The Beginner Guitar Players Guide to Major Scales | Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy | Skillshare

The Beginner Guitar Players Guide to Major Scales

Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy, Your personal guitar teacher

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32 Lessons (3h 23m) View My Notes
    • 1. Major Scales Course Promo

      1:49
    • 2. What is a major scale

      5:00
    • 3. Playing A Major Scale Scale On One String

      7:10
    • 4. Creating a major scale across the neck

      6:58
    • 5. Circle of 5ths Explanation

      2:14
    • 6. Major scale position 1

      6:14
    • 7. Major scale position 2

      5:01
    • 8. Major scale position 3

      4:53
    • 9. Major scale position 4

      4:37
    • 10. Major scale position 5

      5:06
    • 11. How to practice your major scales

      5:55
    • 12. What is a pentatonic scale

      3:17
    • 13. Major pentatonic scale position 1

      3:36
    • 14. 10 Licks in Major Pentatonic Position 1

      15:25
    • 15. Major pentatonic scale position 2

      4:34
    • 16. Major pentatonic scale position 3

      4:06
    • 17. Major pentatonic scale position 4

      3:38
    • 18. Major pentatonic scale position 5

      3:54
    • 19. How to practice the major pentatonic scale

      10:59
    • 20. What are chord tones

      6:55
    • 21. Major chord tones position 1

      4:37
    • 22. Major chord tones position 2

      4:01
    • 23. Major chord tones position 3

      3:49
    • 24. Major chord tones position 4

      3:16
    • 25. Major chord tones position 5

      3:12
    • 26. How to practice chord tones

      9:54
    • 27. G Major Pentatonic Lead Path

      6:55
    • 28. Arpeggios in position 1

      12:01
    • 29. A major pentatonic Lick 1

      8:23
    • 30. A major blues Lick

      12:01
    • 31. Diatonic 6ths on strings 1 and 3

      9:48
    • 32. Diatonic 6ths on 2 and 4

      13:13
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About This Class

Are you interested in learning how to play your major scales? Then you've come to the right place. 50% of all songs you're probably going to play will be in a major key. So why not understand the music theory behind what makes those songs so great. This course was designed to teach a you how to play any major scale, pentatonic scale, or major chord tones in any key anywhere on the neck. This material is absolutely essential to becoming a good guitar player.

What will you learn in this course?

  • The music theory behind the major scale

  • How to create major scales going up the neck and across the neck

  • How to ready my circle of 5ths chart

  • How to play the major scale in any key anywhere on the neck

  • How to play the major pentatonic scale in any key anywhere on the neck

  • How to play the major chord tones in any key anywhere on the neck

  • Great practice techniques for these scales

Bonus book just added for 2019!

  • A digital copy (PDF) of my scales book called "Basic Scales A study of the Ionian and Aeolian Scales". The book is 85 pages long and has charts for the following

    • major scales all over the neck in all 12 keys

    • major pentatonic scales all over the neck in all 12 keys

    • major chord tones all over the neck in all 12 keys

    • minor scales all over the neck in all 12 keys

    • minor pentatonic scales all over the neck in all 12 keys

    • minor chord tones all over the neck in all 12 keys

Why should you buy my course?

  • My name is Chris Rupp and I'm the founder of the GuitArmy.

  • I've been teaching guitar full time for over 18 years.

  • I have taught more then 30,000 individual private guitar lessons.

  • I teach guitar students online all over the world.

  • I have a bachelors of music degree from the world renowned Berklee College of Music where I studied with some of the best guitar players on earth. 

  • I created a successful line of guitar instruction DVDs that sold very well and garnered the attention of the "As Seen on TV" folks.

  • I love teaching guitar and helping students become better musicians through the guitar.

  • I will answer your personal questions and help you with learning the material in this course.

Why should I take your course and not just learn from YouTube?

You can try to learn guitar from YouTube but eventually you'll figure out there's so many videos out there is very hard to put the information together in a coherent way. I have students come to me all the time that are tired of watching random guitar videos on YouTube and don't know how to put the information together. With my course you will get a systematic way of learning your major scales.

Do I have to be a great guitar player to benefit from this course?

No! This course is more geared towards beginner and intermediate players. There's a lot of information in this course so take you're time learning the material. You will have full lifetime access to the course. 

Transcripts

1. Major Scales Course Promo: Welcome to the beginner Guitar Players Guide to Major Scales course, where you will learn how to play in practice your major scales. My name is Chris and I will be teaching this course. I'm a graduate from Berklee College of Music, where I received a bachelor of music degree. I'm also the founder of the guitar training camp, where I teach guitar students online all over the world. I've been teaching guitar students in person and online since the year 2000 and I've given more than 30,000 private individual guitar lessons. I created this course the health guitar players understand and learn to play the major scale, the pentatonic scale and the major core tones all over the neck. If you wish to write songs improvised, create melodies, playing a band, the information in this course is essential. By the end of this course, you will be able to play any major scale pentatonic scale or major chord tones in any key anywhere on the neck. The course is designed first to teach the music theory behind the major scales. Then I systematically go through each of the five positions of the major scale. The pentatonic scale and then the major chord tones. Each example is shown in multiple places on the guitar neck. There are at least 25 pdf charts for all of the material in the course, so you will get plenty of resource material to assist you. The ideal student for this course is a beginner or intermediate guitar player, that which is to expand their knowledge of the guitar and take their playing to the next level. The only requirements for this course is you should have a guitar and be willing to learn. Feel free to check out the course description, and I look forward to seeing you inside the course. 2. What is a major scale: the major scale or the Ionian scale, is one of the most commonly used scales in music. The scale consists of seven notes arranged in a particular order. That order is whole step host up half step whole step, whole step, whole step, half step whole step, whole step, half step whole step, whole step, whole step half step. Each scale degree has a name. The first note in the scale is called the Tonic. The second note is called The Super Tonic. The third note is called the Median. The fourth note is called the sub dominant. The fifth note is called the Dominant. The sixth note is called the sub median. The seventh note is called The Leading Tone. The eighth No would be called the Tonic. Because you've come back to the original note he started on just up one octave. You can create triads off of the notes in the major scale. To create a triad, you simply play every other note for three notes in the scale. For instance, if you were to create a triad in a C major scale, starting from the tonic, you would play a C e n G seen mean gene. If you play those three notes together, they will create a C major chord, which would be considered the one chord or the tonic. This is also called a diatonic chord, because it's created from the notes in the scale. If you were to play every other note from the second note in the scale, you would play a D F and N A, which would create a D minor Triad D F. A. The diatonic corps created would be the super tonic chord. I just call this the two minor chord. If you play every other note from the third degree in the scale, you would play the notes E g and B me G B. The diatonic chord you would create would be an e minor chord. That e minor chord would be the median. Or, as I refer to it, the three minor chord. If I were to start from the fourth note in the scale and go every other note for three notes, I would play an F A and see this would create an F major chord, F A C. This diatonic chord would be called the sub dominant chord. I just call it the four chord. If I were to start from the Fifth note and create a triad, the notes would be G, B and D. This would create a G major chord, G b d. This cord would be the diatonic chord called the dominant. I call it the Five Chord. If I did this process from the six note in the scale, I would play the notes A, C and E. Those notes will create an a minor chord. Hey, c e. This diatonic chord would be the sub median, which I call the six chord. And last but not least, if I created a triad starting from the seventh degree of the major scale, I would play the notes B, D and F the D f. This would create a be diminished triad. This diatonic chord is called the leading tone. I call it the Seven Chord. These seven chords air the diatonic chords for the key of C. Why is that important? What does it even mean? Have you ever played a song and wondered, How did they choose the cords they used? Have ever wanted to write your own song and wondered, How do I know what cords go with what chords. The diatonic chords are the basic seven chords using creating chord progressions in a major key. There are lots of other chords that can and are used in creating a song in major. But you really need to have a good understanding of the diatonic chords created from Major , because that's what most songs in a major key you're going to use. I've attached a reference chart of all the diatonic chords in all 12 major keys to this lecture. To sum up, I think it's really important to understand the pattern of half steps and whole steps needed to create a major scale and what chords can be created from those notes. 3. Playing A Major Scale Scale On One String: in this lecture, we're gonna take a look at how to create a major scale going up the neck and down the neck . Okay, Before we start going up and down the net creating major scales, we have to have a decent understanding of what is a whole step in what is 1/2 step. So a whole step is basically when you're going up two frets or down two friends. So I'm gonna start in this G right here. I need to go up a whole step. I'm going to go up to France today, So a whole step is up to friends. I want to go down a whole step. I just go down to friends down to this f So that is what a whole step is. You're going up or down. Two frets. Ah, half step is when you going to go up? One friend. So if I needed to go 1/2 step above this G, I would just play right here on this G shar If I need to go, I have step below this g. I would just go down one friend to G flat and that's what whole steps and half steps are all right. The next step is learning and understanding the pattern of a major scale. A major scale. Going to start here in half a major scale is going to be up to whole steps and then 1/2 stab betting Gonna go up three whole steps and 1/2 step. So end up with this Rimi far, So la ti dough. So once again, that is, you start here going to go up to whole steps than 1/2 snap. Then you're gonna go up three whole steps and then 1/2 step, and that is the pattern. Um, I personally use numbers. I don't use salt fish like no relief. Also, um, I typically don't use letters. You can certainly use the letters F a g B flat, C d E f. That's the letters in a an F major scale. The reason I used numbers is because I can use those numbers anywhere on the neck. If I get 12345671 I don't need to know the notes in an F major scale, because I can start here on F sharp and go 12345671 That's why I think it's really important to use the numbers. So you understand the relationship between the numbers eso if you're gonna be using the numbers, the half steps or between three and 41234 and then the other half step is between 715671 And that's that's the pattern of how to create a major scale going up and down the neck. Okay, now I'm going to play. Ah, major scale. I decided to use a wanna play in a major scale going up the neck and down the neck on the six string, so we'll start here on one. It's gonna go. 12345671 I got further. 1234 Going back. 43217654321 No, I don't want to just practice going up the neck. I want a practice going down the neck as well. So I'm gonna start here and go. 17655671 There was any major scale on the six string going up and down in the key of a eso What I want to suggest to you is, um we're gonna do this on all six strings. And then what you need to do is practice all 12 keys. I would suggest going around the circle of fifths. You can just pick random notes or you can start on sea, do it all on C, then go to G than D than A. It's a little more organized if you go around the circum, the circle of Fifths. But you know that's up to you. How you want to do that. All right, So now let's go ahead and take a look, and we're gonna play in a major scale, going up and down the neck on the fifth string. All right, this is open. A was gonna go. 12345671 If I continue on is gonna go 123456 That's as far as I go. So if I come back 6543217654321 That's how you go up and down the next plane and Amy to scale on the fifth string. Now let's take a look at how would you do that on the fourth string. Okay, so I have to locate Where is an A at on the fourth string is gonna be right here on the fourth string. Seventh fret. So I'm gonna get down first. I'm gonna go. 1765445671 that when I go up 12345671 I grew up here, too, to be coming back to 1765432 one. That's where you would play on a major scale on the fourth string. Now let's take a look at the third string. All right. Here on the third string, we have an A on the third string. Second, fret eso There's anyone number or note. I could go lower down to seven, so I'm mostly spending most my time going up. The knack, them back down, so it's gonna go. 12345671 2345 Coming back. 543 217654321 All right, so and when you're doing that, you always have to be very aware of where your half steps you always want to remember that three and four together. 123456 and 71 are always together. All right, so now let's take a look at how would we do that? Um, play that a major scale on the second string on the second string A is on the 10th Fret. We're gonna start here. We're gonna go down 1st 1765432 Coming back up. 234567 Back to one. Going up higher. 1234567 The one. 17654321 That's playing in a major scale Going up and down the second string. Now let's take a look at the first string on the first string. The A is gonna be on the fifth Fret. So if we go down, is going to go 17655671 Going up the neck. 12345671234 Going back. 43217654321 That was how you playing a major scale going up and down the neck on the first string. That is how you create on a major scale, going up and down the neck on all six strings. Now it's gonna be your job to go ahead and do that, not only in the key of a but do that in all 12 keys. Have fun. 4. Creating a major scale across the neck: in this lecture, I'm going to show you how to create a major scale going across the neck. This skill will allow you to start on any note on the guitar and create a major scale going up, down or across the neck. I think this is an important step to understanding major scales. It could be very confusing looking at scale charts for the first time and not understanding why you're supposed to be putting your fingers where the chart says before we can start creating scales, we have to learn to rules. The first rule is what I call the whole step role. When I'm creating a major scale going across the neck. I almost always used this rule. If you're creating a major scale and you need to go up a whole step, you can either go up. Two frets on the same string, or you can get down. Three frets on the next higher string. If I take any note on the guitar, let's say I take this number here on guy need to go a whole step higher. That's just part of the scale that I'm creating. I can g o up a whole step are up. Two frets where I can go three frets down on the next string. I consider this three frets down because we're starting on this note. I move my finger over and then a countdown. Three frets 123 So the distance from here to here is a whole step just like this is on. That rule applies for whether I'm going from the six string to the fifth string. I could go from the five to the fourth string, the fourth of the third string, and it also applies what I'm going from the second string to the first string. This rule works for all sets of strings, except for when you're going from the third string to the second string. When you're going to the second string, you don't get down, three frets. You only go down to friends. If I'm playing a note on the third string on and I need to go a whole step higher, I can go up. Two frets on the same string. But if I want to go to a higher string, it's only down. Two frets. Not three frets. Like the others, you can hear, hear d and this e is only down. Two frets not three. Like on all the other sets of strings. The second rule is the half step rule. If you're creating a major scale and you need to go up 1/2 step and you want to go to the next higher string, then you need to get down. Four frets on the next string. This rule applies to all sets of strings, except for when you're going from the third string to the second string. In that case, you only have to get down. Three frets if I'm creating a scale and I want to go up 1/2 step but like if I'm playing in a major scale and I get 123 d right here is the fourth. That's 1/2 step from C Sharp today. Um, if I wanted to go to the next higher string, then I would go 123 and then it's down. Four frets on the known street number five. So how I figured that out as I move my finger here was 3123 Move my finger over and I count down for 1234! And that applies for the head that half that rule applies for all sets of strings. Except for when you're going from the third string to the second string ITT's then that rule It's not down for because that would be a unison. It's down three frets. So if I was going 1212341234 And that for that halfs that from 3 to 4 is down, three frets going to the second string. Now that you've learned the two rules of creating major scales across the neck, let me show you some examples. This is how I would build on a major scale. I'm going to start on this A and I'm gonna end up on this a right here. So what, We're gonna go one, then it's a whole step 22 It's a whole step, the three So I can do that. Three frets down on the next string. That's three from 3 to 4 is 1/2 step from 4 to 5 is a whole step from 5 to 6 is a whole step. So I'm gonna do with three friends down here. So it's 56 from 6 to 7 is a whole step from 7 to 1 is 1/2 step from 1 to 2 is a whole step . So instead of going up here, I'm just gonna play right here for 2 to 3 is a whole step from 3 to 4 is 1/2 step 5 to 6 is a whole step. Remember, the whole step rule is when you're going to the second string, it's only down two frets. So this is five. And then a whole step to six. Thin from 6 to 7 is a whole step. So I can play that seven right there. And then we have one I just created on a major scale just by thinking about Do I go up a whole step or half step? And then what does that look like? When I go to the next string and this example, I'm going to play in a major city. I'm going to start here, e work my way up to this Say appear so I could get 123456712345671234567 I'm going to do that same exact exercise, but I'm gonna take a completely different path. Gonna start here and I'm gonna work my way up to this A appear so I'm gonna go. 12345671234567123456 71 Creating scales isn't just about going this way across the neck or going up the neck at a diagonal. It's also about coming back. So I'm going to start here on this A and end up down here so I could go. 1765432176543217654321 I'm gonna do that same exercise, but I will take a completely different path this time, so I'm gonna go 1765432176543217654321 Now that you've seen some examples on when you to create major scales all over the neck from any note, you just pick and no and then start creating a major scale. You can pick a starting point and an ending point, and then challenge yourself to see how many different ways. You can create the scale. I think this could be a very fun exercise. Once you've gotten comfortable with creating a major scale up the neck and across the neck , I think it's time to start learning the five standard patterns of the major scale. 5. Circle of 5ths Explanation: in this lecture, I'm gonna show you. Ah, my circle of fifths with key signatures chart Basically the reason I'm showing you this. I want to explain it just a little bit because I am going to reference it several times later in the course. Eso first we started here. If this is the key of C right here you see the sea. It's called a circle of fifths chart because if we go up 1/5 musically above a sea, we go to a G Ah, fifth above a G is a d. Then they and any so want to support you. Continue going around the circle by got going by fifth, you will go around 12 different notes and then you will come back to see. That's why they call it the circle of Fifths. There's other. There's a couple other things to notice here, um, in the center here it says, minor keys. This this a is the relative minor to the key, the major KFC. What that means is the key of C is the exact same notes as the key of a minor. And in the key of C, there's no Sharps and there's no flats. So if we move up to G, we'll see one sharp. So in the key of G, we have one sharp which we your f sharp that be the seven note in the scale. Uh, you can't get that from looking at this chart. You can also see the e minor is the road of minor to G major. That means e minor and G major are the exact same notes eso and then it keeps going around . As you can see here, the QB has five sharps and is also the same is G sharp minor. So how do I use this chart? I use this for practicing purposes like if I want to practice c major scale position one I've started on C and then go around and play that position one in e flat B flat after I guess I played in all 12 keys. That way I end up practicing every possible key on the neck. It's very good for you to really learn where all the notes are on your neck as well. Ah, and that's the main reason I wanted to show you what this chart is. Um, it's basically just following around these notes, and I use it for, uh, to practice everything, whether it's pentatonic, chord tones, Anything you think of that, that's something you need to practice in a certain area on the neck. Go ahead and go and do it around the circle of fifths. So you cover all 12 possible places on the neck, the player. And that's my explanation of my circle of fifths with key signatures chart. 6. Major scale position 1: in this video. I'm going to show you how to play the major scale for position number one. Let's take a look. Okay. This is how you're gonna play a major scale position one. Well, the first thing going to do is you're going to locate the A on your six string fifth. Fred, I could have chosen any one of the 12 major scales that could have chosen f f sharp G g sharp, C d. I just You know, I chose to start with a kind of It's right, the middle, the neck. Kind of a nice place to play a major scale because of the fret with All right, so I'm gonna start here on a and it's gonna go. 123456712345671 Then I like to go up to two. Since you get this this to hear this be I think you up to two. Welcome back to 176543217654321 Then I like to get down to seven and I always like to come back to one. I like to start on one. An end on one. I just think it helps with your ear training. All right, so let's go ahead and get through that one more time. We'll start here. Onyango. 123456712345671 to 21765432176543217 Back to one. And that is an a major scale. First position. Okay, this is how you're gonna play a D. Major scale. Position one. We're going to start here by finding D on the six string 10th fret and it's gonna go. 123456712345671 way. Get to appear. 21765 4321765432171 Now I'm picking all these notes down, but I would suggest when you're practicing your scales, I would suggest as soon as possible to start alternate picking. And what that means is you're gonna pick down, and then the next note in the scale you pick up and down down, the more you alternate pick the more proficient, more proficient you're picking is going to pay. And you'll find that your ableto pick different passages a lot easier because of your ability to order NIT pick. All right, so now I'm gonna go to that one more time. We'll start here with the we're gonna get 1234567123456712 217654321765432171 And that is how you play D Major scale. Position number one. Okay. And for your third major scale position, one that I'm going to show you. I decided to use F sharp right here. So it is on the six string. Second fret. That's where F sharp is, and it's gonna look like this. 12345671234567 one. Going up to coming back to 176 543217654321711 more time. 1234567123456712 2176 54321765432171 And the reason I'm playing each of these slowly and twice is I hope you're you know you're going to play along with me. I was like, ladies setting me playing through him really fast. I'm going through slowly so you can play along on Just imitate what you see here. Also, make sure you either looked at the P. D EFs or print out the resource material so you can see exactly, you know, the patterns that for the major scales And that was how you play f sharp major position one . And that's how you play the major scale position number one. 7. Major scale position 2: in this video, I'm going to show you how to play the major scale for position number two. This is how you play G. Major scale position number two. I want to start right here on this G. There's a couple different ways you could go about finding that G. How I do it is I know where g is on the six string. And then I go up to up to France and over two strings this octave here. That's how I find another way is if you know the notes. If you know the four strings de unesco d e have G. That's another way to find it as well. All right, so here's how you play G. Major scale position number two on day. I like to start here. I don't like to start down here on film on two and go 2345671 I prefer to start a once you train your ears So you're hearing degree me off. Also, la todo You're kind of starting and ending on the dough or the root of the scale. So it goes. 12345671234 4321765 432176543223456711 more time. 1234567123 Floor, 4321765 43217654322345671 That was a major scale for G major position number two. Okay, for the second example of major position to I'm gonna do a C major scale. So I need to find C on the D String, which is on 10th. Fret right here. That's going to go. 123456712344321765432 1765432 2345671 more time. 12345671234 Coming back. 432 17654 3217654322345671 That is how you play a C major scale. Second position. Okay, for the third and final example of the major scale position to I'm going to do f starting here on the F on the fourth string. Third fret, and that's gonna go. 12345671234 4321765432176 54322345671 All right. One more time. 12345671234 432176 543217654322345671 And that's how you play the major scale position. Number two. 8. Major scale position 3: in this video, I'm going to show you how to play the major scale for position number three. So for the first example of a major scale position three, I'm going to do an E. So you just need to find E, which is on the the fifth string. Seventh fret right here. Should sound like your six string. Just an occupier. It's gonna look like this is gonna get 12345 6712345 Coming back. 54321765432176543345671 one, more time. 123456712345 54321765432176543 34567 On one. That is how you play an E major scale position. Position number three. Okay. For the second example of a major scale position three, I'm going to do C sharp, so I'm going to start right here on the C sharp on the fifth string. Fourth fret right here. It's gonna go 1234567123 four Size coming back. 54321765432176 543345671 I one more time. 1234567123 45543 217654321765433 45671 That was a C sharp Major scale in third position. Okay, for your third and final example of a major scale position number three, we're gonna do it out of the key of G. We're gonna start here with G on this on the fifth string. 10th fret. It's gonna g o 12345 6712345 54321765 432176543345671 one more time It goes. 123456712345 5432176 543217654334567 one. And that's how you play the major scale for position number three 9. Major scale position 4: in this video, I'm going to show you how to play the major scale for position number four. Okay. For the first example I've chosen see major position for. So we're gonna start here on C, which is on your fifth string. Third fret, and it's going to go. 12345671234 56 654321765432 176556711 more time. 1234567123456 Coming back. 65432 17654321765 5671 That was how you play a C major scale. Fourth position. All right. For our our second example, I'm going to show you how to play F major scale position number four. So we need to find f on the a string, which is right here, which is the eighth fret and we're gonna go. 123456 712345 six, 65432176 543217655671 more time. 1234567123456 65432176 543217655671 has how you play an F major scale position number four. And for the third and final example I'm going to be showing you how to play an A flat major scale fourth position. So we just need to find a flat. This is your a string, your fifth string. So we know that open is a in the 12. Fred here is a as well in their double dots. So then that means a flats gonna be right here and it's gonna go. 1234567123456 6543217654321765 56711 more time. 123456712345665432 17654321765567 one. And that's how you play the major scale for position number four 10. Major scale position 5: in this video, I'm going to show you how to play the major scale for position number five. For the first example, I'm going to show you how to play a B flat, major scale position. Five. So we need to locate. Where is where's the B flat on the six string? It is right here on the sixth. Fret. It's also on the sixth grade of the first string, or and on the eighth fret of the fourth string. But me personally, I like to, um and also it Z right here as well. That's a B flat as well. But me, I always like to start it, but based off the six string. So I just locate on the six string and then I play the scale and it goes. 1234567123456 seven, one. Coming back. Gonna be 176543 21765432176671 one more time. 123456712345671 176543 21765432176671 And that was how you play a B flat. Major scale, fifth position. For the second example, I'm going to be playing a D flat, major scale, fifth position. So I need to find where D Flat is. I know sees here, and D is here. So if these here on the 10th Fred, then D Flat would be on the ninth. Fret. So we'll start there with my pinky and it's going to go. 1234567123 45671 Coming back. 1765432 17654321766711 more time. 123456712345671 176 54321765432176671 And that's how you play a D flat. Major scale fifth position for the third example of position number five. I'm going to be playing it out of the key of E. So I just need to locate E. On my e string my six string and happens to be right here on the 12th. Fret where my double dots are. Eso is going to get 1234567123456 71 17654321765432176671 Well, more time it goes. 12345671 2345671 Coming back. 17654321765432176671 And that's how you play the major scale for position number five. 11. How to practice your major scales: How do you go about practicing major scales? The ultimate goal with the major scale so that you can play any key anywhere on the neck at any time. I believe that my practice ideas will help you achieve that goal. In this lecture, I'm going to talk about different ways to go about practicing and learning the five major scale patterns. The first step is to learn each position by themselves, take each position and practice them over and over, sticking to the correct fingering that I show you in the videos. It's really important to follow the suggested fingering. So you train your hands and muscles to play the scale position the same way every time. Once you have the patterns down and you can see them on the neck, then you can experiment and use whatever fingers you want for soloing. Once you've played each position enough times that have the pattern memorize, you want to play them around the circle of Fifths. By doing this, you will play the scale pattern in all 12 keys. Okay, so I'm going to start with C major position number one. I'm gonna start with this. See? Right here. Gonna play the position. And then when I want to do is I want to go up 1/5 going around my circle of fits. So 1/5 above a sea is a G. So I'm gonna get out here to G. Then I'm gonna go 1/5 above G, which is D compared to D. My advice would be to play up through the pattern and then come back and then end on one so that what you want to do is you just want to go around all 12 keys and practice every key position number one. After practicing each individual pattern in all 12 keys, I would then practice all five positions in one key. This is C major scale, all five positions. Position number one, position number two through number three. Theo, position before down here. See major position five. Theo Next. That would play all five positions in each key going around the circle of fifths. Obviously, this would take a long time, so I would just start with one key a day or whatever you think you can handle on a daily basis. Another big part of playing scales is being able to move freely from one position to the next. It can get a little boring if you just keep soloing with the same patterns all of the time . What I used to do is practice going between two positions on every two sets of strings. Okay, for this example, I'm going to use a major position one, and what you want to do is you want to take a look at what are the notes on, say, the bottom two strings five and six that I have in the key of a major. The numbers are 712345 Here's a Here's 112345 Then I could take a look at What do I have in position? Number two? I have 23456 and then I want to mess around. And for this exercise, you know you don't have to use correct fingering. Just just mess around and go between the two patterns basically, and you want to take notice. What are the notes that both patterns have in common? Both of position over one and two have they have the two here and the five year wait to go to the next set of strings. I'm gonna take a look at what notes that we have in a major position. One just 345671 And then position for two. We have 5671 to wear. What you want to do is you want to keep going through that positions one and two for each set of strings. You want to do it between strings three and four. You want to do it between strings two and three on and then last but not least then strings one and two. Ah, and it's basically helping you see how the two patterns interlock. So you don't want to just do that for Positions one and two. You want to go ahead and do that, that this exercise between all sets of scale patterns, this exercise would really help me? See how the two panners interlock using some of the same notes you want to practice going between positions one and two than two and 33 and four, and so on until you feel comfortable playing up and down the neck between all five scale positions. Okay, Now what? You've learned all these scales and now what do you do with them? I would practice soloing with them. I suggest going to YouTube and looking up different major backing tracks in a variety of keys and practice soloing over them. When I was growing up, I spent a lot of time soloing over albums that I owned, I didn't have Anything is awesome is YouTube. There's a huge library of backing tracks on YouTube to take advantage of them. These are a couple of ideas how I would handle practicing the major scales. Try them out, maybe come up with a couple of your own ways. First learned the material, then be creative and have fun with it. 12. What is a pentatonic scale: What is the pentatonic scale? Ah, pentatonic scale is a scale with five notes per active. Ah, major pentatonic scale consists of the route the second, the third, the fifth and the sixth note in the scale. The route 2nd 3rd 5th and sixth. The scale is used in traditional music all over the world. You can hear the pentatonic scale being used in blues, jazz, rock, pop, funk, metal, bluegrass, folk, R and B. In practically every genre of music, it's a pretty safe scale to solo over. There's no two notes in the scale when played together can create a minor second or a flat fifth. This is what a minor second sounds like more, and this is what a flat fit sounds like. I personally used the scale to see where I'm at all over the neck. The pentatonic pattern fits together like a puzzle going up the neck and down the neck. This is the pentatonic pattern for position number one thes higher notes right here become then the lower notes for the next position for position over to Theo. The two pentatonic patterns share the same set of notes that happens between all five patterns they fit together like a big giant puzzle. I think of the pentatonic scale is my foundation. I've spent a lot of time learning, practicing and memorizing him. I spent endless hours soloing over songs and backing tracks until I was able to quickly play any pentatonic scale all over the neck. Whenever I play a court, I instantly know what the pentatonic notes are available to me right where that court is. Once I see the pentatonic scale, I can quickly visualize what the scale looks like. The pentatonic scale was already five out of seven notes in a major scale. Then you just have to add in the fourth and the seventh, and then you'll have the whole scale. The Pentatonic CEO goes 12356 And if I added foreign four and seven in, it would be 12345671 and then it would be the full major scale or a full Ionian scale. Once I convince you allies the scale, I can see what the chord tones are available to me. Then I decide if I want to play the pentatonic scale, the appropriate scale for the cord or the chord tones for the current cord. Some guitar players are more scale based or arpeggio based. For whatever reason, I have always been more of a pentatonic bass guitar player. I highly recommend spending a good amount of time learning the five pentatonic patterns. They will become your friends and help you sound great on guitar for the rest of your life . 13. Major pentatonic scale position 1: in this video, I'm gonna show you how to play the major pentatonic pattern for position number one. This is how you play Major pentatonic position number one of chosen to use a the key of a first. I'm going to start here on this a here, which is on the six string fifth fret which is a here. So we're gonna go. 123561235612 Coming back. 21 321653211 more time. 123561235612 to 1, 6532 165321 That was a major pentatonic position. Number one. This is how you would play a C major pentatonic position. One first you would start here on C, which is on the six string eighth fret and you would go. 123561235612 2165321653211 more time. 123561235612 2165321653 to 1. That is how you play. See Major Pentatonic position number one. And this is how you play F Sharp. Major pentatonic position one. We'll start here on F sharp, which is on the six string. Second fret, and it's gonna go. 123561235612 Coming back. 216532165321 more time. 123561235612 to 16 532165321 And that's how you play the pentatonic scale for position number one. 14. 10 Licks in Major Pentatonic Position 1: in this video, we're gonna be taking a look at 10 different guitar licks that I created in major pentatonic scale. Position number one. Let's get into it. Uh, all right, for lick number one and really all licks one through 10. I do them all out of the key of C right here in position number one. You can do these licks anywhere on the neck. So if this was a like, you could do it down here in a g s o. They are movable, so you can play them in any of the 12 major pentatonic position ones. I just shows that you see, because I like where it is on the net, and there's no sharps or flats, so I think it's a little easier when looking at the music. All right, so for the first leg against So what I'm doing here? Our explain. I'll go through it slowly here. I'm starting on the second note in the pentatonic. I'm going to three going 56 Now, if you look at my proper pentatonic fingering it would look like this. Why would use these two fingers, but for playing licks? I prefer to use these two fingers. They're just stronger. Stronger fingers for me. Um, so I don't mind shifting up just a little bit. Yeah, that's completely normal. I would advise learning the correct fingering. And then when you go to play legs, you can choose what fingers you want to use. So one more time studying here on two. I'm going to three. I'm going 56 and coming up here. One coming back to six on. I'm going over here to this d here, which is the second, and I'm bending it up a whole set. So what I'm doing is I'm taking this note here, and I'm pushing the string up. It's called a band. I'm pushing it up to it hip. Sounds like this year. So going to 35616 then taking this to bending it up to three. So that's how I play the lich number one. All right. For lick number two. I'm going to go first, go through and explain exactly what notes I'm using and what I'm doing. All right? So first we start off with I'm playing. I'm gonna start here with this. This note here is the fifth and will be playing the route. Same time on that. I'm hammering down on the second string 10th fret, which is the sex. So I'm going. If you're looking at the guitar tablature and you're wondering what is that little teeny note with the line through it? That's called a Grace note. Basically, that's happening, that notice happening so fast that it's not worth notated ing exactly how long it is because I'm basically coming in on beat number one with this going very fast hammer on. So I just put it as a grace note. So I'm going, I'm hammering on I'm taking, uh, this interval here is 1/4 and I'm hammering on the lower string. Old Step I Jimi Hendrix made that sound very popular, so you'll see music all the way. It's just a really cool sound. Eso That's why I included it. The lick itself isn't all that interesting, but this concept there it is a great sound that you wanna be able to use for your major pentatonic. So I'm doing the five and the route here, hammering on six, coming back to five, playing it twice, then going up to the six note than the route and then back to the six. When I say the six I'm referring to This is the six note in the scale. 123456 I know it's the 10th fret. I'm referring the numbers I'm using or the numbers of how it functions within the scale. So one more time the lich is and that was lik number two. So for lick number three, what I'm doing here is I'm playing triplets and playing four triplets going triple, let triple, let trip bullet and we analyze. Exactly what I'm doing is I'm playing the fifth note here this g I'm hammering on to a which is the sixth and then underneath my first finger here. But I'm barring um on the a thread here both of these notes on strings one and two. So I'm hammering down from 5 to 6 on. Then I'm picking up on see here, which is the root. So I'm picking down hammering and then picking up on the first string s for that triplet. I only have to pick twice. I'm just picking down and up, down, down. All right. And this is this is that that is a hammer on. It's a quick, easy, simple lick. It sounds really good, and you can use that that concept that that lick another in different I can use down here in position number four so you can use it all over the neck, not just position number one. So I thought that was a really Kulik basically to add to your mental lick library. And that was lik number three for Lick number four. I'm going kind of kind of like it's very similar to lick number three, but I thought it would be interesting to use a pool off. So what I'm doing here, I'll talk. Technically, what I'm doing here is I'm taking the second note in the scale and I'm pulling off to the route, going from D to see or 2 to 1. And then I'm putting doing that, pull off and then I'm picking this G here, which is the fits. I'm going to 15 to 15 and they're triplets against. I'm going triple at triple let Triple triple, and that is how to play lick number four. So in licked number five, what we're doing here is kind of a cool, simple concept we're just taking two notes in the pentatonic scale. These two notes are available and these two notes are available also. So if you hold Botham down, you're gonna slide up to the next available toe. And technically, what we're doing is we're taking the fifth and the route where G and C were sliding up. Teoh A and D, which is which is the sixth and D is the second. So on my like I used eight notes and ah dotted half note to keep it simple. Going one and 234 I just put a little vibrato on there with my whammy bar. This link is pretty common. Can hear that this look at the beginning of Jason Mraz I'm yours. Ah, that lake is also used in the beginning guitar solo. It's used down here in the key of G for Pink Floyd's wish you were here eso one more time his goes like this. That was lit number five in licked number six were taking this same concept on sliding up to the available pentatonic notes in position one and we're gonna move it The strings two and three And what we're using here is We're starting on the second wave, the second in the fifth note in the pentatonic scale, and we're sliding up. Ah, whole step to the third note on the six Note. So looks like so that lick it sounds like and that was lik number six for lick number seven. What we're doing here, it sounds like what I'm doing is the first thing I'm doing is you'll see this little seven grace note at the beginning. Um, So what I'm doing is I'm doing a really quick hammer on to come in on one, like, going, like, four, and so that Grayson is very quick. Eso it doesn't get notated in terms of the length of time. So what I'm doing here is I'm taking the second note in the scale on the fifth note in the scale, and I'm hammering down on the third string here on this e here, which is the third. So I'm coming. I'm doing that right on beat. Number of one of going one, and then I'm playing, going back to the two and five here for the end of 12 Going one and then to what I'm doing here is just kind of slapping the strings to get kind of a muted sound going one and two. And then on the end of two, I'm playing those two notes again, the two in the five, and I'm just putting some vibrato on for second half of the measure. Librato is when you just kind of what you don't just kind of wiggling the strings back and forth, basically doing little mini bends to get some nice vibrato. So it sounds like one and Teoh, And that was lik number seven for lift number eight. What I'm doing here is I'm sliding from two up to three. Let's go slide. That's why you see you see a seven. You see a line kind of going up to nine. That is a slide, going one and playing see here, which is the root so going. Then they use the same finger that I used for the slide. He's the same finger to go from the third note to the fourth note, which I know isn't in the pentatonic, but I think the licks really cold, So I'm going 34 that I'm going appear to the second, which is this D on the 10th fret So it sounds like that was that was kind of playing it cleanly. What I like to do is I like to let I like that. I like to play those two notes. I like to let this one he bringing this one here is ey, play this one. You can hear both the notes at the same time. And when you slide up, I like to play both of those at the same time. So it sounds like, But if you don't want to do that, then it knew we would not do that. You would be, Oh, lift your finger slide up thin this lift that finger. And that is how you play lick number heat for like number 10. What I'm doing is I'm playing some six feet notes with go one e and TUI and three and four . So that's how you count it. And what we're doing here is we're basically doing a three note pattern that we're working our way back. We're going on. If we're gonna analyze Atticus to 16 then we're gonna g 0165 They were gonna go 653 than 532 on an end on the route, which is one once again. And that was lik number nine for like, number 10. What I'm doing is taking four pentatonic notes, just playing him over and over in a group of four years and 16 notes going one D and two D and three and four e. And, uh, I have to be picking him down, up, down, up, down, up, down, up. That would be caught alternate picking. You could pick them all down if you wanted, but that we get very tiring. It's much more efficient if use alternate picking, which is basically, you're changing the direction every time you pick the next. All right, this is a really common pattern, and you can do it anywhere on the neck or in any position like this would be positioned one down here. Position five. I didn't do it on basically any four sets. Any grouping of four pentatonic notes this position one e s. So I just thought that was a real common thing to do with the pentatonic eso. I thought that would be a fitting lift. Number 10. I hope you've enjoyed thes 10 different guitar licks for pentatonic position number one 15. Major pentatonic scale position 2: thin this video, I'm gonna show you how to play the major pentatonic for position number two. And this is how you play G major pentatonic position to The first thing you want to do is you want to locate where the root is. So the route is either gonna be on the fourth string or the second string. Meet personally how I find position number two quickly. If it's gonna be g major position to, I have to play. Then I think of where g is on the six string. Then I go up to threats and over to friends, and this is G just up one octave. You don't have to if you know the notes on the D string. Really? Well, you can just go straight to the note, but that's how I do it. I used kind of like this little locked up drink. I find this g I go up two frets and over two strings, and that's where G is one octave higher. So that that that tells me where I'm going to start my pattern. So I'm gonna start here on this G and go. 1235 6123 coming back. 321653216532 Going back up to 3561 For this pattern, a lot of people they want to start down here on two. I suggest that you always start on the route way. You're kind of always starting and stopping on one so you can hear the pattern it. So I think it's OK to practice on. Then you get down to the root down here. At least it finishes the patterned. So we go ahead and go over that one more time. 1235612332165321653223561 And that was G major pentatonic position number two. This is how you would play. Be major pentatonic. Position number two. First thing you're going to do is you're gonna locate where B is on the six string, which is Thesixties ring seventh fret then just go up. Two frets and over two strings. You will find this be here on the D string and then you're gonna play your pattern. It's gonna go. 12356123 321653216532235611 more time. 123 5612332165321653223561 And that is how you play a B major Pentatonic position number two. All right, this is how you're gonna play. E major Pentatonic position number two we're gonna start with Is this right? Here is gonna go. 12356123 32165321653223561 more time. 12356332165321653223561 And that's how you play the pentatonic scale for position number two. 16. Major pentatonic scale position 3: Mm. In this video, I'm going to show you how to play the major pentatonic for position number three. This is how you play D major pentatonic position number three. To locate where you need to start, you need to find a d on either the second string or the fifth string. But me personally, I always find it on the fifth string because if you're used to playing courts used Teoh knowing where the notes are to build your cordial power chords in your barn boards off the fifth and the sixth string. So I always just shoot for Where is a d? Add on the fifth string, which is gonna be the fifth string Fifth fret and the pentatonic patterns goes 123561235 Coming back. 5321653216533561 one more time. 123561235 5321653216533561 This was D major pentatonic position number three. Now I'm going to show you how to play in a major pentatonic position. number three I'm gonna find where a is on the fifth string, which is the fifth String 12 Threatened was gonna go. 123561235 53216532165335611 more time. 123561235 53 21653216533561 That was an A major pentatonic position number three. Now I'm gonna show you how to play an F major pentatonic for position number three. Start here with this F on the fifth string. Eighth fret. It's gonna go. 123561235 53216532165335611 more time. 123561235 53653216533561 That's how you play the pentatonic scale for position number three 17. Major pentatonic scale position 4: thin this video. I'm gonna show you how to play the pentatonic pattern for position number four. And this is how you would play a C major pentatonic position number four. First thing you're going to do is you're gonna find the root, which is gonna be on the fifth string. Third fret where you received your gonna go. 1235612356 653216532165561 Woman time. 1235612356 Coming back. 653216 My 32165561 a c major pentatonic for for fourth position. This is how you're gonna play. E major pentatonic. Fourth position. You start here on me, which is on the fifth string seventh fret you're gonna go. 1235612356 653216532165561 more time. 1235612356 65321653216561 That was the major pentatonic position Number four, this is G major Pentatonic position number four. And first we're gonna find G, which is on the fifth string. 10th fret That is the root of the scale. I'm going to go. 1235612356 6532165321656 Back to one one more time. 12356123 6532 153216561 And that's how you play the pentatonic pattern for position number four. 18. Major pentatonic scale position 5: Theo thing. This video. I'm gonna show you how to play the pentatonic pattern for position number five. And this is how you play an A major pentatonic position number five. There's three different routes in this position. You have one on the six. String one on the third, on one on the first. I generally just go for the route on the six string so I could figure out where I'm going to start. We'll start here on this A you go. 12356123561 1653216532161 Well, one time, 1235612356 one, 1653216532161 That was a major pentatonic position number five. This is how you play C sharp major pentatonic position five. First, I'm gonna locate C sharp on the six string, which is on the six string ninth friend right here on the dot. And it's gonna go. 12356123561 165321653216 Impact on the road again. One 12356123561 1653216532161 That is how you play C Sharp Major pentatonic position number five. This is how you would play an F major pentatonic for position number five. First I would locate after going on the six string 13th. Fret is going to go. 123561235611 653 216532161 more time. 12356123561 1653216532161 And that's how you play the pentatonic pattern for position number five. 19. How to practice the major pentatonic scale: So you've learned your five individual pentatonic patterns. Now let's talk about how to practice them. You're going to practice the pentatonic patterns just like I showed you in the lecture that talks about how to practice major scales to recap first, learn each individual pentatonic pattern. Second, play each pattern around the circle of fifths. Third, pick a key and play all five patterns in that one key fourth go around the circle of fifths , playing all five positions for each key. The main idea I wanted to focus on in this lecture is the way that I taught myself to see the pentatonic patterns up and down the neck. To teach this practice exercise. I'm going to use the key of G. I'm choosing the key of G because the first position is near the bottom end of the neck and you'll be able to see how each pattern connects, starting from the first position. So the idea for this exercise is you're going to play the four pentatonic notes on strings five and six from position one through position five going up the neck. I suggest you play each position four times to give you time to see the notes in the next position. Now let's take a look at this exercise on the guitar. So this exercise is going to start on G major position one and the 1st 4 pentatonic notes in that position on strings five and six are 1235 What you want to do is play those four times and you're doing that. You want to think of what are the notes in position number two? It will be right here going to 356 I play those four times as I'm playing these four times . I'm thinking. About what? What his position Number three look like. It's up. Here it is. 3561 played four times and they appear to position number four and I have 5612 and then I go up the position. Number five. I would have 6123 and I usually go up into position one again. The 1235 If I was to do that again, would look like and I would also go back down. I would be Oh, probably, instead of playing going up the nose, I would come back down and then position number five for three to back down a position. Number one E think this exercise will really help you be able to go up and down the next specially on those two sets of strings. Next, we're going to do that. Exercise on Strings four and five. Going up the neck on Strings four and five is gonna look like we're gonna start here. These four notes, this is 3561 That's position number one in a position. Number two, we're gonna have 5612 You might see me If I'm going up and down, I might switch to these and my first and third finger. This'll would be proper fingering. And this is probably what I would do most of the time in proper finger. Just what I find more comfortable. So for position number two we're doing, we're doing 5612 for position number three. We're going to go 6123 Position number four. We're going to G 01235 for position number five. It's gonna be 2356 way moment. Back to position one. It's gonna be 3561 to come back. That was that exercise on strings four and five. Now let's do the exercise on Strings three and four for Strings three and four in position number one. We're gonna start here with 6123 way. Go to position number two and we're gonna dio 1235 Position number three It's going to be 2356 The position Number four. It's gonna be be 3561 Position number five, It's going to be 5612 thing going back to position number one. It's going to be 61233 Through that again. Position one position to 345 Position Booth found positions. 5432 Back down. That was that. Exercise on strings three and four. And now strings two and three. Okay, this exercise on strings two and three. We're going to start right here in position number one and we're gonna play 2356 thing. We're gonna get a position number two and we're gonna play to be 3561 They were gonna go up to position number three and it's going to be be 5612 way. We're going to position number four and it's going to be 6123 thing we're going up to position number five year. It's gonna be 1235 And we're going back to position number one where it's going to be 2356 thing. I'm doing this position a little slower because I think this is the hardest set of strings to to get down. So one more time is gonna look like this, I think. And then, of course, you can go back down. And that was this exercise on strings two and three. And now let's do the last set of strings one and two for position number one. We're going to start here and we're gonna play 5612 Then when we get a position number two , we're gonna play 6123 We're gonna go appear to position number three and we're gonna play 1235 Thin position number four, We're gonna play 2356 Then we, when we go, appear to position number five. We're going to be playing 3561 on when we go back. Appear to position number one, we're going back to 5612 So I would play each one of those four times and I go up the neck and then back down the neck. No, I was suggesting that you do each each pattern four times, but you don't have to do four times. Feel free to start challenging yourself and think, Can I do it in three times? Theo on, then then moved to to and then the ultimate is only one time. Obviously, that's a lot harder, because you have to really be able to see the patterns quickly. Eso That's just some fun, different ways to approach the exercise. The point of this exercise is that you will learn how to move up and down the neck with the pentatonic pattern. This exercise will make it a lot easier to flow into different patterns. This will also help you see where the major scale and the court tones are on the neck. These different exercises take a while to get down, so just take it slow and be patient with your progress. I suggest putting on some major backing tracks from YouTube and have a blast soloing over them. 20. What are chord tones: what are chord tones. The court tones are the tones or intervals using creating cords. The court tones are the odd numbers and a major scale. The quart tones consists of the root of the scale, which I would call the one the third, the fifth and the seventh. For example, if I was in the key of C, the court tones for a C major chord would be C E G B or 1357 What are the benefits of knowing the chord tones? The benefits of knowing your chord tones is it really helps. You see that the guitar neck better. They can help you create cords, understand cords that can help you solo play arpeggios, create melodies, create rhythm parts and many other things. Let's take a look at some examples. One example of why quarter tones are very important to understand is it helps me build cords, and it will help you build cords as well. For example, if I need to play G major chord, I know that a major chord has roots thirds and fifths ones, threes and fives. So when I played his G major chord, it's all made up of roots 3rd 5th For example, If I get through and tell you what each Gordon is, it's a root fifth root 3rd 5th on, then the root again. That's really important if you want to change, create different types of chords. If I want to turn this into a G major seventh chord, for example, I need to have 1/7 inning so I can put E put 1/7 here. I can go. 1357 I'm going G B D F sharp. I can also put 1/7 in right here if I want to play different types of chords. If I need to turn this into a G minor core, what I can do is play G major, and I could take this be lower down 1/2 step toe, a B flat, which is 1/3 down to a flat third. So that takes that Meet. G. Major court turns it into a G minor corn. If I need to play a G dominant seventh chord, the chord tones for that are 135 and flat. 7135 flat 7135 flat. Seven Eso. What I have to do is I get rid of this route here? E put in a flat seven that turns it into a dominant seventh chord. Um, this this course is only really dealing with them. The major chord tones. The 135 and seven. I'm just trying to show you how. By understanding the court tones, you can create many different types of chords, whether it's major chords, minor major sevenths, minor seventh diminished chords, uh, many chords, g old men, many different types of courts. That's one example. Why understand chord tones is really important for creating cords. One example of how chord tones really helps me with my guitar playing is, let's say, have to create a court progression using the chords G, C and D. I could play it like this thing. Maybe I don't want to use open chords. Or maybe there's another guitarist in the band. Or maybe there is a part that's playing some lower notes the cords down here on the bottom of the neck. So maybe I want to play something up a little higher. So I like to use things that are called triads. That's basically it. Just 3/4 tones. The root third and fifth eso If I could play a G chord like this thing, I could play see like this and then d like this on that. Just me knowing my court owns the reason I know this is Ah, little see Triad is because it's part of a C bar chord. Where has the third? The fifth in the root And then the same exact court appear for D whereas third to fifth in the root s so I could play the same I could play it up here knowing my court tones for us like g, c and D. So it's out with Sally, but maybe I want maybe maybe that's a little too high sounding. I want some maybe some lower notes so I can take this try. And since I know my chord tones, I could just play Ah, try it Based off the strings 23 and four g would sound like this way have seen on de where I just move it up where it's ah through 3rd 5th so that little corporations and I could play it down here is Well, I could play like this so understand my core tunes really helps me very quickly create different rhythm parts for different types of chords that you're gonna need to play. And that is one example of how chord tones can really help you with your guitar playing all right, another example of how you can use chord tones to better your guitar playing. One thing that I do is I use a lot of court turns. Most think about court tones when I'm playing guitar solo. Let's say I'm going to play going, going to be going from a G major chord. Let's say, if I'm in the key of G, that would be the one chord to the three chord, which would be be minor, so I could just solo over top of the G major scale the scale. But as the cords are changing, I wanted to sound like my my guitar solos following the cords better. So I'm probably going to emphasize the core at least one of the chord tones in the next chord, which is the B minor chord. So maybe I'm gonna wanna emphasize maybe the flat third or the route. So if I'm playing, let's say over the G. I want to focus place, um, just G major scale stuff on. Get that be minor. It's gonna sound really nice if I choose one of the core tones in that chord. So I'm gonna choose this one thing back to Gee, maybe I'll target the route. But that's Ah, real quick example of its called core tone soloing, where you're really very aware of what Quart owns air in the next chord. And then you target those so that your you're soloing sounds a lot more like you're following the cords. And that's what a lot of top guitar players dio and just make sure playing sound great. That's another example of how chord tones can really help you improve your guitar playing. Now that we've talked a little bit about what core tones are and how they could be beneficial to your guitar playing, let's take a look at how to play. The major court turns for positions one through five 21. Major chord tones position 1: in this video, I'm going to show you how to play the court tones for position number one. This is how you play the major chord tones for position number one have chosen to start with on a, which is on your fifth fret here, and the major scale goes 123456712345671 But what we're what we're gonna do is we're gonna play the court tones, which are just the odd numbers. So what we're gonna do here is we're gonna play one, which is a We're gonna play the third note in the scale, which is C Sharp. Does the scale this 123 we're gonna skip to and just play one in 313 Then the next odd number is gonna be five the next quarter, tone instead of playing 12345 gonna play 135 Then we're gonna skip six right here. And we're gonna play seven, Which is this g sharp. So so far, we have 1357 where the notes would be a z Sharm e g sharp. They want to come back here with our thank you here to play this route. That's one that's in a right there. So we have 13571 they were gonna skip to, which is this. Be right here. We're gonna play the sea Shar gonna go 13 or a sea Sharm. We're gonna skip this d here because that's the fourth. And we're gonna get to this E, which is the fifth. So we're gonna go a C. Sure you were gonna skip this? The six note here, which is f sharp. I'm gonna play this the seventh year, which is G sharp. We're gonna play 1357 and then we're gonna go back to a here, which is one. So to review those what we're playing here is we're going. 135713571 Coming back. 175317531 So I'll run through this one more time. 135713571 Coming backwards. 175317531 That's how you play the major quarters for position number one out of the key of a or basically have the key of a s. So now I'm gonna show you how to play them somewhere else on the neck. Okay. Next. I've chosen to show you how to play the court tunes out of position number one for D. So what you want to do here? You want to find D on your six string 10th fret? Then we're gonna play the exact same pattern. We're gonna go. Every other note in the scale. We're gonna go. 1357135 seven. And then back, the one which is D coming back. Going a 175317531 Now I'm gonna show you how to play that exact same quarter tones down lower on the neck. All right, Now, I've chosen to show you how to play the court. Tens for position number one out of G flat from starting here on the six string. Second fret on G flat. And as you can see, the as you can see and feel that these threats are spread out more so it's gonna feel a lot different than when you were playing in Appear on the 10th friend. So it's gonna be 135713571 Coming back. 17531753 and 11 again, more time. 1357135 317531 And that's how you play the court tones for position number one. 22. Major chord tones position 2: in this video, I'm going to show you how to play the court tones for position number two. Here's how you play the major chord tones for position number two out of the key of a So what? What? What I do is I really want to find I need to know where the one is the root of the scale in Egypt where the a is. So what I usually do is I think of where it is on the six string. Then I just go up two frets and over two strings that tells me where my my route is because typically and such starting down here on three and going 3571 I think you should really always start on one to help train your ears to hear like the triad of your Peggy 0135 e. So I think when you practice these, you always want to start on one. There are the root is also on the second string right here on the 10th Fret. But I would start on this one. And here in these are the numbers because 1357 13317 531753 Normally, what I tell students is when you get when you get down here three, go back up and go. 3571 of my students want Tokyo 17531 Which I'm not opposed, Teoh. But that's kind of going down into position number one. So I suggest just practicing coming down to the C sharp, the third here and then going back up. 3571 That what? You're kind of starting and stopping on the same note. So one more time. Those are 135713 coming back. 317531753 Going back up. 3571 Those with the court tones for a major position number two. Okay, now I'm gonna show you how to play the court tones for E major position number two. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna need to find my e on the D string, which is right here. You can do that easily by playing my six string open. That's e going up to friends and then over two strings. That's a real quick way for me to locate. Where the root of the scale is so it's gonna go. Starting on this year is gonna get 135713 come back. 317531753 Going back up. 3571 more time. 135713 They're coming back. 317531753357 You play the quarter tones in second position for the key of E. All right, This is how you play the court tones for a D major position to you find D here up on the six string 10th Fred, I go up two frets and over two strings and arrive here at this d That's gonna be the one it's going to go. 1357133175 317533571 more time. 135713 3175317533571 And that's how you play the court tones for position number two 23. Major chord tones position 3: in this video, I'm going to show you how to play the court tones for position number three. This is how you play the chord tones for position number three in the key of F. So what you want to do is you want to find half on the, uh, on the a string so it happens to be on the is on the eighth fret Does the notes on the A string go A B C D E f. And so I'm gonna start right here. I'm gonna start my pinky. That is the f That's gonna be one is gonna go. One, 357135 Something back. 5317531753 Going back up. 3571 more time. 1357135 Coming back. 51375317533571 This particular pattern is really used a lot in for sweeping. You'll see a lot of metal players doing really fast sweeps on this one. Really, this pattern really lends itself really well to do. To do that, you'll see a lot of guys going. They like this is made you change it to monitor. There's a lot of a lot of sweeping that happens out of position number three. And that was F major position number three. Chord tends. Okay, this is how you're gonna play D major. Third position D is gonna be on the fifth string. Fifth, Fred is the Misko A B C D started here on this D on the fifth Fret. It's gonna go. 1357135 Coming back. 5375317533571 more time. 135735 Going back. 53175317533571 That's how you played the court tones for D major position for three. Okay. For this last example, I'm gonna show you how to play the major core tunes for position number three out of a I'm gonna start right here on this A on the fifth string 12th. Fret it's gonna go. 1357135 53175317533571 Going back up again. 1357135 53175317533571 And that was how you play the cartoons for position number three out of a major, and that's how you play the court tones for position number three. 24. Major chord tones position 4: in this video, I'm going to show you how to play the court tones for position number four. All right, this how you played the chord tones for E flat? Major position number four. Just so you know, I'm kind of randomly picking the notes, because I could I could start here on e could do it down here on D Flat. E just happened to shoot. I'm trying to choose different notes just so you get a couple different looks. So I'm not always using a and e every single time. All right, Teoh, I'm going to start here on this E flat, which is on the fifth string six fret gonna go. 1357135 Tell me back 31753175571 more time. 1357135 Coming back. 53175317571 That was thecornerscores for E flat. Major position number four. Okay for your next example. These are the core tones for C major position number four, some starting here on C which, because it is a scene, the court tones go 1357135 Going back. 53175317571 more time. 1357135 5317531757 Warn those air the court tones for C major position number four And this is how you would play the court tones for G major position number four. First, we're gonna find G on the A string, which is owned the fifth string. 10th. Fret right here and the court owns would go 1357135 Coming back is going to go. 531753175 Going back up. 71 more time. 1357135 Coming back. 53175317571 That is how you play the court tones for G major. Fourth position. And that's how you play the core tones for position number four 25. Major chord tones position 5: in this video, I'm going to show you how to play the chord tones for position number five. Here are the core iTunes for B flat. Major position number five B flat happens to be on the six string six friend right here on this B flat droid above a All right, So the court tones for that position are gonna go 13571357 going back. 175317531711 more time. 13571357 17531753171 And those are the court tones for B flat. Major position number five. All right, these are the core tones for E major position number five. So you want to locate your E on your six string 12th? Fret right. Your double dots, you start with your pinky. That's gonna go. 135713571 Coming back. 1753175317 on back the one more time. 135713571 Coming back. 17531753171 That was the court tunes for position number five out of the Key of E. Here's how you play the chord tones at a position number five in the key of a oh eso you need to find a on the six string, which is your six string fifth fret. So you're gonna start here and go. 135713571 Come back. 175317531 more time. 135713571 17531753171 That is how you play the court tones for position number five out of the key of a major. And that's how you play the court tones for position number five. 26. How to practice chord tones: now that we've learned the major chord tones for positions one through five, how do we practice them? Let's take a look. The first step to learning your chord tones really well is practicing each of the five positions a lot. You want to practice each position hundreds of times until you build up some muscle memory for each position. I would practice them randomly all over the neck. Just pick any fret to start from and play one of the positions. I would also make sure you practice the cord tone numbers. It's gonna be really important in the future that you understand your intervals. I would practice learning the intervals from the root note. For example, this is a major third 1313131313 This is a perfect fifth. 15151515 This is a major 7th 1717 171717 and this is an active 1 to 112111 I would practice this exercise in all octaves for the five chord tone positions. Now let's take a look at step number two. The second step for practicing your chord tones would be using the Circle of Fifths charm. This chart has been added to this lecture as a resource. I would download it and print out this, PDF or just view it as you need it in the course. You can go about using this chart and a couple of different ways to practice your chord tones. First, start with number one. What you're gonna do is play the major court tones for position number one out of C. Then you're gonna go up 1/5 to G and play the major court tones for position number one out of G. Then you're gonna go up 1/5 from a G, which is a D and play D position one. You know you're gonna continue this pattern of fits until you play all 12 keys in position one. Now I'm going to demonstrate this exercise. Okay, Now I'm going to demonstrate how to go around the circle of fifths, using the core tones for position number one. So what we're gonna do is we're gonna find I'm going to start with cease and see has no sharps or flats. I like to start with C and then go go around up 1/5 around to all 12 keys. So I'm gonna go ahead and start with C here, which is on the six string eighth fret instead of playing, uh, you know, basically the full position or both Actives. I'm just gonna play the first active like this. You, of course can. Then go ahead and play. Ah, you know the full range of the position. So we're going to start here. We're gonna play, see? Then we're gonna go up 1/5 to do that. What we're gonna do is we're gonna start with this C and then we're gonna go up two frets and over one string. Whatever note this is which happens to be a GI, that's the next position that we're gonna play. So, um, we're gonna go here to G gonna play the G chord tones for position number one. Remember, I'm only playing half the pattern. Then 1/5 above a G is a d. So we're gonna go up two frets over one. We find a d here. That's 1/5. We're gonna start on this D here on the six string 10th fret and ago 1/5 above this D which is an A We're gonna go fifth above and a which is E. So I'm gonna go up here to the six string 12th fret on this E right here on fifth above. And he is a B. So I'm gonna go up here to be here. That was on the six string seventh fret, and they were gonna go above fifth above a B, which is f sharper, g flat. We're gonna come down here to the second fret. All right, I'm gonna go fifth above an F sharp, which is C Sharper D flat, which is on the six string nine threat. And fifth above the C sharp is G sharp or a flat. And that is gonna be on the six string fourth friend. All right, so that was an eight sharp. We're gonna go Ah, fifth above a sharp. And it's gonna be a d sharp or e flat. So we're gonna go right here, which is on the six string 11th fret. We're gonna go way. You need to go 1/5 above any flat, which is gonna be a b flat. So we're gonna find that on the six string sixth fret and we're gonna go fits above a B flat, which is F I could play it here, which is basically open here so you can see that. But instead I'm going to play it up here. It's just easier to play since we're not using any open notes. So I'm just gonna play it up here on the six string 13th Fred and and then fifth above and F will be back to see. That's basically how I would handle practicing all five different patterns for the chord tones. I would then do position 234 and five. The third step. The practice senior chord tones is the pick a key and then play the court tones for all five positions. In that key, for example, I will pick the key of G. I would play the core tones for G major position one. Then it would play the court tones for position number two and position number three. Position number 43 Onda Position number five. I would practice the positions going up the neck and going down the neck. Once you get comfortable with this exercise in the key of G, I would do the same exercise in all 12 keys. You could randomly pick whatever t you feel like working on the main guitar keys are E. Jean A, C and D. I would recommend going around the circle of fifths, starting in the key of C major. That way you could cover all of the chord tones in all five positions for all 12 keys. Obviously, that would take quite a while to practice, so I would just pick one key each day. Now let's take a look at my last step for practicing the chord tones. The last step for practicing the court tones would be to improvise with them. This could be somewhat limiting because you only have access to four notes. You may not think it really sounds that great. Remember, it's just an exercise to help you learn and see the chord tones better. Here's a demonstration in the key of G. Theo. I think this could be a good exercise to learn how to add in some core tones into your rhythm playing. To make this exercise a bit more fun and challenging, you can change the cords. Let's say I'm going to play the courts G. C. and D. Here's an example. These are the steps that I used to get my chord tones down, but you can certainly come up with your own fun and creative ways to practice court turns. 27. G Major Pentatonic Lead Path: thes thesis. Christian, the guitar training camp and guitar me in this lesson, I'm going to show you a common lead path that guitar player Jews to get all the way from down here. G major, I'm gonna show you how to go up G major pentatonic and end up here in position number one up here on the 15th. Fret. Let's take a look. Okay. In this lesson, I'm going to show you how to play G major pentatonic lead path. And what that means is you have a lot of students and they learn how to play. Position one position to position three, position for position five. But then they want to know. How do I How can I get a g o between those? How can you go up the neck and down the neck pretty easily and that's what this lead path is gonna do? It's gonna basically lead you up through all five positions. This is going through the lead path with the interval numbers. So this is one. This is G right here. 12356123563 six, one. Uh, okay. Now we're gonna come back with a 165321653216532 one. That was the lead path using the interval numbers. Now let's go ahead, and I will go ahead and play through it again and use the letters of the G major scale. I go up the neck using letters. It's gonna go g a b d e g a being dio a a a geo coming back It's gonna g o b e a g o p a g e d c b a So the main benefit of this path is just gives you a way to scoot around the neck. Like if you know you want to be down here on, Do you want to get up to this pattern? Uh, no. It's nice to be able instead of just jumping up there. It's nice to be able to have a wayto way slide right up into that pattern so it feels natural feels it looks natural. So some different things that you can dio me personally. I like when you slide up here from from 2 to 3. Have these six notes here in a row. Jimi Hendrix should use those a lot. I love this. Kind of what? I'm doing it. That that sound Hendricks did it a lot. What I'm doing is I'm holding this G in the sea down that I'm hammering down on this a year to me. It's I'm holding this. It's 1/4 the interval here. Just two notes beside each other that I'm hammering down a whole step below on the lower string thing. You can do it on the strings for thing. You could go over and do it on the last. Ah, just a nice, lower low range area toe do since a lawyer. Another area. That's nice. Is this area right here? E I love this. Look, that looks sounds great right there. What I'm doing is I'm holding this E. I'm sorry. This d d and G, and then I'm hammering down on this e here. No number wise. It's, um, this 51 that I'm hammering down on six. Ah, that's a nice little area. This is a great place here. Here's the the root here. This g I like, take this this d here and bend it up. Up to up to be, which is 1/3 Teoh. I like to bend this up on with my pinky. Get this D here, which is the fifth back down the way. It's a nice little look right there. And ultimately everyone, not everybody. But generally it's nice to get back. Back up to position number five. There were a lot of people have a lot of their legs thing, So this path is a way that you can lead your itself right up into there so you can do some leads up higher. So those were just a couple little lead areas that I like to noodle around in. So my suggestion is to run this this path. Just keep going up and down it until you haven't memorized, but this is not set in stone. This is, um I think I even changed a little going back. Um, but you just want o get familiar with it and then start practicing when you stop during the path. And how do you go back into life? I want to stop in this position here. Position for how do I get up, Teoh? That I'm kind of imposition for I want to stop in position number three right here. um, men Right in this position. Obviously position to is right here. You have to get very far for that. But just a quick little path to get, uh, smoothly get between all all the five positions up and down the neck. I hope you have enjoyed this lead guitar lesson. 28. Arpeggios in position 1: Hey, this is Chris Froome guitar Me. And today we're gonna be taking a look at six different arpeggios that you can practice in position number one. Let's take a look. So the first arpeggio we're going to take a look at we're going to play through an A major seventh arpeggio I'm gonna do them all out of a sense is kind of right in the middle of the neck. Good spot. The play these So with the major seventh arpeggio, we're gonna have 1357 13 My 71 coming back. 175317 by 317 then I like to get back on one. Let's play through that arpeggio one more time It's gonna go. 13571357117531753171 The reason I like this exercise so much practicing different arpeggios in one position Did you get to hear how the different chords sound? So if I play major, major, seventh or a dominant seven, maybe a minor seven flat By playing the different arpeggios you get to hear what the courts sound like s so I think it's very good for your training, and it's also very good for practicing your dexterity. And now let's take a look at the next arpeggio. The next arpeggio we're gonna take a look at next is a dominant seventh arpeggio. That's probably my favorite arpeggio. The chord tones and a dominant seventh chord are 135 and flat seven. So let's go ahead and play through it going to go. 135 flat 7135 coming back flat. 731 flat. 7531 Now you might, you might say, Well, I've used a different fingering for that, Uh, you know these air to me, these air, like the basic fingering, is that I use There's different ways to play these arpeggios, but I think this is a family fairly standard way. Instead of playing flat seven year, you're playing flat seven here instead of year. But I think they're, uh, you started and being able to play six different arpeggios right here without really moving your hand. Um, so let's go ahead and play through that arpeggio one more time. 135 flat 7135 flat 71 even get three appear you wanted. It's coming back. One flat 7531 flat 7531 So if you're wondering, how can this benefit my playing? Running these arpeggio as they don't seem that interesting way have to you have to remember work. We're playing four nodes, 4/4 tones. The 135 flat 71 eso if you come across, say, an eight board and and a seven quart and a 75918 a 7 13 thes quarter tones are four out of the possible seven notes. Whatever scale you might be able to play over top of that court. So no matter what, no matter what kind of dominant seventh chord these notes are going toe work basically creates a really quick framework that if you're not sure what the play, you can play just the court tens and probably get by doing that. And it'll sound just fine work and at least create a framework that you can then add in. Like if it's in a seven flat nine, you can play through the arpeggio, the flat nine in here to make it even sound more like your customizing your lead playing over top of the cord eso like That's my explanation of why these really important to get down. And that was an 1/7 dominant arpeggio. The next arpeggio we're gonna take a look at is an A minor seventh arpeggio the court tones for minor seventh arpeggio or one flat 35 flat. Seven of one set of 135 flat 71 which is the dominant 7th 135 flats at one. We're gonna lower this third down, Flander e could playing down here. That's kind of a big stretch when we can just play this in this scene right here, this flat third. All right, so that arpeggio is going to go one flat. 35 flat 71 blundering five flat 71 that I like to get the flat three up here. Let's go backwards. We're gonna go flat three flat seven My flat. 31 flat 75 flat 31 Let's play through it one more time. One flat 35 flat 7139713 slash 31 by flattering one flat 753 On the back. The one again. So you might be looking at this and thinking already know this pattern? That would be a minor pentatonic position. One theme. Any differences were not playing. We're taking out the four. The pentatonic is one flat 345 flats and one We're just leaving out the fourth, cause it's ah, it's not in some one of the core tones is not one of the odd numbers. So So this if you're familiar with, uh, playing minor pentatonic, then this is gonna be a really easy arpeggio for you to get down. And that was an a minor seventh arpeggio. The next arpeggio we're gonna take a look at is an A minor seven flat five arpeggio eso we're gonna have here is one of one flat three flat five flat 71 flattery. 573 coming back. We have flattery. Flat 7531 flat 7531 Let's play through that arpeggio one more time. We're gonna get one flat. Three flat. Five flat 71 flat. 35 flat. 71 Flattery flat. 31 flat. 7531 flat. Seven flat 531 That is an a minor seven flat five arpeggio Now we're gonna play in a diminished arpeggio, so we're gonna start here. But this one, we're gonna get one flat. Three flat five, double flat. 71 Flattery. Fine. Double flat. 71 Flattery coming back. We have flat three one, double flat, seven flat 53 And then down here, back to one. Let's go ahead and run through that arpeggio one more time. So we have one flat. Three flat five, double flat. 71 flat, three flat, five, double flat, seven flat, three flat, three, double flat, seven flat. 531 double flat, 75 flat three and then one droning. Why my state Double? Flat seven. The court tones need to be odd. Numbers 11 flat. Three, flat five. Because this interval here is a 6123456 From here to here is that is a major six interval. But since we need to call that some type of seventh, we have to call it a double flat. Seven. It was years of the route here would be a major seventh. There's a flat seven. This six right here. We're gonna have to call this a double flat set it sounds pretty strange, but once you get through, you know what? You kind of get used to it. It's not worth fighting over whether this is a six there, a double flat seven. All right. And that is how you play an a diminished arpeggio. Now we're gonna play through a old minutes, seventh arpeggio and the numbers for the augmented are 13 sharp five flat seven. So let's go, and we're gonna go 13 sharp. Five flat. 713 sharp. Five flat. 71 coming back flat. Seven sharp. 531 flat seven sharp. 53 on one. Let's go ahead and run through that one more time. We have 13 sharp. Five flat. 713 sharp. Five flat. 71 Coming back. One flat. Seven sharp. 531 flat. Seven sharp. 531 That's how you play an AOL minutes. Seventh arpeggio. So how I used to use this as a practice routine as I would just sit and run these arpeggios I play major. Then maybe minor. Maybe dominant. Seven. Thin minor, seven flat. Five Depend. Just kind of run them all together pretty quickly back to back so I can hear and feel on, See what the differences are. Eso What I used to do is I would do this in position one, and then there's four other positions out of a then, which basically covers the entire neck. So I wouldn't just do this in Position. One is I would run these arpeggios in all five positions. Um, and it's a really good exercise for your finger. And like I said, it's very good for your your training s. So that's how I would practice this kind of going forward. But at first you really just want to play through these and just get your fingers. Ah, accustomed to playing them and learning what the different chord tones are in the different arpeggios. Thanks for taking the time to check out this guitar lesson from guitar Me. If you're interested in more cool things, make sure you go over to our Web site and check it out at guitar me dot Net 29. A major pentatonic Lick 1: Hey, this is Kristen guitar. Me. And today we're gonna be taking a look at how to play a major pentatonic lick in a major. So here is the guitar lick in a major. So now I'm going to play through the lich slowly. Now, let's take a look at the a major pentatonic scale that I'm using. Um, so if I start right here on this a 12356 The reason I'm using numbers is the's air the intervals. It's the first note of the scale. Second scale, third note, actually, major scale goes 1234567 one. And the pentatonic scale is 12356 on repeats 1235 And if I come back, it gives 532153213 So this is the tithe we're working with, Um, And then I also with the like, I go down here to position number two. I start on this a year, and I played those that same seven notes. 1235612316532 On this Basically major pentatonic second position. All right, now I'm gonna go through and I'm gonna analyze the lich and tell you exactly what I'm doing . All right, So when I'm starting right here on this be here, which is the second a is the root of the scale. So I'm starting here on B. I'm betting that up a whole step, so it sounds like c sharp, which is which is the third of the scale. And then with my pinky underneath here and playing this e, which is the fifth. So I'm bending the common kind of country, like so taking this to the second, bending it up to the third and playing the fifth this e here right behind it. On holding this, holding this, uh, beyond betting up to see sharp going to be strength on bringing it back down. So I can hear that this note while I'm playing the high e on the first ring, Theo. And then after that, I go down to the A year. Theo, just the route. Thank you. Over here to the third string 11th fret. I'm gonna take this note here, which is an f sharp. That is the six note in the scale when he was gonna bend it up also. So I'm bending this this six year up, Teoh, up to this g sharp, which is the seventh. So? So it's I will say it is hard to get that to do this bed and push up that fourth string without getting it to make any kind of noise. There I was able todo you just have to practice How? Hold your finger does the string might pop over your finger now and makes a bit of a sound . Eso What I'm doing here is I'm taking this six bending it up to a seven. So it sounds like this note here and then playing this a year. So I'm going this 11. Bend it up to 10 and I'm gonna hold that 11. I think that's the one thing in this like that makes it interesting sounding. Just this. This sound here that you're here and seven against the root on your any hearing it for a split second. So it is. It's pretty, it's fairly dissonant, but because you're hearing it only for a split second sounds interesting and that really wrong coming back down on this six and then going down to the ninth right here, which is five. Just the fifth. Take these two notes here, this five in this seven, it's the ninth fret on Strings three and two. But in the scale, it happens to be the 5th 12345 Something in this fight this fifth and seventh. And then I'm gonna hammer on this six year on the third straight. So I'm hammering down here on this 11. So I'm doing this hammer on to the sixth and pulling off. Or he could pull off or you can pick. Either way, it's fine, but I'm doing this hammer coming back down. T we're here, which is the fifth. And then I'm going to start here on this, uh, c sharp and I'm going to slide from this third here. Down to to be here is the second. So I'm gonna go on, get backed out of the room and play six again and then back the one so that you have this on. If you want to know the exact timing of how this like it's played, then what you want to do is you want Teoh get the guitar tablature for the lick. The link is down in the description. That way you can look at it and say, OK, this on the second measure goes Bonnie and to me and you so you can get the exact timing to make sure you go ahead and grab that, uh, the guitar tablature. I'm gonna play the look a couple of times. Feel free to play along with me. Okay, Well, this looks all well and good, cause it's in the key of a What happens if you're not in the key of a well, All you have to do is you just need to know where the root of the scale is. Whatever key urine from in a And then I can do this like I find where a is on the second string. And then Aiken dio two frets above us A. It starts on the second in the scale. I am able to do the like, you know, you're in a It was in the key of G. I find my G on the second string and that I could do that theme. The key of f. It's just about know where your route is, and then you can take that lick and you can play it in any key pretty easily. Now, you might say to yourself, Well, I don't write like that like it's not my cup of tea within. What I suggest to you is change it. You know, you have a way. You have those notes there so you can do what you can. Do whatever you want. That's what I used to do. If I if I didn't care for the leg or I just wanted to kind of create moment like well, then I would use what's available, you know. But the way you can make up your own thing, wait. Just using the same notes that I just learned from that lake and just changing around, making my own thing out of it. So my advice would be to take this lick, learn and have fun with it, and then change it to make it your own. Thanks for taking the time to check out this pentatonic lick in a major 30. A major blues Lick: Hey, this is Chris from guitar me. And today we're gonna be taking a look at Guitar Lick number three a major blues. So here is what the lich looks like. And sounds like All right, so let's go ahead and start breaking this lick down. Basically, what I'm doing is I'm going from a measure of the seven. I call this major blues, and I'm gonna be using dominant seventh chords. So it sounds basically happier. I'm not using minor chord thing. I would be using different notes to make it sound more like I'm playing a minor scale or minor blues. So I'm playing this this party. Oh, complain that over this, a seven chord and a seven chord is you have a route 35th flat seven. Thats the arpeggio for in a seven in this actual a seven chord way Have a room thin a flat seventh a room third on back to the root again. So what ends up happening is I don't have to be oh, have to play. You know, my typical minor blue. I could That would sound just sound fine. What? I want to include this third here and basically put This is more of a kind of a country like that. I want to add that in kind of mix it up a little. Kind of gives it that major flavor that I'm looking for. So what I'm gonna do here is I'm going to slide here from this is the second note of on a major scale or in a mix leading scale or on a blue scale, a minor scale Doesn't matter. Be sliding from two. I'm sliding up to the third note when I say the third. I know it's on the six Fred here, but it's the third Newt on a major scale. 13 It's the third interval, so it's lying from two up to three e. I understand it's four from the fourth fret with six threat, but in the scale 2 to 3 on playing this a up here, which is the root on. What I'm doing is I'm playing out of this a seven chord I'm playing the third and the route . So when I when I hear this this that sound This is a major six interval versus a minor sex . When you play this thing this, uh, to the listener it sounds like a major. Um, it's a major six. Eso reminds me of a major court. If I play this that to me, that sounds and feels like to be part of a minor court. So I'm slide from 2 to 3 through this route here. That's a which is one. And then from here, I'm going to go up on I should mention that those air triplets I'm going so per beat, I'm going triple that triple at like s squeezing those 3/8 notes in tow. One beat going through. And then for beat number two, what I'm doing is I'm sliding from the third string six. Threat was sliding up to seven on the third strings. I'm going on. I'm playing doing a triple here, going sliding from 6 to 7, playing the seven note on the first train, coming back down and play in this seven again. And I could be Oh, if I wanted the notes to ring really kind of ring out as long as possible. I would do that, but I kind of didn't want to do this for some reason. In this licks, I kind of was lifted my fingers just to, uh, uh, chop the kind of a muted notes real quickly so I could hear the individual. That's your choice. You can let him ring where you can choke him off. That's the word I was looking for. All right, so we're doing this. We're going up to seven. The 7/7 and then the next one, we're gonna slide up. Then from this third string seven threat, we're gonna slide up waistline play 999 I should mention how the this seven going. How does that function in? I had a major. A mix relating. What I'm doing here is this is the third, the 3rd 123 of on a major scale, sliding from the third up to the fourth with a slide from the third to the fourth and then playing the second note in scale here because this was the root of a way. So in my mind, kind of outlining the two chord, which is B minor things. This guy like part of the long board outlining the two chord the minor in a major and that I'm sliding up here outlining C sharp minor court, which is the three minor court and those specific notes how those function is. I'm sliding up to the fifth notes in a scale mine. I'm going five and this is the third c sharp and then back Teoh the I like it because I don't think it sounds like minor blues. And that's kind of the point of this major blues lick is I think it just sounds a little different. Little interesting to play over top of Ah, a blues pattern. Now let's go ahead and take a look at the second section of the lake. So after I do this leg, what I'm doing is I'm going to the second string 10th fret and I'm sliding up to sliding up to 12. Sometimes. When I you know, I just created this lick today. So sometimes when I play the lick, I slide out on. Then I plucked the stand and then other times you might see me. I kind of like just sliding down And don't attack the pick when you're the string here is 10. I don't like just lying down and putting a little vibrato on it, Um, the oh, but feel free the pick if you want, it doesn't really matter either way. And what I'm doing is I'm setting up. I'm targeting thing a right here, which is the fifth of this, a seven d seven chord s. So I'm kind of anticipating the court that's coming up, which is the four chord D seven. So I'm going up. I want to do something that leads into the forecourt, the D seven. So I'm gonna take this, um, this a here and slide it up to be on. Then come bring it down, and that's gonna come in timing wise, it's going to come in right before that. Dee Cord has blamed the D seven on. Then what it does is the sound like you. You know, you targeted a note, and then you played a note in the court before the court actually arrived. It sounds really cool. All right, so then the next section is I'm going to go. What I'm doing there is I'm targeting this d seven chord, and here's the actual, like, I'm going to play tan on the first ring. Then on the second string, I'm gonna pluck 13 and pull off to 10. And then on the third string, I'm gonna play 12 Pull off 10 on the third string that I'm gonna play 12 on the fourth string. I'm gonna go back to the third string and play 10 11 and play the 12 again on the fourth string. And how I analyze those notes is I look to see how the how they function within this d seven chord. This is the root of the d chord d this 13 years, the flat seven, the minor seventh interval Pulling off a win here, which is the fifth of a d chord that I'm playing this G, which is the fourth going down here to this flat Sirte, which is an AF so going thing is the flat third or sharp nine of a D seven chord. I caught a flat third being called a sharp mind. If you one and then I want to get down here to D, which is the room, then we'll come back to that flat third and it with a hammer on up to the third thing is f sharp. That's in the core. That's 1/3 of the G seven word. And then after that, I'm gonna come back T which is the root So one more time we're gonna go. And what I'm doing with the timing of this is the 1st 6 notes are two sets of 16th note triplets. So in the beat, which is 123 trip bull that trip bull, I'm playing that twice. I'm going way. So it's gonna be Oh, and then the second part of doing that is a triplet as well. 1/16 note triplets. And then I think I just kind of for 1/4 note for one beat. I just put some librato on that that room. I'm gonna go ahead and play through the lich a couple times and feel free to play along with May three Theo. Now I'm just gonna play the chords 1/7 toa d seven a little bit and give you the opportunity to go ahead and try the lich and maybe ah, take Milik and change it a little bit to make it your own. So it fits your style playing. Here we get 34 Uh , hey, thanks for taking the time to check out this guitar lesson. If you want to get the guitar tablature for this leg, make sure you check the link down below. You go ahead and download 31. Diatonic 6ths on strings 1 and 3: Hey, this is Chris from guitar Me. And today we're gonna be taking a look at how you place, um Diatonic six on Strings one and three. All right. For this lesson, I decided to use the key of e major eso. We're gonna be doing six out of the key of e major. But first we need to learn what are diatonic chords are. The diatonic chords are the cords that are created using the notes in E. Major. And there's seven. There's there's a a court built off of every single note in the scale. The 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th in the Warren Court is gonna B e major to court is F sharp. Minor three chord is G sharp. Minor. Four chord is a 5/4 be with 6/4 C sharp, minor and seventh chord. It's gonna be it's kind of hard to grab, especially up here. It is a d sharp minor. Seven flat five. You might see it. More family written a zey d sharp diminished chord. All right, so what we're gonna be learning here is how to play these These diatonic six going up the neck s So what? We're gonna do is with the one chord we have any major. So all we're gonna play is whatever is being played with the C major chord we're gonna play whatever is being played on the first string and the third string have to be the sea in this g sharp. So, in essence, what we're doing is we're playing the third of the court and then the route on the first wave. Just playing things g sharpening the two chord. It's f sharp, Minor way. Take a look at what? What are we actually playing on on Strings One and three were playing this note here. Sharp were playing in a right here. Eso what's what's gonna happen here? That's what we're gonna play as our six we're going through. This was for the one court thing to Ford, then on For the three court, it is G sharp. Minor way. Take it way. Take a look at what we're playing on Strings one and three D. C. Notes. So if you haven't noticed yet, if it's a minor chord, it's with six is gonna be both on the same front. If it would be a major award, it would look like that? It's a minor court. If it's the court is minor neediness of its major gonna dio assuming that this is the root for both of us. All right, so we have e mail third here for the F sharp minor third for the 34 G sharp minor. Your four chord is a major eso instead of it looking like this, where would be your flat third in your route? We're gonna major third, which is C sharp on your room right here, Major Core your four major. So we're gonna play the third here the c sharp and alert. Alright, your five court is be major eso we're gonna We're gonna use the third here because it was minor would do this, But it's not It's major. Thats your d sharpen your be right here your third and your Route six scored a c sharp minor eso. Since it's a minor chord, we're not going to use this burgeon. We're gonna use this virgin thing. This is gonna be your flat three e And the C sharp is the root here on the first string on . Then for your six scored, it's the one that's the D, the D minor seven, flat five or the D diminished. So all we're going to concern ourselves with, since it's a minor, minor type of court where I play the route, the in the minor third right here. So it doesn't matter matter whether you're playing the diminished or the minor. Seven. Flat. Five. You still have a flat third interval on a route right there. So that's what we're gonna do for the seven chord. So let's go ahead and recap that going up the neck. This is our one court to set back the one going back down. Seven one I should mention by learning these diatonic six on strings one and three. There's just a pattern like the one cords. Major eso if you know how to spell a major scale or spell or play major scale in the first drink is one whole Step two to step 23 Step before pull Step the five hole step to six whole step to seven and then I have stepped back toe 1212345671 If you understand that the 114 and five chords Air Major, which is on. Want a beer? Major? The 23 and six chords or the six build off of 23 and six are minor. 236 on. Then the seven chord is gonna be the minor minor six as well. How we're playing it with the Since it's a flat five chord, it's gonna we're gonna play it just the way we did say s so you can very easily take this this theory on Move it to any key. If I wanted toe, move it to the key of a day If I know the one chord 14 and five are major our scale of 1 to 3. So 14 and five or a D and E are major. The 23 and 6/4 miners weigh C sharp, minor and f sharp on. And then the seven chord is whatever we did with six scored. So So you have one coming backwards 17 So I'm showing you how to do this in the key of e thought it would be makes sense since we start down there at the bottom of the neck. But you can what? You understand what the intervals are had a spell major scale play major scale. And you know that the 14 and five are gonna look like this. The major sixth and the 23 and six are gonna look 236 and seven. I should say we're gonna look like this form here s so that you can pretty quickly do this on in any of the 12 keys. All right, So how can you utilize these six on your playing? Uh, here's a pretty famous song that starts off using these. Sure, you may have heard that before to CCR Song. Uh, you know, the thing is represent G major F Major thing would be part of representing it. See, court. I think they do this at the end. But that's a good example of how someone used that as an intro for a song. You can use it for your guitar leads. There has to be some song. You heard that I like Theo. I think that sounds really nice for you. Kind of e. I just choose one note to kind of dragged down the way, kind of sliding up to the next with I think that sounds good. I think kind of The main way that I use them is it kinda helps me keep in the right mind frame of what GM in. If I know this is 2345 I find in the song and playing in the song and it gives today it gives me something that I could go to right away. I e I just need to get to in a court really quick. It just gives me something I can get it. Oh, probably do something with some a major pentatonic around that I would say that these diatonic six on strings one and three are primarily you use for lead more, uh, kind of instead of playing a full more just two of the notes, But you can use them for rhythm. It's a little tougher to kind of squeeze them in there. But hey, thanks for taking the time to check out this guitar lesson. If you want to see more lessons by guitar me, make sure you subscribe to our channel. Make sure you hit that little notification bells. You get notifications when we come out with new lessons. And I look forward to see you in the next lesson. 32. Diatonic 6ths on 2 and 4: Hey, this is Chris from guitar me. And in this lesson, I'm going to show you how to play some diatonic six on Strings two and four. So in this lesson, I'm gonna be showing you how to place in diatonic six going up and down the neck on Strings two and four in the key of E. Uh, the last last night did was showing you how to do that on strings one and three on. Now this one's kind of a follow up lesson where I'm showing you how toe go up and down the neck using diatonic six following the diatonic chords in the key of E just based off of the fifth string. So the diatonic chords in the key of E based off of the fifth string would start with a Here on your four chord is the five court C sharp minor. It's gonna be your six scored. Seven chord is the D sharp minor seven flat five or D diminished if you won them back to the root, which is e major one way have we have f sharp minor is a two way of G sharp minor, which is the three chord All right, so now that we know what our diatonic chords are, the four chord is A s. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna take a look at what am I playing on strings to and for in that corn playing this year? And I'm playing Theo C sharp from eat a C sharp happens to be a major six interval s. So what we're gonna do is we're just going to play those Teoh. Basically, what's gonna happen is as we're going up these diatonic chords, we're just gonna play separately. Whatever notes were playing on Strings two and four, So here's the way cord. We're just gonna forget everything and just play what's on strings to and for this happens to be a a major six interval here. All right, so that that is, um, that's what we're gonna do. I happen to use these fingers you can use, I guess, whatever fingers you want. But I think the reason I use these is because that when I go to the next one, I keep my, uh, my third finger, my middle finger on the neck, and then I just switch whether I'm using this finger this finger. Whether it's supposed to be major minor, I find that easier. Teoh screwed around the neck easier, But you can use what you like. Right? So that is a major. This what we're gonna do for a meeting with two chord? I'm sorry. Not the two chord. The five court is be major. The four chord was 18. We're going to the same thing from the major five court and we're going Teoh, like these two notes right here, which is a sharp on a D sharp right here. We had the four corner five born right now the six scored a c sharp minor. So now we're not If you take a look at what we're playing on strings to one for we're not playing these todo playing these now e should mention when you're playing this corn here, this a major chord or this be major chord the five court. What, you're actually playing in the court how there's notes function that you're playing the fifth Corps. This is the fifth of the chord. This c sharp is gonna be the third of the court. So what you're doing here because that the core goes 1513 In terms of the intervals that are used to create the A major court, you're playing the route and they're not the route. The fifth and the third is when I played a five chord. Be major playing the fifth of the chord in the third when I get the six scored C sharp minor. I'm not playing the fifth and the major third, because there is no major 30 c sharp minor. We have a flat third, which is E s. So what? You're what? So it's gonna look like this, What you're doing, you're playing the fifth here and the flat 30 minor third of this. And you might be saying all these numbers. I don't know what you're talking about. You know, it's very confusing. Well, you don't have. I'm just kind of filling this in from people that are a little more advanced and you want a little know a little more technically, what's going on. But if you're not that technical yet and you don't know your scales and your interval numbers and all that stuff, but then you could just think of it simply as when I played this court, these are the two notes that I'm playing in that court on strings to and for just kind of keep it simple. All right, So when we go to the Seven Corn way, have this, uh, d sharp minor seven flat five. If we look at the notes that were playing here, we're actually playing these two notes right here. The student, those two notes air functioning as the flat five and the flat. Third of the way. All right. And then when we get back up here to one court way, have any major that your one chord And since its major, we're gonna be playing the fifth and the major third here, which is G sharp. And and then when we go to the two chord, have sharp minor were playing the fifth and the flat Third here on France 11 and 10. Right way. Get the three core G sharp. Minor. It's gonna be the minor of six playing these two notes right here. All right. To recap, we have the four chord, which is a major 5/4 which is the major six chord C sharp minor. We have the seven chord D sharp minor, seven flat five or D diminished We've e majors. The one chord way have the two chord, which is F sharp minor, and then the three court is G sharp minor. 463 So what I suggest next is memorizing the pattern. In the key of E. The one chord is gonna be major. The two cord is minor. 3/4 minor fours major. Five. His major sixes minor. Seven is minor as well. At least it's I know it's a diminished water minor. Seven flat. Five have diminished, but we're playing it way would actually this one. Technically, we're playing it how we would play the major ones. But what if you're like, How is this? Why are we not doing this one minor if you're saying it's minor because the room is right here for that court, so it even though it's a minor type of cord, we're playing it. Is it for it feels like we're doing this is Major that house that sometimes out of minor, because the route is in a different spot when we do this one, the route is here when we do this 17 chord the roots here. So this is actually functioning as the flat five in the flat. Fifth, the court. All right, so if that's not confusing enough, the we have one major to minor. Three minor, four major, five major, six minor seven we get someone will say minor or diminish if you want it, even as they finished and back toe one major. So what's what's the point of that? Um, it's nice to know that the 114 and five are the major form booth that 23 and six theme to three and six chord are minor. Eso you can pretty quickly if you you know how to spell your scat. 176517 is where the six note in the scale is Seventh. I'm sorry. The fifth out here is the fourth. Bye bye. Knowing that that pattern you could pretty quick pretty quickly get up and down the neck regardless of what key urine. All right, so let's say I was in the key that way. Were I was just showing you the diatonic six strings two and four in the key day for the TV . Um, I don't even have to think of what the cords are. I just know it goes 12 three Because I just I just know the pattern. Um, but this the one Ford I don't since I know that it's going one major to minor. Three minor, four, Major, major, six major, seven diminished thing back to the one. So I can pretty quickly create these Titanic six in any key. I just chose E Since the first lesson I did was in the TV, I thought I would continue that. I thought that would make a nice pair of lessons. So, uh, it's very important, Teoh. No, you're diatonic chords. And whether their major minor you want to understand that pattern really well, so rhythmically how I would use these diatonic six on Strings two and four is if I had to play an e chord and and I didn't want to play, Maybe I didn't feel like I needed to play the whole thing. Maybe have a piano player bass player. Someone's really heavy on the room, you know? So you don't really need to be Oh, you sounds kind of cool. I'm sure you heard John Mayer doing these types of sounds. Uh, wait, Cord, Just play the sex way. It sounds really nice. It's a lot less heavy handed that playing the fool six guards sounds really nice, but I also like Teoh strum a lot, so I thought so. What I'll do is I'll just kind of get this gone just some 16 and then I just mess around with me. That that's just a fun way of practising. It kind of gives me some strumming practice, and it kind of reinforces where these the sixth are here, and it sounds kind of cool. It is kind of tough to figure out how to mute all the strings except those two. Um, but if you mess around, theory your hands a little bit, you figure it out like my film is covering the six string. My middle finger here is covering the fifth string, the third strings getting muted out by my third finger as well. And I'm making sure that this finger here, my, uh, my ring finger here is touching. The third fingers touch in the first theme. That's one way that you can that's around and have fun rhythmically with the sixth. So what? I suggest the students if you're getting a little bored with your lead guitar playing. Sometimes I have students there like I'm kind of bored. Everything, like all I'm doing is playing single notes. So whenever they say that, I'm like, Well, do you ever play two notes at the same time? Uh, you know enough. They say no. Then I say, you know, maybe try Cem, the diatonic CEO um, playing tune. It's just kind of breaks it up. My advice, lead wise, is kind of use those to kind of spruce up your lead playing. If you're spending too much time doing single notes, start putting in some of these things die ads or to note chords, the sixth kind of Sprinkle him in with your A single notes, and I think it will really add some really nice texture to your lead plane. Hey, thanks for taking the time to check out this guitar lesson. I hope learning the six will help you with your guitar leads