MASTER MANDOLIN CLASS - Intermediate and Advanced Mandolin | Lesson Pros | Skillshare

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MASTER MANDOLIN CLASS - Intermediate and Advanced Mandolin

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Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

151 Lessons (22h 1m)
    • 1. Master Mandolin Introduction

      1:34
    • 2. D Minor Pentatonic - Starting with the First 2 Strings

      4:07
    • 3. D Minor Pentatonic - Adding the E String

      3:18
    • 4. D Minor Pentatonic - Adding the G String

      2:03
    • 5. D Minor Pentatonic - Adam Steffey Lick/Trick

      7:44
    • 6. D Minor Pentatonic - 60 BPM Backing Track

      10:02
    • 7. Example - A Major Scale with Backing Track

      1:19
    • 8. A Major Pentatonic Scale

      3:34
    • 9. 2nd Octave A Major Scale

      2:05
    • 10. Adding 2 and 1's on the A and E string - A Major

      1:46
    • 11. Adding 2 and 1's on the A and D String - 3 Strings for Rolls and Cross Picking

      3:25
    • 12. Adding 2 and 1's + Rolls Continued Down to the D and G String

      2:29
    • 13. Example - Putting 2 and 1's and Rolls Together Across All Strings

      1:27
    • 14. Example - Adding a First Finger Scale to A Major

      2:02
    • 15. Example - First Finger Scale a Major with Backing Track

      0:43
    • 16. A Major - A Major - A Major Pentatonic Scale - 70 BPM

      10:26
    • 17. Example - A Minor Pentatonic

      3:24
    • 18. Example - Adding First Finger Scale to A Minor Pentatonic with Backing Track

      1:52
    • 19. A Minor Pentatonic - 60 BPM Backing Track

      11:06
    • 20. Example - B Major Scale

      2:28
    • 21. Example - Scale Plants and 2 and 1's

      1:36
    • 22. Example - Scale Tremolo - Double Stops

      1:49
    • 23. Example - B Major Scale along with Backing Track Example

      1:30
    • 24. B Major - Major Pentatonic - 70 BPM Backing Track

      10:26
    • 25. Example - B Minor Pentatonic Scale

      1:44
    • 26. Example - B Minor Pentatonic Scale

      1:34
    • 27. B Minor Trick #1

      1:28
    • 28. B Minor Trick #2

      1:12
    • 29. B Minor Trick #3

      1:56
    • 30. B Minor Pentatonic - 60 BPM Backing Track

      11:06
    • 31. Closed Chords G, C, D, A and F

      7:20
    • 32. Example - Chording with G C D with Backing track Example

      5:58
    • 33. G Chop Backing Track 60 BPM

      10:50
    • 34. Example - Chording with D G and A with Backing Track Example

      3:46
    • 35. D Chop Backing Track 60 BPM

      10:50
    • 36. Example - Chording with C F and G with Backing Track Example

      4:24
    • 37. C Bluegrass Chop 60 BPM

      10:50
    • 38. Example - G Major Scale plus Backing Track Example

      5:02
    • 39. Example - Tricks in the Key of G with Backing Track Example

      3:59
    • 40. G Major Folk Backing Track 70 BPM

      10:26
    • 41. Example - G Minor Pentatonic Scale with Backing Track Example

      3:37
    • 42. Example: Tricks in G Minor Pentatonic

      3:11
    • 43. G Minor Pentatonic - 60 BPM Backing Track

      11:06
    • 44. Key of E Rock Strumming Styles

      4:47
    • 45. Example - E Major / E Major Pentatonic for Rock

      2:57
    • 46. Example - Advanced Tricks and Octaves - Putting it all together with Backing Track

      10:16
    • 47. E Rock Minor Pentatonic 100 BPM Backing Track

      10:21
    • 48. Class Tools 1 - 60 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic

      10:02
    • 49. Class Tools 1 - 70 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic

      10:22
    • 50. Class Tools 1 - 80 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic

      9:55
    • 51. Class Tools 1 - 90 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic

      10:15
    • 52. Class Tools 1 - 100 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic

      9:52
    • 53. Class Tools 1 - 110 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic

      10:08
    • 54. Class Tools 1 - 120 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic

      9:50
    • 55. Class Tools 1 - 130 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic

      10:05
    • 56. Class Tools 1 - 140 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic

      10:16
    • 57. Class Tools 2 - 60 BPM - Mandolin Key of A - Folk

      11:06
    • 58. Class Tools 2 - 70 BPM - Mandolin Key of A - Folk

      10:26
    • 59. Class Tools 2 - 80 BPM - Key of A - Folk

      10:43
    • 60. Class Tools 2 - 90 BPM - Key of A - Folk

      10:57
    • 61. Class Tools 2 - 100 BPM - Key of A - Folk

      10:30
    • 62. Class Tools 2 - 110 BPM - Key of A - Folk

      10:08
    • 63. Class Tools 2 - 120 BPM - Key of A - Folk

      10:22
    • 64. Class Tools 2 - 130 BPM - Key of A - Folk

      10:34
    • 65. Class Tools 2 - 140 BPM - Key of A - Folk

      10:43
    • 66. Class Tools 3 - 60 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic

      11:06
    • 67. Class Tools 3 - 70 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic

      10:26
    • 68. Class Tools 3 - 80 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic

      10:44
    • 69. Class Tools 3 - 90 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic

      10:15
    • 70. Class Tools 3 - 100 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic

      10:30
    • 71. Class Tools 3 - 110 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic

      10:44
    • 72. Class Tools 3 - 120 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic

      10:22
    • 73. Class Tools 3 - 130 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic

      10:35
    • 74. Class Tools 3 - 140 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic

      10:44
    • 75. Class Tools 4 - 60 BPM - Key of B Folk

      11:06
    • 76. Class Tools 4 - 70 BPM - Key of B Folk

      10:26
    • 77. Class Tools 4 - 80 BPM - Key of B Folk

      10:43
    • 78. Class Tools 4 - 90 BPM - Key of B Folk

      10:57
    • 79. Class Tools 4 - 100 BPM - Key of B Folk

      17:29
    • 80. Class Tools 4 - 110 BPM - Key of B Folk

      10:43
    • 81. Class Tools 4 - 120 BPM - Key of B Folk

      10:22
    • 82. Class Tools 4 - 130 BPM - Key of B Folk

      10:34
    • 83. Class Tools 4 - 140 BPM - Key of B Folk

      10:43
    • 84. Class Tools 5 - 60 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic

      11:06
    • 85. Class Tools 5 - 70 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic

      10:26
    • 86. Class Tools 5 - 80 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic

      10:44
    • 87. Class Tools 5 - 90 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic

      10:15
    • 88. Class Tools 5 - 100 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic

      10:30
    • 89. Class Tools 5 - 110 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic

      10:44
    • 90. Class Tools 5 - 120 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic

      10:22
    • 91. Class Tools 5 - 130 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic

      10:35
    • 92. Class Tools 5 - 140 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic

      10:16
    • 93. Class Tools 6 - 60 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop

      10:50
    • 94. Class Tools 6 - 70 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop

      10:40
    • 95. Class Tools 6 - 80 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop

      10:32
    • 96. Class Tools 6 - 90 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop

      10:26
    • 97. Class Tools 6 - 110 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop

      10:17
    • 98. Class Tools 6 - 120 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop

      10:38
    • 99. Class Tools 6 - 130 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop

      10:35
    • 100. Class Tools 6 - 140 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop

      10:30
    • 101. Class Tools 7 - 60 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop

      10:50
    • 102. Class Tools 7 - 70 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop

      10:40
    • 103. Class Tools 7 - 80 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop

      10:32
    • 104. Class Tools 7 - 90 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop

      10:26
    • 105. Class Tools 7 - 100 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop

      10:21
    • 106. Class Tools 7 - 110 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop

      10:17
    • 107. Class Tools 7 - 120 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop

      10:14
    • 108. Class Tools 7 - 130 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop

      10:12
    • 109. Class Tools 7 - 140 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop

      10:09
    • 110. Class Tools 8 - 60 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop

      10:50
    • 111. Class Tools 8 - 70 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop

      10:40
    • 112. Class Tools 8 - 80 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop

      10:32
    • 113. Class Tools 8 - 90 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop

      10:26
    • 114. Class Tools 8 - 110 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop

      10:11
    • 115. Class Tools 8 - 120 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop

      10:10
    • 116. Class Tools 8 - 130 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop

      10:12
    • 117. Class Tools 8 - 140 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop

      10:09
    • 118. Class Tools 9 - 60 BPM - G Folk

      11:06
    • 119. Class Tools 9 - 70 BPM - G Folk

      10:26
    • 120. Class Tools 9 - 80 BPM - G Folk

      10:43
    • 121. Class Tools 9 - 90 BPM - G Folk

      10:15
    • 122. Class Tools 9 - 110 BPM - G Folk

      10:43
    • 123. Class Tools 9 - 120 BPM - G Folk

      10:22
    • 124. Class Tools 9 - 130 BPM - G Folk

      10:34
    • 125. Class Tools 9 - 140 BPM - G Folk

      10:16
    • 126. Class Tools 10 - 60 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic

      11:06
    • 127. Class Tools 10 - 70 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic

      10:26
    • 128. Class Tools 10 - 80 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic

      10:44
    • 129. Class Tools 10 - 90 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic

      10:15
    • 130. Class Tools 10 - 110 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic

      10:44
    • 131. Class Tools 10 - 120 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic

      10:54
    • 132. Class Tools 10 - 130 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic

      10:35
    • 133. Class Tools 10 - 140 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic

      10:16
    • 134. Class Tools 11 - 60 BPM - E Folk

      11:06
    • 135. Class Tools 11 - 70 BPM - E Folk

      10:26
    • 136. Class Tools 11 - 80 BPM - E Folk

      10:43
    • 137. Class Tools 11 - 90 BPM - E Folk

      10:15
    • 138. Class Tools 11 - 110 BPM - E Folk

      10:43
    • 139. Class Tools 11 - 120 BPM - E Folk

      10:22
    • 140. Class Tools 11 - 130 BPM - E Folk

      10:34
    • 141. Class Tools 11 - 140 BPM - E Folk

      10:43
    • 142. Class Tools 12 - 60 BPM - E Rock

      10:49
    • 143. Class Tools 12 - 70 BPM - E Rock

      10:39
    • 144. Class Tools 12 - 80 BPM - E Rock

      10:31
    • 145. Class Tools 12 - 90 BPM - E Rock

      10:25
    • 146. Class Tools 12 - 100 BPM - E Rock

      10:21
    • 147. Class Tools 12 - 110 BPM - E Rock

      10:17
    • 148. Class Tools 12 - 120 BPM - E Rock

      10:14
    • 149. Class Tools 12 - 130 BPM - E Rock

      10:12
    • 150. Class Tools 12 - 140 BPM - E Rock

      10:30
    • 151. Thank you for taking this Master Mandolin Class

      0:56
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About This Class

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MASTER MANDOLIN CLASS - Intermediate and Advanced Mandolin


The #1 Mandolin class online. The most in depth Intermediate to Advanced Mandolin class available online.

Why take a mandolin class from this guy?

My passion is inspiring others to feel more confident in themselves  and their playing. I feel like playing mandolin can do that. After years of  performing and teaching all over the US. at workshops, out of my home and through multiple schools, I was asked by many of my students to make videos of my mandolin teaching style.  Here is the result.

I hope you will join me on the inside of this mandolin class where you will learn some awesome mandolin secrets

Building a strong foundation:

  • This is Part 2 for the mandolin. If you are looking at this class and are a complete beginner be sure to take the Beginner Mandolin Class MANDOLIN MASTERY FROM THE BEGINNING. By taking the beginner class first it will get you up to speed and you will be able to keep up the pace with this class.

  • I will teach you a shortcut way to play mandolin to make it easier to learn mandolin faster. Everything in this class will be broken down and explained for an intermediate to advanced mandolin player in easy to understand parts to help you succeed. 

  • You will learn major and minor scales on the mandolin scales.

  • You will get backing tracks to be able to play along with to help develop your mandolin skills

Who is the target audience for this violin class?

  • Anyone interested in intermediate to advanced learning on the mandolin

  • Anyone who wants to play mandolin for enjoyment

  • Anyone who wants to be a performer or a musician

  • Great for all ages

Mandolin class that's filled with all the information you need to succeed.

  • All these mandolin videos are all broken down to gear toward the intermediate to advanced mandolin player. It's assumed that a person taking this class has already gone through the Beginner Mandolin Class. MANDOLIN MASTERY FROM THE BEGINNING. If you have experience, and know your basic chords and want to get to the next level your are in the right place. I do move fairly quickly in these videos, keep in mind that you can either slow down the videos, speed them up or skip around to the videos that suits your needs.

Questions

Feel free to send me any questions you might have on this class. I  want to make your learning experience the best that it can be.

Thanks         

Thanks for taking the time to look at this MASTER MANDOLIN CLASS - Intermediate and Advanced Mandolin. I look forward to seeing you on the inside and  teaching you how to be a better mandolin player. 
Chuck M

MASTER MANDOLIN CLASS - Intermediate and Advanced Mandolin - The most In depth beginner Mandolin class available online.

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Transcripts

1. Master Mandolin Introduction: my name's Chuck Millar and I'll be your instructor. I've created this course to be the next step after my beginner mandolin course. Now you know the basics. Let's get to the next level. I've made sure to include all the things I wish I knew when I was first on my journey, playing the way e teach this course in a systematic, step by step process that takes one skill and adds another skill on top of it. While leaving in licks and tricks I learned from my mandolin heroes over the last 20 years . We'll learn some things on the softer, intricate side learning advanced fundamentals, toe learning, rock, mandolin or your fingers will fly if you're ready and willing to learn some intermediate and advanced mandolin techniques. C inside. 2. D Minor Pentatonic - Starting with the First 2 Strings: welcome back and we're gonna be learning our deem minor pentatonic scale. And it's a pretty simple one because they involve the same frets on both sets of the strings. So we're starting on this denote our middle finger second finger is gonna go on the third fret of the D string. Then our third failure is going to go on the fifth fret of the D string, followed by open a thing, Then the same thing, same fingers and everything. The second finger goes on the third front of the A string acetone, followed by a D tone, that last note thing and what we're gonna experience is playing the same way that we did previously, with our major scale using these figures to slide back and forth through, we're gonna listen to this back on track, and I'm gonna play along so that you have a good example of what it sounds like along with the backing track. Now we're tries and slides other things that I decided to add in. Besides this d minor pentatonic scale thing in the slides, eyes using some double tones in those double tones just mean you're going off a tone and then playing two Opens but beside it. And you can reverse this one into whatever you decide. Sounds good to you. It really slaw. So it's two and ones. I have two notes in one. And then if I want to switch it, it's two notes over here and then the one on the opposite side thing way. All right, get some practice done with your D minor pentatonic scale, and I'll see you in the next lesson. 3. D Minor Pentatonic - Adding the E String: in this lesson, we're going to be adding the first string tore D minor pentatonic scale so far in the D minor pentatonic scale. We know these tones d f g a c d. We're gonna add these tones on the Eastern my F tone. First fret second finger on the G toned. That's the third fret, then a that third finger on the fifth fret again. All these notes Air slide, herbal Just as before. Now what's happening now is I'm just going to do the same thing as I did before. But add these notes and we're gonna add them in a certain way to give up. Ah, field to it. So we had these minor pentatonic tones. I'm going to slide my F tone to f sharp tone and then resolve to a D, followed by a That's the third finger on and then G that second finger and then the F sharp tone kind of always does that slide up thing. Here's a good example. I want to do that much slower. I was making my way up the manager pentatonic scale, followed by my little Trick Island by a G f Scher de thing. All right. Here's a quick example of that backing track playing this example. This particular backing track is labeled for D minor pentatonic scale down on the course tools in the practice tool section. - So there's a fast example in a slower example of using your first string with your D minor pentatonic scale gets the brackets done and we'll see you in the next lesson. 4. D Minor Pentatonic - Adding the G String: in this lesson, we're gonna be using the notes on our G string for our D minor pentatonic scale. And I looked like this a note, which is the first finger on the second string, followed by sea. And that's the third finger on the fifth front. Wayne. Use these towns for leaders and then continue to play our d minor pentatonic scale thing or has simply used them. It's part of our melodic structure. Here's that backing track, and I'm gonna play along with it. So you get a good example of what it sounds like when we're playing along. - Theo . All right, get some work done. What? The notes that exists on your fourth string for your D minor pentatonic scale. We'll see you in the next lesson. 5. D Minor Pentatonic - Adam Steffey Lick/Trick: in this lesson, we're going to add some Adam Steffey style stuff to the D minor pentatonic scale. And how we're going to do that is we're going to get out of our regular position for D minor. And instead of using our second finger on the F tone, the third fret of the D string and our fifth fret the third finger on the D string, We're going to switch it up with a set of two and three were gonna go one and two. So now my index finger is on the third fret in my middle finger is on the fifth front and we're gonna play those two notes quick. Now, once I get there, I'm gonna play open one to open those of the fingers open. 35 open. Those were the fronts Then I'm gonna play e when I have that odd tone in there. And that odd tone comes from ah, Hungarian scale. So it goes like this was my 1st 3 notes. Next three notes Next three notes 23 Open too. So we put but those together thing. The theme next note is the three, which is the third finger, and that's the three exists on the sixths. Fret and I have a six front followed by Open a my first finger being on the third front of the a string, followed by that six Fred again thing. I'm gonna eventually just go straight up to D by going open a first finger on the third front, followed by D. Good. We're gonna practice that really slow. Ah, a little faster. A little faster yet E o a little faster year, Theo. In a little quicker yet and a little faster. Faster. And if he can play at this fest, No worries. Just practice it by yourself for a little bit. But we're just going a little faster yet thing good. And we can go back down the same way. Played as a scale. We can use any combinations of tones as we want to, as long as we're using that initial lick that we've learned. Okay, so how do I use this in Riel day D minor pentatonic scales. Well, what? We're gonna use the look as we learn. We're also going to turn within that scale and just play whatever you want. Teoh feeding it up again. I'm just shooting choosing whatever I want to play. All right, I'm gonna get that backing track going just to see how it sounds like with the backing track, you get a good idea of how to use it audibly along with a band or to a backing track. - The last notes that we're going to play out of this position are your pinky, and it's going to be on the 357 88 on. And then it's going to slide up and then resolve on a detail. So here's your use for it. Theo. Theo. Mm. All right. Get some practice done on your new Adam Steffey style licks out of the D minor pentatonic scale, and I'll see you in the next lesson. 6. D Minor Pentatonic - 60 BPM Backing Track: 60 beats per minute way, Uh 7. Example - A Major Scale with Backing Track: in this lesson, we're going to be playing a major scale, and we're going to be working with a string followed by the first finger on the second front of the Eastern our middle finger. On the fourth fret of the A string and our third finger on the fifth fret of the Eastern Open, 123 Frets are open to four or five. That exact same pattern happens again, but on the next train over. For an example, let's hear what the A scale sounds like along with the backing track. Take some time in practice, your a scale and we'll see you in the next lesson. 8. A Major Pentatonic Scale: in this lesson, we're gonna be using the A major pentatonic scale and are a major pentatonic scale. Looks like this open A followed by my first finger on the second front of the second string . Their second finger is going to be on the fourth front of the A string thing. Those were the only two notes that are found on the A string. Now I move over to the E string. I play E, followed by my index finger on on F sharp tone. That's the second front of the first drink. And then my last tone is my third finger on a toned. That's the fifth fret. So the 1st 2 sets of notes are making sure all the time we're doing down up downs, followed by open 13 Those are the fingers. The threats are open to five now, as always, just like in the key of D, We were able to slide her fingers from one of the next, so we already know how to do those slides. So we're just gonna move on. All right. There's an example off playing with your a major pentatonic scale and choose a backing track that fits you. This happens to be ah, folk backing track in the key of a and the one that we chose here was 70 beats per minute. But if it's a little too fast and you want to play a little bit slower, there's a couple options for you. You can go down to the bottom left hand side of your screen and you'll be able to find some speed options so you can either slow down or speed it up. Also included, Ah, fair amount of backing tracks for you at various speeds. So just go down to the bottom of this course to the course tools, find that you have a folk backing track and choose one that fits your needs and then practice that without a bunch, and when you're ready, toe, go to the next lesson, we'll see you there. 9. 2nd Octave A Major Scale: in this lesson, we're going to be learning how to play the second octave of a scales. And it's the lower octave of the tube, even though there's a higher octave that we haven't quite played yet. So what's happening is we have our first finger. On the second fret of the four string, our second finger goes on the fourth front of the fourth string. Our third finger goes on the sixths fret of the fourth string. So these are our notes. OK, Sam, find open D followed by one too high three opened. It was the same fingers one whole stepped to whole step 23 for us. How I have the spaces in between except I have open now. Now I have the one 23 So my friends are 246 open 246 open. I'm also in this case. I'm gonna be using my entire a scale. So are a scale that we know is open one high to three. Open one high to three. If I played the two octaves together, they sound like this thing, Uh, way 10. Adding 2 and 1's on the A and E string - A Major: in this particular version of our A major scale, I'm definitely going to bounce my a string and my notes that I play on my eastern together . The same thing is gonna happen when I play my A notes and I'm gonna bounce it off my eastern thing, Play this really slow so you can see the two different notes followed by the one, whether it be to on the note that I'm actually playing or than open note that brings out way, way. 11. Adding 2 and 1's on the A and D String - 3 Strings for Rolls and Cross Picking: same thing happens when I play notes that air on my d string I'm gonna bounce them off a thes air my notes on my D string one high, too high three And I'm just gonna go backwards in my scale Starting on a from here I'm bouncing off now. Once I feel comfortable with that, I'm going to also include my e string thing. Now what's happening? There is I'm playing down. Open down now. After I get from there, I can choose whatever I want to. I Congar back to the a string and then go back to the Eastern if I want to Or just simply going around. What I was doing was a little bit different. I was going for enroll and and then I went back to the A string and into the E string, and I was just kind of making it up as I went. So it'll just take a little bit of practice to see what you like the best thief. Depending on what pattern you can make up any pattern that you'd like. It all sounds good and then you're simply not going to go down the scale Themed that a pattern that I was using is up, up, down, up, up them. Up, up, down on the e a d e a d string Really slow hours, Theo. My transition tone between my two notes is it is the note itself in the e tone, and then it happens again. There's my transition tone. Here's my transition tone transition tone, and it goes on so important like that. So it doesn't matter if you're doing the Ford role or a backwards role, or some semblance of a role that you make of it all sound good as long as you're playing in time with the beat. 12. Adding 2 and 1's + Rolls Continued Down to the D and G String: uh, as I'm going down my skill e keep my first finger down here on e tone and I'm gonna reach It's gonna be hard for some folks, but I'm going to reach for a d tone while I'm playing my e town followed by High three And I'm still keeping my Eastern Down my e note down. And now what's happening now is Theo notes that I'm playing are my g string my D string in my eastern weather in a four roll or backwards roll. So starting with that pinky and the first finger followed by the high three and the index finger followed bythe thing in this particular role, I'm using all of the strings. 43214321 On The whole role that I've done is down, up, down, up to middle strings. Up, down. It looks like this. 4321232 Together a little slower. Last note is just a number. If we can, we're gonna take the first finger and put it down on the a note. That's the second fret of the fourth string and the second fret of the third string and bar them together playing all of the strings with a being open and e being open. It looks like this e 13. Example - Putting 2 and 1's and Rolls Together Across All Strings: Okay. Take some time with a backing track. That folk backing track in the key of a That makes sense to you for a in a speed perspective, we'll see you in the next lesson. 14. Example - Adding a First Finger Scale to A Major: in this lesson. We're going to learn the first finger scale out oven A and not the whole first finger scale . It's just the part that makes sense when we're playing in a So this was our scale are too active scale. And sometimes we slid our first finger up to that fifth threat. And this is where our first finger scale starts out. The ones that we're gonna use is one on the fifth fret. Our second finger is a whole step away from the one on the seventh fret. Our third finger is a whole step away from our second finger. Noticed their spaces in between there. And then lastly, on that 10th fret, my pinky resides and it's 1/2 step away from where our third finger is. And these were the notes. Okay? Thes they're the same notes and knocked it them. So how do I use these? We're going to use them much the same way we would these numbers. Except we have this open A to be able to bounce stuff off of it. We want Teoh. You definitely use it that way. We could just use him as regular notes thing. These notes also could be sled. So we have and I'm good. Gan. It doesn't matter what finger is slid. It's just the notes are the notes and I can slide any one of them if I wish. 15. Example - First Finger Scale a Major with Backing Track: This is what it's gonna sound like with our too active a scale, along with our new notes that we've just learned do plenty of practice with a a backing track of your choice that a folk back on track, we'll see you in the next lesson. 16. A Major - A Major - A Major Pentatonic Scale - 70 BPM: 70 beats per minute, Yeah. 17. Example - A Minor Pentatonic: in this lesson, we're gonna be using a minor pentatonic scale. And the top two strings, the Eastern and a string are just like the D string. We already went through a couple lessons ago, except now we're down two strings. Everything that we did in our d minor pentatonic scale transfers over to a accept his two strings down, everything transfers over, including those Adam Steffey. Looks that way. So all of those are the exact same in verbatim. So since we've already learned that weaken, transfer them over seamlessly. So instead of playing on these two middle strings, we're just going to play the to bottom strings, the e and the A string. Okay, so now that we have that, there's other things that add along to it. We're going to have our one on our G string. That's the second fret. Then our third finger is gonna be on the fifth fret of the G string. We're gonna open, Dean. Our first finger's gonna go from a e flat. Teoh e. So what? We played the open note followed by through the first front and then the second friend, and we're gonna practice at a couple of times together and on, and we're also gonna practice it backwards because they want to get that pretty good pretty quick. So it's gonna look like this, and we're not gonna repeat E. It looks like this real slow. Listen, first on now together, all right, that's what a little quicker way have that we're going to include another not third finger on the fifth fret of the third string. Now we're back to that open a and all of those notes that we just got done playing on those two strings apply so an example of something that we might play way. 18. Example - Adding First Finger Scale to A Minor Pentatonic with Backing Track: other things that we're going to add to our A minor pentatonic scale, just like we did with our first finger scale. In our major scale, it turns into one, three and five, and they're all slide herbal as well. We're gonna listen to a backing track and how this might be used. The name of this backing track that we're going to use is a minor pentatonic. And make sure that when you're practicing by yourself, you're always choosing Metrodome speed. That works for you the best way. Ah, backing track of your choice. Remember, the backing track is called a minor pentatonic. And then you just choose the right, uh, tempo for you. All right, get some practice on most you in the next lesson. 19. A Minor Pentatonic - 60 BPM Backing Track: 60 beats per minute. - Uh 20. Example - B Major Scale: in this lesson word going to be discussing the be major scale. It's the first close scale that we have. And even though that we've used the first tenure before, that's the first time we used of whole first finger scam. It's really important to know the first thing, your scale, because it's something because it is closed. We can use all over the neck of our mandolin, no matter what, Kieran. So here it goes. We have the first finger on a B tone. That's the second front than our second finger's gonna be on 1/4 fret. Third finger is going to be on the sixths front and for the seventh front are pinking. So I have all whole steps here so you can see the space in between the fingers except the pinky. The pinky doesn't have a whole step. It has 1/2 step, so it looks like this had a whole step whole step in 1/2 step. The same thing happens. But on my next ring over in the key of B, I have this closed scale with no opens because I'm using my four or I can play it open and let the e string ring out and not play my for three. Okay, so the only difference there is four or not before, right? Ah, now one. We're playing this particular scale. We're gonna want to practice it both ways. With are backing track because we want to be able to get that pinky action Really nice. And when we moved to other keys down the line, let's say we're playing in C sharp. We don't have that open e to be able to work with or were playing a different like T shirt . 21. Example - Scale Plants and 2 and 1's: the things that we can be able to do on B are little bit more limited than are open sounding scales. While we can't do these thes open sounding ringing things anymore, we can still do to one ones thing, but it requires to have a plant. So I'm going to keep my first finger on this be tone and plain notes out of my first thing . Theun. When I switch to being able to play in my notes that are on my a string, I'm going to plant F sharp. Come on. What? I finally get to my be tone. I'm going to purse down both this be tone and F sharp tone. Yeah, or I can play just single tones. 22. Example - Scale Tremolo - Double Stops: sometimes sends a closed scale is harder to play pretty tones in One of the things that we can do is play um, tremolo. I think on just really fast notes that right on the top of the string and likes notes that I can player the same notes and my tune one's work. He's an example of me playing with a tremolo wherever I would like to. No way. Now, even though I included a couple, uh, tremolo tones that we don't know how to play it, the same idea still exists. Tremolo is simply that that up and down motion with your pick on a note or double stops in R B major scale. 23. Example - B Major Scale along with Backing Track Example: All right, we're gonna listen to a backing track, and I'll share my musical ideas of playing those different tones along with that backing track so that you can get some good ideas when you're ready to mess around with a little bit. Get your fingers really used to that stretch for the fourth finger, then move on to that practice track. - Take a backing track in the backing track that we're gonna use for This is a folk key of B, and then go ahead and choose any tempo that suits your needs. Do some practice, get good at it, and we'll see you in the next lesson. 24. B Major - Major Pentatonic - 70 BPM Backing Track: 70 beats per minute, - okay ? 25. Example - B Minor Pentatonic Scale: in this lesson, we're gonna be learning a B minor pentatonic scale. That's that Blue Z scale. We're gonna first start on a B note that be notes the second fret of our a string followed by 1/3 finger on the fifth fret of the a string, then open E tone first finger on the second front of the first string. It's a f sharp tone, followed by the A tone, which is gonna be the fifth. Fret that I'm gonna slide up with my third finger on end upon a bead tone. But all right, if I go down the scale, I have being open a f sharp, which is that high to the fourth front, the the second friend Open D. And then I end up on the B note, which is the fourth friend. And my first finger, if I want to use it, is there for me as well. It's an eight tone 26. Example - B Minor Pentatonic Scale: All right, Let's hear what it sounds like along with a backing track. Just playing that simple scale. All right, take some time. Choose a B minor pentatonic backing track of your choice. The Jews. A tempo that's right for you. And we'll see you in the next lesson. 27. B Minor Trick #1: Here's some fun tricks out of the key of B minor pentatonic. The 1st 1 that we're going to use is a pull off after I play an F tone and then a pull off . So happens pretty quick and then the notes that I'm gonna play after that our a d tone. That's the fifth threat of the A string, followed by a Beato. Here's an example what it sounds like along with thathe way. 28. B Minor Trick #2: another quick trick. That weaken, due by using our B minor pentatonic scale, is by using our open than one and then two in the open e f f sharp tone. I just repeat, until I decided to move off. Um, so here's an example thing. Here's an example with the backing track. 29. B Minor Trick #3: another trick Weaken Do is using the same F and F sharp tone. But what we're gonna do instead of playing an e with our index finger, we're gonna move it up. One fret and do F Instead, Where are second finger still holds true to the F sharp tone and the notes that we're going to play our f f sharp thing. He's an example how that might be used. Theo. Let's hear what that sounds like with the backing track. - Theo away. All right, there some fun tricks for even the key of B minor pentatonic. Practice those along with a B minor pentatonic track to a temple of your choosing, and we'll see you in the next lesson. 30. B Minor Pentatonic - 60 BPM Backing Track: 60 beats per minute way, do you? 31. Closed Chords G, C, D, A and F: in this lesson, we're gonna be learning some closed cords that are movable, the first being RG cord. Typically, we start out with a two finger G chord with our index finger on the B note with our index finger on a G note. That's the second fret and third fret. Now our third finger is going to go up to this G note on the D String. It's the fifth fret, and our pinky is gonna go up to this dino that's on our fourth string. Now it's going to be important to know that there's a couple different versions of this geen. Normally, when we're chopping, we're not going to hear any of that big tones that are running out. Typically, there are always exceptions, like in the case of country where there's more of a rolling kind of strong. But in this case, we're going to be chopping based on what a sneer drone sounds like. So what's gonna happen is we're going toe here, the tones and but not actually strong. Um, and then as we're going through the strings, we're going to release the pressure and then you hear a dead and tone. If we only hear a dead tone. We're not exactly doing it right. We want to hear part of that cord versus just a dead tone so you can hear part of the cord as it gets muted versus just the dead tone. And when we're talking about that dead tone, that means we're just not pushing down on the strings. They're still touching the strings. But I'm first getting all the cords as if they were all right, now and then as I go through the strings, you hear the tone and then they decay. And that is, uh, very common chopped that you here today versus the chop that we heard in the past where you actually hear a tone and then it's dead. That's an old style of a chop. What we're going for is the new south of the Chatham. Now that we know how to do a chop were specifically thinking about what the next court is going to be, and we can practice chops on her own. But we're just gonna try to live a little faster using a C cordon. So the C chord is exactly like the G chord. Remember, it's moveable. So the G could be played as a flat a b flat bees he flat and so on. What I'm really trying to think of is my G chord being moved up one set of strings. Now there's no place for my pinky to go, and that's fine. What I'm really trying to do is make sure that that he is also needed cause I don't wanna have it bring out if it was just simply a C chord, I would want to wring out or I could let it ring out. But if it was a C sharp court, that he wouldn't sound very good. So I want a muted how I'm you'd It is by touching the back side of my finger my index finger to the strings so I can play a senior CIA sharp uh d in flat e f f sharp all the way up the neck with these closed cords. The next chord that I'm gonna do is a closed D chord. We used to know it as on open d chord or unopened ik or like this one finger, But we're gonna do it as a closed court. It's moveable, and our first finger's gonna go on a tone, the second finger's gonna be on it F sharp tone. Third, there's going to be on a D tone for frets. Their second fret. Fourth front fifth fret and the E is dead from my first finger deadening the tone again, The chop is hearing it, hearing the ringing of the tone as the pick goes to the string. It deadens. All right, so now we have that one. That accord or the closed accord is exactly just like the D that we just got done playing. Except it's one set of strings down all of the same fingers, all of the same frets. Now, now that I have them on my new set of strings, I'm gonna take my index finger and bar both the G string and the D string. So I have my e tone and my a tone ringing out. It's kind of hard to do. Just make sure that the index fingers flattened. It won't be able to sound out if the fingers curled around has to be flattened. That shop is hearing the tones after you get your pick through the strings. It didn't Okay, that's our accord. The last chord that's movable that we're gonna work on is our f chord for my f chord. I have my third finger on the fifth fret of my fourth string. It's acetone that I have on F tone on my d string. That's the third string. Third fret now all the way down on the bottom. Here I have my first finger on F tone. Naturally, the A will ring out. Since it's a movable chord. I want my A not to ring out. I'm going to take my index finger and mute the first string from the bottom on that A. And then this finger is gonna come down a little bit and mute the top string of my aim. Now as I can play F. That's movable. I can also play F Sharp Jane Flat debut flat jeans so on. So those are movable cords that we can chop with, and there's no harm as a beginner mandolin player using a dead and shop just by having your fingers down. It almost sounds the same, except you don't hear the beginning of that cord, so go ahead and practice your corpse and we'll see you in the next lesson. 32. Example - Chording with G C D with Backing track Example: in this lesson. We're going to work on our clothes, position cords for the chords, G. C indeed. And we're going to work towards playing a backing track so that we can work with our chops . The first chord that we're gonna use is our G chord. And that's the middle finger on G tone. First finger on a B tone third finger on a G tone and fourth finger on A A de tone fronts are three, 257 Now, in this particular video, I won't be chopping quite as hard as they normally would. And that has to do with just microphone picking up too much volume, and it will make everything crunchy. And then you want to turn your volume down. So I know that when we're actually playing no, to put a little more behind it than you're seeing me do. Okay, so we're at this G corner and know that a lot of people are gonna have trouble with this Pinky, just know that your fingers have to be at this 45 degree angle, and then instead of curling around the pinky, you're not actually gonna but a curl to it. You're just going to flatten it out and then set it down. That's what we're going for. It has to be curled on just a smidgen the smidgen ist of curls just to get over that d string that it sounds out And it isn't muted in our song that we're gonna play. We have, um, three lines and each line has four measures. Each measure has four beats. So you really have 12 times to play G 12 times to play, see 12 times to play d and then it just repeats itself over and over again. When we chop, we Onley chop on the end one end two and three and for And so this is what it's gonna sound like with a G one 1234 Now that we understand how that works, the next thing that's gonna happen after those 12 beats is gonna be a C. We simply have to move this same shape that we know up one set of strings. And now that Pinky doesn't belong anywhere, and we're going to, uh, commute that e string with our fingers on the bottom side of our index fingers where that's gonna happen So again, it's gonna be one end to you. End three n for and again, When we do a chop, we have our fingers down pressed and as we know through the strings, they're going to lift up and have a dead tone. We're gonna hear half the court, not just dead tones. All right, then, after the C chord, we're going to move to a D chord, which is much more of a position change, and we have to be able to move quickly. So take some time. Figure out how to move your finger quickly. Know that your third finger is on the right. Fret, but it's on the wrong string. So I have to move that down to my second string and these two fingers move. And once I think about those that move specifically is my third finger not changing. So it doesn't relax and then have to reset. It just goes straight down to the second string fifth fret, and then these two fingers move over where my index finger is on the second fret of the fourth string and my second finger is on the fourth front of the third string. I know one Teoh one end, Teoh One end, Teoh One and Teoh. All right, let's practice it together. We're going to do it Nice and slow. And about 60 beats per minute. 1341 Measure fourth measure. Here it is seen. Second measure measure fourth measure. Get ready for needs. Second measure. Flash measure that goes back. Jeans. All right, Take some time and find the backing track key of G Chop to be able to practice along with those backing tracks. We'll see you in the next lesson. 33. G Chop Backing Track 60 BPM: 60 beats per minute. 34. Example - Chording with D G and A with Backing Track Example: in this lesson, We're going to use the key of D, and we're gonna use our D corn, which we know how to play from the last lesson. So here's our D accord the next quarter. The progression is Accord we already know is are closed g chord, then the last chord that we're gonna learn looks a lot like our d chord that we know. But it's one set of strings down just like the d chord. Except I'm going to take my index finger and bar my third and fourth string on the second. Fret. So I have both notes. All right, so I have my dick ord, my G chord, my record. And then finally, I go back to deal and just remember that you're having your fingers pressed as you're chopping your releasing the strings. It's not a dead chop, and it's not hearing the notes that somewhere in between all right, let's listen to and practice along for right now to a 60 beats per minute backing track. When you feel ready, even pause the video at any time, and when you're ready, we'll be back here with a backing track and we're gonna practice it together starting on a D chord. One, 234 Second measure third measure fourth measure to G Chord Second measure third measure fourth measure cord measure for measure back D chord measure for measure G Chord measure. Fourth measure. Here's an a chord measure. Measure back to practice with your backing tracks down below this course and make sure you're looking for key of D Chop Key of the chop and that'll go through the ones that we just went through. Just choose backing track that fits your speed and we'll see you in the next lesson. 35. D Chop Backing Track 60 BPM: 60 beats per minute four. 36. Example - Chording with C F and G with Backing Track Example: welcome back, and we're gonna be working in the key of C and R three chords that were working with in the key of C. R. C. We already know that chord the G Corn way already know that chord with the new court is the f chord, and I have my index finger on a F tone. My A string doesn't have anything on it, but my D string has on F tone. That's that third fret of the third string and last note is a C tone out of 1/3 finger on the fifth fret of the fourth string. And naturally, if I play it by itself that a string will bring out and it's okay for it to ring out right now because it's in a natural position of F. But again, if I move that at all, that a doesn't sound good, it's not a close skill anymore. So what I have to do is I have to take my index finger and I have to move it up a little bit, so it touches that bottom string of A and I have to take my middle finger and I have to move it down just a smidgen. So the mutes that top string of a So if I do that, my f court now becomes movable. All right, so this is kind of that equalizer. So when the guitar players put on their K pose, weaken just move up the same amount of times as they put on their cable. And our chords will be the same in this particular exercise were practicing with this backing track in the Q C for chops. And the first core that we're gonna play is a C. There's a one end to end three in for, and this week, 12 of those. And then we're gonna go to the F chord one in two, n three in for and all the way to 12. And then we're finally gonna end up on that G chord one in 234 all the way through trouble those and then finally back to see so goes around around around around for you practice and this is what it sounds like. 1234 Second measure measure, measure Used. Escort third measure, fourth measure. Here's a G chord. The third measure fourth measure Finally back fourth measure of G third measure. Fourth measure. Finally back. Teoh. All right, find that backing track for the key of C for chops, key of C chops or chopping in the key of C. Go down there and find that and use a backing track that is suited for your skill and your ability for the tempo. Do a lot of practice. We'll see you in the next lesson. 37. C Bluegrass Chop 60 BPM: 60 beats per minute. - Okay , - way , - way . 38. Example - G Major Scale plus Backing Track Example: in this lesson, we're gonna be learning. The G scale in the G scale is much like our d scale are a scale where we played the D scale starting on a d tone way already know that we also know that a scale with the same fingers through the G scale is no different. The Onley thing is different that I start on a G note on a G strength, and that's my first active. My second active is known as 1/3 finger scale. Because I start on my third finger third finger. I'm gonna start on that g toe followed by open a first finger on the second front of the second string a lo to now for my second finger. It's acetone. My next note is a D tone followed by open F sharp and then g who would include a couple more notes. Even though this is the last note of my scale, Gene, I'm gonna using a tone and then I'm going to use a B tone. Theo trick here is that my fingers look like this. This is my third finger pattern. If I wanted to use my fourth finger, it would look like this. I had 1/2 step in between one and two. Ah, whole step between two and four and then, uh, whole step between four and three. So here's that has stepped on a whole step. And if I used my pinky, it's a whole step again, but also equals my open string E So I'm just gonna leave open thing. And again, if it was closed, I'm not going to use it open if I'm making it closed, so it's gonna be three whole step for 41 low 234 whole Step one low tuned Play it backwards on Ford's student backwards Open thing. And here's our other tones. But all right, so if I put the two scales together the first active and the second active, it looks like this thing way. And here's our backing track to be able to practice RG skill on with just the straight G scale and we can also make variations with it as well. We also still have all of our slides, of course, and um, this is at 70 beats per minute. It is one of the folk backing tracks, so it's key of G folk and then when you're practicing by yourself, just pick up a, uh, temple that fits you. So here we go. - Way . All right. Find that folk backing track at a speed of your choice and we'll see you in the next lesson . 39. Example - Tricks in the Key of G with Backing Track Example: Here's some tricks that we can use in the key of G. We have this G scale. We're going to take this third finger on a tone and, uh, see tone on a string, and we're gonna be ableto bounce those two notes off each other and then go to friends And then I'm gonna take thes two. I'm gonna move my ring finger up one but my middle finger comes up so that there's 1/2 space in between. So am the third front and the fifth fret, the fifth fret and the seven threat Theo seventh fret in the eighth front. So the first tone that I'm actually really gonna play is this team. It's really like open records. So it's just gonna be the B tone and a G tone thing. I want to go up all the way this time way. This is what it sounds like. Way I can also take jumps off of a denote while I'm playing notes on my a string. Same thing for notes that I'm playing on my d string. I can drone on open G. Theo knows that I'm playing up. Here are index meant your Aunt Aggie tone Ah, whole step for my second finger. Ah, whole step for my third finger and then 1/2 step for my pinky. Little what it sounds like. - All right, Once you're comfortable playing your tricks out of the key of G, go back to that folk G backing tracked to a temple of your choice, and we'll see you in the next lesson. 40. G Major Folk Backing Track 70 BPM: 70 beats per minute. 41. Example - G Minor Pentatonic Scale with Backing Track Example: in this lesson, we're gonna be learning the gene minor pentatonic scale. And we already know the D minor pentatonic scale Open and the Adam Steffey version three. And that was the same thing. With the open A and the Adam stepping, All right, The same thing happens with those open scales as the G as it is open scale. And that's gonna be that. Open that third open third fret the threat open dirt, Frett, Frett, Frett and the Adam Steffey version works Same thing, just like we did on our key of a in a key of d with difference Now comes in the next part. It's the second octave of RG minor pentatonic. So you start out with the third finger. That's a G tone on the D string on the fifth Fret now our fingers are gonna be all whole steps apart. B flat, C D f and Jean. I'm gonna include a B flat there and that's the sixth fret. All right, we're gonna listen to see what that sounds like if you want to follow along or try to follow along this awesome or make up your own things to the G scale as we're practicing along, but here we go way . Now that we understand at least the basics of the G minor pentatonic scale and that new position, try to incorporate that into your playing. Find the gene minor pentatonic backing track and use a tempo that's of your liking. This happens to be at 60 beats per minute. Maybe you wanna go faster. Maybe you want to go slower. What? However you choose it is going to be fine. So do some practice and we'll see you in the next lesson. 42. Example: Tricks in G Minor Pentatonic: Here's some tricks to play in our G minor pentatonic scale. When I find myself on a d tone on the a string, I'm gonna slide it down and then I want to immediately go to B flat on I'm gonna move it up to be And then I'm gonna resolve on a g tone e i e. I can also do partials of just that so I can play in just Onley and my B flat slide to be or I can just take my third finger and slide at that. Other things that can happen with my G scale is I can play a closed ah minor pentatonic form and that means my first fingers on a G tone. And then my next tone is on a B B flat. But it's the third finger, and that's gonna be on my 35 7/8 fret. My pinky is gonna be on my 10th fret and that repeats itself on the next string. E. Do that a couple times away, right? Let's see what that sounds like. - Way a lot, right? Go back to that G minor pentatonic backing track at a speed of your choosing inducing practice and we'll see you in the next lesson. 43. G Minor Pentatonic - 60 BPM Backing Track: 60 beats per minute, Yeah. 44. Key of E Rock Strumming Styles: I've had a special request to do some information on how do I play Rock Mandolin? And I decided to put this together for us. So he's gonna be in the key of E and we have to learn our record. We're gonna have a be toned things being tone here and Ito and we're gonna pat it, so play them together. We also have another be tone back here this fourth fret on the fourth string with the second finger and my strumming pattern is down down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down I can have up at just about any time if I wanted to But this is the basic points of this trump e can also dio e could also do all pulsating those whatever is more comfortable for you. And however you would like to do it, uh, up to your creative preference. So here's our e major chord. The next core that we're gonna play is an accord, and we're gonna have our finger on both of these tones the a tone here and then the, uh, e tone here, and I'm gonna strum all of this. Trio B is going to be just the same except thes. Two fingers are moved up. Two frets and all are the same. Let's hear what it sounds like. - Wait , wait. Now that we know how to strum along with this rocking backing track, we have to know the chord structures to be able to play along with it. And it's really what's called a 12 bar blues progression. So there's think of, uh, three lines of four measures when somebody calls it a bar. It's simply just a measure. So it could also be called 12 measure blues and a be synonymous. So the first line has four measures, and it's all gonna be that the 2nd 2 measures of the second line will be an accord. And then it'll go back on the last two measures of that Ah, that second line. So we had E and then we have a a goes back to e. And then the last line is be the first measures be. Then the next measure is a and then the last to measure is the last two measures is e and then e. And then it just repeats all over again. So again, we have e then we have a E. Then we have B A E, and that makes up our 12 bar blues. Okay, since I have that 12 bar blues pattern, uhm you might need to write it down and practice with that rock backing track in the key of e Do some practice with it and we'll see you in the next lesson. 45. Example - E Major / E Major Pentatonic for Rock: in this lesson, we're gonna be learning a rock scale that we can use to play to our rock backing track in the key of e The notes that we're going to use are going to be e a sharp g open a b de e on . We're gonna keep going up g a be And then the 10 friends and the 12 front, uh, notes that I can use that are underneath that are D Here's that be tone to second finger the one Let's play through those notes again. One is your fingers now 123 Open 13 Open E to three. I'm gonna shift to the seventh front with my first finger and then three and then four on the 10th fret and the 12th fret. All right, these air the frets that we're using to 45 Open to five Open 357 10 12 way. This is what it sounds like when we played along toe are backing track. All right, now that we know are e scale in how to play along with are backing track pick in e rock backing track that fits your speed and your ability to lots of practice. And when you're ready, we'll see you in the next lesson 46. Example - Advanced Tricks and Octaves - Putting it all together with Backing Track: one of the first things that we're gonna work on is this little riff. Sounds like this thing. When we play these notes, we're starting off with the G toned, then were physically plucking it off with our finger. Then we're taking a B talent and plucking it up some do it down. Fuck that. I'm gonna take this a tone and do the same thing, but I'm leaving this beat. Oh, I'm going to get up to this be town and do the same thing thing Really slow, pluck upwards. Pick a pluck upwards pick be toned. That's the fourth finger on the seventh. Fret open. Being Theo now it doesn't have to go back and forth. It can only go one way. If you wanted Teoh or backward, however you decide that you want to play, it is gonna be amazing. So this is how it sounds like next to our backing track. The next thing that we're going to do for affects for rock and roll looks like this. We're gonna take that 12 threat with her middle finger and we're gonna pluck it down. Then the middle finger plucks off, followed by an uptick. So I did. Together we have 12th front pluck downs. What actually plucks the string followed by an uptick way. Once we can do that fast and it may take quite a wild affair, you can get up to speed. We're going to use this these notes out of our e scale that we know how to play followed bythe. Then I'm gonna go to the next set of dots the next set of dance. What? I'm using this type of a form I can play anyway that I want to I can go down the scale or I can go up this gun. It doesn't really matter what I do as long as I use that effect and amusing e tones to be able to make that effect. So this is what it sounds like with the backing track. The next effect that we're going to use is something called octaves, and it's simply an active, complaining e tone followed by an e town. My index player from follows on one e and my pinky plays the next year. Now this octave here comes up to t o to the 10th front on the 15 threat and it's gonna go Teoh really slow is So what I'm coming back for from here. I'm going to that 10th fret to the nine threat to the 9th 10th fret to the main threat to the 10th Brett to the ninth Front and then finally back to my 12 in sin. Here's how we can use it along with are backing tracks. Besides using those actives, we can use octaves that are in our first oxygen thieve. That's the fifth fret. Theis is the seventh front. This'd is the ninth Fret and we're gonna get the 12 front Theun, we're going to go up to the 14th fret after our octaves were still gonna use our index finger on a e tone and the notes that we're going to use our first finger and 1/3 finger now First finger will go on the e tone. I have a whole step in between my second finger and my first finger. And then my third finger is 1/2 step in between my second finger and my third finger. And when a drone e when I d. O e dropped down to my d tone, that's the seventh notes of the scale. And then come back up to you. All right? This is what it sounds like when I put it all together. Way, way. For a lot of folks, that rock stuff is pretty advanced. So take your time doing it. Make sure that you're picking a pretty slow rock backing track that you can play along with were playing at 100 and two beats per minute, and we're doing it for that rock and roll effect So you can actually hear what that sounds like when it finally comes together. But for most of us will be probably playing at a much slower pace. So do a lot of practice do a whole lot of practice on that rock n roll If RocknRolla something you want to play, Thanks so much for taking this course. It's meant a lot that you chose me as your instructor, and I tried to give you asthma much information I possibly could. In this course. If you have any questions at all, you can always reach out to me. Just send me a message and I generally answer everything within 24 to 48 hours, wishing you the best of luck in your future mandolin endeavors and wishing you the best and whatever you dio 47. E Rock Minor Pentatonic 100 BPM Backing Track: 100 beats per minute. Um 48. Class Tools 1 - 60 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic: 60 beats per minute way, Uh 49. Class Tools 1 - 70 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic: 70 beats per minute day . 50. Class Tools 1 - 80 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic: 80 beats per minute. 51. Class Tools 1 - 90 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic: 90 beats per minute, way, - way . 52. Class Tools 1 - 100 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic: 100 beats per minute, - way , - way , way, way. 53. Class Tools 1 - 110 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic: 110 beats per minute, way, way. 54. Class Tools 1 - 120 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic: 120 beats per minute, - way , way, - way . 55. Class Tools 1 - 130 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic: 130 beats per minute, way, way, way, way. 56. Class Tools 1 - 140 BPM - D Minor Pentatonic: 140 beats per minute, way, way. 57. Class Tools 2 - 60 BPM - Mandolin Key of A - Folk: 60 beats per minute. 58. Class Tools 2 - 70 BPM - Mandolin Key of A - Folk: 70 beats per minute, Yeah. 59. Class Tools 2 - 80 BPM - Key of A - Folk: 80 beats per minute, okay? 60. Class Tools 2 - 90 BPM - Key of A - Folk: 90 beats per minute, okay? 61. Class Tools 2 - 100 BPM - Key of A - Folk: 100 beats per minute. 62. Class Tools 2 - 110 BPM - Key of A - Folk: 110 beats per minute. 63. Class Tools 2 - 120 BPM - Key of A - Folk: 120 beats per minute. 64. Class Tools 2 - 130 BPM - Key of A - Folk: 130 beats per minute. 65. Class Tools 2 - 140 BPM - Key of A - Folk: 140 beats per minute, - okay ? 66. Class Tools 3 - 60 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic: 60 beats per minute. - Uh 67. Class Tools 3 - 70 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic: 70 beats per minute. 68. Class Tools 3 - 80 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic: 80 beats per minute. 69. Class Tools 3 - 90 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic: 90 beats per minute. 70. Class Tools 3 - 100 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic: 100 beats per minute. 71. Class Tools 3 - 110 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic: 110 beats per minute. 72. Class Tools 3 - 120 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic: 120 beats per minute. 73. Class Tools 3 - 130 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic: 130 beats per minute. 74. Class Tools 3 - 140 BPM - A Minor Pentatonic: 140 beats per minute way. 75. Class Tools 4 - 60 BPM - Key of B Folk: 60 beats per minute work . 76. Class Tools 4 - 70 BPM - Key of B Folk: 70 beats per minute, - okay ? 77. Class Tools 4 - 80 BPM - Key of B Folk: 80 beats per minute. 78. Class Tools 4 - 90 BPM - Key of B Folk: 90 beats per minute. 79. Class Tools 4 - 100 BPM - Key of B Folk: 100 beats per minute, No. 80. Class Tools 4 - 110 BPM - Key of B Folk: 110 beats per minute. 81. Class Tools 4 - 120 BPM - Key of B Folk: 120 beats per minute. 82. Class Tools 4 - 130 BPM - Key of B Folk: 130 beats per minute. 83. Class Tools 4 - 140 BPM - Key of B Folk: 140 beats per minute. 84. Class Tools 5 - 60 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic: 60 beats per minute way, do you? 85. Class Tools 5 - 70 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic: 70 beats per minute, way, way, - way . 86. Class Tools 5 - 80 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic: 80 beats per minute, - way , - way , - way , way, - way , - way , way, - way , - way . 87. Class Tools 5 - 90 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic: 90 beats per minute, way, way, way, way, way they way. 88. Class Tools 5 - 100 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic: 100 beats per minute, - way , way, - way , way, way, - way . 89. Class Tools 5 - 110 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic: 110 beats per minute, - way , way, - way , way, way, - way , way, way, - way , - way . 90. Class Tools 5 - 120 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic: 120 beats per minute, - way , way, way, - way . 91. Class Tools 5 - 130 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic: 130 beats per minute, way, way, - way , - way . 92. Class Tools 5 - 140 BPM - B Minor Pentatonic: 140 beats per minute, way, - way . 93. Class Tools 6 - 60 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop: 60 beats per minute. 94. Class Tools 6 - 70 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop: 70 beats per minute way . 95. Class Tools 6 - 80 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop: 80 beats per minute, No. 96. Class Tools 6 - 90 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop: 90 beats per minute. 97. Class Tools 6 - 110 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop: 110 beats per minute. 98. Class Tools 6 - 120 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop: 120 beats per minute. 99. Class Tools 6 - 130 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop: 130 beats per minute. 100. Class Tools 6 - 140 BPM - G Bluegrass Chop: 140 beats per minute, way, way. 101. Class Tools 7 - 60 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop: 60 beats per minute four. 102. Class Tools 7 - 70 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop: 70 beats per minute. 103. Class Tools 7 - 80 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop: 80 beats per minute. - Thank you. 104. Class Tools 7 - 90 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop: 90 beats per minute way. 105. Class Tools 7 - 100 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop: 100 beats per minute. 106. Class Tools 7 - 110 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop: 110 beats per minute, way, - way . 107. Class Tools 7 - 120 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop: 120 beats per minute way . 108. Class Tools 7 - 130 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop: 130 beats per minute. 109. Class Tools 7 - 140 BPM - D Bluegrass Chop: 140 beats per minute. 110. Class Tools 8 - 60 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop: 60 beats per minute. - Okay , - way , - way . 111. Class Tools 8 - 70 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop: 70 beats per minute. 112. Class Tools 8 - 80 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop: 80 beats per minute. 113. Class Tools 8 - 90 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop: 90 beats per minute. 114. Class Tools 8 - 110 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop: 110 beats per minute. 115. Class Tools 8 - 120 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop: 120 beats per minute, way, way, - way . 116. Class Tools 8 - 130 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop: 130 beats per minute. 117. Class Tools 8 - 140 BPM - C Bluegrass Chop: 140 beats per minute way. 118. Class Tools 9 - 60 BPM - G Folk: 60 beats per minute. 119. Class Tools 9 - 70 BPM - G Folk: 70 beats per minute. 120. Class Tools 9 - 80 BPM - G Folk: 80 beats per minute. 121. Class Tools 9 - 90 BPM - G Folk: 90 beats per minute. 122. Class Tools 9 - 110 BPM - G Folk: 110 beats per minute. 123. Class Tools 9 - 120 BPM - G Folk: 120 beats per minute. 124. Class Tools 9 - 130 BPM - G Folk: 130 beats per minute, but 125. Class Tools 9 - 140 BPM - G Folk: 140 beats per minute. 126. Class Tools 10 - 60 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic: 60 beats per minute, Yeah. 127. Class Tools 10 - 70 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic: 70 beats per minute. 128. Class Tools 10 - 80 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic: 80 beats per minute. 129. Class Tools 10 - 90 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic: 90 beats per minute that 130. Class Tools 10 - 110 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic: 110 beats per minute. 131. Class Tools 10 - 120 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic: 120 beats per minute. 132. Class Tools 10 - 130 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic: 130 beats per minute. 133. Class Tools 10 - 140 BPM - G Minor Pentatonic: 140 beats per minute. 134. Class Tools 11 - 60 BPM - E Folk: 60 beats per minute. 135. Class Tools 11 - 70 BPM - E Folk: 70 beats per minute. 136. Class Tools 11 - 80 BPM - E Folk: 80 beats per minute like school. 137. Class Tools 11 - 90 BPM - E Folk: 90 beats per minute. 138. Class Tools 11 - 110 BPM - E Folk: 110 beats per minute. - Oh ! 139. Class Tools 11 - 120 BPM - E Folk: 120 beats per minute. - Okay . Oh. 140. Class Tools 11 - 130 BPM - E Folk: 130 beats per minute, okay? 141. Class Tools 11 - 140 BPM - E Folk: 140 beats per minute. 142. Class Tools 12 - 60 BPM - E Rock: 60 beats per minute. 143. Class Tools 12 - 70 BPM - E Rock: 70 beats per minute. Uh uh Oh. - Uh huh Uh 144. Class Tools 12 - 80 BPM - E Rock: 80 beats per minute. - Uh huh. And 145. Class Tools 12 - 90 BPM - E Rock: 90 beats per minute. 146. Class Tools 12 - 100 BPM - E Rock: 100 beats per minute. Um 147. Class Tools 12 - 110 BPM - E Rock: 110 beats per minute. 148. Class Tools 12 - 120 BPM - E Rock: 120 beats per minute. 149. Class Tools 12 - 130 BPM - E Rock: 130 beats per minute and 150. Class Tools 12 - 140 BPM - E Rock: 140 beats per minute. - Uh