in whole steps and half steps where I went whole step half step, post that post step half step whole step and then another whole staff. Now we're going to do is we're gonna talk about So those are actual notes here in the scale . We're gonna start assigning them numbers. Eso like this, G This gym G right here is gonna be the first note that scales we're gonna talk. We're gonna call that one. I'm gonna go up a whole step two to the second note in the scale. Then we have 1/2 step to go, which is gonna be a flat three. The reason this is called a flat three is because the interval from here to here is a minor third from here to here would be a major third from G. To be, that would be a major third interval, but in minor, we don't have a major third, we have a minor third interval. So it goes 12 flat three. I'm going to go up a whole step before then you're gonna go up a whole step the five. Then it's 1/2 step, the flat six, and then a whole step to flat seven and then a whole step back to the root, which is one. So let's go ahead and do that one more time. We're gonna start down here on G. We have one whole step to to half step the flat. Three. Ah, whole step before the whole step. 25 1/2 step to flat six. A whole step to flat seven and then a whole step back. The the route, which is one j. So in my brain, what I do is I just need to know where the half steps, the half step for between two and flat. Three on there between five and flat six. So as long as I know that I can quickly create a minor scale anywhere on the neck, Um, so when I'm creating a minor scale, I'm really thinking of the numbers, not necessarily the whole steps and half steps. It's just really important to know where the whole steps are and where the half steps are. So, like between one and two is always a whole step. And really there's a whole step between every interval, every interval number, except for two and flat three and five and flat six. Now let's go ahead and create some minor scales just starting from random notes anywhere on the neck. All right, so I'm just gonna pick a random note on the guitar. I'm gonna pick this note right here. That was to be a B flat, but I don't really care what they care about that I'm just gonna start here. I'm gonna follow the pattern and get 12 flat. 345 flat. Six flat. 71 I'm gonna go back and get one flat. Seven flat. 654 flat. Three to back down the one. So all I'm thinking about is what is the number? And do I have to go up 1/2 step? Whole step? That's how I'm able to do that. Let's pick another one. Let's say I want to start from this note right here. Here's a random note. So I'm going to go down one down a whole step the flat, seven down a whole step the flat, six down 1/2. Step to five. That's a whole step down to four. Then a whole step down the flat. 3/2 step down to two and then a whole step back down toe A, which is one. So it's on a minor scale. We go 12 flat. 345 flat. Six flat. 71 Now, you might be thinking, What fingers am I supposed to use for this exercise? It doesn't matter. You can use whatever figure if you want your pinky the whole time. If you wanted to be a little weird, I'd probably is my 1st 2nd or third finger. But for this one, Once we get into playing exact patterns than you know, we're gonna talk about exactly what fingers to use. But for this exercise, just use whatever finger you want. All right? Now, let's create another random minor scale. I'm gonna start here with this half, and we're gonna get one whole step. 2 2/2 step the flat, three whole step before whole step. The 5/2 step, the flat, six whole step, the flat seven. And then a whole step back upto half, which is one going to get back. Gives one flat. Seven flat. 654 flat. 321 So what you want to do is just do that. Um, you know, I'd probably at least 50 times or however many times that you're very comfortable with creating those going up and down the scales I would keep creating the minor scale up and down one string until you're very comfortable with the pattern and the sound of the minor scale. Then I would move onto the next step, which is creating the minor scale going across the six strings. 4. Creating minor scales across 6 strings: in this lesson, I'm going to show you how to create minor scales going across the neck. I think this is the next logical step. After learning how to create minor scales going up and down one string once you understand and are able to create minor scales across the Net following a couple simple rules, learning the five minor scale patterns is gonna make a lot more sense. That's getting close and take a look at how to do this. So for creating a minor scale going across the next like this, there's any two rules that you have to remember on. Those rules are when you want to g o to the next string and it's up a whole step. Whole step meaning up, two frets. So if I want one to flattery, E could go up here to four. This is ah, whole step from flat 3 to 4, but I want to go to the next string at this point that we don't have to go out of position . I can stay in this area, so you want to flattery this This fourth right here is also three frets down on the next string, so when I say three frets down. I want you to envision you want to flat three moving your finger over and then counting down 3123 So it goes 12 flat. 34 So then that rule is going to apply That three frets down for going up a whole step that's going apply. Teoh, Teoh, This all sets of strings Except for when you go from the third string to the second string and it's only two Somebody a 12 flat three set a four here. I'm gonna play four here. Whole step the five a half step The flat six No holds up the flat. Seven. But instead of going out of position of women, Ugo, just three friends down on the next drinks of flat seven way. Have one right here for two. I could stretch up with my pinky, but I believe in my court, my scale charts. I suggest that you get to hear we're gonna go flat 71 and then you gonna go down three frets on the next string to get to that, it's 1/2 step to flat three whole step. Before now, five is a whole step above, which is right here. But it's not down. Three friends you can hear is gonna be down to friends. So when you go from the third string of the second string, the whole step jump is down to friends, not three. So we're going. He's 12 flat 345 is gonna be right here. 5.5, Step the flat, six whole step to flat seven. And instead of getting one up here, I can once again go down three frets, which is right here. That's where one is two and then flat. Sorry it. Let's go ahead and do that one more time. 12 flat. Three up a whole step 245 flat six flat 71 down. Three frets the two flat 34 And then when we get the second string is only down. Two frets. So five right here. Five flat, six flat. Seven. Instead of playing one here, we're gonna get down. Three frets one. Of course, the same rule applies in reverse. So I'm going from one. I need to get down a whole step by going to hear I could get flat seven right here flat 7655 is here. Four is going to be here because this note is the same assistant that both D's, um 54 flattery to hold. Stepped down the one flat seven flat, 65 for flat, 32 in the back, down the one. So let's let's create some meat, some minor scales up from different notes other than just starting with our first finger on the six string. All right, what if we were going to start with, say, our pinky on the six string? We'll start right here on this. See? So we're gonna end up playing in C minor scale, so we'll start here with one, and I'm not gonna go appeared to, cause that doesn't make any sense because I kind of want to stay in this area. So no one and then I'm gonna get get down. Three frets on next. During two halfs up the flat three will step before five is gonna be three frets down on the next drink. Five flat six flat 71 is gonna be ah, whole step. So it's gonna be three frets down, one whole step to asked up the flat. Three. The four is right here, but instead we're gonna play it good down. Two frets on the second string. 12 flat. 34 Whole step, the 5.5 Step the flat. Six. Then we will go up a whole step, which is down. Three frets for flat seven, and then back to one. Now, let's create a minor scale starting on the fifth string. Fifth fret. This is ah would be typically Ah, position number four. So we'll start here. The one most up to half step the flat three. Now I need to go up to four, so I'm going to get it over here. Right Here was 12 flat, three down. Three frets 245 flat. Six down. Three friends to a flat. Seven on one. So they get stretching. Appear to two. I'm just gonna play down. Two frets on the second string to flat 345 Will be right here. Five flat. Six flat. 71 more time. Because 12 flat. 345 flat six flat 712 flat. 345 flat six flat. Seven Appear the one you want to go up there. Now I'm gonna create a minor scale, starting on the fifth string with my pinky. I'm just picking that Sanath. I'm just picking a kind of a random note here, so this is one whole step to flat 34 whole. Step the five flat six, flat seven. And it's a whole step with one. I'm gonna use my first finger to shift. I know. We have to go up here. 12 flat, three. Then it's a whole step before step 25 flat six coming back flat. 654 flat. 321 flat seven Sound here. So I'm gonna play right here. My pinky so I can shift down one flat. Seven flat 65 for flat, 3 to 1. Want to keep going lower, flat seven. And then I need to get a flat six. We're gonna play it here. One flat, seven flat. 65 Or get under flat three to get that. It was in f minor scale. Another good exercise is to take a low note. Say this effort here, and then figure out how to play a minor scale all the way up to this f right here. And then basically, you're kind of weaving your way using the pattern and your brain figuring out how to play the scale. So really, you're playing up through all different five, all five different patterns. All right, so I'm gonna start here with one eso When I do this, I suggest you try it many times and try different paths because there's really a lot of different ways you could do it. It's almost endless. So you go 12 flat. Three. I'm gonna go up here to four. Then at any point, I usually suggest going to a new string. Ah, higher string when you have to go up a whole step. So I'm on four. So five is going to be here. Five flat, six flat 71 I want to go over here to to flat 34 maybe. Uncle appeared, uh, five flat six flat 71 Get a two here in sunny down two frets too flat. 345 flat six. You're flat. 71 All right, so now I'm gonna do it again. But I'm gonna take a completely different path. Not sure exactly how I'm gonna go into making this up. One to flat 345 flat six flat 712 flat 345 flat six flat 712 flat three 45 flat. Six flat 71 That was completely different than the first time. So Isis suggests trying a bunch of different patterns, you know, just kind of work your way up from work your way back down and really get a feel for the pattern and what it means. Teoh. No. Go to the next drinks. You can kind of work away across the the neck and back. I would practice creating minor scales up and down the neck across all six strings for a little while until you get really comfortable with the exercise. Then I would dive into learning the five standard fingering for the minor scale that will allow you to play in any minor key anywhere on the neck. 5. Minor scale position 1: in this lesson, I'm going to show you how to play the minor scale for position number one. This is going to be the most important minor scale position that you're going to learn. The reason this scale is so important is that the root of the scale was based off of the six string and it's gonna be the quickest and easiest. Define. Let's take a look at how to play the minor scale position. One pattern. This is how you play a minor scale position. One. I'm going to choose this note right here, which is a on the six string fifth. Fret I could choose any if I want to choose being played here. Play. Start here on G play G minor position one. But I'm just choosing a because it's kind of right. The mill in act. I think it's good for demonstration purposes, so I'm going to start here. That's gonna be the route with one of the scale. This is one whole step. The to that, it's 1/2 step, the flat three. Then a whole step, the four hole step, the 5.5 step to flat six and then a whole step the flat. Seven In a whole step again. Toe one. It's a whole step. The to half step the flat three. Step 24 It will be a whole step 25 then 1/2 step to flat. Six. Whole step to flat seven. There's gonna be a whole step. The one we're back to a day again. We started on a five years in a Here's an A or 111 So we're on one. It's gonna be a whole step to to on. It's gonna be 1/2 step to flat three. Okay. And going backwards when we'll start here on flat three. Where we left off flat 321 flat seven flat. 654 flat. 31 flat. Seven flat. 654 flat. 321 Let's get through that pattern one more time. We're gonna get 12 flat. 345 flat. Six flat. 71 The first time I went through the first time I went through this scale, I used this finger. And now the second time I'm going through, I'm using my pinky. You can use either one. I typically will go like this. I switched to my pinky for this one And then I stretch I reach up here for this to But if I'm not thinking about it sometimes I get like this and I do like an extra long three frets spread here with my first finger on my third finger. So it's really up to you. What you want to dio I would try both. I would use my pinky and then shift up. Or I would use my third finger and then stretch down with my first e. Find both of more acceptable. I would just do either one and then see which one you like. All right, So I'm gonna start here from this one again of regular to say it's going 12 flat. 345 flat six flat 712 flat three coming back flat. 321 flat seven flat. Six 54 flat. Three Teoh one flat seven flat 654 flat. 3 to 1 in terms of how do you pick the scale? Um, if you're not used to playing scales and not used to alternate picking, then it's OK. If you want to get through nice and slow, pick all the notes down. But ultimately, if you want to get better as a guitar player to be able to play a lot faster, you want to be able to modern it pin in order the order and pick means you're going down, Up, down, up, down, up. So my advice as your practicing this You're kind of killing two birds with one stone by practicing alternate picking. Going down, up, down, up, down, up, down, up, down. You will be able to play scales a lot faster that way. Just in the beginning, it might seem kind of awkward, but I promise you it will pay off in the long run in terms of how do you How do you practice? What do you do with this scale? I'm not gonna cover that in this lesson. I will cover that in another video for these scale pattern videos. I'm literally just showing you how to play it physically. Play it and then I'll show in other videos. I'll show you what to do with them. That is how you play the minor scale position one. When you practice the scale, you want to practice it in all 12 keys. Keep playing. It over and over again until you have the fingering and the interval numbers memorized. I would even practice it with your eyes closed, they released. Not looking at the guitar. You'll need to be able to visualize the pattern in your mind. This will take a lot of practice and repetition to achieve, so you better get practicing. 6. Minor scale position 2: in this lesson. I'm going to show you how to play the minor scale second position. Let's take a look at how to play it for the minor scale position to I've chosen a once again. We played position one down here, so I'm going to start on this one right here. This a and we're going Teoh do position number two. It's going to be within these four frets. It's all contained within this four, which is nice. No shifting up or down s Oh, that's really nice. I could have chosen any key I wanted if I wanted to. Dio say d minor position to I would start on this d here on the fourth string. I want to do f Get down here where f is. And I would start to pattern here one to flattery. I'm just choosing to do so you can really do it in all 12 keys. And that's how you should practice that. I'll discuss that in a later video, but now I'm just gonna show you physically how to play minor scale position too. So we're gonna start here on one. It's gonna go 12 flat. 34 five flat six, flat 71 to flat 34 We're gonna come back four flat. 321 flat seven flat. 654 flat. 321 flat. Seven flat. 654 flat. Three to it. It's hard not to want to get down toe one, since it's right there. But what I tell people is, if you're gonna practice, be practicing that pattern. I like to go down to the lowest note in that pattern and then I go back up to the route. I always tell people to start and stop on the one the root of the scale. Just say that you're getting your hearing. What that scale sounds like. Um, your train your ear toe here, where the root is and what the intervals are and how they relate to the root. Let's go through that one more time. We're going to go 12 flat. 345 flat. Six flat. 712 flat. 34 Coming back. Four flat. 321 flat. Seven flat. 654 Flat. 32 one flat. Seven flat. 654 flat. 3 to 2 flat. 345 flat. Six flat. 71 So keep in mind, I have pdf's and charts for all of these in the course. So if you're having trouble seeing what I'm doing or understanding what I'm doing, make sure you look at and download the pdf. So all the charts for the scales you will. I think you will find them very helpful. That is how you play the minor scale position to Now that you know how to play the 1st 2 positions, try going between those two patterns in a particular key. Being able to connect all the patterns is going to be really important for mastering your minor scales. Be patient and practice often. 7. Minor scale position 3: in this lecture, you're going to learn how to play the minor scale for position number three. Let's take a closer look at how to play the scale. Minor scale. Position three. For this exercise or demonstration, I'm gonna be showing you how to play an E minor scale position. Three. I'm choosing this. He here just kind of keeping it in the middle of the neck. Wanted to keep doing a minor position. Three. I would go up here to this day right here on the fifth string. 12th fret. No way. I'm just trying to keep it here in the middle of the neck. So I'm gonna start here on this Me on the fifth string seventh fret. That is the one that is the root of the scale. And this, uh, position three is gonna get 12 flat. 345 flat. Six flat seven one. It's a finger shift up flat. Six flat seven. Finger shifts upto one to flat 345 flat six coming back flat. 654 flat. 321 flat seven flat. 654 flat. 3 to 1 for flat seven. Right here. I'm going Thio Going to do a finger shift. I'm going. Todo is gonna go using my second thing early. He's my first finger that's gonna allow me to reach up to here to get my flat six. So I'm gonna go four flat. 321 Finger shift flat. Seven flat 65 for get back up. The one for five flat six flat 71 The reason I'm shifting here to my pinky instead of using this finger is because I'm setting up when I have to get down to two. If I want to keep going back up the scale. So I shift here so that it's comfortable that for me. Toe, play those notes right there. All right, so I'm gonna go ahead and play it one more time. 12 flat. 345 flat. Six flat. 712 flat. 345 flat. Six. Coming back flat. 654 flat. 321 flat. Seven flat. 654 flat. 321 flat. Seven flat. 6545 flat. Six, flat. Seven. And then back. Toe one. Once again, since I'm going pretty slow, I'm just picking most of them down. But when you practicing you want to practice? Alternate picking where you're going? Down, up, Down, up, Down, Up, down, up You get the idea. That is how you play the minor scale position three. 8. Minor scale position 4: in this lesson, you're going to be learning how to play the minor scale fourth position. I consider this scale position the second most important of all five positions. The reason. It's more important to learn than, say, the second or the third position is because the route is based off of the fifth string. When you're playing chords based off of the fifth string, you will most likely be playing a chord bass out of the fourth position. So it's very handy to know your minor scale fourth position. If you look at a large amount of guitar solos and minor, you will see that the positions used most often are the first and fourth position. That doesn't mean you shouldn't learn them all really well. It just means that you'll probably use positions one. And for the most often, let's take a look at how to play the minor scale fourth position. The minor scale position. Four. I'm going to go ahead and do e minor scale position for since for Position three, I used the minor Miles will use e minor position for right here. It's still kind of in the middle of the neck, Um, and This is what it looks like. E, I want to play d minor. I would just start here on date, but C minor B flat minor. You used the exact same fingering. You just slide it around for position, for wherever you whatever scale you want to play, you just stop with your first finger. Like if I want to. G minor e, start on G right here. All right, so let's do e minor position for going to start here on one when he is going to get 12 flat . 345 flat six flat. 71 to flat 345 flat. Six flat. Seven Coming back flat. Seven flat. 654 flat. 321 flat. Seven flat. 654 flat. 321 flat. Seven flat. 65 Then we're gonna get back upto 15 flat. Six flat. Seven on back to me, which is one one more time. 12 flat. 345 flat. Six flat. 712 flat. 345 flat. Six flat. Seven Coming back flat. Seven flat. 654 flat. 321 flat. Seven flat. 654 flat 321 flat seven flat 6556 flat 71 That's how you play the minor scale position. For as I had mentioned at the beginning of this lesson position one in position for are the most commonly used minor scales. You want to make sure that you have them down really well. 9. Minor scale position 5: last but not least. Let's take a look at how to play the minor scale. Fifth position, minor scale position five. I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to play a C minor scale position. Five. I'm going to start with my pinky on. See right here, because I haven't Ah, demonstrate that scale yet, See? Scale. And it is keeping right in the middle of the neck. So I'm gonna start here with on one. See? It's gonna go 1 2/2 step the flat. 34 5/2 step to flat six, flat 712 flat. 345 flat six flat 71 Coming back. One flat. Seven flat. 654 I'm gonna do a finger shift instead of playing flat. Three of my third finger. I'm going to switch to my pinky and go flat. 321 flat. Seven flat. 654 flat. 321 And I'm gonna get down to flat seven and then go back to the route one again. 12 flat. 345 flat. Six flat. 712 flat. Three. Finger shift. Appear to 45 flat. Six flat. 71 Coming back. One flat seven flat 654 Finger shift with the pinky to flat 321 flat. Seven flat 654 flat. 321 down the flat. Seven them back to one And then is how you play the minor scale position. Five. Now that you've learned all five positions, you will be able to play any minor key anywhere on the neck. There's no need to hurry. This material takes quite a while to get down to the point that you just know it. Learning your minor scales is essential to being a good guitar player, so I suggest learning it in small chunks at a time and just have fun with it. 10. What is a pentatonic scale: the minor pentatonic scale. What is it? What's it good for? How do I play it? The minor pentatonic scale is just simply a five note scale. The natural minor scale goes 12 flat. 345 flat six flat 71 And to turn that into a ah minor pentatonic scale, we just need to get rid of the two and the flat six. So we end up with one flat 345 flat 71 Once again, that was just one flat 345 flat seven and then one those of the intervals that you need to create a minor pentatonic scale. So what is it good for? I always looked at minor pentatonic is Ah ah, kind of a fun, easy framework for being able to solo over minor chords. Or if I'm in a minor key, let's say if I'm in a minor, I can easily play this two notes per string pattern. And that's really what the pentatonic is. You end up playing to nose for string, which makes it kind of easy to play physically. You don't have to play a No. Three does pris training and sometimes to it's always two news for string eso It gives me a very quick framework. Since I've memorized where all five patterns are for a minor, I can very quickly go. Everyone allows me to very quickly solo in a minor and anywhere on the neck Another big benefit to the minor pentatonic scale and really any pentatonic scale this works for Major as well is what happens if you're playing a song and you need to solar or create some pills and you don't you're not sure what key you're in. So if you're going along and all sudden here comes a D flat minor chord and you're not quite sure what key you're in than a D minor pentatonic with D minor pentatonic scale should should work Fine. Should sound OK. Kind of like it out of a jam. But I give you it's something some framework to work with. Ah, when you're not quite sure, what are the exact notes of the scale that you're in? So how does this mystical, magical pentatonic scale How did why's it always sound good? Because any two combinations of any notes in the scale they generally sound pretty good that any to comment any two notes are never gonna create a minor ninth flat nine or Monday night or a tri tone, which is a sharp for a flat five. Those are hideous sounds that you definitely want to avoid. But when you're playing pentatonic, any two notes I play, they sound like they generally work pretty well together on. That's a big reason why the pentatonic scale is a good, safe scale to use. So how do you play it? What I want you to do is I want you to take some time, and I want you to watch the next five lessons for the minor pentatonic positions one through five. And I want you to really spend some time and Roy learn each position really well and memorize the fingering because in another lesson, I'm gonna show you how I would practice the pentatonic patterns so that you can kind of piece together and be able to play in any key anywhere on the neck. But first, you really need to get down. There's five different fingering 11. Minor pentatonic scale position 1: way in this video, I'm going to show you how to play the minor pentatonic scale for position number one. Just like how you mentioned that the minor scale position one is the most important scale you're going to learn. This pentatonic pattern is by far the most used pattern on the guitar. It is the main pattern use for the blues, rock, country and many other genres. You can very easily use this fingering to play over a minor key or major key in this lesson will be looking at how to play it in a minor key for minor pentatonic scale position one. I'm going to do it out of a since it's right here in the middle of the neck. Um, a nice, easy place to play, I think is very comfortable doing things in A or B. All right, so we're gonna start here on this a in on the six string fifth fret, and this is gonna be the root of the scale is gonna go route, and then we're gonna get a flat three here. We're skipping two because two is not in the pentatonic. It goes one flat 345 and we're gonna skip flat six here because that's not part of the Pentatonix. We're gonna go from five right to flat seven. Then a whole set of one way of flat. Three a whole set before five. Flat 71 flat three coming back flat. 31 flat. 754 Flattery, one flat. 754 flat. Three on one. Let's get through that one more time. It's gonna be one flat. 345 flat 71 flat. 345 flat 71 flat three flat 31 flat. 754 flat 31 flat 75 for flattery. One. If you need more assistance on how to play that, make sure you take a look at the the pdf that has the chart for this position. That is how you play the minor pentatonic scale position one. Make sure you learn this pattern really well because you're going to use it a lot on the guitar 12. Minor pentatonic scale position 2: in this lesson, you're going to be learning the minor scale pentatonic position to this scale is the pentatonic pattern that sits just a little higher on the neck than position one. Let's take a look at how to play it. Minor pentatonic scale position to I'm going to do this out of the key of a and I'm going to start on this a right here. I could have chosen any letter. I could have chosen this f sharp right here to start it. This g just be, you know, it doesn't really. It doesn't matter. In, I would learn the position first and then, you know, practice it in other areas of the neck. So I'm gonna start right here on this one. The reason I'm not starting on the six string on Flat three is because I think that Ah, at least in the beginning, when you're just learning the scales, I think you should start on one and end on one. So we're gonna start right here on this a right here, which is one because one flat 345 flat 71 flat. 34 coming back. Four flattery. One flat. 754 flat. 31 flat. 7543 Then we're going to go from this flat three. We're gonna go back up and end on one to get a flat. 345 flat. 71 Let's go ahead and go through that again. One flat. 345 flat 71 flat. 34 Coming back. Four flat. 31 flat. Seven 54 flat. 31 flat. 754 flats. Three flats. 345 flat. 71 And that is how you play the minor pentatonic position number two. 13. Minor pentatonic scale position 3: in this lecture, you're going to learn how to play the minor pentatonic for position number three. Let's take a look. Minor pentatonic scale. Position three. I've chosen to start. I want to kind of keep it right here in the middle of the neck. Like I mentioned in the 1st 2 So I'm gonna Jews. I'm gonna start here on this E right here on the fifth string. Seventh fret that way. It kind of keeps it right here in the middle. All right, so I'm gonna This is gonna be one right here. I was gonna go flat. 34 five, flat seven. We're gonna finger shift up here using our first finger toe one where he is right there. We have flat flat. 34 and five coming back. 54 flat 31 on one. A finger shift with my pinky down here to flat 75431 flat 7544 five flat 71 one more time. One flat. 345 flat. 71 flat. 345 54 flat. Three flat. 754 flat. 31 flat. 754 They're going back up the 145 flat. 71 That was how you play the minor pentatonic position. Number three 14. Minor pentatonic scale position 4: the minor pentatonic scale position. Number four is almost important to know his position. Number one, this pattern is usually the second go to pattern when you're playing in minor. The reason this pattern gets used so much is because it's based around the minor chord built off of the fifth string, and it's contained within four frets, which makes it very easy to play. Let's take a look at how to play it. Minor pentatonic scale. Position four in position three. I used E minor, so I'm gonna use E minor again and start on this E here on the fifth string. Seventh fret and the scale. It's going to get one flat. 345 flat 71 flat. 345 flat seven flat 754 flat 31 flat. 75 four flat 31 flat. 75 Going back up the 15 flat. 71 Another time. One flat 345 flat. 71 flat. 345 flat. Seven flat 754 flat. Three flat 754 flat 31 flat. 755 flat 71 And that was how you play Minor pentatonic position number four 15. Minor pentatonic scale position 5: in this lesson, we're going to be taking a look at how to play the minor pentatonic scale position number five. This is the final pentatonic pattern going up the next. If you learn all of the five patterns, you will be able to play a pentatonic scale in any key anywhere on the neck. Of course, memorizing and learning the five patterns and how they link together is a lot of work. But the pay off is really worth it. Let's learn how to play position number five Minor pentatonic scale. Position five I have chosen to use Start on. See here. Once again, it's kind of in the middle of the neck. So I'm going to start on this. See, on the six string a threat E could have started anywhere I could started right here. E I wanted to do in a me. I'm just choosing to start here on this. See? So it goes one flat. 345 flat. 71 Flattery. 45 flat. 71 Coming back. One flat. 754 flat. 31 flat. 754 flat. 31 flat. Seven Back to one. Let's get through that again. One flat. 345 flat 71 flat. 345 flat. 71 uh, flat seven flat 31 flat. 754 flat. 31 flat. Seven. Back to one. That was how to play the minor pentatonic position number five. Now it's your job to practice all five patterns and learn how to link them all together. Have fun. 16. What are the minor chord tones?: So what are the chord tones, the core tones, or just simply the odd numbers in the scale. The minor scale goes 12 flat. 345 flat, six flat 71 And then the court towns would just be one flat. 35 flat seven and then one. The court tones are the notes that are used to build chords, so it's really important to know where your core tones are and what they are. For instance, if I play this a minor chord, it's going to be all one's three flat threes and fives. So if I go through and figure out what What you know what, Cortona? I'm playing on each strength. It's 151 flat 351 I want to turn this into an A minor seventh. I have to put a flat seven in there, so I'm gonna get rid of this A here, this route putting this flat seven. So I might do that, you know, im adding that flat seven. So I just turned that into an a minor seventh chords. E could also put my pinkie down here on this flat seven and added a flat seventh in that way. So the court tones are really important for you to understand basically, how you how you build cords. It's also very good with cord tone soloing. Or if you're playing over a cord and you want to emphasize the notes that we're probably going to sound a little stronger or better, then you probably don't want E. I want to emphasize the court tones with one's threes, fives and sevens, or flat threes and flat sevens. In this case, since we're using Minor Another way that modern guitar players air using court owns a lot with sweeping arpeggios. I am in no way, ah, sweet master. I've sat in there and tried over and over to try to play them really fast. They're fun, but if you want to do any sweeping or playing arpeggios, that's basically what you're doing. You're playing a lot of chord tones. Swing conclusion. The court tones aren't the sexiest thing. Toe learn the actual scale and the pentatonic is a lot more fun, I think a lot more accessible to use, but you really need to know your chord tones so that it helps you understand cords. And what are the notes? They're going into cords court structure. And if you want to do any kind of arpeggio ation, it's really important to know what your core tones are. Eso have fun. Go ahead, learn them and just think of those is just another little bit of information that you have that you can apply in a minor scale. 17. Minor chord tones position 1: in this lesson. I'm going to show you how to play the minor chord tones for position one for the minor chord tones for position one. I'm going to choose G. We'll start right here, and that's gonna be our one. We're gonna play a minor chord tunes right here, and we're going to start here with this G. That's gonna be one. It's flat. 35 flat 71 flat 35 flat 71 flat three coming back flat. 31 flat 75 flat. 31 flat. 75 flat. 31 Well, more time. One flat. 35 flat. 71 flat. 35 flat. 71 flat. Three flat. 31 flat. 75 Flattery, one flat. 75 flat three. And then back down. The one which is the rude. That is how you play the core tones for position number one 18. Minor chord tones position 2: in this lecture, you're going to learn how to play the court tones for minor position to minor chord tones. Position number two. I'm going to choose to stay in G just like it did with position number one. So I'm going to start on this G right here on the fourth string. Fifth fret. That's gonna be our route. I suggest that you start on one and then end on one. Just said that you know where the roots of the chord at least roots of the scale or the court are. So this is one flat three five flat. 71 flat three coming back flat. 31 flat 75 flat. Three one flat. 75 flat three going back up flat. 35 flat. 71 Once again. One flat, 35 flat. 71 flat. Three flat. 31 flat. 75 flat. 31 flat. 75 flat. Three going back up flat. 35 lats. 71 I suggest that you play through the court. Tends to kind of go as low as you can on go back up and kind of start and stop on one. That just helps. You really gotta get a good feel for where the root of the the scale is and those of the court tones for position number two. 19. Minor chord tones position 3: No way you're going to learn the minor chord tones and position three in this lesson for the minor court tones for Position three. I'm going to do it out of G. Just like a deposition one and two. So I'm going to start on this G on the fifth string, 10th friend. We're gonna go one flat. Three five flat 71 flat. 35 five flats, three flats, 75 flat. 31 flat 75 flat. 71 one more time. One flat. 35 flat. 71 flat. 35 Coming back. 531 flat 75 flat. 31 flat. 75 flat. 71 That is the core tones for position number three. 20. Minor chord tones position 4: This'll Essen, I'm going to show you the minor chord tones in position number four for the sector size. I'm going to show you how to play the minor chord tones for position number four. I'm gonna do it out of D. That way I can stay more in the middle of the neck because going up there was going to start getting pretty high up on the next. I want to kind of keep it in the middle, so it's more in the center of the frame for the shot. All right, so here are the core tones for position number four out of the key of D. We'll start here with one flat 35 flat. 71 flat. 35 flat. Seven Coming back flat. 75 flat. 31 flat. 75 flat. 31 flat. 755 flat. 71 Let's do that one more time. One flat. 35 flat. 71 flat. 35 flat. Seven Coming back flat. 75 flat. 31 flat. 75 flat. 31 flat. 75571 And that is how you play the court tones for position number four 21. Minor chord tones position 5: in this video lecture. I'm going to go over the minor chord tones for position number five. Minor chord tones positioned. Five. I'm going to do this out of the key of D, just like I did position for So to do this out of position. Five. To start on this d here, which is on the six string 10th fret and it's going to go one flat. 35 flat 71 flat 35 flat. 71 Coming back. One flat, seven flat 31 flat. 75 flat 31 flat. Seven. The back of the one. What's again? One flat 35 flat. 71 flat. 35 flat. 71 one flat. 75 flat. 31 flat. 7531 flat seven. And then you go back up to one. Those are the core tones for position number five. 22. Tips for practicing minor scales: in this lecture, I'm going to show you two different methods to go about practicing the scales and information. In this course. The first method is gonna be called the All in one method, and the second method is going to be called the all five at a time method. Now, let's go ahead and take a look and see what those methods are for the all in one method. What that means is, what you're gonna do is gonna take one specific position, say, uh, a minor position. One could be anywhere. Could be have minor g minor. Doesn't matter. I'm just using a minor because it's nice. Doesn't me sharp to flats and you're going to learn the scale in that position. And don't just learn it in one active like I did. Make sure you learn it. You know the full position, you're gonna learn the minor scale on Ben. You're gonna take some time, you're gonna learn the minor pentatonic, and then you're going to then go ahead learning the court tones and a minor position one. So when you're doing this, you want to make sure that you're really aware of what the numbers of the intervals are. So when you're practicing your minor scale, you want one too flat. 345 flat. Six flat 71 What those numbers mean is a one is the first note in the scale. The two is a major second interval. So from here to here, that's a major. Second interval was 12 flat three. So from one to flat three that's a minor. Third interval from 1 to 4 is a perfect 4th 1 to 5 is a perfect fifth. 12 flat. Six. That's a minor six interval 12 flat. Seven. A minor seventh interval and we have from 1 to 1, which is inactive. So you might say, Well, why do I need to know these numbers? It's really important to know where all your intervals are because then to change two different things. If you want to go from the a minor scale to the pentatonic or switch the court owns, you really need to understand what are the numbers or the intervals that you need to put in that scale to play the correct scale. So for a minor scale, you have to have all seven f that one too flat 345 flat six flat 71 for the minor pentatonic. What you're gonna do is we're not going to have him. The two it's gonna get one flat 345 skipped flat six flat 71 So by playing those right together, e think it helps you understand better, which numbers? Air intervals you need to leave out. And then for the court tones, it's all the odd numbers. It's one flat 35 flat 71 So I can play the scale, you play the pentatonic, and then I can play the court because I'm playing him all right together. I can really see you know, the different notes or the different intervals in each. Whether it's the scale, the pentatonic of the chord tones, I think that has, ah allows my students have a better understanding of what's happening right there, and also helped you instantly know what your different options are right in that position or in that active that you're in. And you don't want to just practice this in one position. You want to go through and use this technique for all five positions. Now let's take a look at the second method. The second method is what I call the all five at a time method. This is the method that for, you know, probably 15 16 years that miss how I would teach people to learn scales. You would learn position number one, Say a minor position one. I'm only doing one off. If I'm not doing the full scale on, then you Would you practice that a lot? Then what? You have that down. Then we go into position over to position number three. Position number four. Way to position number five down here. So you would actually go ahead and practice position one and over and over and over until you have the finger pattering memorized. Then you would do 234 and five. And then once you did all that for all the minor scales, then you would go ahead and do that for the pentatonic scales and then do the chord tones. The reason I've been using the all in one method is I think it and I think it helps you learn each position better because you kind of learning the three different things you need to know right in position. And they get helps you learn the intervals better. But it really it's up to you. You know, you may want to say, Well, I just want to play a minor scale all over the neck, Like, how do we do? That s o then Then the other method, the all five time methods might be a better choice. I suggest doing boat, maybe one day practice just only one position and then another day, practice a minor, the scale all over the next, uh, really Mix it up and try to keep it interesting. 23. Diatonic chords for minor: thin this lesson. We're going to be taking a look at the diatonic chords for minor. So what are the diatonic chords? The diatonic chords air seven chords that are created using the notes in the minor scale. Let's take a look at what they are. Okay, The diatonic chords for minor. I'm going to use a minor as an example, as I've been using for other lessons, the one chord is an a minor chord. So in the key of a minor, the one chord isn't as a minor chord on how where that comes from, is, um, it's basically it's ah, it's a court that's built off the root note A And if you go every other note in the scale go a C E. If I play a C and creates a minor triad so the warm court is minor. And if I start from the second note in the scale, go every other note in the scale. What do we end up with? We end up weighing up with the diminished triad, so the to court is gonna be diminished re little more advanced. Uh, the full minor seventh chord would be a minor seven flat five chord or 1/2 diminished, but for in terms of, like song writing purpose in general purposes, I like to think it just is the to court is diminished, even though technically the full the full, proper seventh corps to be a minor seven flat. Five. All right, if we start on, see which is the flat third, you know your skills. 12 flat. Three. If we go every other letter in the scale See e g. We end up with a major corn. So far, we have the one. Chord is a minor thing to cord is be diminished. The flat three chord is major. The four chord If we go Every other note. Starting on D. The fourth note. We go Every other note in the scale way end up with a D minor triad. So the 4/4 of Minor on then, if we do the same for the five court way, end up with way, end up with a minor chord. So let's recap. We have one minor to court is diminished flat 3/4 major. 4/4 minor, 5/4 minor. The flat six chord right here is the flat six. Note 12 flat 345 flat six for you. Every other note in the scale turned out to be a major corn. So f major is going to your flat six chord that also played down here. And then if we go every other note starting with, um, the flat seven we're gonna end up turns out to be found out to be a major triad. So the flat seven court is major as well. So let's recap. We have one minor to diminished flat three major and we have four minor, five minor, flat six major and then flat seven major, those air the seven diatonic chords in the key of a minor. So you might be saying yourself, Woo, I don't I don't understand what you're talking about. I don't understand. Like what a key is or what's What's the point of all this? I don't even know how to play those chords that you're talking about. Eso What I am going to do is attached to the to this lecture or less than I'm gonna have a chart here is going to show you all. I'm gonna show you all 12 keys and all the cords that go in all 12 keys. Eso You gonna find this very, very helpful. You're You want to make sure you print that out or at least downloaded so you can look and say in F minor, The three chord is flat a flat, and that's gonna be a big help. And in terms of ah, how do you play these chords? I'm also gonna attach to different bar chord charts one that's based off the six string and then one that's based off the fifth string. That way, if you're looking at the chart and you're like, I don't know where to play, you know, saying a diminished or how to finger it you can look it up and you can see a couple different a couple different ways to play it on my bar Chord charts. So the big benefit understanding what diatonic chords are in any given key is it allows you to if you want to create your own music like I can very easily create a chord progression going. Ah, just knowing that What? Mike, my chords are available. Go E I choose 14 flat 651 s. So it allows me to very quickly create chord progression. Then I could record it. Then I console over it and practice my scales. And to me, that's a huge benefit toe. Understanding your diatonic chords. Another big benefit to understanding diatonic chords is when you get a play a song. Let's say you know something to name minor. When you learn that chord progression for the song, you're going to see that 99% of the time they're using chords in the key. So to me, it really helps me understand. Help me remember the song quicker, and it just gives me a better understanding of how that artist put those chords together and why they use those specific cords for that song. Does it mean they're always going to use the diatonic chords? Now you gonna find the songs that are kind of, you know, probably 95% of the time, they all songs. They're going to use mostly diatonic chords, but there's different things, like secondary dominance. If I want to go from this, a minor to G, I could put in a G seven before the G you know, So there's different somewhere. Any techniques where they use different types of chords that aren't diatonic chords. But in general, most of the time, when you play songs that they're going to use diatonic chords, it helps you learn songs faster, because then you can start soon as you figure out what Kia song is them. You already know the set of chords they're probably going to be using, and it just helps you learn the songs fast. That gives a a little deeper understanding of the key that you're in the scale. You could be using the cords that are probably going to be used. I find it very helpful in the long run might seem pretty complicated now, but the longer you play music, you'll find that it's very important to understand you're diatonic chords. 24. Must know guitar lick: Hey, this is Christian, the guitar training camp, and today we're gonna be taking a look at a must know guitar leg. All right, in the first guitar lick, what we have here. It's a simple for no pattern is going, and I'm considering it out of a minor. This would be a here. This is the route. So it's going one flat three, which is C and D, which is four. So it's going one flat 34 back down to flap three and then back down to the roots. So the pattern is you just keep doing that over and over you go, Theo. Problem is, this lick comes up in a lot of classic rock songs like rock Songs, and it's a picking pattern that you really need to know, because whether it's this kind of pattern or maybe more about neoclassical kind of sound, this picking little picking pattern comes up in a lot of different songs in a different variety of different types of licks. Eso once you can kind of once you can get this picking pattern down. It's really gonna help in the future, because if you try to pick this thing, try to pick everything clean and individually. It's hard to get up to. Ah, great deal of speed. So? So what I'm doing is I'm picking down on the AM going down. I'm going down on this 13 right here. Uh, I think people call it economy picking. Um, it's to me. It's basically going down, down. It's almost like I'm sweeping it. Since I'm gonna have to play those two real quick, I'm going to go down on 14 down on 13 up on 15 and I'm gonna do a pool off back down to 13 . So it's gonna be Oh, so that's all I'm doing over and over. I'm going down, Down, up. Pull off. So what? What happens here is you only have to pick three times for those four notes because you have the pool off on. In this first example, I just have it 1/16 notes. So it's like you're going one e and two e and three end up for you. I think the hardest part for people eyes it's going to be getting used to doing. There's two down picks in a row, so basically, I'm kind of just doing one down stroke and then one up and it becomes very efficient cause I'm just going down, up, down, up, down, up and getting four notes out of it. Now let's take a look at the second example in the second part. Basically, all I've done is I've just doubled the speed. So instead of going one e and to be and doing it one time per beat, um, you're probably more likely. If you can play it quickly. You might do it two times for beat like this would be would be beat one. You're just doing it to times for B. So what you want to do is you want to practice it really slowly and get the picking correct . Down, down, up, flopped down, down, up, Pull off. You just want to keep going slowly doing the correct picking and then speed it up in that so they were able to go faster and faster. And I promise you, you will find this lick in a lot of different solos. It may not be in this exact form. It could be with a different fingering, but it you will find that this is very helpful skill toe have for doing guitar solos. Thanks for taking the time to check out this must know guitar lick. If you like to see more lessons like this, make sure you subscribe to our channel. 25. Pentatonic creativity guitar lick: Ah, uh oh, this is Chris from the guitar training camp. In this lesson, we're gonna be taking a look at a specific pentatonic lick and talk about ways that you can use that lick to freshen up your own pentatonic soloing. So for this minor pentatonic lick, um, what I decided to do was I was working with a student and we're talking about different ways that we can be creative with pentatonic. So it doesn't sound like you're always playing everything and right in the room on. And I know this isn't in the pentatonic better knife right there. But I put it in anyways, And so when I came up with just the idea of string skipping, that's not new. I didn't come up with it. But I'm like, What does it sound like if I go every other string like here's d minor pentatonic U s. So I thought, What does it sound like if I just go up two strings and back? I'm like, Well, that's a pretty cool sound. It sounds to me if you did used to doing a lot of string skipping to me, it sounded very fresh s so I decided to come up with a guitar like, Ah, that kind of you know, uses that technique. And so let's take a look at it. So here is that lick played slowly. You'll probably need the guitar tab down below to help U. S. Oh, I'm doing hammering on the first string. I mean that the first ring, but the fifth string and hammer ruins the first note scale. It's the route is going one flat. Three I'm doing. That is a hammer on that. I'm going to the third string and playing C D, which is flat 71 I'm going my vein by seven. Then I'm going back to the fourth string in hammering from 5 to 7. That's the fourth note. Fourth to the fifth of a D minor one flattery. Poor going for 45. And then on the second string I'm going. I probably should dio, but I like the sound of this. Ninth year of this, two were just too flat. 32 I just thought that sounded cooler than going from flat 3 to 4. I thought it sounded cooler on then. We're going back to the third string to go from 7 to 5 pull off and then we're gonna go to the fourth string, which is the fifth there. That a thing we're going, Teoh, the third string fifth fret, and they're going to go back to the fourth string and do a pull off from 7 to 5 on, then end on this up here, which is flat three. So if I played again one more time, I do notice that if I go slower, I do pick it a little differently. Um, when I'm doing it much faster, I'm doing almost the whole thing. Llegado I'm hardly picking at all, but you can. You can do it however you like. I'm not gonna dictate or tell you how you're supposed to pick it. Um, but I would suggest doing the hammer ons and pull offs. So I'm gonna go ahead and play this like, a couple times and you can play along with me. I'll do it nice and slow and then you, of course, can speed it up fast. Did you like Here we go. 1234 I think the more llegado you play it, it just has a cool, smooth sound. So you don't just have to use this, uh, considers D minor position for here. This pentatonic. You know, you can take that concept of skipping Ah, the pentatonic, skipping strings and doing whatever you like. Like if I want to a minor position one. I could do it down here. Just kind of get you out of the same. It's still the same box pattern, but it sounds different when you skip strings on. I think it's a really cool concept, and it gets a relatively easy way to make your pentatonic sound different. If someone, if I heard someone doing, I think we'll that sounds really cool. What are they doing? You know, lo and behold it just the same pentatonic box that everyone else uses. Um, I think it's just a cool way to spice up your pentatonic playing. Thanks for taking the time to check out this pentatonic lick and soloing concept. If you like this lesson and you'd like to see more, make sure you subscribe to our channel 26. A Minor Blues Lick: Hey, this is Kristen guitar. Me. And in this lesson, we're gonna be taking a look at how to play Lick number two. It is a blues lick out of the key of a minor. Let's take a look at how to place. All right, this is lik number two of my lic Siris for guitar Me and this happens to be Ah, lick number two It is Ah, blues lick and a minor e created this lick because, uh, in position one right here for a minor, You know, the main pentatonic lick area that everyone uses. I just wanted to do something down here in this position. I'm not a huge fan of this area here. I have your word, the root here. So I thought there must be something cool. I can come up with a lick, uh, kind of right in this area for a minor s. So this is what I ended up coming up with. All right, So that is the look. I will go through it nice and slow. More time, nice and slow. And now let's go through and analyse. And I will tell you how each note functions in the key of a minor or a minor blues. Let's go and take a look at that. All right, so for the lick, I start off with plain this c and this a right here, use these two fingers. But 3rd 4th finger that happens to be the fifth and the route in a minor. I played as on Then I get down here. I have this d here, which is the fourth. So this is the fifth, and this is the fourth. So I go, I played this D in this A at the same time. So that's the fourth. No, to the scale and the route. So go on, hammer down on the second string. Fourth fret into a hammer on pull off. What I'm doing there is hammering. This is the fourth note in the scale. This d I'm hammering down t flat, which is the flat five or the blues note, and I'm pulling back off to the fore playing this note. See here, which is the minor third of the scale workers 12 flat, three d o get back and play thes two notes The D and the A here at the same time Come over here on the third string playing the fifth, the fifth fret here, which is See that I get out and play the route, which is a i g, which is the flat seventh, a minor seventh when I go back to the root here, which is a so it looks like this thing. And now I'm gonna go ahead and play through it a couple times nice and slow. And I would like you to play along with me. 34 get a little slower. 341 more time. 341 My students will say to me, I need some blues licks. Can you show me some blues licks? I generally tell people, you know, obviously, you know, learn them the main basic blues licks, but try to create some of your own and infuse your own style in tow. But I get that people just want kind of like a lick vocabulary. And I think this lick is able to get into that vocabulary. I think it should be in there. It gives you a blues like the play. You know what I consider position? Five of a minor on this. You can play this in any key very easily. You just have to keep in mind of what you need to play. I need to play this in the key of C I find See on the first strength. And then I can go. Maybe, uh, say d You really doesn't matter. I can play it anywhere. B e can play it anywhere I want very quickly s So that's why I think it's just a good lick tab in your library. So that's how you play lip number two. It's a cool little blues lick in a minor. Thanks for watching this lesson.