Making a 4-Patch Throw Size Quilt | Louise Silk | Skillshare

Making a 4-Patch Throw Size Quilt

Louise Silk, FiberArtist

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6 Lessons (31m)
    • 1. Alternate 4 Patch Introduction

      6:57
    • 2. 4 Patch Selecting The Fabric

      3:58
    • 3. 4 Patch Cutting The Fabric

      2:21
    • 4. 4 Patch Piecing

      7:30
    • 5. 4 Patch Quilting

      6:49
    • 6. Alternate 4 Patch Gallery

      3:14

About This Class

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This class will go through all of the steps to machine piece and hand quilt an alternate block 4-patch quilt.

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Transcripts

1. Alternate 4 Patch Introduction: welcome. Today we're gonna learn how to make a basic patchwork quilt and quilt. My definition is three layers of fabric, a top that could be patchwork or apple K or embroidery. And then inside, where you can't see it is a batting. It's kind of a fiber fill that gives it its thickness. And then there's a backing, something that goes on the back that holds all the pieces together. And today we're through this whole this Siri's this class. We're going to learn how to make a patchwork top and make it into a quilt, piecing it by machine and quoting it by hand. Well, the basic block that we're going to use is a four patch four patch means that if you take a square and the names of quilts pretty much from old days from the 17 hundreds, when patchwork quilting was really started, they just named the blocks by what they looked like. So this is a patch of four patches together, so it's called a four patch, and we're gonna learn to make a four patch that is an alternate with a solid block. And even though this is a print fabric, this is one big, solid block. So this whole quilt pattern is called an alternate block for patch. Can you see that there? Okay, so we're going to do a four patch. But we also could look at this quilt, and this quilt has what's called a nine patch. So if you look in counties up, there are nine patches in the block. And this quote also is an alternate blockers, a solid dead and block. And then every other one is a patchwork block. And by the way, this quill is Ah, quote of my mother's materials of my mother has been deceased for quite a while, but these were materials from her. Help me always remember and think of her. So this is a alternate nine patch quilt. Now, just to show you one more example, this is also a nine patch. This is a very old quilt that I made circle like 1979. You know that, circa means we don't really, really exactly remember the date. But it's around the right date, and this is a nine patch Hubley can see it. It's very tiny. And then this is a nine patch that alternates to make a Double nine patch, so this is called a nine patch double nine patch. And then, to make it even more interesting, this quilt is put on the diagonal, the blots on the diagonal to make much more. You see, when you look at this quote, you just see this overall pattern of this chain of fabric when really it's just a simple nine patch by nine patch. If you've never made a quote before, my favorite size for a beginner for a first time quote is a 60 inch square or thereabouts. It's a great throw. It's great you could put on a table. You can use it at the bottom of your bed on the couch. If you have a lot of experience with quilts or you wanna really wanted quote that's gonna fit the size of your bed. Then you could do that to figure out what the size of your bed is. Say if it's a queen Queen mattresses 60 by 80 and then you have to add around the edges so that it falls over the bedside. But I'm going to give you a hand out that really explains all that and helps you figure out what size but you're gonna make. And then once you decide what size, what you're gonna make, you're going to start to gather here Materials. Now, my materials, um, one of the great things about a four patch and an alternate four packs that we're gonna make is it's a great way to use up little pieces of fabric and scrap pieces of fabric. And if you look back here, this is my fabric stash. This is where I keep all my fabrics and they arranged by color, and they're also ranged by materials like I have a T shirt, scraps and all the quilting fabric scraps. So for this project, because I wanted to make it a little simpler and not so complicated. Amusing yardage. I'm using mostly quilters materials that 100% cotton that you could buy in a quilt shop. We're online. It's really easy to get a good selection, but maybe you already have a little stash. So then I went into my stash and what I picked was just really some ends of my most favored . Beautiful fabrics like batiks are very popular, and I have this beautiful purple batik. It has this nice spiral on it. I love these Fassett fabrics that they have these very beautiful colored flowers, and I went through and picked out, but just a bunch of them's whatever I could find that I liked. And that's what I'm going to use for the little squares. But then the most important part of this quill it beginning there so much of it. And this is something that you need yardage for is the alternate part, and also it ends up the border, and it's really what's going to set off these fabrics. And the first thing I got out was an old sheet I have. It's like a denim sheet, and it's Ah, blue woven. It's really quite nice and so often used. And I thought, Well, that be great. I haven't You need a lot of it again. I'll give you the charges that will be on the paper that's attached to this, but I don't know. I felt like it could be more contrast ing and would be more interesting. And then a friend of mine just gave me these old table clause in their cotton to cotton table plus and I thought, Wow, these would really set it off very nicely. And then I started kind of changed the project that I want to do because I would like actually, it would be fun for me to make a patchwork tablecloth using the table blood and using these patches. And I thought, Well, I could do that with you. I could do kind of a variation again of this, um, and make a tablecloth. But I really want to teach you to make a quilt. And I want to go through all the steps of a quilt. So then I went to one more fabric and this is, ah, fabric that I buy in yardage. It's a raw silk. It really has a great texture to it. I made it for quotes. Use difficult before I have a lot of it. I by five or six yards at a time. And it's also not a stark White is this'll, but it's a really nice cream and much more contrast than the blue eso. That's what I'm gonna use. And also you're gonna need yards for backing. And again that will be in the information. We'll talk about that more as we go on, but for me I'm gonna use leftover fabrics that I can cut and make into a backing. And that's what this is where I don't expect you to do that, but you will need a backing and we'll talk about them or as we go on, but time to select your fabrics. 2. 4 Patch Selecting The Fabric: if you've never made a quote before. My favorite size for a beginner for first time quote is a 60 inch square or thereabouts. It's a great throw. It's great you could put on a table. You can use it at the bottom of your bed on the couch. If you have a lot of experience with quilts or you wanna really wanted quote that's gonna fit the size of your bed, then you could do that to figure out what the size of your bed is. Say, if it's a queen Queen mattresses 60 by 80 and then you have to add around the edges so that it falls over the bedside. But I'm going to give you a hand out that really explains all that and helps you figure out what size you're gonna make. And then once you decide what size what you're gonna make, you're going to start to gather here. Materials. Now, my materials, um, one of the great things about a four patch and an alternate four packs that we're gonna make is it's a great way to use up little pieces of fabric and scrap pieces of fabric. And if you look back here. This is my fabric stash. This is where I keep all my fabrics and they arranged by color, and they're also ranged by materials like I have a T shirts, crabs and all the quilting fabric scraps. So for this project, because I wanted to make it a little simpler and not so complicated. Amusing yardage. I'm using mostly quilters materials that 100% cotton that you can buy in a quilt shop. We're online. It's really easy to get a quick selection, but maybe you already have a little stash. So then I went into my stash, and what I picked was just really some ends of my most favored. Beautiful fabrics like batiks are very popular, and I have this beautiful purple batik. It has this nice I'm spiral on it. I love these Fassett fabrics that they have these very beautiful colored flowers, and I went through and picked out, but just a bunch of them's whatever I could find that I liked. And that's what I'm going to use for the little squares. But then, the most important part of this quill it beginning. There's so much of it, and this is something that you need Jahrige for is the alternate part, and also it ends up the border, and it's really what's going to set off these fabrics. And the first thing I got out was an old sheet I have. It's like a denim sheet, and it's Ah, blue woven. It's really quite nice and so often used. And I thought, Well, that be great. I haven't You need a lot of it. I get I'll give you the arches that will be on the paper that's attached to this. But I don't know, I felt like it could be more contrast and would be more interesting. And then a friend of mine just gave me these old table clause in their cotton to cotton table plus and I thought, Wow, these would really set it off very nicely. And then I started kind of changed the project that I want to do because I would like actually, it would be fun for me to make a patchwork tablecloth using the table. But I'm using these patches and I thought, Well, I could do that with you. I could do kind of a variation again of this, um, and make a tablecloth but I really want to teach you to make a quilt, and I want to go through all the steps of a quilt. So then I went to one more fabric, and this is, ah, fabric that I buy in Jahrige. It's a raw silk. It's really has a great texture to it. I made it for quotes. Use difficult before I have a lot of it. I by five or six yards at a time, and it's also not a stork. White is this'll, but it's a really nice cream and much more contrast than the blue eso. That's what I'm going to use. And also you're gonna need yards for backing and again that will be in the information. We'll talk about that more as we go on, but for me, I'm gonna use leftover fabrics that I can cut and make into a backing. And that's what this is where I don't expect you to do that, but you will need a backing and we'll talk about that. Maura's We go on, but time to select your fabrics 3. 4 Patch Cutting The Fabric: ready to cut our quilt. We're going to make a 60 inch square throw quilt, and it's gonna be an alternate four patch. This is the four patch just to colored blocks into solid blocks, and then it will alternate with this block. These air four inches finished these blocks of solid blocks, and I just did. It started a little block just to give you a an idea so that you know what it looks like on in order to figure out exactly how much cunning we have to do. I use a notebook where I figure out exactly what size cooled I'm going to make and how I'm going to add seam allowances and how much fabric. And so I have all that in the handout, which is beside this lesson. So I figured out that we need for this quill. We need to make 85 of these blocks and 84 of these blocks, and if you look over here, you'll see that I've done most of the cutting already. I had 15 different colored fabrics and I figured out that I needed 12 of each of those and they're all here and now I'm going to show you how to cut the last one. Just so you see how I do my cutting, what I do is they take the yardage and I lined up the salvages and they lined them up to the full. So it's a very manageable piece of fabric. And then I lined up the full to the edge of the to the grid on the on the board, and then I just cut off a little bit extra to make sure that it's I'm working on a solid edge. And now these air two inch blocks finished. So that means when you cut it, you have to cut 2.5. It's 1/4 and seam allowances and quilting. And so I'm gonna take this. Put the ruler of a court 2.5 and cut it this way, and then I'm gonna take the folded pieces. I need 12. So maybe I'm gonna be able to get 12 out of this strip. So I'm gonna do first again, is even off the edge. You know, I'm cutting for at one time. So this is four great 12 and this little extra in case I need it. And here I am, all my blocks ready to start sewing 4. 4 Patch Piecing: I met a sewing machine and we're now we're going to make the four patch blocks ever. We're going to make these blocks. So what you do is you take one solid piece and one print piece and you know you'll picks them up as you go along. The prince, you put the right sides together, the prints on the right it goes right sides together. So it quarters allowing now don't listen. Lift the presser foot. Don't live. Cut the thread. And if the color one is up for this next one, I'll put the color block down and the solid one on top. So what I'm doing is alternating that and again, I'm gonna keep the quarter. We want going and I'm going to take another one right sides up. Solan is on the bottom. The president's on the top. What color going this way? You're gonna just keep on going like this. Gonna take a long time, listen to some good music, have fun with it, is colored. One is on, the bottom line is on the top and you're gonna keep on going Now I've done two blocks and I'm just keep on going like that until I have put all of the blocks into two sets. And then what happens is you'll come back and you will open them up on your custom apart in twos and you'll see that they can now be some together as a patchwork block. People ask me, should you press it? And really, it's better not to press it until the very end, because what happens is when you so these two blocks together you can feel the seam allowances, and you can make sure that they need and you could, and they need really nicely by pressing them in offices, directions what you've been doing your finger. So then you would take all these through. I haven't done too many, so I don't have to me to put through, but just again, just to show you you open it up, make sure that their opposite right sides together make sure seems air butting up to each other, and people are going. You go all the way until you may years. Another said that I had done start earlier. So again, when everything is in twos, then you're gonna make it into fours to make sure that the blocks opposite together. But up to see morons is with your finger way through when you're died. A for these. The car open the and we'll be ready to go on to the next step. We've pieced all the blocks there piled up here. He's with solid blocks and what we're gonna do is make a grid of 13 blocks by 13 blocks. So I did the first row. 123456789 10 11 12 13. And we're gonna alternate every other block. So here's a Here's a patchwork block and then solid block. So now this is Rah Juan, This is road to And there they stayed together like a flat. And now I'm gonna add I'm row three. So first I'll go. Patchwork block, wind it up. Funded corner in Don't lift the presser foot. Don't cut the thread. If I have Patrick Block, the next one is gonna be a solid block. No way. 13 times for this third row, every other one patchwork solid. So you get the idea. That's the next step. I've been having a good time at the sewing machine and now I have made all the rose It's 13 blocks by 13 blocks, 13 going this way and 13 down in alternates between the four patch and the solid block. And now it's very easy for me to go back, and so it across the other way, because they're kind of attached and I know exactly where it's gonna go so I can line up the edges. And so the quarter of seam allowance and I can rotate the way the seams go so that I can make sure I get a perfect match all the way along. And I did that The last two rows already sewed them together so you could see how nice it looks when you completed all that you can iron the whole top and then what we're going to do without Borders we're gonna do is add off for inch border all the way around. And I have four extra four patches will go in each corner, and what you're gonna do is measure across and it should be. This is square. So whatever this measures miss metres 54 I could measure a couple more times and the other way, and maybe one side might mess Measure 54 a half. One side might measure 54 quarter. But what you do is take the average because what we're gonna do is make it fit in. One great thing about putting on Borders is that it kind of squares up the quilt. And if you're a little often your seam allowances, it takes care of all those problems. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna cut. I made a big length of 4.5 inch strips and I'm gonna so those I'm gonna cut those Andy 54 inch links. So just, um, go a little bit step further so you can understand that I have another quilt talk that I need. It's a variation off this quilt on guy used the This is gonna be a big quilt. It's for queen size bed. So I wanted to get a little bit more yardage, get a little more power out of my four patches. So what I did was make a four patch in a nine patch and then I alternated that to a solid block, but and also put on the diagonal. But that's a whole another lesson. Another time you learn to do diagonals and then I have already cut the the border for this when this is gonna be 12 inch border, because this is a 12 inch block. So what I did was I take it and I paid one end, and then I pin the other end, and then I kind of ease it in to make it fit. And what you do is, you know, the borders air are straight and even and, you know, you cut them all the same. So if you make the patchwork fit into the borders again, you'll have a really nice squared off quilt. 5. 4 Patch Quilting: I thought you'd like to see the larger quilt top finished. So I put on the wall for you to see it, and you grill clearly. You can see the nine patch, the four patches that come together with for this 54 patches come together with four solids , nine patch alternate blocks and then the triangles that put it on an angle. And I just mentioned before that putting on an angle was like a whole nother lesson. And the reason it's another lesson is because we have to learn about triangles and this quote that I was just trying to teach you. This is about squares. So in another role, lesson will make a quilt once made out of triangles and you learn all those rules. But also, then you can see that this quote is all marked and ready to quilt, and that's what we're gonna do now. This is the four Patch top, the smaller one that's finished. You can see that I added the border, and I have a four patch square in the each corner, and when you're finished doing all of the piecing, you compress the top from the front so you can see that you like the way it looks. And this is the last time that you will press. It may be the only time that you pressed it, and the next thing to do is decide how you're going to quilt your quill from a T joint hand quilted, and I For this quote, I use stencils, and also you could just draw lines. But I picked this stencil for the border. It's a cable, simple cable, and I also found some flowers that I'm going to use in each of the blocks. Then I mark it with a chalk pencil, and you wanna be careful to use a pencil that will wash out like you should never use ink or, um, they are special pencils that are called water soluble marking pencils. And that's what you should use to mark the top of your quilt when you've done your marking , then you have to get a batting. And for this food, I'm using a 80% 20% quilters bat. I. I like it a lot. It's very thin and flat here. Some extra pieces of it you can see on what you do is you have to make a backing so that this is a 16 square. You have to make it backing. That's about 66 inches square and already did that. You could buy quilters backing at the fabric store and they're like, 90 inches wide and then you can cut it down. But I pieced backing. So if you're gonna piece it, this is backing. And so, like a couple different fabrics that I pieced together, If you're going to piece it, you have to be. If whatever the size of your quilt is, it should be about four inches bigger all the way around. So then what you do is lay out your backing, lay out your batting one full layer and lay out your top and again, you're going to see you're gonna have some extra all the way around the edges on this is ah , quilting frame. We use this forehand quilting. You need to create a little bit of attention to do the hand Quilting. This is quilting thread. Quoting threat is special. It has a silicone finish on it and it makes it a little stronger and keeps it from nodding while you're working on it. And then you're going to use a quilting needle. It's called a between between a shorter than a regular needle and it shorter so that you could move it in and out more easily. On I use a eight, um, really skilled culture. Someone's going to a 9 10 I've even seen women that use a 12 on and then so whatever needles, you can start with a 70. Even if you've never quilted before, do you get comfortable with it? What you do is take the threat off and put it on the needle, and then you're gonna not one end of it. And the thing about quilting is that we want to always hide the knots. We don't want to see the knots on the front or the back, and by the way, I have to use a thimble. This is a leather symbol. You could use any kind of symbol that you like, but you really need something because your finger pushes the needle through the thread. So now I'm gonna show you how to hide the not so what you do is, and generally I do this from the back, but because I want you to see it, I'm doing it for the front. So you go away from where you want to start your needle and you bring it up into where you want to start it. And then the North is here. Well, that's really ugly. So we have to not say so. We pop the not So I popped the not and went through to the fabric, and now it's stuck in between the batting and then a quilting line of quilting is a back and forth thread. I think for you, if you're just quoting for the first time, it's important to make the stitches even. Don't worry if they're too small or too big, but I'm using my finger ups for underneath and my finger on top to pull it through. And you see, I'm going across the diagonal this square because it will show up very nicely the quilting and look very pretty. And then when you're ready to end the fat threat, I wouldn't ended. I would keep on going. But just to show you how to end it, you go all the way down and you come all the way back up at the beginning of the thread, You take your needle and you make a not very close to the edges. Just one little, not go back in the same hole for your needle way and pop it. And there you have it. A hand quilting stitch. I'll try toe. Go over that again. Another time I'm sure you can look it up online. If you want to look at how to do it some more pieces of metal, I'll do another teaching a little bit later on, which does goes into that more thoroughly. But that's good enough to get you started. And then also, I can't really do it right now. But the finally after the whole thing is quilted. We work our way out and around and do all the hand quilting, and when it's done, we're gonna bind it. That will be the last step of our quilt, and so a binding is a 2.5 inch strip. That's double, and what you do is you cut the backing and the batting so it's even. And then you take the binding and you double it and you sew it by machine through all the layers, and then you turn it, and so it to the front, and you have made a really beautiful alternate for patch and quilted quilt 6. Alternate 4 Patch Gallery: way.