Learn Blender 3D: Become a 3D Illustrator by Mastering Blender | Arash Ahadzadeh | Skillshare

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Learn Blender 3D: Become a 3D Illustrator by Mastering Blender

teacher avatar Arash Ahadzadeh, iOS Developer & UI Designer

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

44 Lessons (6h 56m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:32
    • 2. Course Structure

      1:16
    • 3. What's Blender?

      1:12
    • 4. Introduction to Blender

      2:52
    • 5. Blender Interface

      2:11
    • 6. Navigation

      7:27
    • 7. Transformation

      12:41
    • 8. Workspaces

      3:20
    • 9. Object Mode Vs. Edit Mode

      4:03
    • 10. How to Add an Object to Your Scene

      8:08
    • 11. Mesh Anatomy

      6:55
    • 12. Modeling Tools

      27:30
    • 13. Object Origins

      19:30
    • 14. Proportional Editing

      7:48
    • 15. Modifiers - Part 1

      20:04
    • 16. Modifiers - Part 2

      12:45
    • 17. Light Types

      8:41
    • 18. Materials

      7:25
    • 19. Rendering

      6:57
    • 20. Introduction to the Project

      0:40
    • 21. Modeling Terrain

      10:29
    • 22. Modeling Rocks

      8:00
    • 23. Modeling Palm Trees

      18:06
    • 24. Modeling Surfing Boards

      5:28
    • 25. Modeling - Sea

      9:12
    • 26. Scene Composition

      12:22
    • 27. Applying Materials to Your Objects

      7:27
    • 28. Add Realistic Lighting to Your Scene

      9:10
    • 29. Prepare Your Scene For Rendering

      5:00
    • 30. Render Your Scene

      4:53
    • 31. Introduction to the Project

      0:32
    • 32. Modeling - Room & Windows

      13:35
    • 33. Modeling - Couch

      18:03
    • 34. Modeling - Desk & Chair

      16:27
    • 35. Modeling - Computer

      19:47
    • 36. Modeling - Carpet

      6:05
    • 37. Modeling - Pot & Plant

      10:56
    • 38. Modeling - Shelves & Books

      7:17
    • 39. Modeling - Secondary Objects

      15:51
    • 40. Applying Materials

      37:20
    • 41. Lighting - Day

      9:11
    • 42. Render Your Scene

      4:30
    • 43. Lighting - Night

      2:47
    • 44. What's the Next Step?

      0:50
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About This Class

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This course has been prepared using the latest version of Blender (3.0 or above).

Do you want to become a 3D illustrator, but you don't know how to start? Have you ever wanted to create realistic 3D models for your design projects? This course will allow you to develop your 3D design skills, and you can add 3D illustrator to your CV and start getting clients for your skills.

Hi everyone. I'm Arash, and I'm a designer. In the past few years, I helped over 50,000 designers worldwide to build their own design businesses from the ground up. In this course, I will help you learn and master Blender comprehensively from scratch and become a 3D illustrator.

Blender is one of the most powerful 3D software in the market that many design agencies use. In fact, Netflix used Blender for one of its movies. You can use it for video games, visual effects, animations, 3D illustrations, and many more.

Many designers think that 3D modeling is hard and complex, but I will teach you how to build amazing 3D illustrations in a simple, fun, and engaging way.

This is not another 3D design course where you just learn theories. Instead, we will only focus on practical and essential things you need to know to become a 3D artist.

In the first part of the course, I will teach you the basics of 3D design, and we will go through all the features of Blender in the Blender Academy section. In the second part of the course, you will put everything you learned into practice by creating a 3D low-poly beach step by step from scratch. Next, we will dive into a more advanced project and create a 3D modern room with many objects such as a desk, computer, couch, carpet, plant, etc. Throughout these projects, you will learn about realistic and stylized modeling, materials, textures, 3D lighting, rendering, and so much more.

With over 7 hours of content across 40+ lectures, I will take you from beginner to expert, and teach you everything you need to know in order to use Blender professionally.

An amazing course for people with zero 3D design experience or for experienced 2D designers who want to learn and master Blender and become a 3D illustrator. By the end of this course, you’ll have two complete real-world projects for your own portfolio, and every student will have the knowledge and confidence to apply for a 3D illustration job.

Course highlights:

  • Mastering Blender

  • Advanced Tips & Tricks

  • Build two complete 3D illustration projects.

So, what are you waiting for? Join the class!!

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Arash Ahadzadeh

iOS Developer & UI Designer

Teacher

I am a UI/UX Designer & an iOS developer with having almost four years of experience in application development and also ten years of graphic design and UI/UX design.
My passion is helping people to learn new skills in a short-term course and achieve their goals. I've been designing for more than ten years and developing iOS apps for four years. It's my honor if I could help you to learn to program in a simple word. I currently am teaching, Figma, Sketch, iOS 13, Swift 5, Illustrator, Photoshop, Cinema 4d, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, etc.

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Have you ever wanted to become a 3D designer but didn't know how to start? If so, you are in the right place. Hi, I'm Orash and I'm a designer. I also teach 3D design at the University of Economics and Human Sciences in Warsaw. 3D design is all about telling a story. In this course I'm going to show you how to become a 3D illustrator using Blender to tell your own story. Blender is one of the most powerful 3D software in the market that many design agencies use. In fact, Netflix used Blender for one of its movies. Yes, you heard it right. This course has been designed for people who are completely new to 3D design or let's say design in general. First, we're going to go through the 3D design fundamentals and everything you need to know about Blender and its features. Then we will jump into the fun part, which is designing real world projects. During this course you and I are going to work on two separate projects from scratch, a 3D low poly beach and a modern 3D room. Throughout these projects you will learn about realistic and stylized modeling, materials, textures, 3D lighting, rendering, and so much more. I'll also show you some cool techniques to bring your design to life. Whether you are a graphic designer, a UI UX designer, or interested in NFTs, knowing how to design 3D illustrations is a must-have skill nowadays. If you are ready to become a 3D illustrator, I'll see you in class. 2. Course Structure: Hey everyone. Welcome to the first lesson of this course. In this video, we're going to talk about the course structure and how you can proceed with it. Well, in the first section of the course, you will learn about Blender, which is the software we are going to use throughout this course. You will learn about its interface tools, features, etc. If you're not familiar with Blender at all, I highly recommend going through the Blender academy section of this course to be prepared for the following sections. On the other hand, if you have already used Blender and know how it works, you can jump into the project section and start working on a real-world project. After the Blender academy section, we will work on two separate projects from scratch. For each project, I will share some tips and tricks with you and also the most practical techniques for modeling, shading, lighting, and rendering. You can download the project files for each project in the resources section. Last but not least, I would appreciate it if you could leave an honest review of the course so that I could make it better and better for you. See you in the following video. 3. What's Blender?: What's Blender? You may or may not know the answer to this question. But for those who don't, Blender is a piece of 3D software with countless tools and features that allows you to use it for various purposes. You can use it for video games, visual effects, animation, 3D illustrations, and many more. It's open source, which means you can use it for any reason for free and also you can contribute to it to make it a better tool. But just because it's free, it doesn't mean that it's not useful for complex and real-world projects. Many famous companies are supporting Blender financially to make it better and better, like Amazon, Adobe, Microsoft, Google, etc. We can easily say that blender is the best free 3D software in the market and many design agencies use Blender for their projects. As I mentioned before, there are many things we can use Blender for, but in this course, we're going to focus on 3D illustrations, which is an exciting topic. So I'll see you in the next video. 4. Introduction to Blender: Hey everyone, welcome to the first video of the blender academy section. In this video, I'm going to show you how to download Blender and which version you should get. To download Blender, you need to go to Blender.org. If you open up this website, this is the official website of blender. You will find this download Blender button right here. If you just hit this button, you will be taken to the download page. Here you will see this large blue button which says download Blender version 3.0.1. This is the latest available version of Blender. Basically, this website automatically detects your operating system so you don't need to go ahead and change this setting here. But if for any reason you want to download another installer, you can simply head over to this drop menu and choose your desired installer. For instance, if you're using an M1 Mac, you can head over to this drop menu and choose MacOS, Apple, silicon. Right now you just need to hit this download Blender button to download the latest version of Blender, I highly recommend downloading the latest Blender version, since this is going to be the most stable version for production work. Right now the latest version is 3.0.1. In your case, it could be different, but as long as it's 3.something, you are going to be fine. Download it. Great. As you can see, the installer has been downloaded and you can simply open it up and follow the steps. Installation process is so smooth, so I don't need to go through that. But once it's installed, you need to open it up and you will see this page. Well, this is the splash screen. When you open up Blender for the first time, you might see some settings here. For example, the language of the interface, you can simply modify that. But since this is not the first time I open up Blender, I'm not going to see that once you choose your preferences, you will be taken to this page. Here you can basically create a new file and you will see all your recent files. To close this splash screen, you just need to click somewhere else. For example, here and there it is. Whenever you create a new project in blender, you will see something like this. It's strange, but this is a very famous cube because as I said, once you create a project, this is what you see always. You will see a cube right here. You will see a camera, this is the camera, and a light. Don't worry about these elements if you don't know what they are, because we're going to talk about them one by one. For now the only thing that matters is that you go to Blender.org, download the proper installer, and install it on your system, and that's all. In the next video we're going to talk about the blender interface. See you then. 5. Blender Interface: Hey, welcome back. In this video we're going to talk about the interface of Blender. Basically, we can divide the whole interface into four main parts. The 3D view, which is this large part, the outliner, which is this part, the property panels, which is right here. Finally, the timeline right at the bottom. When you open up Blender for the first time, you may say, "Wow, it's a complex app" and indeed it is. But don't worry because I'm going to walk you through everything you need in order to become a great 3D illustrator. Let's talk about the 3D view. This is where we spend 90 percent of our time as a 3D designer, we can create a model here, we can rotate around our model. This is where we create our 3D model. We add materials to it, we add lights to it, and finally, we will prepare it for the final render. There are many tools around this section that we will talk about in our future videos. But for now you need to understand that this is where we create our 3D models and where we can add our objects. Now let's talk about the outliner. Well, if you are a 2D designer, you might be familiar with the layers list. The outliner works just like the layers list in other software. Here we can organize all our elements such as shapes, lights, camera, and also we can create different collections. A collection is basically a group. Here right at the bottom we have different property panels. These are so important and we're going to go through the most important panels during this course, so don't worry about them right now. The last section is the timeline, which is placed right here, and it's used for animating our objects. It's not what we're focusing on in this course. We're not going to talk about animating. We're going to learn how to create a 3D illustration. Don't worry about the timeline for now. That's all for this video. In the next video we're going to talk about navigation in Blender, which is so important. See you then. 6. Navigation: [MUSIC] Hey, welcome back. In this video, we're going to talk about navigation in Blender, which is very important because when we work on a 3D scene, we navigate to different parts of our scene a lot. It's very important for you to know how you can navigate in Blender. There are many ways you can choose to navigate in Blender, and I'm going to show you all those ways and then you can decide which way suits your needs. First of all, let me mention something. I use an add-on to show you the hotkeys that I use so you don't have it installed right now and you don't need it. Whenever I press a key on my keyboard or on my mouse, you will see that hotkey right here on the bottom left corner. If I hold down the Shift key, you will see it says shift. If I left-click, you will see this mouse appears here. Most of the time when I hit something, I will say that. But in case I forget to say something, you can always take a look at this section to understand what I'm pressing. Let's get into it. If you head over to the top right corner here, you will see a bunch of options. We have this large gizmo, and we have these options. Let's start with this zoom icon. If you just left-click on it and then move your mouse down or up, you can zoom in or zoom out, just like this. Right underneath you will find this hand icon. If I just left-click on it and drag, I can pan around just like that. Then we have this camera icon. If I just click on it, I can see the camera view, and if I just click on it once again, I can see the user perspective. We are not going to need that for now. Then this grid icon allows us to toggle between the perspective view and orthographic view, just like this. The orthographic view just disables the perspective distortion, which we will talk about later. What you need is this zoom icon, this hand icon. Here right at the top we have this gizmo. If you just hover over here, you will see this white area appears. If I just click and drag on this white area, just like that, I can orbit around by object, which is quite fun, if it's your first time working in a 3D environment. Just like that, I can easily orbit around my element. Here you will find three different axis. If you click on this x-axis, you will be taken to the right orthographic view. You can see the name of this view here right on the top left corner. If I click on z, I will be taken to the top orthographic view, and if I click on y, I will be taken to the back orthographic view. You can also click on minus y to go to the front view, minus x as well to go to the left view, and minus z to go to the bottom view. This is how you can orbit around in Blender, but this is not the best way to do that because when you want to create a 3D model and a 3D scene, you don't want to always go to these buttons and try to pan around or orbit around. It's going to be a tedious process. There is a better way to do that, and I'm going to show you. Basically I'm going to divide this part of video into two different parts. The first part is dedicated to those people who use a three button mouse with a left-click, right-click, and middle mouse button, the scroll wheel, and also another part which is dedicated to those people who don't use a three-button mouse, like those who have a trackpad, using a laptop, etc. Let's talk about the first part and for those people who have a three-button mouse. First of all let me mention something. If you really want to become a 3D designer, I highly recommend getting a three-button mouse because it's going to make your life much, much easier. But if you can't, that's all right. You can still work in Blender perfectly. If you have a three-button mouse, you can click and hold your middle mouse button to orbit around your object, like this. You can use your middle mouse button to zoom in and zoom out as well. Then if you hold the Shift key and use your middle mouse button, you can shift around your scene, just like this. To the left, to the right, to the top, to the bottom, and that's all. Once again, if you want to orbit around your scene, you just need to hold your middle mouse button and then move your mouse, just like that. If you want to shift around, you can hold down the Shift key and then use your middle mouse button and move your mouse like this. If you want to zoom in and zoom out, you can use your middle mouse button just like this. But now let's talk about those who don't have a three button mouse. In that case, you just need to go to the Edit right here, then head over to the Preferences, and from here go to Input, not Navigation, go to Input. Right here we have this mouse section. You can enable this emulate three-button mouse. When you enable this option, you can use the Alt key on your keyboard, hold down the Alt key, and left-click on your trackpad and then you can orbit around your scene. If you want to shift around, you can hold down the Alt key and Shift key and then left-click and drag, just like that. If you want to zoom in or zoom out, hold down Alt and Ctrl, and then left-click, just like this. That's how you can navigate in Blender. Right now I'm going to talk about a few hotkeys in Blender because if you want to work in Blender professionally, you need to learn them. It's going to accelerate your design process and it's going to make your life much, much easier. As you remember, I told you that you can hit over to this gizmo and you can click on one of these axis, for example, x to go to the right orthographic view, click on z to go to the top orthographic view, etc. But if you hover over each axis, for example, x, you will see its shortcut appears. It says Numpad 3. If you have a numpad, you can use these shortcuts to switch to a different view. For example, if you want to go to the top view, you can use number 7. It's the same as hitting z here. If you want to go to the front view, you can use number 1. It's the same as hitting minus y. If you want to go to the right view, you can hit number 3. It's the same as hitting x. But what if you don't have a numpad? Well, don't worry. You can still go to Edit Preferences, and here in the input, you will see this keyboard section right above the mouse section. You can enable this emulate numpad. If I hover over it, it says main 1-0 keys act as the numpad ones useful for laptops. That's exactly what you need. So you can enable it, and then your main numbers on your keyboard will act as a numpad. All right, guys. That's all for this video. I hope you enjoyed it. I'll see you in the next one. 7. Transformation: [MUSIC] Hey, welcome back. In this video, we're going to talk about transformation in Blender. There are many things we need to discuss, so let's get into it. First of all, before you could move an element or let's say transform it in any way, you need to understand how to select an element, because first, you need to select something, then you can perform an operation. To select an object, you can simply left-click on it. For example, if you want to select this cube, you can just hover over it and left-click on it. As soon as I left-click on it, you can see that it's being highlighted both on the 3D view and also in the outliner. As you can see, our cube is selected and it's highlighted. If I click on this light, you can see that now this object is highlighted. The same thing applies to the outliner. If I click on camera, you will see that now our camera is highlighted. When you select different objects, you can see that these properties on the property panels changed. That's because each object has different properties that you can modify in Blender. Don't worry about all these properties, we will talk about them later. But now I'm going to show you how you can select multiple objects. To select multiple objects simultaneously, you can simply hold down the Shift key on your keyboard and then left-click on your objects. Just like that. I'm not sure if you have noticed or not, but right now when I selected multiple elements, one of them is highlighted in a different way with a different color. This camera is highlighted with a bright orange color, but these two elements are highlighted with this dull orange color. What's the difference between these elements? Well, when you click on an element in Blender, it will be selected as an active element. Right now this cube is our active element. What do I mean by active? Well, when an element is selected as an active element, it gives us different abilities to modify it. For example, when this cube is active, we can modify these cube's properties rather than this camera properties. Let's suppose I select all of these elements. I'm going to start with this cube. I'm going to select it, hold down the Shift key, select the camera, then hold down the Shift key and select the light. The last element you select will always be your active element. Therefore, if you want to modify these properties, you can see it says Light, you can adjust the property of your light elements, not these two. That's one thing to consider when you select your elements. there are many different things we can do with an active element that I will talk about later. Now if you want to make this cube active, you can simply hold down the Shift key and left-click on this, and now our cube is active. If you want to modify the properties of this, let's say camera here, you can hold down the Shift key again, left-click on it, and now our camera is active. As you can see, it's indicated with this bright yellow color in the outliner as well. If you head over to the toolbar right on the left side, you can see right at the top we have this selection tool. We have a few selection tools if you just left-click and hold on this first, let's say icon, this cursor icon, you can see we have different options. We don't need to talk about them right now, but by default, this select box tool is selected. When the select box tool is selected, you can simply left-click somewhere and drag to select multiple elements. We have, for example, this tweak option. If you click on it, you can select an element, and then you can move it around. We will talk about moving elements around in a few minutes. But this is one thing to keep in mind. Most of the time we use this select box, and that's why by default, this tool is selected. Now that's our cube is selected and you learned how you can select an element, let's talk about transformation. How we can move this object, how we can rotate it, and how we can scale it up and down. I'm going to make sure that this cube is selected. As you can see, it's active, and if you head over to this property panel, this orange icon, as you can see here, you can see this transform panel. We have a bunch of properties. We have location X, Y, and Z-axis. We have rotation X, Y, and Z-axis. We have scale X, Y, and Z-axis. By default, the location is set to 0, 0, 0. If you want to move it along the X-axis, you can simply modify this X value. You can just left-click on it and drag just like this, and I can move it along the X-axis. If I want to move it along the Y-axis, I can just left-click and drag here, and the same thing applies to the Z-axis, just like that. If I want to rotate it along one axis, I can simply left-click and drag this way. To undo an operation, you can simply hit Command Z or Control Z on your keyboard multiple times, just like this. Now if you want to scale it up, you can simply head over to the scale section and left-click and drag to scale it along at the X-axis, the Y-axis, and the Z-axis. Let me undo these operations. This is one way to transform your object. I showed you how you can move your object, how you can rotate it, and how you can scale it, but definitely, there is a much better way to do that. That is using these tools, the transformation tools on the left side, right in the toolbar. Right under the selection tools, here we have the move tool. If I just select it, you will see this gizmo appears with three different arrows indicating our axis. For example, if I want to move it along the Y-axis, I can click on this green arrow and drag, just like that. If I want to move it along the X-axis, I can click on this red arrow and drag it just like this. If I want to move it along the Z-axis, I can just click on this blue arrow and move it up and down. We have these little squares as well. If you want to move your object along two different axes, you can use these squares. For example, this red allows you to move your elements along both Z and Y-axis according to your viewport. This one, this blue one, allows you to move your object along the X and Y-axis, and this one allows you to move your objects along the Z and X-axis, just like that. But here we have this little circle as well, this white circle. If you just hover over it and left-click and drag, you can move your object freely according to your view. I am going to hit Control Z or Command Z to undo the operations. If you want to reset all these properties, you can simply select your object, head over to the Object menu here, go to Clear and click on Rotation for instance. Now let's talk about the next tool, which is the rotation tool. If I click on it, you will see this new gizmo appears. It's quite funny. If I left-click in this red circle, I can rotate it along the X-axis. If I left-click on this green circle, I can rotate it along the Y-axis, and if I left-click on this blue circle and drag, I can rotate it along the Z-axis just like this. If I want to rotate it along multiple axes, I can hover over this white circle, left-click on it, and drag. If you want to rotate it incrementally, you can simply hold down the Control key on your keyboard and then left-click and drag, then you will see these lines and they help you to rotate incrementally. If you take a look at the top-left corner of my screen, you will see the rotation degree 75, 80, 85, 90. It's quite helpful sometimes. Great. That's all about rotation. Now let's talk about the next tool which is scale. If you want to scale your object up and down, you can use this gizmo. If I use this little box, this green box, it allows me to scale my object, along the Y-axis, like that. This one allows me to scale my object along the Z-axis, and this one along the X-axis. If you want to scale your object along all axis, you can just left-click on this large circle, just like this, and scale your object down and up just like that. The next tool is the all-in-one transformation tool. If I just click on it, you will see all our gizmo appear here. You can simply rotate your object, you can move it around, and you can also scale it if you want. It's quite helpful. This is how you can transform your object in Blender. But this is not the best way because professional designers always tend to accelerate their design process. You need to learn a few hotkeys to make your life much easier even if you want to learn something from a tutorial nowadays, most designers, almost all of them use Blender hotkeys. It's a good practice to learn them and they are quite simple, so let me show you. I'm going to undo the operation. Let me select the selection tool, and let's suppose you want to move this object. The hotkey for moving an object in Blender is a G for grabs. If I hit G on my keyboard, I can easily move my object around just like that, freely. But you may ask how you can lock this move tool along one axis. That's a good question. While I'm in the move mode, I can hit Y to lock it along the Y-axis. I can hit X to lock it along the X-axis, and I can hit Z to lock it along the Z-axis. Just like this. Once again, hit G, then Y to move it along the Y-axis. To confirm, you just need to left-click then G, X to move it along the X-axis, left-click to confirm. You need to always confirm it before you go to the next action then G, Z, and move it up and down and left-click to confirm. That's how you can move an object in Blender using a hotkey, G for grab. Keep that in mind. I'm going to hit Control Z or Command Z a few times, just like this. Now let's rotate this object. To rotate it, you just need to hit R to select the rotation tool, and then you can freely rotate it. But if you want to rotate it along a specific axis, you can hit, for example, Y to rotate it along the Y-axis, X to rotate it along the X-axis, and Z to rotate it along the Z-axis. The next hotkey is S for scale. Hit S. You can freely scale it up and down, and if you want to lock it along one axis, you know what to do. You just need to hit S, Y to lock it along the Y-axis, left-click to confirm. S and X to lock it along the X-axis, left-click to confirm, and S and Z to lock it along the Z-axis. Just like that, you learned how the transformation works in Blender. Now I want you to go ahead and practice all these tools, especially make sure to practice those hotkeys because they are so important when we start working on our projects, I'm going to use those hotkeys. Use G, R, and S to transform your shape. All right guys, I hope you enjoyed this video and I'll see you in the next video. 8. Workspaces: [MUSIC] Blender has different predefined window layouts that you can use depending on your needs. These predefined layouts are called workspaces. Here right at the top you can see we have different workspaces. We have layout, modeling, sculpting, UV editing, texture paint, shading, animation, rendering, compositing, geometry nodes, and scripting. We have also this plus button, which allows us to add our own workspace and customize it however we want. Whenever you open up Blender, you are in the layout workspace by default. This workspace by default has four different editors. We have the 3D viewport, which is this large area. We already talked about it. We have the outliner, then we have the property panels, and right at the bottom we have the timeline. These are all called editors. Each workspace could give you a different window layout in order to help you achieve something specific. For example, if you want to create a 3D model, you can head over to the modeling workspace right here. As you can see, since we don't need the timeline for modeling, the timeline is gone. You need to keep in mind that you can add your own workspace and customize it however you want. But for now, don't worry about it, it's not needed. The modeling workspace allows you to modify your geometry. We've been talking about the geometry in our upcoming videos. This sculpting workspace allows you to modify the mesh by sculpting tools. The UV editing is actually for mapping a 2D image texture coordinates to a 3D surface. We are not going to talk about UV editing right now, but you need to know that whenever we want to add a texture to an object, we need to use the UV editing, which is quite helpful. We have the texture paint, it gives us some tools for coloring image textures in the 3D viewport. We can use shading, which is another important workspace, and it gives us some tools to add materials to our objects. The animation workspace allows us to animate our objects. The rendering workspace is dedicated to render results. If you want to analyze your render results, that's where you can find your renders. What about compositing? Well, the compositing workspace is used for post-processing of images. For example, if you want to add an effect to your final render like a glow, you can do it right here. We have the geometry nodes. It's used for procedural modeling using geometry nodes. It's way more advanced, so we're not going to talk about it right now. Finally, we have scripting. Here, we can write some code to add more functionalities to Blender, which is not our purpose in this course. Most of the time we are going to use this layout workspace because we want to see our 3D viewport, our outliner, the property panels and a timeline. All right. That's all about workspaces in Blender. I hope you enjoyed it and I'll see you in the next one. 9. Object Mode Vs. Edit Mode: [MUSIC] In Blender, we have different modes to work with. For example, we have object mode, we have edit mode, etc. To see the mode you're in, you need to head over to this top-left part, and here as you can see, it says Object Mode. If I open up this drop menu, you will see we have a few other modes, for example, Edit Mode, which is the most important one, we have Sculpt Mode, we have Vertex Paint, Weight Paint, and Texture Paint. You need to understand that not all objects have these modes, but what's the difference between them? Well, for now we're not going to focus on these four modes because we are not going to use them a lot for now. But let's talk about object mode and edit mode. Well, whenever you want to modify your object as a whole, you need to be in the object mode. For example, if you want to move your object around as a whole, you need to make sure to be in the object mode and then you can use the hotkeys, for example, G to move it around, or you can scale it up just like this. But whenever you want to edit your object, you need to enter the edit mode. To enter the edit mode, you have two ways. You can either go to the modeling workspace. As you can see, as soon as I go to the Modeling workspace, the mode has been changed to the Edit Mode. But there is an alternative, you can simply stay in the Layout workspace and then change the mode from Object to Edit here. Lastly, you can use the hotkey, which is way more convenient than going ahead and manually modifying your mode. The hotkey for switching between object mode and edit mode is the Tab key on your keyboard. If you press Tab once, you will enter the edit mode, and if you want to get back to the object mode, you need to hit it once again, just like that. When you are in the edit mode, you will get access to all these modification tools, or let's say modeling tools to create a new shape, to modify it however you want. Basically, when you create a 3D model and you want to modify it, you need to modify its mesh data. To modify the mesh data, you need to enter the edit mode. I'm going to show you an example right now, but it may not make sense because we didn't talk about the anatomy of mesh. But don't worry in the upcoming videos, we're going to go through all these topics. Right now, when we are in the edit mode, we can get access to vertices, edges, and faces. Well, vertices are these little dots as you can see, edges are these lines, and faces are these squares, just like this. As I said, we will talk about the mesh anatomy in our upcoming videos. But for now, I just want to show you how I can modify this mesh in the edit mode. I'm going to select my vertex tool here, and I'm going to click on one of these vertices and if I hit G for grab, I can move it around just like this to modify this shape. I can select another vertex, hit G, and move it around. That's only possible when you are in the edit mode, because in the edit mode, we are able to modify the mesh data. If I go back to the object mode, I cannot modify the mesh data anymore. I can scale it down if I want or I can move it around as a whole object, but I cannot modify the mesh data. Here I can simply scale it down, I can move it around. But if I want to, for example, move this corner round, I need to enter the edit mode, select this vertex, hit G, and move it just like that. That's all for this video. I hope you now have a better understanding of different modes in Blender. I hope you understand the difference between the object mode and the edit mode. See you in the next one. 10. How to Add an Object to Your Scene: Hey, welcome back. In this video, I'm going to show you how you can add objects to your scene. As usual, we have these default shapes here. But first, let's go ahead and delete them for now. I'm going to select all of them just like this, hit the "Delete" key on my keyboard or "Backspace." Now we have an empty scene, and I'm going to show you how you can add an object to this empty scene. First of all, whenever you want to add an object to your scene, you need to make sure that you are in the Object mode. It's very important. Right now I'm in the Object mode, and the first way to add an object to your scene is to head over to the Add panel here, you can click on it. From here we will get access to a bunch of options. Here we have Mesh, Curve, Surface, etc. Right now let's focus on Mesh. Here we have different options. For sure you don't have some of these options because I installed some add-ons. I will talk about add-ons later, but for sure you have all these top options. We have Plane, we have Cube, we have Circle, UV Sphere, etc. To add an object, we just need to go to Add, Mesh, and choose one of these objects. I'm going to choose UV Sphere just like this, a new object has been added to your scene. You can simply now scale it up, rotate it, move it around, just like this using the hotkeys. This is the first way to add an object to your scene. The second way, which is the most convenient way, is to use the hotkey. The hotkey for adding an object is Shift plus A. If you hit "Shift" and "A," this Add menu pops up here and you can go to Mesh and from here you can choose your shape. But you may ask, why can't we add a shape in the edit mode? Well, we can, but look what happens. Let me scale it down a little bit and I'm going to move it around. Hit "G", move it to the right side. Now, I'm going to enter the Edit mode and here we can still see this Add menu. If I click on it, I can add, for example, another shape just like this. As you can see, a UV sphere has been added to my scene. But basically these two shapes are joined. So if I get back to the object mode by pressing the Tab on my keyboard, you can see that in the outliner we have only one shape here. These two are both highlighted, so if I want to scale them down, look what happens. If I hit "S," both of them will be affected. Because right now Blender detects these two objects as a one joined elements. If it's your intention to join different objects and edit them in the Edit mode, you can go ahead and add an object in the edit mode. But if it's not, you can simply go back to the Object mode and then from here, you can choose another shape. Here, as you can see in the outliner, we have two different objects. That's the most important difference between adding a shape in the Object mode and in the Edit mode. Make sure to keep that in mind. Well, one other way to add an object to your scene is to just go to the toolbar on the left side. Here, as you can see right at the bottom, we have this little cube icon. If I just left-click and hold, you will see we can add a cube, we can add a cone, we can add a cylinder. Let me show you how it works. You can just simply select "Add Cube," and then here in your 3D viewport, you can just left-click and drag just like this. Then you can move your mouse up to define the volume of your cube, and that's all. As you can see, our cube is ready. Well, we are never going to use this option to add an object to our scene, but it exists. I just wanted you to know that there is this little option. I'm not sure whether you have noticed or not, whenever we try to create a new object here, for example, a mesh, that object will be added right here to the center. This point right at the center is called the world origin. Let me remove a few of these objects quickly. By the way, you can remove your shapes by right-clicking as well. You can just click on "Delete." The other way to remove an object is to just select it and hit "X" and then hit "Delete." The main way which I always use is to press the "Delete" key on my keyboard. Just keep that in mind. I was talking about the world origin. By default, our objects will be placed right here. The reason is this little red and white circle, which is called the 3D cursor. The 3D cursor allows us to define where we want our object to be placed, and by default, the 3D cursor is placed right at the center. If you want to put your objects somewhere else, for example, here, you need to move your 3D cursor first. To do that, you can head over to the toolbar on the left side and from here right under the selection tool, you can select the cursor, this is the 3D cursor, and then if you left-click somewhere else, you can see that your 3D cursor has been moved. Now, if I hit "Shift" and "A," I can simply place a new object right there, just like that. Well, we may need to move our 3D cursor around a few times when we are modeling, therefore it would be much easier if you learn the hotkey key moving that. The hotkey for moving the 3D cursor is Shift and right-click. If you hold down "Shift" and right-click somewhere, your 3D cursor will be moved to that particular location. I'm going to hold down the "Shift" and right-click. But you may accidentally place your 3D cursor somewhere here, for example. It's going to be far away from your center and you might need to place it right back at the world origin. To do that, it would be very hard to just zoom in here and try to find the exact center point. Therefore, you can head over to object and then snap, and here you can choose "Cursor to World Origin," just like this. The other way is to just reset the position of your 3D cursor. Let me show that to you using the hotkey. I'm going to place it somewhere around here. To reset the position of your 3D cursor, you can simply hit "Shift" and "C", just like this, it will be placed right here. Right now you might not understand the importance of the 3D cursor, but when you start modeling and when we start working on our own project, you will clearly understand how important it is. Let me show you a good example. I am going to remove this UV sphere, and I am going to add a cube here. So hit "Shift" and "A," go to Mesh and add a cube. Now, suppose you want to place another object right on top of this cube. To do that, you can simply add a shape and then move it up, but it's not going to be precise. Therefore, what we can do is this. We can go to the top view using this Gizmo. Or if you remember the hotkey, you can press seven on your num pad to go to the top orthographic view. Then here we can place the 3D cursor on top of this cube. Right now. It's placed here inside, right at the center. But I can hold down the "Shift" key and right-click here, and now as you can see, it snaps to the top of this cube. If I add another shape here, for example, a plane, you will see that it has been added here right at the top of this cube. If I scale it up, you will clearly see that. That's all about adding objects to your scene and how you can position them using the 3D cursor. I hope you enjoyed this video and I'll see you in the next one. 11. Mesh Anatomy: [MUSIC] In this video, we're going to talk about the mesh anatomy. But before we do that, you need to actually understand what a mesh is. Well, in simple words, a mesh is a combination of vertices, edges, and faces that define the shape of a 3D object. You may not know what they are, but if you remember, we already talked about them when we were talking about the edit mode. In this video, we're going to dive into the details. You need to know that each object in Blender has some object data. If you, for example, select this cube and head over to the outliner, you can expand it by clicking on this little arrow. Right under it, you will see this green icon. This green icon indicates the data of this particular object. This is our object. This is our object data. Each object has some different data that we can modify. For example, if I select Camera here, you can see this green icon right there, and I can modify the data of this camera. For example, I can modify the focal length, all these properties for the light as well. If I select the Light here, I can modify the data of this light. The same thing applies to our mesh because our cube here has some mesh data as well. But we can't modify the mesh data here just like other objects, for instance, light and camera, because it would be too hard for us to do that. We can modify the mesh data in the edit mode. By now for sure, you know how to enter the edit mode. You just need to select your object, hit the tap key, and you will enter the edit mode. As I said, a mesh is nothing but a combination of vertices, edges, and faces. I already introduced these elements to you before, but let's go through them once again. Each mesh is created by different vertices, different edges, and different faces. A vertex is basically this little point, as you can see, right on the corners. These are called vertices. This one is a vertex. Then two vertices, for example, these two, create one edge in between. This is an edge. Here right at the top, we have different selection tools. The first one is called the Vertex Select tool, the second one is called the Edge Select tool, and the last one is called the Face Select tool. If you want to select an edge, you need to select the Edge Select tool, and then you can simply click on one of these edges, just like this, to select that particular edge. Different edges create a face. Here we have four different edges creating this area in between. This area in between is called a face. If I select the Face Select tool, I can click on this top face or this one or this one. This is how we can modify our mesh data. Let's use some of the things you learned so far. Let's suppose we want to move this edge around. First, we need to select the Edge Select tool right here. Then let's select it. As you can see, it's been highlighted. Then I'm going to move it along the x-axis. To do that, I just need to hit G For grab, and then I can freely move it. If I want to lock it along the x-axis, I need to hit X on my keyboard and then move it around just like that. As you can see, this edge has been repositioned. Since all these edges and these vertices are connected. Once you move this edge around, you can see that all other parts will be affected as well. That's how it works. I can rotate it as well. Let's hit R, and you can simply rotate it. As I said here, these four edges create this face. If I select this face and I try to move it up, if I hit G, then Z to lock it along the z-axis and move it up, it's going to do the same thing as I had selected four edges here. Instead, I can just hold down the Shift key on my keyboard and select these four edges one by one, and then hit G, Z, and move them up because four edges create one face. As soon as I select these four edges, as you can see, this face is highlighted as well. The same thing applies to vertices. As I said, two vertices create one edge. Let's suppose I want to move this edge, I can select it, hit G, then X, and move it. This is going to do the exact same thing as I had selected two vertices using the Vertex Select tool. Just like this, hit G, X, and move it. When we say modeling, we actually mean modifying all these elements, vertices, edges, and faces, to create a new shape. That's how it works in 3D software. In fact, there are many things we can do with each shape using all these modeling tools that we will cover in the upcoming videos. But for now, you just need to understand what a vertex, an edge, and a face are. What I want you to do is this; please create different shapes in the object mode. For example, here I can get back to the object mode. Let me move this shape around. Then I'm going to add a new object here. For example, a UV sphere this time. Enter the edit mode and try to modify this shape using the hotkeys you learned. G for grab, S for scale, R for rotation. You can simply select these vertices, one of them or many of them, and move them around, rotate them. For example, I can select this top vertex and then hit G, Z, and move it up. You can select one of these edges or multiple edges. In fact, let's select these two edges and move them. Hit G. Just like this. You can move them around. Or you can select different faces. You can hold down the Shift key to select multiple faces and try to move them. Hit G. Move them just like this. You can rotate them as well to create some crazy shapes. This is going to be your exercise, and it's very important because you need to get used to these elements, vertices, edges, and faces. All right, guys. That's all for this video. I hope you enjoyed it, and I'll see you in the next one. 12. Modeling Tools: In this video, we're going to talk about modeling tools in Blender. There are many modeling tools in Blender that we can use for different purposes. But we are going to focus on the most important ones. First of all, I'm going to select this little cube here, and I'm going to enter the edit mode, and for sure you know how to do that. But before I do it, I'm going to enable my screencast keys add-on so that we could see what I'm pressing on, on my keyboard. Then I'm going to hit the Tab key on my keyboard to enter the edit mode. Now that we are in the edit mode, you can see that these tools appeared on the left side. These are our modern tools. As I said, you can find many of them here, but we're not going to talk about all of them because some of them are more advanced and I don't want you to be overwhelmed with all these complex tools. We're just going to focus on the most important ones. The ones that we use again and again and again when we try to model an object. Later, when you get used to these basic tools, you can go ahead and explore the other tools by yourself. Without further ado, let's get started.. We already talked about the transformation tools here, the move, rotate, scale, and transform, and also we talked about the Selection tool and a 3D cursor. Here we have all the modeling tools. Right here we have the annotate tool. It's quite helpful sometimes when you want to just draw something here for your reference. But I personally never use it. Let me go ahead and erase it quickly, just like this. The next tool is the measure tool. It allows you to measure something, just like this. Most of the time you're not going to use it, except you really need a specific dimension for your object. I'm going to hit X on my keyboard to remove that. The next tool is just for adding a new object, just like what we had in the object mode, to add a cube, add a cone, add a cylinder, etc. We're not going to use it here because you know the shortcut for that, you know the hotkey for adding an object is Shift NA, so you can use that hotkey. But one of the most important modeling tools in blender is called extrude, which is this one. But right now you can't see the name of these tools. I'm going to show you a very good trick so that you could see the name of these tools until you finally memorize them. If you just hover over this section, you will see that your cursor changes to something else and then you can left-click and drag it out, just like this, and you can see all the names here. Here it's called extrude region. This is, as I said, one of the most important tools in blender, and it allows you to extrude something. It could be a face, it could be a vertex, and it could be an edge. Let's give it a try and see how it works. First of all, I'm going to select my vertex tool, just like this, and I'm going to select one of these vertices, just like that, and then, I'm going to click on this extrude region. As you can see, this plus icon appears here, and I can left-click and drag to extrude this vertex out. What this tool actually does is this, it duplicates your vertex, in this case it's a vertex. Then you can move that duplicated vertex, and it will create a connection between the duplicated vertex and the initial vertex. The same thing applies to faces and edges. If you select a face and you try to extrude it out, it will duplicate that face. You will move it up or down, left or right, and then it will connect those two faces together. That's how the extrude tool works, in simple words. I hope you get it now. As you can see now we have these two vertices with disconnection. Here we have an edge. If I select the Edge tool, I can select this edge because an edge is composed of two vertices. But let's see how we can extrude an edge. I'm going to select the Edge tool here, and I'm going to select, for example, this edge. Then I'm going to make sure that my Extrude tool is selected, and using this plus button, I can drag it out. Just like this, I could extrude my edge. Using the Extrude tool, we duplicated this edge, we moved it, and then this Extrude tool connected these two edges together. Therefore, since we have four edges now, it created a face as well for us. That's how it works. It's very simple. Let me undo this operation. I'm going to hit Control Z or Command Z, and then I'm going to select the Face Select Tool here, and I'm going to select this face, and I'm going to extrude it out this way. You can extrude it multiple times just like this. All right, cool. Now I can select another face, I can extrude it out. I can select this face, extrude it out, and create a fancy shape, just like that. If you left-click on this Extrude tool and hold, you will see that we have four more options. We have extrude manifold, we have extrude along normals, we have extrude individual, and extrude to cursor. We will talk about these tools later when we work on our own project. But for now, I don't want to confuse you with all these options, but we will go through a few of them when we create our own 3D model. Let's talk about its hotkey as well. Because anything in Blender can be done using a hotkey. The hotkey for extrusion is E, and you need to get used to that. I'm going to select this, select box tool. Let's suppose you want to extrude this face out. You select it, you hit E on your keyboard, immediately the extrude tool is selected and you can extrude it out, just like this. You can extrude an edge like this as well. I'm going to select the Edge tool, hit E, and extrude it out. You can lock it allowing your specific access if you want, for example, x. I'm going to select, for example, this face, hit E, and I'm going to extrude it a lying on the y-axis. I'm going to hit Y to lock it along that particular axis, and I'm going to extrude it out, just like that. But I'm going to mention a very important point here when it comes to extrusion. Let's suppose you want to extrude this top face. You first select it and then you hit E and you move it out and you say, Well," no, I don't want it to be extruded." The way you can do that is this, you press Escape on your keyboard and it will be canceled. However, what you cancel right now is not the extrusion itself, you cancel the movement. I know it's a little bit complicated, but bear with me, I'm going to explain it to you. As I said, we just canceled the movement. Whenever you select something and you hit E, you immediately create a duplication of that particular element. It could be a face, it could be a vertex, it could be an edge. Then you move it. When you hit Escape to cancel it, you are duplicated element is still there sitting on top of the initial element, could be a face, an edge, or vertex, always. Right now, we just canceled the movement, but our duplicated faces still, they're sitting on top of our previous face. I'm going to prove that to you. How? I am just going to hit S and I'm going to scale it down. As you can see, we just scaled the duplicated face right now and it's sitting on top of our initial face. If you want to cancel an extrusion, you need to make sure to hit Command Z to remove that duplicated layer. It's very important otherwise later you will face so many different problems and issues. Once again, I'm going to select this face, and let's say you want to extrude it out. You hit E, you extrude it out. Then you suddenly change your mind and you want to remove this extrusion. What I prefer to do is this. You confirm it with left-click and then you hit Control Z or Command Z. This way, we don't have a duplicated layer here. What I want you to do right now is this pause the video and try to use the extrude tool however you want. Just select it, select different components like faces, edges, and vertices, and try to extrude them out, however you want. You just need to select one face, then hit E and extruded out, then confirm with left-click. Please go ahead and give it a try. Now, I'm going to talk about another point. Whenever you add an object to your scene or you use one of these tools, something appears here, as you can see, it says Extrude Region and Move. In this case, because we used the extrude region tool and this is called the redo panel. If I expand it, you will see a bunch of options appear here, like move, x, y, z. You can adjust all these things here and for each tool, you will see different options appearing here. What you need to keep in mind is that once you do something else, this redo panel will be gone forever and you need to undo the operation use that tool again to sit right here. Let me show that to you. Let's suppose I am going to create a new object. I'm going to enter the object mode. I'm going to move it to the right side, just like this and hit Shift and A and then create a cube. As soon as I create this cube, I will see the redo panel appears here. I'm going to open it up. It will show me the size. I can adjust its size, I can adjust its location. I can adjust its rotation degrees as well, just like this. But look what happens when I left-click here, it's gone. I'm going to remove this shape. Just select it, hit Delete on your keyboard, and create a new cube are redo panel is there. But look what happens when they move it. If I hit G and move it, you see now we can't modify the dimensions of this cube anymore because we did something else with the Move Tool. Now we can see all the properties of the move tool. We can adjust it and if I left-click, it will be gone. Keep that in mind. The same thing applies to modeling tools. If I just remove this cube and if I select this object, enter the edit mode. Let's suppose you use the extrude tool. I'm going to zoom in a little bit, hit E, extruded it up, confirm and you will see this extrude region panel pops up. Here you can modify these properties. The same thing applies to other tools but with different properties. Just keep that in mind it's going to be so useful sometimes. Now, let's talk about the next important tool which is called Inset Faces. If I select this face and I select this Insert Faces tool, you will see this circle appears. I can hover over this circle, left-click and drag to inset this face. What happens is this, It's like you duplicated that face and then you scaled it down, like what we did with the extrusion. When we cancel the extrusion, I said that the duplicated layer is still there. I proved that point to you by scaling it down. The Insert Faces tool does the exact same thing without using the Extrusion tool. Whenever you need to insert a face, you have two ways to do that. You can either select one face, hit E, hit escape without any movement, and then scale it down. This is one way or you can simply use the Insert Faces tool. You can select a face, then select the Insert Faces tool and try to insert it inside. The hotkey for Insert Faces is I on your keyboard. If I select this select box tool, and let's suppose I want to inset this face. I'm going to select that face, hit I, and then I'm going to move my mouse to insert this particular face and then you can use another tool. You can, for example, extrude this new face up, hit E, and extrude it up. Then let's suppose you want to insert it inside, hit I, insert it inside, then E extrude it up. That's how we create a 3D model. We just use all these tools together to get what we want. The thing with the Insert Faces tool is that you can insert multiple faces as well. I'm going to enter the object mode and let's remove this shape and try to create another shape. I'm going to hit shift and A, and let's add a cube here, and let's enter the edit mode. I'm going to select this top face, hold down the shift key and select this side face as well. I'm going to insert them together. What I do is this, I hit I and try to insert them just like this. But what you see right now is that they are somehow connected. You see, if I just confirm here we have this connection. But if it's not your intention, if you want to get an even thickness around this middle face, you need to use a shortcut. Let me undo it. I'm going to hit, I inset it. If you take a look at the top part here, you will see a few hotkeys appeared. We have the depth and we have also one option called individual and it's turned off as you can see. If I hit I once again on my keyboard, I will enable the individual insert faces option. Just like this I can insert these phases individually. Now, I want you to go ahead and use the Insert Faces tool and try to combine it with the Extrusion tool. You just need to insert a face just like this. Then you can hit E to extrude that face out. Once again, inset it like that E to extrude it out. Please go ahead and give it a try. Now, let's talk about the Bevel tool. It's another important tool in 3D modeling because it allows us to add a bevel to our edges and also our vertices. I'm going to explain that to you in a few minutes. Let me show you how it works when you want to smooth out your edges. We can use this Bevel tool for example, here we have a sharp edge. If I select the Edge tool and I select this edge, I'm going to choose the Bevel tool. Using this handle, I can bevel it, what it does is it creates a flat face to make this connection smoother, just like this. But you may say that it's not that smooth it just looks like a ramp and your right. To make it smoother, we need to add more segments to it because right now we have only one segment. To add segments, you can open up the redo panel here and as you can see, the number of segments is set to one. If I just increase it, you will see it became smoother just like this. It's a very helpful tool in 3D modeling. You can adjust all these properties with segments, but most of the time we only change the segments and width. But what if you select a face? If you select a face, it will try to bevel all the edges around that particular phase. Let me show that to you. I'm going to select this face. Let me select the face tool and then I'm going to bevel it and look what happens. As you can see it beveled the edges around this face and I can add more segments to it to make it smoother, just like that. But they also mentioned that you can bevel vertices as well. How can you do that? As you can see here in the redo panel, we have this effect option. By default, it's always set to edges. It will affect only edges. If you select a vertex and try to bevel it, nothing happens unless you change it to vertices. Let me show that to you. I'm going to select the vertex tool, and then I'm going to select this vertex. If I try to bevel it, look what happens. Nothing. That's because this effect option is set to edges. If I change it to vertices, look what happens. Now, we can create a bevel perfectly and we can adjust the segments. Just keep that in mind. It's quite helpful. I'm going to show you some other use cases as well when you can use the vertex Bevel tool. But as always, you need to learn the hotkeys of Bevel as well. The hotkey for the Bevel tool is Control B. Let me select this H2 and I'm going to Bevel this edge here. Let me select this selection tool and if I hit Control B, I can select the Bevel tool and I can simply Bevel it. But you may ask, how can you make it smoother? Well, the answer is you need to increase the number of segments. The good thing about using the hotkey is that you can use your scroll wheel to increase the number of segments just like this. Now let me talk about the other hotkey because right now we talked about the hotkey for the edge, particularly. If I want to Bevel a vertex, I need to switch it to the Vertex tool. Let's select one vertex. I'm going to select the vertex tool here. I'm going to select this vertex right there. Let's suppose you want a Bevel it. You hit Control B but nothing happens because we need to change the effect property to vertices and then V to select the vertex mode and now you can simply Bevel it just like that. Cool. Now I'm going to show you another good use case of Bevel. Let me just enter the object mode, remove this shape, and this time I'm going to add a plane to my scene. Hit Shift and A and add a plane here just like that. I'm going to enter the Edit mode now and imagine you want to make this square rounded. I'm going to go to the top orthographic view, hit number 7 on your numpad. Alternatively, you can use this gizmo always. While the Vertex tool is selected, make sure that all your four vertices are selected. Then hit Control B, then V to select the Vertex tool and try to Bevel them. Just like this, you can make those corners rounded and you can increase or decrease the number of segments depending on your needs. I'm going to point out something which is very important. If you remember, we talked about the objects data in our previous lessons, and I told you that each object has some data and our mesh has some mesh data. Here if I enter the Object mode and I make some modifications here, I'm changing the object, not the mesh data. Let me show you an example. Once again, I'm going to select this plane, hit G, X, and move it to the right side. Hit Shift and A, add another plane here. This time before I enter the Edit mode, I'm going to scale it down a little bit. Hit S to scale it down, then hit S, X, and scale it along the x-axis just like this. Here on the right side on this object property panel, you can see that our scale is no longer set to 1,1,1. If I select this previous object, you can see the scale is set to 1,1,1. That's because we didn't scale it., but we scaled this object. You may ask what's wrong with it? Well, nothing's wrong with it, but let me show you what happens when you try to Bevel these corners now. I'm going to enter the edit mode, and I'm going to make sure that these vertices are selected. If I hit Command B or Control B, then V, and try to Bevel, look what happens. You see now I can't Bevel them perfectly and that's because we scaled our object as a whole in the Object mode. We didn't scale our vertices, edges, and faces. What's the solution to that? Well, whenever you scale something here in the Object mode and you see the scale is not set to 1,1,1, you need to make sure to apply that scale to your object. How to do that? It's very simple. The first way is to just go to Object and here you will find this Apply menu and under this, you can find the Scale option. If I click on it, you will see that now our scale is set to 1,1,1. If I enter the Edit mode and then try to Bevel these vertices hit Control B or Command B then V, look what happens. Now I can Bevel them perfectly. It's a very important thing to remember when you try to create your models and it's also a common issue for many beginners. Just keep that in mind. But as always, I need to let you know the hotkey for applying your scale. Well, the hotkey for that is Control A. When you select your object in the object mode and you hit control A, this Apply window pops up and here you can apply everything like all transforms or just scale, rotation or location. Just keep that in mind. Now let's talk about the next tool. I'm going to remove these two. Hit Delete on your keyboard and now let's add a cube here, just like this, and enter the Edit mode. The next tool we're going to talk about is called Loop Cut, and it's very useful. Let me show you how it works. If I select a Loop Cut tool and I hover over my object, you will see these yellow edges appear around my object, both vertically and horizontally. This is called a Loop Cut. If I hover over it right now, I can left-click to confirm it. Now as you can see, it added a few more edges to our shape. It allows us to modify our shape in a more flexible way and we use it almost all the time. Like the Extrusion tool and Interface tool, the Loop Cut is also very useful. But here we just created one Loop Cut. What if you want to create more cuts. While you can open up the Loop Cut redo panel. And here you can increase the number of cuts to two, seven, whatever you want. You can make them smaller as well, just like this, but we almost never use it. You can go ahead and explore all these options by yourself. But for now, we just need to adjust the number of cuts. This is one way to create a Loop Cut. The other way is to use the hotkey for that. The hotkey for Loop Cut is Control R or Command R. If I just hit Control R or Command R, you can see this Loop Cut appears here, but using the hotkey you can control the number of cuts using your mouse wheel. I can move my mouse wheel just like this to increase or decrease the number of cuts however I want. The good thing about hotkey is that when I decide on the number of cuts, I can left-click to confirm, but then I can reposition these Loop Cuts as well. I can move my mouse up and down, and once I'm satisfied with their location, I can left-click to confer. Now, our Loop Cuts are created. Whenever you want to add more details to your geometry, you can use the Loop Cut. You can add more vertices, more edges, and more phases to your geometry, just like that, then you can select, for example, this edge. You can move it out. Hit G, X and move it out to create something like that. Perfect. Now we can go ahead and practice the Loop Cut tool. There is one more tool here that we will not talk about right now because it's not important. You just need to learn the Loop Cut tool and how it works. The last tool we are going to talk about in this video is the Knife tool. Whenever you want to create some cuts in your geometry, you can select the Knife tool. Then you can head over, for example, here. You can just left-click somewhere. Move around, left-click here, move here, left-click, left-click, and to create your cuts, you can hit Enter to confirm. As you can see, these new edges have been created. These are the cuts and now you can simply select these edges just like this. Let me select the Select Box tool. Select this edge, hold down the Shift key, select this edge. You can just hit G, Y to move them out Just like that. Depending on your needs, it could be quite helpful. There are a few other tools here that we're not going to talk about right now because as I said, we are not going to use them a lot in our projects. Probably we will use this Edge Slide tool, but I will show you how you can use it later when we start working on our projects, not now. Your assignment now is to go ahead and practice all these tools. The Extrusion tool, the Insert tool, the Bevel tool, that Loop Cut tool, and finally the knife tool. Try to combine all these tools together because you are not limited to use only one of these tools. Just create different shapes. For example, you can move it around. You can hit Shift and A, create a UV sphere, scale it up, hit S, scale it up, hit G, Z, move it up, then enter the Edit mode and try to create a new shape out of this UV sphere. That's how you can become a good 3D designer. For example, you can select a few faces just like this. Then you can extrude them out. You can hit E and extrude them out just like this. Then I'm going to do the same thing here. Hit E and extrude them out. You can also insert other faces. Hit I, inset them, then extrude them to create something new. Finally, you can Bevel them. Hit Control B and try to Bevel them. Try to modify the number of segments depending on the model you are building. All right guys, that's all for this video. I hope you enjoyed it and I'll see you in the next one. 13. Object Origins: Any object in Blender has an origin point and that origin point determines where that object should be placed. Basically, the location of each object in Blender is determined by that origin point. As you can see, when I select this cube right at the center, we can see this little dot, this orange dot, that's called the origin point of this cube. If I select this camera instead, you can see the origin point of this camera is right here. For the light as well, it's placed right at the center. It's hard to see it, but it's there. You may ask, why does it matter? Well, it matters because when you try to transform your object in Blender, all those transformations will happen in relation to the origin point. You need to know how it affects your object when you transform it. I'm going to show you some examples to understand it better. Here we have our cube. First of all, let me select these two objects, our camera, and the light, and remove them because we don't need it right now. I'm going to select this cube. Let's suppose we want to rotate it. If I hit "R" on my keyboard and I try to rotate it along the z-axis look what happens. I'm going to hit "Z" to lock it along the z-axis and then try to rotate it. As you can see, it rotates around that origin point. That's how the transformation works in Blender. It will rotate and it will scale around that origin point. Now, imagine we want to create a door. The way the door works is that it should pivot around one side. I'm going to create a door simply by modifying this cube. Let me scale it along the x-axis. I'm going to hit "S", then "X", scale it down to something like this. Remember our origin point is still here in the center. Then "S", "Z" to scale it up this way. Here is our door. I'm going to hit "G" and "Z" and move this door up. Our origin point is right here at the center of this object. Now, imagine that we want to open this door. You may say, well we can hit "R" then "Z" and try to open it. But look what happens. It's rotating around that origin point. That's not what we want. It should rotate around this side of the door. It should pivot around this side. This is how a door works. So what we need to do is this. We need to move this origin point to here. How can we do it? While there are many ways to do that, and I'm going to show a few of them to you so you could compare them easily. But the first thing I'm going to mention is this. When you are in the object mode and you move your object around, you will move your object with its origin point, like what we have here. If I hit "G" and move this door around, you will see that its origin point will move with it as well. However, if I enter the edit mode, if I hit "Tab" on my keyboard and I hit "A" to select all these faces and vertices, and I try to move them to the right side. Look what happens, G, our origin point stays where it is. This is the main difference between transforming your object in the edit mode and in the object mode. It's very important you need to understand the difference because otherwise, when you start modeling, you may be confused and you may ask why nothing works as expected. Keep that in mind whenever you want to transform your object, whether it's the move action or the rotation or scale with the origin point, you need to go to the object mode. Right now I mean the object mode, if I hit "G" and move it, you can see that it will move with its origin point. But when you want to just move the mesh without its origin point, you need to enter the edit mode and then move it. Keep that in mind. This is the first important point. There are many other points that we're going to talk about, but this is the foundation that you should keep in mind. I'm going to undo the operation. Now, let's suppose we want to put this origin point here. Well, based on the things that I just mentioned, you can say that, all right, we can go to the edit mode. We can hit "A" to select all these phases and vertices. Then we can go to the right orthographic view, just hit "3" on your numpad, or you can use this gizmo and easily we can move this door, along the y-axis. Hit "G", "Y" and move it to the right side and we can put it right here. Just like that. If I get back to the object mode and I now try to rotate it, look what happens R, Z and try to rotate it. Now, it behaves just like a door. That's exactly what we need. However, it's not an ideal way of moving your origin point because we have a more precise way. Well, let me undo it. I'm going to hit "Control Z" a few times. While the other way we can move this object origin is to move it to our 3D cursor. The way we can do it is this. We need to be in the object mode. Then we need to go to the Object menu right at the top. From here, we can go to Set origin. Here we have a few options. We have geometry to origin, origin to geometry, origin to 3D cursor, origin to center of mass, and origin to center of mass volume. Well, most of the time we use origin to geometry or origin to center of mass. If you hover over each option, you will see its definition. But right now we want to put this origin point right here where our 3D cursor is placed. I'm going to click on origin to a 3D cursor and just like this. It's precisely located where our 3D cursor is. Now, if I try to rotate it, hit "R". This time I'm going to rotate it, allowing the y-axis to see the effect. Just like this, it rotates perfectly around that origin point. For example, if you want to move this origin point right here to the side, what you can do is this. You can snap this 3D cursor to this phase and then you can go to the Object menu and set the origin to 3D cursor. Let me show you how it's done. First, enter the edit mode, select this phase. Then I'm going to hit "Shift" and "S" to open up this pie menu. This is the first time you see this menu. It's so cool. Here we have a few selection options. We have selection to cursors, selection to active, selection to grid, cursor to select it, etc. We are not going to work with all of them. But right now we want to place the 3D cursor right here. We need to snap it to this phase. To do that, we say cursor to select it, we selected the phase, and now we click on cursor to select it and it will snap the 3D cursor to the middle of the selected item, just like this. Then I can enter the object mode, hit "Tab", and now set the origin to a 3D cursor. This way we can make sure that our origin point is placed right at the center of this phase. That's how the origin point and transformation works. You need to remember that when you scale an object, it will be scaled in relation to the origin point as well. If I tried to scale this door down, look what happens. You see it, scales down in relation to this origin point. But if I put this origin point here, look what happens. I'm going to select this edge now. I'm going to enter the edit mode, select this edge, hit "Shift" and "S" cursor to select it, enter the object node and change the origin point's location to the 3D cursor, just like this. Now if I try to scale it down, look what happens. You see it scales down in relation to the new origin point's location. It's quite helpful and you need to understand this concept. Make sure to practice it. Make sure to modify the origin points location a lot to understand how it really works because you need it when it comes to 3D modeling. Now that you understand what the origin point is, I'm going to show you a few other examples and we're going to talk about the pivot points. I am going to remove this door. I'm going to reset that 3D cursor's position, just hit "Shift" and "C". Then I'm going to add a cube here. Now, I'm going to duplicate it a few times. You don't know how to duplicate an object. It's so simple, you just need to hit "Shift" and "D". There are two different types of duplication in Blender. We have a link duplication and we have a simple duplication. The difference between them is that when you have a link duplication, if you modify one of those objects, all of them will be modified. But if you have a simple duplication, those objects will be separated, they are not going to be linked. We will talk about these two types because we are going to use them a lot in our projects. But for now, I'm going to create a simple duplication by pressing "Shift" and "D". Alternatively, you can just right-click on your shape and choose duplicate object. As you can see here, we have duplicate linked, but we need this one. You can just click on it. It will be duplicated. You can hit "X" to lock it along the x-axis. Left-click to confer. I'm going to repeat this process a few times, but not here. I'm going to go to the top view. It's seven on your numpad, hit "Shift" and "D", duplicate it, I'm going to do it a few times. Just like this. Perfect. Now we have a few cubes. As I said, we are going to talk about the pivot points. If you head over to this top menu, you will see a few options. We will talk about them in our future videos. But for now, we're going to talk about the pivot point, which is this one. If you open it up, you will find a few options. Well, by default, the pivot point of each object is set to median point. It means that it will pivot around the median point of itself. The median point is right at the center of that particular object. To show you how they work, I'm going to select them all and then I'm going to try to rotate them. So if I hit R and I tried to rotate them, what happens is this; it will be rotated along the average median point of all these cubes. Blender first calculates the average median point of all these cubes, and then it will rotate all of these objects around that particular average point. That's how the median point works. But now let's talk about the other options. Let's start with a bounding box center. If I select it, what happens is this, blender will create an imaginary rectangle, let's say a boundary, around all these cubes and then it will rotate all of these cubes around the center of that imaginary rectangle. That's how this option works. If I hit R and rotate them, you see it's rotating around this point. This is the center of that imaginary rectangle. That's how this option works. But what about a 3D cursor? When you set it to a 3D cursor, your objects will be rotated in relation to the position of your 3D cursor. Let me show that to you. If I select this one, look what happens. I'm going to hit R. You see, it's rotating around this point. For instance, if you want your objects to rotate around this point, what you can do is this; you can hold down the Shift key and right-click here to put your 3D cursor here and then make sure that your pivot point is set to 3D cursor. Now look what happens if I hit R and try to rotate them. You see, it will be rotated around this 3D cursor, just like this. It's quite helpful sometimes. The next option is individual origins. When you set it to individual origins, what happens is this; all these objects will rotate along their individual origins. So each cube here has an origin point, as you can see. If I rotate them now, look what happens. You see the difference now. This option is also quite helpful. Depending on your needs, you can decide which one of them suits your needs. You can easily modify them again and again and again based on what you're trying to achieve. You should also keep in mind that these transform pivot points don't just work for rotation. The rotation is just an example. They will work for scaling and moving as well. If you try to scale them while the pivot point is set to individual origins, look what happens. You see, now they scale around their origin point. I'm going to go to the next one. The median point is the default pivot point, so we're not going to talk about it. Then we have the active element. Well, when you set it to active elements, all these objects will transform in relation to the origin point of the active elements. I already talked about the active element. The last element you select is going to be highlighted differently, just like what we have here. Now if I try to rotate them or scale them, they will rotate in relation to the origin point of this active cube. You can see this active element in the outliner as well. I'm going to rotate them. It's R, just like that. That's all about pivot points. Before we wrap up this video, I'm going to talk about a few other things. Right next to the pivot point option, we have this option, transformation orientation. By default, it's always set to global. If you open it up, you will see that we have a few transform orientation options. We have Global, Local, Normal, Gimbal, View, and Cursor. I'm not going to talk about these for right now because they are more advanced. Maybe we will talk about them later, but for now, let's focus on these two. Let me remove these additional cubes. We don't need them anymore. I'm going to select this cube. Let me hit Shift and C to bring the 3D cursor back to its original position. I'm going to select this cube, hit G, X, and move it right here. As I said, the transform orientation of all objects by default is set to Global because each object has a Global transform orientation and also a Local transform orientation. What do I mean by that? Well, let me remove this cube. I'm going to create a new one. So here we have this Q. If I select the Move tool here on the left side, you will see these axes appear, these arrows appear. The blue one is always the z-axis. You can move it up, move it down. The red one is always the x-axis. You can move it to the right side, to the left. The green one is the y-axis. You can move it this way. Now imagine you rotate it. I'm going to hit R. You rotate this cube a little bit. Let me go to the right orthographic view first and then rotate it. Hit R, rotate it this way, and we still have these axes and these arrows, just like this. We can move them around this way. These are called global axis, and the reason they are called global is because they work in relation to the world origin. But as I said, each object has a Local transform orientation. Let's suppose you want to go to the right orthographic view, and you want it to be moved diagonally. The way you can do it is this; you can just move it up, you can move it to the left a little bit, move it up, move it to the left. But this is not how it's done because it's not going to be precise and it's going to be so frustrating. Instead, we can set the transformation orientation to Local, and as you can see, these axes have been relocated. These arrows have been moved as well. Now this blue arrow points to the z-axis of that particular object, to the Local transform orientation. You can simply move it this way, this way, or this way. But if I set it back to Global, look what happens. I'm going to show you another example to really understand it. I'm going to remove this cube, hit Shift and A, and from here, I'm going to add this famous monkey to my scene. So by default, this orientation is set to Global. Now I'm going to go to the top orthographic view. Let me move it, hit G, move it here. I'm going to rotate it a little bit, just like this. Then I'm going to duplicate it, shift and D, move it here, rotate it, hit Shift and D, move it here, rotate it. Once again, move it here, rotate it. Once again, Shift and D, move it here, rotate it. If I select all of them and I select this Move tool, and you try to move them along the x-axis, look what happens. Keep in mind that our orientation is set to Global. You see, they will move in relation to the world origin, just like this. But if I set the orientation to Local, now look what happens. You see, each one moves independently because each object has its own local axes. I can move them this way. I hope now you have a better understanding of pivot points, origin point, and transformation orientations. Now it's time to go ahead and practice everything we discussed in this video so that you could get used to all these options. I hope you enjoyed this video, and I'll see you in the next one. 14. Proportional Editing: [MUSIC] In this video, we're going to talk about a very cool feature in Blender called proportional editing. Well first, let me go ahead and remove all of these objects. I'm going to remove them, and then let's add a plane to our scene. Hit "Shift and A" go to mesh and from here add a plane to your scene. Then you can scale it up, hit "S" and scale it up just like this. Now we can enter the edit mode. If you hit "Tab" on your keyboard, you will enter the edit mode. So far so good. Well, we already talked about transformation in Blender. However, in this video I'm going to introduce another cool feature of Blender to you. As I said, it's called the proportional editing. First of all, I'm going to sub-divide this face into multiple faces. What we can do is this. We can either use the loop cut here that we already talked about or we can simply select this face tool and then select this face. Right-click on it, and you will find this sub-divide option. If you click on it, you will see we will have four different subdivisions. Now we can open up this redo panel and we can increase the number of cuts. Here, I'm going to enter 15, just like this, and now we have multiple faces as you can see. Perfect. Now, I'm going to select this vertex tool. Here we have all these vertices. The reason I wanted to sub-divide this face is because we want to talk about proportional editing. Let me select one of these vertices. For example, this one. If I hit "G and Z" look what happens. We can move this vertex up just like this without affecting the vertices around it. Because we are just moving this vertex up. However, imagine you want to move this vertex and you want all the vertices around it to be affected as well. To do that, we can enable the proportional editing tool, which is placed right here at the top. If you click on this option, you can enable this proportional editing tool. The hot key for that is O on your keyboard. If you hit "O" you can disable it or enable it, and then you can hit "G" and as soon as you hit "G" you will see a circle appears. This circle defines the fall off of the proportional editing tool. Let me show you what I mean by that. If I hit "Z" now to lug it align the Z-axis and move my mouse up. Look what happens. You see I'm moving this vertex up. However, now all the vertices around it are being affected. Basically this circle defines the radius of the vertices or let's say faces and edges that are being affected by these proportional editing tool. If I want to make this radius much larger, I can use my mouse wheel and as soon as I increase the fall off, you can see that more and more vertices are being affected by this tool. Look what we have here. We can create such a smooth transformation as you can see, it's so cool. I'm going to confirm here right next to this proportional editing tool, we can change the type of fall off. If I open it up, we will have these options. If you enable this connected only, it will affect only those vertices that are connected. I'm not going to talk about it right now. But what we are interested in is these types, by default, it's set to smooth, so it gives us a smooth fall off, as you can see, it gives us this smooth transition. If I change it to, for example, sphere, let me hit "Command Z" to undo the operation we performed. Now if I hit "G and Z" look what we get. I'm going to change this fall off type to something else like root. Look what happens now. Hit "G, Z," you see how it behaves now, let me change it to something else may be sharp, G, Z. We can get a sharp point. You can go ahead and check all of these options, but I'm not going to do that. Instead, I'm going to select this random fall off type and look what happens if I hit "G, Z" all the vertices around our selected vertex have been affected, however, in a random way, they have been moved randomly. This fall off type is really suitable, for example, creating mountains for your projects if you need that. Now that you understand how this proportional editing tool works, I'm going to show you a few other examples. Let me remove this plane. I'm going to get back to the object mode and let me create a UV sphere. Then I'm going to enter the edit mode. I'm going to show you how you can create an egg using the proportional editing tool. First of all, make sure to set it back to smooth and you need to keep something in mind, when you use the proportional editing tool, make sure to turn it off because sometimes you forget that and then you try to move things around, but you see that something strange happens. That's because your proportional editing tool is still enabled. Keep that in mind whenever you use that. In order to create an egg, you just need a UV sphere. Then I'm going to enter the front autographic view. Hit "Number 1" on your numpad, just like this. What I'm going to do is this. I'm going to select this top vertex. Once again, hit "1". Let me zoom out a little bit and I'm going to move it up along the z-axis. I want all the vertices around that particular vertex to be affected. That's why I need this proportional editing tool to be turned on. I'm going to hit "G, Z" and I am going to decrease the fall off because it's too much. Now look what happens if I move my mouse up. Just like that, I can create an egg. Perfect. Here is our egg. Can you see how simple it is to create a 3D model in Blender? Using this proportional editing tool, you can create many cool things. If I enter the object mode now, you can see that our model is ready, but we will see all these faces. When you have a limited number of faces or vertices or edges, your shape won't look smooth at all. Because you can see all these phases because they are so large. However, if we just go to the object mode and we right-click on our object, here we will have this shade smooth option. If I click on it, it will smooth out our shape just like that. This is our egg. If you want to see your faces and all those segments again, you can just right-click on it and click on shade flat. That's all about proportional editing. When we start working on our projects, we will use the proportional editing tool a lot. If you didn't understand it quite well, don't worry about it, we will practice it a lot. Right now it's your turn to go ahead and create this simple egg on your own. I hope you enjoyed this video and I'll see you in the next one. 15. Modifiers - Part 1 : In this video, we're going to talk about modifiers in Blender. What are modifiers? Well, according to Blender, modifiers are automatic operations that affect an object's geometry in a non-destructive way. Well, let me simplify it for you. Basically, modifiers allow you to add some effects to your objects without affecting the geometry itself. When we say in a non-destructive way, it means you are not going to change the mesh data directly. Let me show you what I mean by that. Well, imagine you want to bevel these edges, the edges of this particular cube. First, you select it, then you enter the edit mode so hit "Tab" on your keyboard. As you know, you need to select this edge select tool. Select these two edges, hold down the "Shift key and click on them one by one and finally hit "Control B" and try to bevel them. I can increase the number of segments as well and left-click to confirm. If I head over to the object mode, you can see that now we have a nice bevel here we can enter the edit mode again. However, we just modified our geometry in a destructive way because we cannot turn it back to what it was before. We can not get those sharp edges anymore. It would be so hard we can actually, but it would be very tedious. Instead, we can use a modifier to perform the exact same action in a non-destructive way. Later we could adjust our bevel, we can adjust the number of segments, or even remove the bevel entirely. I hope you get how powerful modifiers are. There are many different modifiers in blender that you can use. However, we're going to focus on the most important ones at this stage. Without further ado, let's get into it. First, I'm going to undo the operation. I'm going to remove this pebble just like this, hit "Control Z" a few times. The way you can add a modifier to your shape is this. You select your object, you head over to the right panel here. If you just click on this wrench icon, you will be taken to the modifiers panel, and from here, you can open up this drop menu and as you can see, we have four different categories of modifiers. We have modify, generate, deform, and physics. Well, the modify, deform, and physics are quite advanced modifiers and we don't need them most of the time, but we may use a few of them in our projects in the next few chapters. But for now, we're going to talk about the generate category. This category is the most important category of modifiers. Well, as you can see, we have many of them. We have array, bevel, Boolean, build. We're not going to talk about all of them. We're going to talk about the most important ones and those modifiers that we may use almost all the time. Let's start with the array modifier. If I just click on "Array", as you can see, this modifier has been added to this particular object and you can immediately head over to the outliner and if I expand this object from here, you will see right under this object data, this modifier has been added. I'm going to collapse it. This array modifier allows us to create different instances of our base object and we can offset them using these factors. We have factor X, Y, and Z. Let me show you how it works. Here we have our base cube. Imagine you want to have 10 identical cubes sitting next to each other. The way we do that is like this. Instead of duplicating this cube, we can add this array modifier to it to create different instances of this particular object. By default, the count is set to two. I'm going to increase it to maybe six. Now we have six identical instances of our base cubed sitting next to each other. However, we can't really see them because they are attached to each other since factor X is set to one, if I increase this value, you will see our cubes now, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 cubes. The number of count is here. You can increase it or decrease it depending on your needs and here we increased factor X. That's why these instances have been created and have been placed along the x-axis. If you want them to be placed along the y-axis, you need to set the X factor to zero. and then you need to increase the Y factor to maybe 2, 3,4 anything or Z. You are not limited to just modify one of these factors. You can set a specific value for each of them. For example, here, I can increase the Z as well to create such an effect. Then I can decrease Y to create some steps just like this. The good thing about modifiers is that you add modifiers to one object and then whatever you do to the base object will be applied to the instances of that object as well. Here, we have one main object. This is our base object. If I try to scale it, look what happens if I hit "Tab" and I enter the edit mode, I cannot select all of these four cubes. I can only select my base object. So if I hit "A" on my keyboard to select all these edges and all these faces, you will see that only my base object is selected now. Let's suppose we want to scale it along the x-axis to create some steps so I can hit "S", then "X" and just scale it along the x-axis. Just like that, you will see that whatever I do, whatever changes I make here will be applied to the other instances as well and that's great. There are many other things here we can talk about, but it's not really necessary for now because it's going to be so complicated for you. However, you need to keep in mind that we have this constant offset option as well. Write now, we use this relative offset by default, this one is enabled, but if I disable it and if I enable this constant offset instead, you can change the distance using these values using meter, just like that. That's one thing to keep in mind. I'm going to disable it and enable relative offset. There is one more cool thing here, and it's called Object Offset. Let me show you how it works. Let's suppose you want to control the behavior of these instances using another object. Well, let's create another object. In fact I'm going to hit "Shift" and "A". Let me create a UV sphere. It's placed right here, but it's so small. I'm going to hit "G", "X" and move it to the right side. Then I'm going to select my cube here, my stairs. I'm going to enable this object offset. If I expand this here, you can find this eyedropper icon. If you click on it and you hover over your UV sphere, left-click. Now, the position of our instances and our stairs, let's say depends on the position of this UV sphere. If I select this UV sphere now and I hit G to move it around, look what happens. It can control the way these cubes behave just like this. That's so cool. I can even rotate it. It's R to rotate and I can create some cool shapes. Just like that. It's quite fun, isn't it? That's our first modifier and it's so useful whenever you need to create different instances of an object, let's say a few identical instances of your object. You can use this array modifier. The reason we call it non-disruptive is because we can modify all these properties all the time. Let's suppose you want to decrease the count just like this. You can increase it as well. What if I don't need these instances anymore? You can simply click on this little icon right next to this camera and you can disable it. One more thing about modifiers is that you can apply modifiers to your object as well. If you click on this little arrow and you click on "Apply", now we don't have any modifier here. If I enter the edit mode, you will see that all these instances are part of one object. Therefore, I can no longer modifying the properties of these stairs because they are basically one mesh. I can go ahead and modify the whole geometry if I want. But I cannot modify the properties of these instances in a non-destructive way so that's something to keep in mind. Let's talk about the next modifier now. I'm going to remove this stair, this UV sphere as well and let me add one cube just like this. We don't need this camera and this light. Let me remove them as well. The next modifier we're going to talk about is Bevel. Well, we talked about the Bevel tool before when we talked about all the modeling tools and you know how it works. This modifier does the exact same thing. It allows us to add some bevels to our edges or our vertices. If I add this modifier to my cube, look what happens. I'm going to zoom in. As you can see now, our edges are beveled and here we have the vertices option as well. If I switch to vertices now our vertices are beveled. I'm going to go back to edges. Here I can increase or decrease the amount as much as I want. I can increase or decrease the number of segments. Here we have a few other options like Limit Method, angle as well. We're not going to talk about them right now. But you may ask, what's the difference between this modifier and the bevel modeling tool in the edit mode? Well, the difference is simple. We are adding this effect to this cube in a non-destructive way. If I enter the edit mode, look what happens our cube is intact, our mesh is intact. I can still select this edge. I can move it to the right side, for example, hits g, x and move it along the x-axis. I can modify this Bevel amount whenever I want. Just like this. However, if I had selected this Bevel tool and if I had added this Bevel in the edit mode, it was not possible for me to adjust it later on. That's something to keep in mind. I'm going to undo the operation and now I'm going to remove this bevel modifier. You need to understand that you are not limited to add only one modifier to your object. You can have a stack of modifiers for one object. We will talk about it later. Let me remove this modifier just like this and let's talk about the next modifier. The next modifier that we are going to talk about is called Boolean. Well, this is a very important modifier as well because it allows us to combine two different shapes or subtract one shape from another shape. Let me show you how it works. Well, I'm going to add another shape here because whenever you want to use the Boolean modifier, you need to have at least two shapes. I'm going to add this UV sphere, It's right here. Let me move it around. I'm going to place it right there. Let's suppose I want to create a card here. I'm going to subtract this overlapping section from this cube. To do that, I need to add the Boolean modifier to my first object, this cube. I'm going to add the Boolean modifier to it. Then here you will find this object option. Using this eyedropper, you need to select your second object, which is this sphere. But you may think that nothing happened, but your wrong, I'm going to prove that to you. But first, let me show you these options. Here right at the top, we have three different options to choose from. We have intersect union and difference. If you hover over any one of them, you can read the definition. The difference says combine meshes in a subtractive way. This one says combine meshes in an additive way. The last one intersect says keep the part of the mesh that is common between all operands. Here let me show you what happened. The overlapping section here, as you can see, this part that is inside this cube has been subtracted from this cube, but we can't see it. To see that I need to select this sphere and I need to hide it. If you want to hide an object, you can hit H on your keyboard or you can head over to the outliner and click on this little i icon. Just like that, you can see this cut appeared in our cube, and that's because we use that Boolean modifier. However, since I hit my sphere, I cannot move my sphere around. How can we fix that? Well, I'm going to unhide it and then I'm going to head over to the object property panel and from here, if you go to the viewport display section, you can expand it. Here we have one option called display as by default it's set to texture it. That's why we can see this cube the way it looks. If I change it to bounds or wire, look what happens. I'm going to set it to bounce. Now we can't see our sphere anymore and we can see this boundary here instead. But using this boundary, we can still select our object and we can move it around. I'm going to hit G, and I can simply move it around. Just like this. That's why we say modifiers help us to achieve something in a non-destructive way. It's quite helpful sometimes. Now let's select this cube. I'm going to go to the modifier panel and from here I'm going to change the type of this Boolean modifier from difference to union. Now these two shapes are combined. If I set it to intersect, look what happens. It keeps the intersecting section, the overlapping section, and it removes the rest of these two objects. Imagine you want to create a window. You create the wall, then you create a large cube, and then you use this Boolean modifier to subtract that cube from your wall. That's how we do it. In fact, we are going to do it in our future projects. Let me remove this sphere, and I'm going to remove this modifier as well. Now let's talk about the next modifier. Well, the next modifier is called Mirror. The Mirror modifier allows us to mirror our object along the x, y, and z-axis over the object origin. Let me show you how it works. Whenever you want to mirror your object, first, you need to have the mirror and the mirror is always your origin point. These little dots that we talked about before. If I add this Mirror modifier to this cube right now nothing happens. The reason is our mirror is right at the center of this cube. There is no way for this cube to be mirrored. To fix that, we can modify the place of this origin point. You know how to do it. There are many ways to move this origin point to somewhere else. However, the simplest one is this. You enter the edit mode, you hit A to select all your faces. You hit GX to move it along the x-axis, and then you move it around just like this. Now as you can see, we have this mirrored object and here is our mirror now. I'm going to get back to the object mode and explain a few things here. Well, right now our mirror is here and our access is set to X. It means that it mirrors along the x-axis. If I set it to Y you see that nothing happens. The reason for that is because there is nothing here, along the y-axis. If I try to move this object along the y-axis, then you will see it will be mirrored along the y-axis as well. Let me prove that to you. I'm going to enter the edit mode and then while our main object is selected, hit G, Y, and move it. There we go. Now it's being mirrored along both x and y-axis. What about Z? If I enable the z-axis as well, nothing happened. You know why? Because we need to move it along the z-axis as well. While it's selected, hit GZ, move it up and now it's being mirrored along all three axes. Just like that. As I said, it's a very powerful modifier. Here I can simply adjust this base object. For example, I can select this face. I can insert it and look what happens. Then I'm going to extrude it out. Perfect. Now I'm going to extrude it once again. Then let's rotate this a little bit. As you can see, we created this complex shape. It's quite cool to use this Mirror modifier and most of the time I use it for something like tables. If you want to create, for example, four legs of your table, you can use this mirror modifier. I'm going to show you some cool use cases in our future sections. But for now you just need to practice how it works. We have this mirror object option as well. It allows us to have an external mirror. Right now, as I said, the mirror is the origin point of our base object. But what if we want to have an external mirror? We can do that as well. Let me undo these operations a few times. Just like this, to have one cube. We have this origin point here, and as you can see, we don't have it mirrored. I'm going to create another shape and let me create a UV sphere. I'm going to hit GX and move it along the x-axis just like that. Then I'm going to select this cube and from here mirror object, I'm going to choose this eyedropper hover over this sphere and click on it. Now this sphere acts as a mirror for this modifier. Look what happens if I move it around, hit G, you see. All right guys that's all for this video. This is the first part of the modifiers video. In the next video, we will continue talking about other modifiers. For now, please go ahead and practice what you just learned. Try to add these modifiers to your shapes and try to understand how they work. See you in the next one. 16. Modifiers - Part 2: [MUSIC] In this video, we're going to continue talking about the generate modifiers. Well, in our last video, we talked about the Mirror Modifier, the Boolean bevel and array. In this video, we're going talk about this Screw Modifier first. Well, as its name suggests, it allows you to create a screw effect using your objects. If I add this modifier to my cube, you will see something like this, which is very strange. But wait a second, I'm going to show you how to make it look much better. What this modifier does is that it actually creates some instances and then you can modify the angle of these instances sitting next to each other, or you could just increase the screw value just like this, to move these incenses along the z-axis. The z-axis is selected by default, you can set it to x and y as well. But right now, as you can see, our z-axis is selected and we will get something like this. We have the number of steps here, we have set it to 16. This is the default value, but if you want to get a smoother shape, you can increase it just like this to add more steps, but it's not needed, I'm going to set it to 16. Well, this modifier also works in relation to your objects origin. If I try to remove it for now, and I go to the Edit mode, just like this. Hit A to select all these faces, then G, then X, to move this cube along the x-axis while I keep this origin point right at the center. If I add that Screw Modifier to it, now look what happens. I am going to increase the screw and we will get something like this. It just looks like star. Here, the number of iterations is set to one, you can increase it to whatever amount you want. I'm going to set it to four to get something like that. You can increase or decrease the angle just like this. By default it's set to 360, you can set it to 100. You can decrease the screw as well, and it works for any object, just like this. Here we have this axis object as well, just like what we had in the mirror modifier, you can control the behavior of this modifier, let's say, of these instances using an external object. Let's create another shape like a UV sphere. I'm going to hit G, X, move it here, then I'm going to select this cube. From here let's select this eyedropper and click on this sphere. Just like that, now I can control the behavior of this modifier using this UV sphere. If I select it, hit "G", I can move it around just like this to adjust the screw amount. That's so fine. That's all for this modifier. Let me remove it from my cube. Let's talk about our next modifier. First, let me go to the Object menu, go to set origin and set the origin to center of mass, just like this. Then I'm going to go and talk about the next modifier. Well, the next modifier we're going to talk about is called Skin. It actually lets you add some skin to some vertices or edges. I'm going to select this cube, I'm going to enter the Edit Mode and just select this vertex tool, just like that. What I'm going to do is this. I'm going to select one of these vertices, then hit Shift and D to duplicate this vertex. As you can see now we duplicated this vertex, it's right here. Then I'm going to select my cube. Entirely, make sure that you select all of these faces. I can select this face tool, select everything, including this phase, and this one, hit "X" and hit "Delete" faces, this one as well. If I select this vertex tool now, you will find this vertex right here. What I'm going to do now is this, I'm going to go to the right or to graphic view and I'm going to hit "E" to extrude this vertex out just like this, then hit "Y" to, lock it along the y-axis, then again E, Z, move it down, E, Y, move it to the right side. That's all. We just created, three different edges. Now that we have a few edges, we can add this Skin modifier to it, just like that. As you can see, we can simply add Skin to our edges. You can modify these properties. For now we're not going to talk about them, but if you want to modify the thickness of this skin modifier, you can enter the edit mode, hit "Control A", and then move your mouse. Just like this, you can modify the thickness of your Skin. That's how the Skin modifier works. Let me remove it. I'm going to remove this cube as well. Let me create a plane and let's go to the modifier panel, and from here, I'm going to select Solidify. Well, the solidify modifier allows you to add some thickness to your object. That's all. Right now we have this flat plane. If I go to the Edit Mode, you can see that there is no thickness here. I can simply select one of these edges extruded out, hit E, Z to extrude it out. As you can see, there is no thickness here. If I select this object in the Object Mode and add the solidify modifier to it, look what happens. Now we have some thickness and we can adjust it right here. Right now we don't have an even thickness here and here. To fix that, we just need to enable this Even thickness option, and it's fixed. It's quite helpful sometimes when you want to create a shape using a plane and then add some thickness to it. What about the next modifier? The next modifier is subdivision surface, and undoubtedly it's one of the most important modifiers in blender. Let me show you why. Well, when you add a mesh to your scene, for example, this UV sphere, you can see all these faces. The reason we can see all these faces is because we don't have many faces. If we just try to split these faces into smaller faces, our shape would be much, much smoother. If you remember, I showed you that you can just right-click on it and hit the shade smooth option to make it smoother, but there is one other way to do that. If we just add more and more and more faces and vertices to our shape, it would become smoother. However, the problem with that approach is that later when we want to render our scene, our file is going to be so heavy and it's going to be too time-consuming to render one single scene. For instance, if I just delete this UV sphere and I try to add it once again, you can open up this redo panel. From here you can adjust the number of segments and rings and radius. I'm not going to change the radius, but I can simply increase the number of segments just like this, and also the number of rings. Immediately you can notice that it's much smoother now. However, this is not a good approach because of the reason that I just explained. It's going to be so hard for Blender to render this object. It's going to consume so much resources of your system. How can we fix this issue? Well, we can use the subdivision surface modifier to add more details to our mesh in a non-destructive way. Let me show you how it works. I'm going to remove this UV sphere, hit Shift and A, and add this monkey to our scene, just like this. As you can see, this monkey doesn't have so much detail. If I enter the Edit Mode, you can see we don't have so many different phases here. That's why it's not smooth. Imagine you want to make it smoother, hit "Tab" on your keyboard, then go to Modifier and add this subdivision surface modifier to it. As you can see, it's much smoother now because this modifier splits these faces into smaller faces. Here we have two different properties, levels of viewport render. This value defines how much detail you want to add to your mesh. But keep in mind that when you increase this value, although your shape will be much smoother, it would be much harder for Blender to render your scene. Nothing define our render but in the viewport. If I increase it to maybe four, it's so smooth, but it's going to make your file so heavy. What about render? Well, this level, this value defines how smooth this object would be in the final render, not here in the Viewport. My suggestion is you always set the levels viewport to two and the render to three. This way it would be much easier for blender to display all your objects here in the Viewport, and later when you try to render your scene, it would be one more level smoother than what you see here. Then we can just right-click on it and shade smooth. Let me show you one more thing here. I'm going to remove this monkey, I'm going to add a plane. This plane has by default four vertices. If I try to add the subdivision surface modifier to it, it will look like this. I can increase this levels Viewport to two and the render to three. If I enter the Edit Mode now you will see our base shape is still intact. The reason our shape has been changed is because this modifier tries to smooth everything out. Look what happens when I apply this subdivision modifier. When I apply it, if I enter the Edit Mode, now we can see all the vertices and faces that have been created because of that modifier. If you remember, we didn't have these faces initially. Now that we applied this modifier, we can simply adjust our mesh as usual. We can simply move these vertices, rotate them, scale them however we want. Now let's talk about the next modifier. I'm going to remove this. Let me add this monkey here. If I enter the Edit Mode, you can see that our faces are rectangular. But there is this modifier called triangulate, and it allows us to make our faces triangulated and it converts all polygons, these are called polygons, these faces to triangles. If I add this triangulate modifier to it, look what happens. Now we have triangulated faces, I can simply apply it here and if I enter the Edit Mode, you can see that now we have triangulated faces. Now let's talk about the next modifier. I am going to add a UV sphere here, and let me decrease the number of segments to 32 and the number of rings to 16. The next modifier we're going to talk about is called a Wireframe. If you add this modifier to your object, it will create a wireframe shape for you. It's so cool because we can modify the thickness just like this, and we can create some fun and fancy shapes. Let me move it up, it looks pretty good. I'm going to add another shape here, maybe a torus. Let me add this wireframe modifier to it and you will see what we can achieve with it. Guys, that's all for this video, I hope you enjoyed it. Now it's your turn to go ahead and practice what you just learned. Please let me know if you have any questions in the discussion section and I'll see you in the next one. 17. Light Types: [MUSIC] Hey, in this video we're going to talk about lights in Blender. Well, lights are an essential part of your 3D scene because, without them, everything would be so dark. You need to know that whenever you want to render your scene, you need to make sure that you have good lighting, otherwise, your scene wouldn't look good no matter how great your models are. Let's see how lights work in Blender. Right now here, when you open up Blender, you will see this cube, this camera, and this light. But we can't see any shadow here. That's because we are in the solid mode. If you take a look at this upper right corner, right here, you can navigate through different modes. Right now we are in the solid mode that's why we can't see any shadows. Here we have the wireframe mode, we have the dev look mode, and finally, we have the render mode. We will talk about these modes later and we will use them depending on our needs. But for now, you need to know that whenever you want to see your shadows and how your lights actually look, you need to go to the render mode. If I enter the render mode and I tried to select this point light and I move it around you will see that actually this cube is being lit up by this point light. Can you see that? As soon as I move it around, my shadows change as well. To understand it better, I'm going to go ahead and add a plane right here. Let's hit Shift and A, go to mesh, and add a plane here. It's right there. I'm going to scale it up, hit S to scale it up dramatically so this is going to be our floor. Then I'm going to select my cube, hit G, Z, and move it up and let's place it right above this plane. Now, you can see this shadow here. If I go to the solid mode, you will see that our shadows are gone. Keep in mind that whenever you want to see your shadows and how your lights actually look, you need to enter the rendered mode. It's very important. Well, in Blender, we have different types of lights. We have in fact four different types of light. If I select this one, this is our point light. You can head over to this object property on the right panel here. If you click on this little green icon, you can see all the properties of this object. Here we have point, we have sun, we have spots and area. The point light is actually a point radiating the same amount of light in all directions. That's why it's called omnidirectional point light. Basically we cannot rotate it if I hit R, as you can see, nothing changes. We can just move it around just like this and depending on its distance from our cube here, you can see that we get a different kind of shadow. Here we have different properties. Each light has a color property that you can change and also power. By default, it's set to 1,000 watt. W stands for watt. Here we have a few other properties like diffuse volume and radius. Radius allows you to change the radius of this light. The higher this value the softer shadows you will get. When you have a large source of light, like a large window, your shadows will be much softer. We will talk about lighting a lot and all these techniques in our future sections when we work on our projects. But for now you just need to know how these properties work. Don't worry about these three options, you can just leave them as is. We're not going to talk about them right now. You can change the color of your light here using this color picker. Just like this. It's so simple. You can enter a hex color code right here if you have a specific color code or you can adjust the RGB values or HSV values. Using this slider, you can define the brightness of your color, how light it should be, just like this. I'm going to undo it to get our white color and as I said, this is the power of our light and it determines the intensity of our lights. If I decrease this value to 100, you can see our scene is much darker now. If I increase it to 5,000 watts, look what happens. We will get a very bright scene. Now let's change this point, light to sunlight. Well, as you can see, it's so bright, that's because of the power of this light. I'm going to decrease it to one so this works just the sunlight so you can define its direction as you can see using this line. You can rotate it however you want. But its position doesn't matter. If I try to move it, look what happens. I'm going to hit G and move it down. You will see that nothing changes here. Because no matter where you position it, you will get the exact same result. The only thing you can change here is the direction of your sunlight. That's how the sunlight works and most of the time we don't use it. Again, you can change its color if you want. What about spotlight? Well, a spotlight emits a cone-shaped beam of light from the tip of the cone in a specific direction. Right now the radius of this spotlight is set to 3.27. Let me decrease it dramatically and also you can see the direction here. The power is set to one. Let me increase it to 200 and you will see our light appears perfectly. You can adjust the size of this light just like this and depending on the radius, you will get softer or sharper shadows. If I increase the radius, you will see our shadows will get softer. If I decrease it, look what happens. As you can see our shadows get sharper now. You can simply move this light around just like this. You can rotate it as well. It's R, Z, and rotate it along the z-axis and then G, X to move it this way if you want to put your source of light right here. Now as you can see, our shadow appears right here. What about the area light? The area light simulates light originating from a surface emitter like a window or a TV screen, etc. It allows us to get very soft shadows and if you want to set up a studio lights, you need to use area lights because that's what we use in studio. We use area lights. Here we can specify the power, the color, and also the size. If you want to get some soft shadows here, you can increase the size here, the x and y dramatically, and you will see that your shadows get softer and softer and softer. I can move it a little bit. Let me enter the front orthographic view and just move this light far away and as you can see now, our shadows are softer. I can increase the power and we will get such a nice soft shadow. As I said, I will show you how you can utilize all these types of lights when we start working on our projects. But for now, I want you to go ahead and create a plane just like what I did here. Put your cube on top of it and try to modify the type of your light and adjust all these values. For example, you can adjust the color to see what you get. You can modify the power to something like 700 and adjust the size of your light dramatically to see how your shadows get affected and understand the difference between each light source. All right guys, that's all for this video. I hope you enjoyed it and I will see you in the next one. 18. Materials: [MUSIC] In this video we are going to talk about materials in Blender. What is a material? Well a material actually determines how your object should look. In simple words, a material tells the render engine how to bounce light off of an object. It determines how shiny or diffused your object should be, or what kind of color it should have, and whether the light should pass through it or not. I know it may sound weird and complex, but don't worry, we are going to go through all of these in a few seconds. First of all, I'm going to go ahead and create a floor here. I'm going to hit Shift and A, and add a plane. Then I'm going to scale it up, just like this. Then let's select our cube. Hit G then Z, to lock it along the z-axis. By now you should all know how these hotkeys work. I'm going to move it up, just like this. To add a material to your object, you need to select your object. Then you need to head over to the Material tab. On the right panel you can click on this icon right below this green icon. Here is where you can add a material to your object. This cube by default has a material because it's the default cube. But if I remove it and add a new cube, you can see that there is nothing here. But for now, since we have this material, we can go ahead and rename it here. If you just left-click here, you can rename it to Cube, "Enter", to change the name of your material. Here you will see many different properties. You can modify all of them depending on your needs. However, you don't need to know what each property does at this stage because it's going to be so confusing and overwhelming for you. I'm going to focus on the most important properties right now, and later when we work on our projects I'll show you how to adjust different properties to get some specific results. Let's begin. first of all, you can specify a color for your object, right here you have the base color. This is the first important property of your material. You can modify it simply to whatever you want. I'm going to change it to maybe red or orange. But as you can see, nothing changes in our viewport. That's because we are in the solid mode. If you remember in our previous lesson, we talked about lights, and I told you you need to go to the render mode to see what's going on here. However, to preview your materials, we have a dedicated mode here, which is the material mode. You can just click on it and you will see your material here. Or if you want to see the shadows and the effect of your lights as well, you can enter the render mode just like this. I prefer this mode since we can see our shadows. Great. Let's see what else we have here. Well we are not going to talk about these properties right now. The second most important property here is the roughness. This property determines how shiny or how diffused your object should be. So whether it should bounce light off of this object or not. If you want to make it so shiny, you need to decrease this value. Let me show you an example of this roughness. I'm going to add a new shape here. Maybe this monkey, let me put it right here. I'm going to rotate it along the z-axis. Hit R, Z, and rotate it, just like this. I can move it here. Then I'm going to add a material to it. If I select it and I head over to the Material tab, you can see that there is no material, so I need to create one and assign it to this particular object. I can hit this new button to create a material, and I can call it Gold, for instance. Then I'm going to change the base color to something like this. If I zoom in, you can see that it's not that shiny. What I can do is this, I can decrease the roughness. As soon as I do that, you can see that it will be more reflective. As you can see, it's hard to see, that's because of the render engine we're using. In our next lesson we will talk about render engines. Don't worry about it if you don't know what they are, but it's more reflective now. If I increase this value all the way to 1, it's going to be diffused. It's not going to reflect any light. Let's see what happens if I select our ground or our floor, add a material to it. Let's call it Floor. Then decrease this roughness to 0. I'm going to move around. As you can see, it's reflective. I can see the reflection of my light here. If I try to move my light, you see, I can see the reflection of my light source right on the ground. If I select my ground or my floor and I increase this roughness to 1, as you can see, now it's diffused and we can't see any reflection. The next important property I'm going to talk about here is the metallic. If something is made of metal, we need to increase this property for that. For example, if we want to make this monkey metallic, we can select it, we can increase the metallic value to 1, and it will be metallic, just like this. If I modify my source light a little bit, if I move it around, just like that, and I try to decrease the roughness as well. Now you can clearly see that it's made out of metal. Let me change the type of my light to area, it would be much easier to adjust it and increase the size of this light dramatically. Now I'm going to select my monkey. From here you can see that it's totally reflective. I can increase this roughness a little bit because it was too much. As you can see, it looks much more realistic. If I change my render engine, because right now we are using the EV render engine. If we switch to the cycles render engine, it would be much more realistic. As I said, we didn't talk about render engines, so don't worry about it, but we will talk about them. These were the most important properties of the material I wanted to talk about. But as I said in our projects, we will talk about the other properties of this section as well. Guys, now it's your turn to go ahead and create different shapes and try to add materials to them, as I showed you here, it's going to be so simple. Try to modify the base color, try to adjust the roughness, and also this metallic value. You can simply make something metallic and make it shiny, just like what we did here with this monkey. Go ahead and give it a try. I will see you in the next video. 19. Rendering: Hey, welcome back. In this video, we're going to talk about rendering. What is rendering? Well, rendering is the process of converting your 3D scene to a 2D image. Once you are done modeling and adding materials and textures to your model and setting up your lighting systems, you need to render your 3D scene. Otherwise, you cannot see the results and you cannot share it with others. In order to render your 3D scene, you need a render engine. A render engine is something that converts your 3D scene to a 2D image. There are many different rendering engines we can use. However, blender has two render engines that are so powerful, they are called Eevee and cycles. Let me show you how they work and what's the main difference between them. Right now we are in this rendered mode. This is the project that we created in our last video. If you go to the render panel, it's right here. If you click on this little icon, this is our render panel. You will see the render engine by default is set to Eevee. This Eevee rendering engine is so powerful and it's so fast. It's basically a real-time render engine. Whatever you see here happening is done by this Eevee render engine. These shadows and these reflections are being done by this render engine. They look fine, but they don't look so realistic, and that's because Eevee is a real-time render engine. It's not supposed to give you the most realistic lights. However, it does a very good job for previewing your scene because it's so fast, you can simply move around your scene. Your shadows will be rendered perfectly and quickly. But if you want to get an ultra-realistic render, you need to change your render engine to cycles. Just like this, you can immediately see that this render looks much better the reflection of this monkey appears here. That's because we modify the roughness of this material for this cube. If you remember, we decrease it to zero to make it so shiny and reflective, but it's more time-consuming, so it's not as fast as Eevee, but in our final render we should always use cycles, so that's one thing to keep in mind. The other thing is that in order to render a scene, we need to use a camera. We will talk about setting up your camera. But as you can see by default, this camera is here whenever you create a project, so when we render our scene when we render our project blender will render whatever we can see through this camera lens. If you press "Zero" on your numpad or if you just click on this little icon here, this camera icon, this is what we see in our final render. You need to always select your camera, adjust its position. I will show you how to do that in our future lessons and then go to the render menu right at the top and hit this "Render Image" button. Then you will see that blender will start rendering your scene. This is the other point to keep in mind the balance rendering. Now I'm going to talk about the number of samples. Well, if I head over to the render panel, here you can see we have the sampling section. We have two subsections, viewport and render. Well, as I said, our scene is being rendered in real-time in the viewport, what we see here, and also it can be rendered using this render Image option here to save it on your system as a 2D image. The number of samples determines the quality of our viewport render here. I mean, under this viewport section, so if I decrease this max samples to 24, you will see these noises appear more frequently. I'm going to decrease this maximum sample number to maybe 32. I'm going to change this cycles to Eevee, change it back to cycles. As you can see, it starts rendering here, you will see the number of samples, 7,8,9,10. It's not going to look that good, but it's going to be faster. However, in our final render, we need to always have a higher number like 512,256 maybe or even more. But you need to keep in mind that when you increase the number of samples, you're going to get a more time-consuming render as well. But if you have a very powerful computer that can handle like 4,000 samples, that's fine. If not, you can keep it at 512 samples to make it much quicker, and still you can get a high-quality render with this sample. I personally prefer 32 for viewport and 512 for the final render. Now if I hit this "Render Image" button or "F12", the hotkey for that is F12, you will see the number of sample here changed to 512, but in my viewport, I will get only 32 samples. The other important thing is that the rendering process is done by your CPU. Here as you can see, the device is set to CPU, which is not that fast. If you're using Windows, you may use your GPU for rendering, which is going to be so much faster than your CPU. However, you need to keep in mind that not all graphic cards are supported. What you can do is this. You can choose GPU. You can head over to the preferences. Under System, you will find a section right above this memory and limit section showing you the name of your graphic card. You can select your graphic card there if it's supported, right now I can't see my graphic card because I'm using macOS and right now, GPU is not supported by blender for macOS users. I hope they're supported pretty soon, but at the moment, macOS users can only use CPU rendering, but still it's going to be fine. That's all about rendering in our future lessons when we start working on our projects, I will show you some techniques, how to set up your camera, how to optimize your render engine to get the most realistic results. Guys, that's all for this video. I hope you enjoyed it and I'll see you in the next one. 20. Introduction to the Project: Hey, welcome to the first video on this section. In this section, we are going to work on our very first project, which is a low poly beach. But you may ask what low poly is. Low poly is a popular 3D design style that could be used for illustrations, game assets, etc. Many designers nowadays use this side to create interesting 3D artwork. A 3D model is made of polygons, and basically, high poly models are made of many polygons while low poly models contain fewer of them. If you're ready, let's get into it. 21. Modeling Terrain: [MUSIC] Hey, welcome back. In this video, we're going to start working on our 3D models. We are going to create our 3D models, and then finally in our future lessons, we will put all these models together to create a good composition. We will talk about layout and composition, and then we will move on to lighting materials and so on. But for now, you need to go ahead and create a new project and make sure to save your project on your computer. Just hit "Control S" or "Command S" create a folder, and save your project. From time to time, make sure to hit that Control S or Command S hotkey, because sometimes you may forget to do that and you may lose your project. Just keep that in mind. I personally tend to hit "Control S" or "Command S" after a few minutes, after five or 10 minutes, but it's totally up to you. Just make sure to get used to this process. Here is my new project, I already saved it. Now what I'm going to do is this, I'm going to remove all of these objects. Let's remove them, and I'm going to add a plane here because in this lesson we're going to create our terrain. For the terrain, we need a plane. You can use a cube as well but I prefer this plane. It's going to be much simpler so make sure to add a plane here, and then I'm going to scale it up because it's too small. I'm going to hit "S" and instead of scaling it like this, I am going to hit "Number 4" on my Numpad. This way I can make sure that my plane is 8 by 8. I'm going to hit "Enter." The reason it's going to be eight by 8 is because when I press number 4, I will get four squares on each side of these axes, just like this. As you can see, I can count it 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Cool. Now we need to actually give some depth to our terrain. What we need to do is this. I can first rename it in the outliner to keep everything organized. Just double-click and its name here, and let's call it terrain. As you know, since we are going to modify it, we need to use our modeling tools. We need to enter the edit mode, and to do that, we need to hit "Tab" and here I'm going to select this plane. It's selected by default, but if it's not, you need to select your face tool and select this face. Since we are going to add some depth to it, we need to extrude it out. Hit "E" to choose the extrusion tool, and I'm going to move my mouse up just like this, I think something like this looks pretty good. You shouldn't necessarily look for a precise value, you can just eyeball it. I think it looks predefined now. Maybe I can move it up a little bit, while this phase is selected, I'm going to go to the front orthographic view by hitting number 1 on my Numpad, then hit "G, Z" to lock it along the z-axis and move it up a little bit. Maybe something like this. It looks quite good. What's the next step? Well, here on the right side, I'm going to place some water later. It's going to be our C. On the left side, we are going to have some rocks, maybe some palm trees. What I'm going to do is this, first I'm going to add some details to my top face. Because right now we have just four vertices, as we can see, there is not much I can do here. We need more details. The way I can do that is this. I already showed it to you but I'm going to explain it once again. I can just select this top face, right-click on it, and sub-divide it. As soon as I do that this redo panel appears right here at the bottom, I can open it up and I can increase this number. You can see that I can't go more than 10. However, I can just type a value here, maybe 20 looks good, and now as we can see, we have more faces and more vertices to work with. That's exactly what I needed. Let me collapse this redo panel. What else should we do? Well, as I said, I'm going to place the C right here. I'm going to go to the top view, hit "Number 7" on your Numpad, and I'm going to select a few of these faces. I'm going to make sure that my face select tool is selected, and maybe I can select these faces just like this. Then what I'm gonna do is this, I am going to go to the front orthographic view, so hit "Number 1" on your Numpad. You need to get used to these numbers by the way because as you can see, it accelerates your design process dramatically and we need to move these faces down. For sure by now, you all know how to do it. You just need to hit "G" then lock it along the z-axis. Hit "Z" and move your mouse down and something like this looks very good to me. Here we can place our water later. One thing I'm going to mention here is that if you can't remember the shortcut of axes, that's fine, you just need to memorize three colors. It's very simple, red represents the x-axis, green represents the y-axis, and blue represents the z-axis. Whenever you are on the right orthographic view or front orthographic view and you see this blue line, you can clearly understand that this is the z-axis. This red line represents the x-axis, so if you want to move it to the right or left, you need to lock it along the x-axis. Just keep that in mind. So far so good. What else? Well, our terrain looks fine, but I think this part is quite flat, which doesn't look natural to me. Let's go ahead and move some of these faces or vertices up a little bit to make it look more realistic. To do that, I'm going to select the vertex tool, and now what I'm going to do is this, since I don't want this bottom part of this terrain to be changed, I'm going to hide it temporarily. To do that, you just need to select this bottom part. Right now I mean the solid mode. If I try to select these vertices, look what happens. Right now I selected these two. If I orbit around my terrain, look what happens. As you can see, these two vertices are not selected. That's because when you are in the solid mode, you can select whatever you can see, not something behind it. However, if you want to select something behind something else, you need to enter your wireframe mode. To do that, you can simply click on this little icon, you can go to the wireframe mode or you can hold down the Z key on your keyboard to open up this pie menu and just move your mouse to the left side and select wireframe. Now if I try to select these two vertices, the vertices behind it are selected as well. This is a very useful trick you can use in your projects. Cool. As I said, I'm going to hide it. First, I'm going to go to the solid mode and I'm going to hit "H" on my keyboard. As you can see, it's gone. To unhide it, you can hit "Alt and H". Just keep that in mind. H for hiding something, Alt and H for unhiding something. I'm going to hide it once again and now, I can try to select one of these vertices randomly. For example, maybe this one, and I'm going to move it up. But if I hit "G" and try to move it up, look what happens. It doesn't affect the vertices around it. That's not what we want. The tool we need to use now is the proportional editing. We already talked about it and you know how useful and how powerful it is. I'm going to enable it, by the way, the hotkey for that is O, and make sure that the smooth fall of type has been selected. Then I'm going to hit "G, Z" to lock it along the z-axis and try to adjust the fall-off amount, something like that, maybe a little bit more, and move your mouse up. Not dramatically but something very smooth and subtle. Just like this, maybe I can select one more vertex over there, hit "G, Z" and move this place up a little bit, and probably here as well, this one, G, Z, and move it up. Not too much by the way. All right, perfect, it looks quite good, maybe I can select one where it takes over there as well, G, Z, and move it up. It looks quite good to me, we don't need to edit this part for now. Right now, we just need to focus on our terrain and I'm really satisfied with its appearance. If you want, you can go ahead and modify it however you want. This is the way I like it to be but this is your project and you can adjust it with your own creativity. Don't be afraid to make changes, go ahead and try to convert your ideas to real objects. Now we can simply hit "Alt and H" to unhide this bottom part, and we can say that our terrain is ready. However, for this low police style project, I really prefer to have triangulated faces. What I'm going to do is this. I'm going to select these top faces and triangulate them. To do that, I'm going to hit "7" on my keyboard to go to the top orthographic view, select the face tool, and try to select all these faces just like this. To triangulate them, I can hit "Control T" or "Command T" on my keyboard, just like this. Now I have triangulated faces, which looks much better in my opinion. But again, this is just a matter of preference, if you don't like this style, you can go ahead and leave it as is. I guess that's all for our terrain, it looks quite good in my opinion. That's all for this video. I hope you liked it. If you have any questions, any issues, please let me know, and by the way, you can find the project files in the resources section in case you want to compare your project with mine. See you in the next video. 22. Modeling Rocks: [MUSIC] In this video, we're going to create some rocks for our pitch. If you're ready, let's get into it. First of all, I'm going to hide this terrain temporarily. Just click on this little icon here. Alternatively, you can hit H on your keyboard, and now, I'm going to add a cube here. Hit Shift and A, go to Mesh, and add a cube here. For our rock, I'm going to use this cube, and I'm going to show you how you can create a rock simply by just modifying this cube. First, as usual, let's rename it to Rock, and then enter the edit mode, hit Tab. What we need here is this. First, I'm going to scale it a little bit. Hit S. Make sure that your Proportional Editing tool is turned off. Scale it along the x-axis a little bit. Hit S, X to lock it along the x-axis, and scale it just like this. I think it looks very good now, maybe a little bit aligned to y-axis as well. Hit S, Y, and scale it. It looks good. Then we need more details to work with because right now, we don't have so many different edges here. What we can do is this. We can either add a loop cut here and here, or we can just select all these faces. Just hit A on your keyboard and right-click and sub-divide them. I prefer this way because it's much quicker. I'm going to show you the other way as well. Let me hit Command Z or Control V. I can hit Control R to enable the Loop Cut tool, and I can simply create a loop cut this way, confirm it, and this way. I will get the exact same thing, but I prefer the previous way because as I said, it's much quicker. Now that we have more edges and more vertices to work with, we can start modifying this cube. I'm going to select the vertex tool and let me select this top vertex right here. Then I'm going to enable my Proportional Editing tool. I'm going to change the falloff type from smooth to random. Look what happens. If I hit G and Z, and I'm going to make my falloff much larger, just like this, you can see that my vertices are being moved randomly and that's exactly what we need. Alternatively, you can go ahead and manually move them one by one. But for the initial step, I prefer this way. Later, we can adjust them if we need to, but for now, it looks good, I'm going to select this side vertex as well, hit G, this time X and move them. For this one as well, hit G, X, move them. For these two sides as well, G, this time Y, because I'm going to lock it along the y-axis and finally this one, G, Y, and move them. As you can see, we got this random shape and that's exactly what we needed. Now we can go ahead and adjust it according to our needs. Let's see what we need. Well, first, I'm going to select this corner vertex and I'm going to bevel it. You know what the shortcut is for the bevel, hit Control B or Command B, but nothing happens because we need to select the Vertex tool as well, then hit V. Now as you can see, we can simply bevel it. Something like this would be fine. I'm going to do it for this corner as well. Hit Control B or Command B and V and bevel it, something like that. Maybe here as well, Control B or Command B, V and bevel, it, it looks good. Now I'm going to bevel a few edges. For example, this one, let me select the Edge tool. Let's select this edge, hit Control B. This time, you don't need to press V because this is an edge, not a vertex. I can bevel it just like this. It looks very good. Maybe here as well, Control B or Command B, bevel it. Now I'm going to select the vertex tool, and I'm going to select this middle vertex and bevel it. Hit Control B or Command B, then V, and bevel it, just like this. But here we face this problem. If I try to orbit around this object, you can see that we get this artifact here. The problem with this is that it seems that these vertices are not connected properly. This face looks very strange. To fix this issue, we need to have one additional edge right here in the middle. The easiest way to fix it is to select this phase. It's selected by default, but if it's not, just select the Face tool, select it and triangulate it. The hotkey for that, it's Control T or Command T. As soon as I do that, you see that these two vertices are connected now and it doesn't look strange anymore. Cool. Now I'm going to select the Vertex tool and maybe select this vertex, move it along the x-axis, hit G, X, but I'm going to make sure that my proportional editing tool is turned off. Hit G, X and move it. Maybe this one as well. Hit G, Y and move it inside. Here, I'm going to select this bottom vertex, and I'm going to hit G and Z because I'm going to move it down to create such a shape. It looks quite good in my opinion. Maybe I can adjust this vertex as well. Hit G, Z, move it down a little bit. Yeah, it looks very good. That's all. Our first rock is ready. Now what we can do is this, we can try to create another rock. I'm going to rename it to Rock 1. For the second rock, I can simply duplicate it. Just right-click on it and click on "Duplicate Objects", not Duplicate Linked, Duplicate Objects. The hotkey for that is Shift and D, move it to the right side. You can lock it along the x-axis. Now I'm going to adjust this second rock here. I can rename it to Rock 2. Let's enter the edit mode, select all these vertices and I'm going to scale them along the z-axis. Hit S, Z, and scale them all, and then, I'm going to select this bottom vertex. Hit G, Z, move it down, this one as well. Hit G, Y, move it to the right side to make it a little bit wider. Maybe this one, hit G and move it this way. What else? Maybe this one as well, hit G, Y, move it to the right side. You can just move them freely to get a new shape. Now I can select one of these edges, maybe this one, bevel it, hit Control B or Command B. Also, I can select this vertex, bevel it. Finally I need to triangulate it, hit Control T or Command T. It looks very good. Maybe I can select this face here and I triangulate it as well. It looks much better. Now we have two different rocks and we can simply adjust them later if you want, but I think they look very good. In the next video, we will start working on our palm trees. See you in the next one. 23. Modeling Palm Trees: In this video we're going to start working on our palm trees. Let's get into it. First of all, I am going to hide these two rocks. I'm going to click on this little icon in the outliner. For our palm tree, first we are going to create the trunk. For the trunk, I'm going to use a cylinder. Just hit ''Shift and A'' and from the mesh, add a cylinder to your scene. By default, this cylinder has many segments, as you can see, but it's too much for our use case. I'm going to open up this redo panel. As you can see, the number of vertices is set to 32. I'm going to set it to 12 to get less phases, just like this. I am going to collapse this redo panel. Now what I'm going to do is this, I'm going to hit one on my numpad to go to the front orthographic view. Also, let's enter the edit mode, hit ''Tab'' and a scale this cylinder down, hit ''S'' and scale it down just like this to make it smaller. Now I can zoom in and let's see what we have here. As you can see, the origin point of this cylinder is placed right here at the center. I want it to be placed right here. Therefore, while the cylinder is selected. I'm going to hit ''G, Z'' and move it up. I'm going to make sure that this origin point is placed right here. Now what I'm going to do is this, I'm going to select this top face. I'm going to move it up, so hit ''G, Z'' and move it up like this. Also, I am going to scale it because this top part should be wider. I'm going to hit ''S'' and scale it this way. Maybe a little bit more. I can move it up as well, hit ''G, Z'' and move it up. Quite good. This is going to be our base for our trunk. Now I'm going to enter the object mode and let's rename it to trunk. What do we need now is a few identical instances of this base trunk. To do that, we can duplicate it or you can use a modifier. If you go to the modifiers panel, from here, you can add this array modifier to this trunk. By default, this new instance will be placed right next to it. That's because factor x is set to one. However, since I want the instances to sit on top of each other vertically, I'm going to set the factor x to zero and set the factor z to one, just like that. Now I'm going to increase the count here from two, to maybe nine like this. This is going to be our trunk. It looks very good, doesn't it? Now that's our trunk is ready we can go ahead and add some curvature to it because usually a palm tree is not straight, just like this. To create such a curvature, we need to use a curve. This is a new object that we didn't talk about. If you hit ''Shift'' and a on your keyboard, you can go to care of right under the Mesh option. From here, you will find these two options. But if you can't see these options, don't worry, that's because I use some add-ons to get these additional options. We will talk about them later, but for now, you need to add this Bezier curve to your scene. As soon as I clicked on that, this Bezier curve has been placed right here. Let me go ahead and hide my trunk temporarily. If I select this curve, I can enter the edit mode and you will see these handles appear. These handles allow us to add some curvature to our trunk. It's going to be quite fun. Well, keep in mind that the starting point of your curved line is here. The endpoint is here. What I'm going to do is this, I'm going to enter the object mode and I'm going to rotate it. I'm going to hit R,Y minus 90 to rotate it by minus 90 degrees. Let me go to the right view now. Hit ''Number 3'' on the numpad, not number 1, number 3, and I'm going to enter the edit mode. Now what we need to do is this, we need to move this bottom point here. But first, what I'm going to do is this, I'm going to make this curve straight later we will adjusted. I'm going to select this point of this handle. Hit ''G'' for move, just like moving an object. Then I'm going to hold down the Control key on my keyboard to make sure that it snaps to this z-axis, just like this. Because if I don't hold it, look what happens. I can move it freely and it's going to be so hard to make it straight. Therefore, I'm going to hold down the Control key so that it could snap to this line, then left-click to confer. The first step is done. Now, as I said, I'm going to place this point, not this one. This is the handle point, this is the bottom point. I'm going to select this one and put it right here, hit ''G, Z'' and move it up and make sure that it's placed perfectly so our curve is almost ready. Now what we need to do is this. We need to go ahead and connect this Bezier curve to this trunk by using a special modifier. First, I'm going to select this trunk, I'm going to unhide it and then I'm going to go to the modifiers section. From here, add this curve modifier under this deform section. This modifier allows us to connect our Bezier curve to our trunk and then we can control the curvature of this trunk with our curve. It's going to be very fun. If I click on this curve object property, I can select my Bezier curve. Now these two objects are connected. You see nothing happened that's because we didn't adjust our curve. Bear with me for a few seconds. Now, I'm going to select my Bezier curve, enter the edit mode. I'm going to go to the right orthographic view from here. I'm going to place the top point of this curve line right here. Let me zoom in a little bit. Make sure to select the correct point. This is the top point, not this one. This is the top handle. This is the top point. Select the top point and then you can hit ''G, Z'' and move it up just like this. Make sure that it's placed right above your top trunk. It looks very good now. Now we can go ahead and add some curvature to it. While our Bezier curve is selected, enter the edit mode and use these handles to add some curvature. I'm going to go to the right orthographic view, select this top handle point, hit ''G'', and move it. As you can see, we can simply add some curvature to it. I can select this point as well, hit ''G'' and move it. This one it ''G'' to add more curvature to it. Let's select this one, hit G and try to move it this way. I think it's too much. Maybe I can select this top point, hit ''G'', and make it a little bit less curved. Let's select this one. Hit ''G'' and move it right here. It looks very good to me. As you can see, our trunk is ready. The next step is to create some leaves for this palm tree. Let me go ahead and hide this trunk and this Bezier curve temporarily. Then I'm going to add a plane here. It's shifting a go to Mesh and add a plane. Then I'm going to make it a little bit larger. Let's enter the edit mode, hit ''S, Y'', and scale it this way, and also scale it along the x-axis. It ''S,X'' and scale it. Great. To create a leaf, we need some details. We need to have some loop cuts here. What I'm going to do is this. I'm going to hit ''Control R or Command R'' on my keyboard. Then, while I'm hovering over this phase, I'm going to scroll my mouse swill to increase the number of loop cuts to something like this. I guess it looks good. Left-click, and then escape to confirm their position. Then I'm going to add one more loop cut this way, so hit ''Control R or Command R'', and left-click and hit ''Escape'' to confirm its position. Now what I can do is this, I'm going to go to the top view, hit ''Number 7'', then I can select these edges. Make sure that your edge tool is selected. Select this one, hold down the Shift key and select this one. Then I'm going to scale them down, hit ''S and X'', and scale them down this way. All the way to here. Now let's select these two edges. Hit ''S, X'', and a scale them to something like this. Now I'm going to select these two; this one and this one. Hold down the Shift key and select them, hit ''S'' and scale them this way. Now I can select these to hit ''S, X'' and scale them. Now I can select these two, hit ''S,X'' and scale them. As you can see, it looks pretty good. This is going to be the top of our leaf, and this is going to be the bottom of our leaf. Now what I'm going to do is this, I'm going to select the vertex tool, and I'm going to select this middle vertex. Let me go to the front orthographic view, hit ''Number 1'' on your numpad. Then try to enable your proportional editing tool and make sure that the smooth fall of type is selected. Hit ''G, Z'', make your follow-up smaller, and try to move this vertex up; just like this. This way you can add some curvature to your leaf to make it more realistic. Yeah, I really like it. Maybe a little bit more G, Z. It looks quite nice. Now I'm going to show you a very cool trick. Here, I'm going to try to disconnect these two edges. The way I can do it is like this. I select this vertex and I hit ''V'' to disconnect it, just like this. I can go to the right orthographic view, turn off my proportional editing tool, hit ''G'', ''Z'' and move it down a little bit to get something like that. What else do we need? Well, I think that's all. But now we need to reposition our origin point because our origin point should be placed right here, right at the bottom of our leaf. The reason is when we want to put it on our trunk later, we need to duplicate it and rotate it along our origin point. Let me go to the right orthographic view, hit ''A'' to select all these vertices, then hit ''G'' and move it right there, and left-click. Just like this, our origin point is placed right there. From now on, you need to make sure that whenever you want to move this leaf, you need to be in the object mode to move the origin point as well. Otherwise, you may move it accidentally and your origin point would be placed somewhere else. That's not what we want. Before we move on, I'm going to make sure that these two edges are connected somehow. Let me go to the top orthographic view and select these two edges right here. Let me zoom in and scale them down. Hit ''S'' and scale them down, just like this. Yeah, it looks much nicer now. You may think that our leaf is ready, but it's not because this leaf doesn't have any thickness. This is just a simple plane. Let's go ahead and add some thickness to it. The way we do that is by adding a modifier. Do you know which modifier? If your answer is solidify, then you are 100 percent right. We just need to add the solidify modifier to it to add some thickness. I guess maybe 0.02 looks very good. Now our leaf is ready. Let's go ahead and rename it to leaf. It's time to unhide our trunk and our Bezier curve. Let's unhide them. I'm going to place this leaf right here. The way I do that is like this; I put my 3D cursor right here, hold down the Shift key and right-click. Our 3D cursor is attached to the top of our trunk. Then I select my leaf, hit Shift and S, and I'm going to choose selection to cursor. Look what happens. Our leaf is placed perfectly. We just need to adjust it a little bit so that it doesn't go inside our trunk. I'm going to hit number 3 on my keyboard, hit ''G'', ''Z'' and move it up a little bit. Then I can rotate it as well, hit ''R'' and rotate it this way, ''G'' and move it down, just like that. Now I can go to the top orthographic view, number 7, and I'm going to duplicate this leaf. I'm going to have some linked duplication because later when we want to add materials to these leaves, I don't want to repeat myself again and again. Therefore, instead of hitting "Shift" and ''D'', I am going to hit "Alt'' and ''D" to create a linked duplication. Create it, then escape to put it right where it is. Then I'm going to rotate it, hit ''R'' and try to rotate it just like this. I'm going to duplicate it once again, Alt, D, Escape to confirm, hit ''R'' and rotate it. Now as you can see, since we adjusted the position of our origin point, we can simply rotate it around it. Once again, Alt and D, Escape to confirm, R and rotate it. The first part is done. Let me look at it. It looks very good. Now I'm going to duplicate this one, Alt and D, Escape to confirm. Let's rotate it, hit ''R'' this way. But this time, I'm going to go to this view, to the perspective view and I'm going to rotate it up a little bit, hit R and rotate it this way. Go to the top orthographic view. Let's scale it as well. Hit S and scale it. Maybe I can move it up here. Let me go to the perspective view. Hit ''G'' and move it up a little bit and rotate it. I can scale it down as well. Let's go to the top orthographic view. Duplicate it, Alt and D, Escape to confirm, R to rotate. I'm going to repeat this process. Alt and D, Escape, R to rotate. Alt and D, Escape R to rotate. Just like that, our palm tree is ready. I just need to adjust the position of these leaves a little bit. Let me select them all in the outliner, hold down the Shift key and select them all. Go to the right orthographic view, hit number 3 on your numpad and just rotate them a little bit. Hit R and rotate them this way. Now it looks much better. Great. Now that our palm tree is ready, we need to link these parts because if I select this trunk, and if I move it, look what happens. Hit ''G'' and move it around, nothing else will move in it, and that's wrong. We need to somehow group them. The way we group objects in Blender is by the parents option. We need to parent them. To parent it, it's very important to know how to select these elements. First, you need to decide which object is the main parent, and which objects are the children. I want to make sure that this trunk is the parent of these leaves. Therefore, I need to select it last. First, I'm going to select all these leaves in the outliner. Then I'm going to hold down the Control key and select the Bezier curve. Finally, hold down the Control key and select the trunk. It should be highlighted with this bright yellow color. Now to parent them, you just need to hit Control P or Command P. Here, you can see this parent window pops up. We have a few options, we have object, we have object keep transform, and a few others. We need to use this one. When we use this one, it will make sure that the transformation of these objects stay the same. Hit "Object Keep Transform", and that's all. Now as you can see, the trunk is the parent. If I select it here in the outliner and I hit ''G'' and move it, you can see that everything else moves with it. All right guys, that's all for this lesson. I hope you enjoyed it. Make sure to save your project, and I'll see you in the next video. 24. Modeling Surfing Boards: [MUSIC] Hey, in this video we're going to work on our surfing boards. We are going to model a surfing board together. Without further ado, let's get started. First of all, let me go ahead and hide this trunk. Let me show you something. When you parent a few elements and you want to, for example, hide these elements, you can't just simply hide the parent. If you do that, you can only hide your parent. Instead you just need to select your parent. As you can see, we have many children here. If I just right-click on this trunk, I can click on Select Hierarchy to select all these elements as well. Then I can hit H on my keyboard to hide them all. Just keep that in mind. Now I'm going to reset the position of the 3D cursor. Let me hit Shift and C. To create our surfing board, I'm going to need a plane, hit Shift and A, go to Mesh, and add a plane just like this. Now I'm going to go to the top orthographic view. Hit number 7 on your numpad and let me scale it. Hit S and scale it along the y-axis, just like this. I'm going to make it very tall like that. Also I am going to scale it along the x-axis. Hit S, X, and scale it to get something like this. Now what I'm going to do is this. I'm going to go to the Edit mode, hit Tab, and extrude it out, to give it some depth. Hit E and extrude it to something like this. Now I'm going to use a technique called hard surface modeling. It looks like this. I'm going to go to the object mode and I'm going to add the subdivision surface modifier to it. If you remember, I told you that when you use this modifier, it will break your phases into smaller phases. Therefore, you will get more details to work with. That's exactly what we need to do. I'm going to add this subdivision surface modifier to it. As soon as I added to it, you will see that my plane has been modified dramatically. That's because now this modifier is trying to move all the vertices and try to place them next to each other. But don't worry, we are going to fix that. First, I'm going to increase the levels viewport here to add more details. I'm going to set it to three and also the render to three. I'm going to zoom in as you can see, it looks much better, but still it's not smooth. Let me right-click on it and click on Shade Smooth. We will get something like this. It looks quite good. Let me go to the top orthographic view and now I'm going to enter the edit mode. I'm going to hit Tab on my keyboard. We need to adjust this surfing board. Right now it looks very good. We could leave it as is, but we can make it look better. I'm going to make this top part a little bit sharper and also here. Therefore, what I'm going to do is this, I'm going to orbit around this object, and I'm going to select these two edges. Hold down the Shift key and select them both. Go to the top orthographic view, hit S, and scale them to make it very sharp. Then I want to do the same thing for these two edges. For the bottom part, hit S and scale them. Now we need to scale this part, but we don't have an edge here. You know what to do, you just need to add a loop cut here. I'm going to hit Control R or Command R. I'm going to add one loop cut right at the center. Left-click. Escape to confirm, then hit S and X to scale it. I'm going to make it look like this. Now I think it looks very nice, don't you? Maybe we could make it a little bit thicker. I'm going to enter the edit mode. From here I'm going to select this bottom phase, these phases, these two. From the side maybe I can hit number 3 to go to the right orthographic view. I can move these phases down. Hit G, lock it along the z-axis, hit Z and then move it down a little bit. Now it's a little bit thicker. The last thing we need to do is to just rotate it. Let me go to the right orthographic view, hit R while I'm in the object mode X and 90 then Enter. I'm going to go to the front view number 1. The next thing I'm going to do is this. I am going to place this origin point right here. Enter the edit mode, hit A to select all the vertices and phases, hit G, Z, and move this surfing board up. Just like that. Let's place it right there and our surfing board is ready. You may ask why I repositioned this origin point here. That's because when we want to put all these objects in our final scene, I can simply rotate this surfing board on the beach. I think it looks very good. Let me go ahead and rename it in the outliner. I'm going to name it surfing board. That's all. All right guys, I hope you enjoyed this video. I'll see you in the next one. 25. Modeling - Sea: [MUSIC] In this video, I'm going to show you how you can create the sea, actually some low poly water. Let's get into it. First of all, I'm going to go ahead and select this surfing board and let's hide it. In order to model our sea, we need to unhide our terrain because we need to perfectly place it right here. I'm going to unhide it in the outliner and then I'm going to go to the top view. Hit number 7 on your numpad. For the sea, we just need a cube or a plane. I prefer a plane. First, I'm going to put my 3D cursor right here, hold down the Shift key and right-click. Now as you can see, this 3D cursor is snapped to the top surface of this part. Then I'm going to hit Shift and A and from mesh, I'm going to add a plane to it. So here is my plane. I'm going to go to the top view once again, let's enter the edit mode, and now I'm going to scale it. Make sure that it's selected. If it's not, just hit A on your keyboard to select all vertices and faces, then S, Y and just scale it, but not all the way to the edges because I want to have some empty space over there. It's going to make our design look much more interesting, like this, and then S, X and scale it this way as well. Something like this should work. Now let me go to the front photographic view, this way, hit number 1 on your numpad and extrude it out. Hit E and extrude it this way, something like this. I think it looks very good. Let me go to the top photographic graphic view. Maybe I can move it a little bit. However, not in the edit mode because I want to move this origin point with this surface as well. Enter the object mode, select this plane or let's say now it's a cube, hit G, and just move it along the y-axis a little bit so that you get an even spacing on both sides, maybe a little bit more. Something like this looks great. Now let's go ahead and rename it in the outliner right here. I'm going to name it sea. Now I'm going to enter the edit mode and I'm going to add more details to this top surface because this top face is going to be divided into smaller faces so that we could transform all those faces and get an interesting sea. If I select this top face and right-click and subdivide it, what happens is this, as you can see, each face now is rectangular and that's not what I want. If I subdivide it once again, you can see they are still rectangular and it doesn't look good because I want to have some squares here instead of rectangles. Therefore, I'm going to undo this operation. What I'm going to do is this. I'm going to create some loop cuts first, so hit Control+R or Command+R, then use your mouse wheel to increase the number of cuts maybe to three, yeah, it looks good. Then I'm going to add one more loop cut this way to create a square here. Hit Control+R or Command+R and just create one loop cut right in the middle, left-click to confirm, and hit Escape to confirm its position. As you can see, now we have some squares. Now if I go ahead and select these top faces, hold down the Shift key and select them all, I can subdivide them easily. I can open up this redo panel and increase the number of cuts to get more details. Let me increase it to maybe six, six should work. I'm going to collapse it and now our top surface is ready. However, if I enter the object mode, you can see that it didn't do anything, we just added some details. But we added these details to our top face in order to be able to modify them. The way I am going to modify them is like this. I'm going to select some of these faces and then I'm going to group them. I'm going to show you how to do that, it's something new, we didn't discuss it before. Finally, we will add a specific modifier to those specific faces that we group to adjust the position of these faces. Let me show you how it works. First of all, I'm not going to select all of these faces. I'm going to deselect a few of them. If you hold down Control on your keyboard and then press minus, you can contract from the selection or you can expand it by Control+Plus. I'm going to hold down Control or Command and then press minus. Just like this, I can contract from the selection and I'm going to group all these selected faces. To do that while they're selected, I'm going to head over to this section, this object data properties. If I click on it, right at the top, you can find this vertex group section. If I hit this plus button, I can create a group. I can double-click on it to rename it, let me name it surface, Enter. Then you need to make sure to hit this "Assign" button. If you don't, these faces won't be assigned to this particular group. It's so important, hit "Assign," and now if I click somewhere else to deselect them and I hit the "Select" button, you can see that these faces will be selected. The first step is done, we created our vertex group. Now, it's time to add our modifier to this object. I'm going to hit Tab on my keyboard to go to the object mode and let me go to the modifier and this time we are going to use a new modifier, displace. We haven't talked about it before, but I'm going to show you how it works. Well, this modifier allows you to get the information of a texture and project it to your object. In this case, we are going to project the information of a texture to our vertex group that we just created. First of all, from here, we can choose our vertex group that we just created, surface, then I am going to add a texture here. Right now we don't have any texture therefore we need to click on this "New" button and you will see something like this, don't worry, we are going to fix that. Now we need to head over to the texture settings here or you can just click on this button, you will be taken to this panel, it doesn't matter. I'm going to click on it. Here we have a few options. First, we can rename this texture, we can rename it to surface as well or whatever you want. Just make sure to keep your names organized. The type as you can see by default is set to image or movie. Here, basically, what you can do is upload a texture or a movie and then you can project the information of that texture to your vertex group. But right now, we are going to use a predefined type of texture. If I open up this drop-down menu, you can find many predefined textures. For the surface of our water, I'm going to use clouds and you will find something like this. The top surface of our water is going to be distorted by this texture. So far so good. Now here under these clouds section, we can adjust these properties such as size and depth. But for now, I'm not going to change the depth, I'm just going to change the size to something like maybe 0.8. Yeah, something like this. It's a little bit too much, but don't worry because we can always adjust the strength of our modifier in the modifier section. I'm going to head over to the modifier. From here, as you can see, the strength is set to one. I'm going to decrease it a little bit until I get something very good, maybe something less. I guess it looks good. Keep in mind that you can always adjust these values since this is a procedural effect, unless you apply to your water, you can always tweak these settings whenever you want. Now I think it looks pretty good. Later when we add a material to our water, you will see how beautiful it will become. The last step here is to triangulate these faces. What I'm going to do is this, I'm going to enter the edit mode. First, I'm going to select all these top faces. I'm going to hit Control+Plus to expand my selection or Command+Plus if you're using Mac, then I'm going to right-click here and click on Triangulate Faces. Alternatively, you can use the hotkey, which is Command+T or Control+T. Now if I enter the object mode, you will see that it looks much better. Guys, that's all for this video. I hope you enjoyed it and I'll see you in the next one. 26. Scene Composition: [MUSIC] In this video, we're going to start working on our scene composition. We need to compose our scene by putting all the models we created together. Let's get started. First of all, I'm going to go ahead and select this C and let me hide it for now. We already created a few models like rock 1, rock 2, surfing board, and also trunk. I'm going to start by unhiding my rock here using this eye icon and it's too big, it's placed right there. I'm going to select it, hit "G", then "Z", move it up, and then I'm going to scale it down, hit "S", and scale it down dramatically to get something like this. It's cool. Now I'm going to place this rock here and I'm going to duplicate it a few times. However, I'm going to show you another feature of blender, which is the snap tool. If you take a look at this top bar, you can find this snap option. If you enable it on the right side, you will find this drop menu and I'm going to open it up. Here it says snap tool. We could set it to snap to vertex, edge, face, volume, edge center, edge perpendicular, but for now we're not going to talk about these options. We just need to use face. The reason is, I want this rock to be snapped to the faces of our terrain. However, we need to enable these two options as well. Align rotation to target and also project individual elements. Great. Now if I hit "G", look what happens and I try to move it around. As you can see, it snaps to our faces just like this. It would be much easier for us to place it however we want. I'm going to place one right here. Maybe I can rotate it. Hit "R", and rotate it a little bit. If you hit "R" twice, then you can rotate it freely, just like this. So hit "R" and "R". I'm going to rotate it this way, cool. Then I'm going to duplicate it, but I'm going to need a link duplication. I'm going to hit "Alt" and "D" just like this. I'm going to place one over there. Let me rotate it R, R just like that. Maybe a little bit more, something like this would be fine. Maybe I can move it a little bit down, but I need to make sure that my snap tool is turned off. I am going to turn it off, then hit "G", "Z" and move it down. Let me duplicate it once again, "Alt" and "D" and maybe I can place it here, hit "G", "Z", move it up. Let me go to the top orthographic view, hit "G" and bring it right here. Now I can simply move it down G, Z, and let's rotate it each are twice to get something like maybe this, I can scale it down a little bit. I'm going to hit "R" twice. It really depends on your preference, how you want to create your layout, but for this scene, I think we need more rocks that's why I created two types of rock here. We're going to use the second type of rock that we created. Let me unhide it. It's right there. Now I'm going to hit "G", move it be here, hit "S", scale it down. Turn on the snap tool again, hit "G" and let's put it right here. I can rotate it, hit "R" twice to place it this way, hit "Alt" and "D" to duplicate and maybe I can place one here as well. I can scale it down. Let's place it here. I need more rocks over here and over here. "Alt" and "D", then scale it down. I can rotate it. I just need some random positions for my rocks to fill this beach, let's say, and also "Alt" and "D" for this one, let's place it right here, scale it up a little bit. I think here it looks good. Maybe this one, I'm going to select it "Alt" and "D", bringing it here, scale it down again, "Alt" and "D". Maybe I can put one here. I can rotate it this way also, this one, let me duplicate it. Place it here, scale it down. I'm going to move it a little bit. It looks very good. Maybe I can move this one as well. I think it looks pretty good. I need one large right over there as well and I'm going to use this second type of rock hits "Alt" and "D", and bring it here and scale it up just like this. Then I'm going to go to the front orthographic view, hit "1" on your numpad and move it down, move it inside the ground, disable the snap tool, hit "G" "Z" and bring it down just like this. Maybe I can move it to the left side a little bit. Hit "G", "X" and move it to the left side. Just like this, our rocks are ready, I think. We don't need more rocks here, but what I'm going to do now is this, I'm going to duplicate these rocks and place a few of them right here, right under the water, because when we render our scene, we are going to be able to see these rocks under the water, which is going to be so nice. Let's select this one for instance, hit "Alt" and "D", enable the snap tool, hit "G" and bring it here. I can place one right there. I'm going to scale it up and then let me rotate it freely. So hit "R" twice, I'm going to place it this way. Then I'm going to duplicate it once again, "Alt" and "D". Let's place one here as well. Scale it down, hit "G" move it down. I'm going to rotate it, hit "R" twice hit "G", bring it here. I'm going to scale it down. Once again G, something like this. Now I'm going to select this small rock, "Alt" and "D" bringing it down. I'm going to place it right over there. Once again, "Alt" and "D." Let's place it right here. We're going to scale it down and rotate it, hit "R" twice. Finally, right here I'm going to place a few rocks as well. Let me select this one. Hit "Alt" and "D", place it here, scale it up, rotate it. You can hit "R" twice to rotate it freely. I think now it looks good. Then let's select this small rock. Hit "Alt" and "D" put it right here, again, "Alt" and "D", put one right there, scale it up and move it a little bit. It looks quite good. Maybe a few small rocks here as well. Let's fill this area. "Alt" and "D", scale it up and rotate it just like this. That's all for the rocks. I think we have enough of them. We don't need more rocks. If you feel that we need more or we need less, you can go ahead and involve your own creativity here and try to compose a scene based on your own preferences and based on your own ideas. For now I think it looks pretty good. The next step is to unhide the C. And as you can see, a few of these rocks are visible. Later you will see those small rocks will be also visible, and it's going to be quite nice. Now we can place our palm tree here. We can unhide our trunk. But as you can see, when I unhide it only the trunk is visible because we already parented all the children and we need to unhide them one-by-one Let me unhide them just like this. Then I'm going to select this trunk, the parent disable the snap tool, hit "S", scale it down. I'm going to scale it down a little bit more, and now I'm going to enable the snap tool and make sure that this face option is selected. Look what happens if I hit "G" and move this tree around. Just like this, we can place this tree perfectly on our faces, and that's exactly what we want. I'm going to place one right here, then I'm going to duplicate it. But when you want to duplicate something with its children, you need to first select all of its children. Just select this trunk, right-click on it, and click on "Select Hierarchy". Then "Alt" and "D" to create a link duplication and bring it right here, as you can see, a new trunk layer has been created. We can simply call it tree. Let me go ahead and call it a tree and this one tree two. Let me reposition it. I'm going to go to the top view and I'm going to rotate it. I'm going to hit "R", then "Z", and rotate it along the Z-axis just like this. Let me see how it looks. Yeah, it looks pretty good. Maybe I can hit "R" and rotate it this way. Maybe I can make it smaller, just scale it down a little bit and also I'm going to reposition it here. It doesn't look very good. Hit "G" and place it maybe here. It looks much better. Now I'm going to duplicate it once again. Make sure to select all of its children, hit "Alt" and "D" to duplicate it and let's place one here as well. I'm going to go to the top orthographic view, hit number 7 on the numpad, select the parent, hit "R", "Z" and rotate it. Maybe a little bit more this way. Yeah, very good. I think that's enough for our trees. We don't need more trees. Maybe I can scale this one down a little bit to have some variations. Now, it's time to bring up our surfing board. I'm going to select it unhide it. As you can see it's too big. So first let me disable this snap tool, select the surfing board, scale it down, and I'm going to place it here right inside the sand. Hit "G", "Z", bring it up, but it should be inside the sand. Then I'm going to go to the top orthographically view hit "R" and rotate it this way. Maybe not straight, something like this but it's too big. When you create a 3D model, you need to think of proportions as well. Right now this surfing board has the same size as this palm tree. It doesn't make any sense. Therefore, I need to scale it down dramatically to something like this maybe. I'm going to bring it up a little bit heat "G", "Z" and move it up. Now I'm going to duplicate it, but not a link duplication. Hit "Shift" and "D", bring it to the left side. Let me go to the top orthographic view and zoom in and I'm going to place it right behind it, something like this. Then let me go to the perspective view here and let me rotate it a little bit just like that. I think it looks pretty good. Maybe I can bring it down, hit "G" and "Z" to get something like this. I really like this composition. But what I'm going to do is this. I'm going to select these two. I'm going to go to the top orthographic view, hit "G" and move them here. Here it looks very good and that's all. I think our scene looks pretty good. It's interesting and in the upcoming videos, we will add materials to all these objects. See you in the next video. [MUSIC] 27. Applying Materials to Your Objects: [MUSIC] In this video, we're going to start applying materials to our objects. Let's get started. I'm going to start with the terrain. I'm going to select my terrain here. To add a material to it, as you know, we need to head over to the material section here, to the material property tab. From here, I'm going to click on this plus button and then click on this new. Here, we can name our material, let's call it Sand just like this, and then we can change the base color. But right now, if I change it, nothing changes. That's because we are in the solid mode. I already explained the reason of that, so we need to head over to the LookDev mode or the material mode. You can click on this icon or you can hold down Z on your keyboard and just go to material preview. However, it's very hard for us to recognize our objects and distinguish between our objects. Therefore, we can modify the light of our scene so we could distinguish between our objects easily. If you head over to this icon, if you just click on this little icon, this window pops up, and from here, you can rotate your light source, just like this. Now, as you can see, it's much easier to see all our objects just like this. Now, we can modify our base color here. For the sand or for the terrain, I am going to use a very light yellow color, very light, something like this. If you want to get the exact same result as I get, you can simply use this hex color code to get the exact same color here. It's E7DFBA. But you can go ahead and use your own color. I'm going to modify it maybe to something else. The hex color code is E7D8B6, and it looks very good. We don't need to do anything else for the terrain. Now let's work on our rocks. What I'm going to do is this. I'm going to click on this rock, this one, and I'm going to create a new material just like this. Let's call it Rock, and I'm going to change the base color. Using this eyedropper icon, I'm going to choose the color of our sand. Then I can simply adjust the brightness of this color to something darker, and also I can adjust its color. Yeah, something like this, I think it looks very good. As you can see, these rocks are connected together because we made some link duplications. These rocks are also connected together, so I'm going to select this one. But this time, instead of creating a new material, I am going to reuse the materials that we just created. If I click on this little icon, I can browse all my materials and I'm going to choose Rock. Just like that, all our rocks have materials now. If you decide, for any reason, to adjust the color of your material or any other properties, all your rocks will be affected since they are linked, so keep that in mind. Now, let's move on to our trees. I'm going to select the trunk first. For this trunk, let me give you the material. I'm going to choose the color of our rock using this eyedropper, maybe this one. I am going to give it something like brown. Something like this, but very dark brown. I think it looks very good. For the leaves, I'm going to give it a dark green. Let's select one of them, add a material, and I'm going to call it Leaf. By the way, I forgot to rename this material. I can simply select it for a second and change its name to Trunk, and change the material to this Leaf once again. For the leaves, I'm going to change the base color to green, something like this, and make it darker. I'm going to adjust the brightness, something like that. It looks very good to me. Yeah, it looks pretty good. What about these surfing boards? Well, for these boards, I'm going to select one of them. Let's create a material, new, and let's call it Surfing Board 1. For the base color, let's see what we can use. I'm going to choose orange maybe, or red, it would be very beautiful. Yes, something like this. For the next one, let's select it. I'm going to show you a very useful technique. Sometimes you might need to duplicate your previous material and adjust it like this. You select this surfing board material, then you click on this little icon to duplicate it, and this is a new material. I can rename it to Surfing board 2, hit "Enter", and I can change the base color to something else, maybe yellow or I could use purple as well if I want. But I prefer yellow. Yeah, this one looks very nice. Something like this. Now, if you browse your materials, you can see that there are two separate materials here. Great. So far so good. Now let's move on to our water because it's going to be so interesting. For our water, first, just select the C layer here in the outliner, the C object, and add a material and call it Water. First, let's change its base color to light blue. I'm going to use this blue, something like this, and then I'm going to decrease the roughness because the water should be reflective. But not too much. I'm going to decrease it to maybe 0.3, something like this, but not all the way down to zero because it's going to be too reflective then. 0.3 would be fine. But there is one more thing to adjust here, and that is this IOR property. If you don't know what IOR is, let me explain it to you quickly. IOR stands for index of refraction in physics. Basically, IOR defines how much the ray changes direction once it passes through this particular object. In this case, it's water. The light ray goes through this object and then it changes direction. The IOR of water is 1.333. If you just Google it, you can find it easily. You can't see anything happening here. However, when we render our scene and when we add lights to our scene, you will clearly see the difference. All right guys. That's all for this video. We successfully applied all the necessary materials to our objects, now we can move on to the next lesson. I hope you enjoyed it and I'll see you in the next video. 28. Add Realistic Lighting to Your Scene: Hey, welcome back. In this video, I'm going to show you how you can add realistic lighting to your scene to make it look beautiful. Because if you can't get the lighting done properly, no matter how beautiful your models are, your final render wouldn't look good, believe me. In this video we are going to go through a lot of things, a lot of interesting things. What do we need here? Well, for this scene, I'm going to make the whole environment dark because I want it to look like that it's midnight. We can have the moonlight as well and everything is dark and then we can make our scene beautiful by just adding a few types of lights. Let's see what we can do. First, I'm going to add a light here to my scene so hit "Shift" and A, go to light and I'm going to add an area light. It's placed right here so we need to move it. But first, I'm going to change the pivot point here to 3D cursor. Because later I'm going to rotate it around the 3D cursor. Then I'm going to hit G, Z and move it up just like this. Now, I'm going to hit R, X to rotate it along the x-axis and then write 45 and then minus, and as you can see, it's placed right here. Then I'm going to hit R again, this times Z and 45 so our light is placed here. Then in our final render, we will place our camera this way, something like this. It would look beautiful. All right, what else do we need? As I said, it's going to be a night scene. I'm going to change this color to maybe blue, something like this, but I can't see anything happening here. That's because I'm in the material preview. If I want to see what's going on here, I can either go to the rendered mode or I can click on this little arrow and enable scene world and scene lights , still nothing changes. That's because the power of my light is set to 10 watt. It's nothing. Now I can increase this power to maybe 2,000 watts and then you can see what's going on here. We will see all these shadows, but these shadows are not soft. The reason is the size of this light source is set to one meter. It's not what we want. To get soft shadows, we need to have a large light source. Therefore, I'm going to increase the size to maybe five meters and now as you can see, our shadows are much, much softer. So far so good. You can clearly see the reflections on the water. Then what I'm going to do is this. Well, we can clearly see that it's night, but we still need to do something because I really don't like this lighting. I'm going to show you a very cool technique. You can go to this world property panel if you just click on this pinkish icon and from here you can adjust the color of your whole scene and whole environment. So I'm going to open up this color picker and I'm going to use blue for that and look what happens. Now it looks like that it's midnight. Maybe I can increase the brightness a little bit, something like that. Yeah, it looks very good, the strength looks fine. Let me see. It looks pretty good. Now what I'm going to do is this. I'm going to go to the render property panel and from here we have one section called color management. If we open it up, we will get access to these properties. These are so helpful and it's going to make your scene look much better when you tweak them. First, I'm going to change this exposure, by default it's set to zero. I'm going to increase it to make my whole scene a little bit brighter. Let's set it to one. It looks much nicer now. Maybe it's too much, maybe I can set it to 0.5 instead. Yeah, I like it better. Also we have this look option by default, it's set to none. We have medium contrast, low contrast, high-contrast. I prefer this medium, high contrast, and as soon as I click on it, look what happens. Now we have darker shadows and actually we have a higher contrast ratio, but our scene is too dark still. What I can do is this, I can select my light source, I'm going to go to this light property and I'm going to increase the power to maybe 2,500. Okay, now it looks much better and also I can move this light away a little bit. To do that, we need to move it using its local transform orientation. Right now it's set to global. If I set it to local and then hit G and then Z, I can enable this local transform orientation and I can move it away just like this. I'm going to go back to global. By the way, the shortcut for switching between global and local is this. If you want to locate along the Z-axis, you can hit Z twice and then you will switch to the local transformation orientation. It works just like this, G then Z and Z. If you press Z once, you can transform it using this global axes. If you hit it twice, you can transform it using the local transform orientation. Now it looks much better in my opinion, what else do we need? Well, here in the beach, I'm going to place some point lights so let me hit Shift and A and add a point light. It's placed right here, hit G, Z and bring it up and let's see where we can place it. I'm going to go to the top or to graphic for you and then let me change this pivot point to median point, hit G and place one right here behind this rock. Let me see if it looks good. Okay, I'm going to go to the front orthographic view and bring it down, hit G, Z and move it down somewhere around here. Yeah, go to the top orthographic view and let's change its color. I'm going to give it an orange color because we use blue for our world color, orange would create a great harmonious combination here, something like this. Then let's turn this power up to maybe 25 or maybe 30 and I think it looks very good. Maybe I can bring it down a little bit. Hit G, Z and we'll be down and now it's time to duplicate this light. I'm going to hit Alt and D and place one right here, or maybe right here behind this rock. I can place one right here as well, so Alt and D place it may be here or here. It looks very good. Yeah, I really like it. I can bring it up, hit G, Z and bring it up. I need a few more so Alt and D, I can place one behind our surfing boards. Let's see how it looks. I really like this and I guess that's all we don't need more point lights here, maybe one behind this tree as well. Let me add one more. Alt and D, bring it here, make sure that it's placed right behind this tree so hit G and move it just like this and I think it looks very good. We don't need anything else, but what about our water? Well, I think we can put a few point lights below the water as well. It's going to make it look so interesting. Let's create another point, like hit Shift and A it's placed right here, it G, Z, bring it up. Then I'm going to go to the top orthographic view, hit G and move it here. Then let's change its color to maybe light-blue and bring the power up to 25. Go to the side or front view, hit G and move it down, down the water, Z and bring it down just like this. It's right under the water. Maybe I can move it down a little bit more, G and Z. Now it looks very good. Then I can duplicate it a few times so maybe I can place this one right near the rocks that we created. I'm going to hit Alt and D, bring this one maybe here, Alt and D, and bring this one near these rocks. We can't see the real result right now. That's because we are not using a photo realistic render engine. In the upcoming videos, we will set up our scene for the final render, we will add the camera to our scene. We will adjust the camera view and finally, I will show you how you can get a realistic render. So see you in the next one. 29. Prepare Your Scene For Rendering: In this video, we're going to prepare our scene for rendering. I'm going to go ahead and quickly add a plane here as our floor, because later when we render our scene, we need to have a floor right behind this terrain. First of all, I'm going to make sure that my 3D cursor is placed right at the center of my world origin. If you are not sure whether it's centered or not, you can simply hit "Shift" and C to reset the position of your 3D cursor, and then hit "Shift" and A and add a plane to it. It's placed right below your terrain. I'm going to scale it up dramatically. Hit "S" and scale it up just like this. Nice. Then I'm going to give it a material. Go to the material property tab and from here, click on this plus button, hit the new button and let's call it floor. Then for the floor, I'm going to use another color, something like this, maybe something darker, so I can decrease the brightness. Something like this. Then before we could render our scene, we need to add a camera to our scene, because as I said, when you want to hit this render button here, Render Image button, you need to have a camera. To add a camera, you can simply hit "Shift and A", and from here you can go to camera and click on it. Now a camera has been added to our scene and it's placed right here. Make sure that it's selected in the outliner and move it up. Hit "G", "Z", and move it up just like this, and then we can adjust its position. I'm going to place it right around here. It's going to be so hard for us to just move it around this way. Therefore, I'm going to show you a very good trick so that you could adjust its position easily. First of all, to see our scene through our camera lens, you need to click on this little camera icon or number zero on your numpad. [NOISE] I'm going to click on it, and this is what we will see in our final render. However, this is not what we need. We need to see the whole scene. Therefore, we need to adjust the position of our camera. To do that, I'm going to click on this little icon right next to this gizmo. Alternatively, you can hit "N" on your keyboard to open it up, and you can go to View. In here you can find this option, Camera to View. By default, it's not checked, but if you check it, if you hover over it, you will see the definition. It says, "Enable view navigation within the camera view." Once we enable it, we can simply move around our scene and our camera follows our movement. It's going to be so easy for us to place our camera perfectly. Keep that in mind. It's very useful and it's very handy. Let me hit "N" to close this window. The next thing we need to do here is to adjust our lens type. By default, it's set to perspective. I'm going to set it to orthographic, because when it's set to perspective, we will get a realistic distortion of our scene, but that's not what we want. I'm going to set it to orthographic to get this view. When we set the type to orthographic, we don't have that distortion we get in the perspective mode. Then we need to change this orthographic scale. But before I do that, I'm going to adjust the dimensions of this lens. Right now it's set to 1920 by 1080. However, if you want to render this scene for Instagram, or for Dribble, or Behance, you can simply adjust this dimension by going to this panel right under the render panel, and from here, under the Format section, you can change the resolution. I'm going to set the X to 1600 and the Y to 1200, and then I am going to go back to the camera property panel, and let's change this orthographic scale to something like this. I'm going to zoom in a little bit. Very good. Maybe I can hold down the Shift key and move the whole scene up, and also I can orbit around it to find a good spot. I really like this view. Cool. Now I'm going to select my plane and let me change its base color a little bit to make it somehow darker, and also I'm going to change its color to maybe white. Something like this would work. Now our scene is ready to be rendered. In the next video, I will show you how to set up your render settings and render your project. See you in the next one. 30. Render Your Scene: [MUSIC] Hey, welcome to the last video of this section. In this video, you're going to learn how to set up your render settings and actually how to render your scene. Without further ado, let's get into it. First of all, when you want to render your project, you need to make sure that your camera is enabled. If you see something like this, it means that you are not seeing your scene through your camera lens. Hit zero on your numpad to see your scene through your camera lens, and then head over to the render mode, just like this and now I'm going to go to the render properties panel and as you can see by default, the render engine is set to Eevee. I know that it doesn't look so realistic and it's fine, but we can make it look a little bit better by enabling this ambient occlusion option and also this bloom and also this screen space reflections to see all the reflections. We already modified this color management section, these properties, you can go ahead and adjust these values if you want, but what I want to do here is this, right now I think this tree doesn't get enough light. Therefore, I am going to select the parents of this tree, which is the trunk here and then I'm going to rotate it a little bit, hit "R" and then "Z", and then rotate it a little bit so that it could get a little bit brighter, this way. Alternatively, I could add another light source from this direction, but that's not what I want because my light source now acts as the moon. Cool. I think our scene looks very good. Now, I'm going to change my render engine from Eevee to Cycles, and I'm going to change the max samples here, the number to 32, because 1024 is a lot for the viewport and you can see that our result looks much better, but when you render your project, you may find it noisy. To eliminate all those noise you can head over to this render section and from here, you can enable this denoise and under this denoise option, you can set the denoiser to open image denoise. You may see some other options depending on your OS here, but open image denoise works perfectly. This is an AID noisier running on the CPU and it just eliminates all the noises in our scene. Great. Now, let me change the maximum samples of render as well, 4,096 is too much because it's going to be so time consuming. I am going to set it to 512, it's going to be enough for this case. When you increase this sample number, the quality of your final render will be much higher. However, the trade-off is the render time. There is one more thing we need to do before we hit the Render button. When we are applying materials to our objects, I forgot to modify one of the most important properties for this particular object, our sea. So let me quickly modify that because it's very important. Otherwise we are not going to be able to see through the water because it's not going to be transparent. I am going to select our water, the sea, head over to the materials panel and right under this IOR that we set before, we have this property called transmission. Whenever you want to make something transparent so that you could see through it you need to increase this value. By default, it's always set to zero. If I set it to one to make the water completely transparent, now you can see the appearance of our water changed a little bit, but if I hit the Render button here, now you can see that our water is transparent. I'm going to wait until the render is done. Our render is done and as you can see now, we can see it through our water. Whenever you want to make something transparent, you can always increase the transmission property in the material panel. Here is our final render, but it's not saved yet. You need to keep in mind that whenever your render is done, you need to save it manually. To do that, you need to head over to the Image menu right at the top, just click on it and from here you can hit Save or Save As it doesn't matter, specify a location on your computer and then hit Save. I'm going to specify a name here. Let's call it low poly beach and then save as image. That's all. All right guys, I hope you all enjoyed this section and I'll see you in the next section. 31. Introduction to the Project: Hi, welcome to the second project of this course. In this section, we're going to design a 3D model room with many different objects such as couch, desk, computer, and so on. By the end of this section, you will be able to model all these objects, apply materials and textures to them, and finally render two different versions of the scene, the day and night versions. See see you in the next video. 32. Modeling - Room & Windows: [MUSIC] Hey, welcome back. In this video, we're going to start working on our second project. First of all, create a new project in Blender and save it on your computer. Once you're done, go ahead and remove these objects, we don't need them so select them all and hit "Delete" on your keyboard until you get an empty scene. That's our starting point as always. Let's see what we need. For the room, we need the floor and the walls. There are different ways we can create the floor and the walls, one of them is that you can use three different cubes and put them together but there is a much better way to do that. Let me show you how it should be done. To create the room, first, I'm going to create a floor. We need a plane instead of a cube. I'm going to hit Shift and A, and under the mesh, I'm going to choose plane. Then I'm going to scale it up but not in the object mode in the edit mode. Hit "Tab" to scale it, hit "S" and hit number 4 on your Numpad so that we could get an 8 by 8 plane, enter to confirm. Then, this side and this side we need to have our walls. The way we create walls is this. We select these two edges and we extrude them up. Let me show you how it's done. I'm going to select the edge tool, I'm going to select this edge, hold down the Shift key and select this one. As you can see, these are highlighted. It means that they are selected. Then I'm going to hit "E" then "Z" to lock it along the z-axis and then let's try five to make it five meters. Just like this. As you can see, the floor and the walls are created. However, we don't have any depth here and that's wrong, because we need to have some thickness for our floor and for our walls. How can we create that? Well, what we can do is this. We can select all these phases and then we can extrude them. But if I hit E, look what happens. I will get something like this, and that's not what we want. We need to use another extrusion tool, which is called extrude along normals. But we didn't talk about normals. That's fine because I am going to explain that to you in a second. But first, let me show you where you can find this tool. If you just click and hold on this extrude option, you can see we have extrude along normals. Let's talk about normals quickly. Well, what's a normal? A normal is basically a vector line or let's say a line. Just imagine that there is a line perpendicular to something. It could be your faces, your edges, and your vertices. Normals by default are hidden, but I can unhide them to make it more understandable. While you are in the edit mode, you can head over to this option, just click on this overlays option and here you will find many different checkboxes. Right at the bottom, we have this normals section and we have these three options. If I click on this one, you will see that a few lines appear here. I'm not sure if you can see them perfectly. There is one small blue line here perpendicular to each phase. As you can see, I can adjust their size so that you could see them easily. These lines are called normals. As you can see, they are perpendicular to these phases. I can also enable this option. These are the normals of our vertices. You need to keep in mind that our faces and our vertices have normals. When we use this extrude along normals option, it means that we extrude all our faces or all our vertices along these lines, along these normals, that we can't see normally. Just keep that in mind. To use this new extrusion option, you need to hit "Alt and E" on your keyboard, and this window pops up. Here you can choose extrude faces along normals, just like this, and then just move your mouse. Now we are extruding our faces along normals perfectly. But we have one problem. The problem is that we don't get an even thickness on all sides. If you take a look at the top bar, you can see that the even thickness option is turned off by default. To enable that, I can hit "S" on my keyboard and I can simply enable it. I'm going to set a specific value for this thickness. Let's write 0.3 and then make it negative. Just hit "Minus" to change its direction, and then hit "Enter" to confirm. As you can see, our room is ready. Let me go ahead and hide these normals. We don't need them. We will use this extrude along normals option a lot throughout our course, so you need to thoroughly understand how it works. Now that our room is ready, let me enter the object mode. I'm going to rename it here in the outliner to room. Now it's time to create our windows. I'm going to create two windows here on this wall. I'm going to show you a new technique here. First, let me enter the edit mode and I'm going to select this face, this one. Then I'm going to duplicate it. Hit "Shift and D" to duplicate it just like this, then press "Escape" to disable its movement. Right now this duplicated layer is placed on top of our previous face. While it's selected, you need to hit P to open up this separate window and click on "Selection." What we did is like this. We duplicated a face, then we separated that duplicated face from our room object. If you take a look at the outliner now we have two objects, the duplicated one that we just separated from this previous object is called room.001. Blender automatically changes its name. You can go ahead and rename it and we will do that but this is a very useful technique. Sometimes we don't need to create a new object using this mesh option. We can simply select an edge, a vertex, or a face, duplicate it, then separate it because we want to keep it where it is. Alternatively, you can go ahead and create a new plane rotate it, try to align it with your wall, but it's going to be so hard. Make sure to use this technique when you want to keep the position of something the same and you want to have a new object. Let's enter the object mode and I'm going to rename it to windows. As I said, we're going to have two windows here. Therefore, we need to make this duplicated object a lot smaller. I'm going to go to the front view, so hit one on your Numpad, and then go to the wireframe mode so that you could see everything clearly. I'm going to hold down the Z key on my keyboard to open up this pie menu, and I'm going to choose wireframe. Alternatively, you can just click on this little icon right at the top right corner to switch to the wireframe mode. Now that our windows object is selected, I'm going to enter the edit mode, hit "Tab" hit "A" to select this face, hit "S" and scale it down. Something like this would be fine in my opinion. Then hit "S, X" and scale it down along the x-axis. It looks very nice. It's going to be one of our windows. Then hit "G, X" and move it along the x-axis. I'm going to place it right here. We can adjust its position later. Let me show you what happened. I'm going to go to the object mode. If I orbit around my room, you can see that this face is placed on top of our wall. Now we need one more window and we can use the array modifier as you know, I can add this array modifier to this object and adjust this X factor. Let me adjust it this way. I'm going to set it to 1.5. It looks very good. Maybe I can hit "G, X" and move it to the left side a little bit. It looks much better. I want them to be inside our wall and I will explain it later why I need that. But for now, I'm going to go to the right orthographic view. Hit "Number 3" on your Numpad. Let me zoom in, then hit "G, Y" to move them along the y-axis and move them here and place them right at the center. They are inside our wall. This is the first step. Now, what I'm going to do is this, I'm going to duplicate this object, hit "Shift and D" to duplicate it, then hit "Escape" to cancel its movement. Here I'm going to rename it in the outliner to windows shapes just like this. Now I'm going to extrude it. Let me go to the right orthographic view, enter the edit mode, hit "E" and extrude it this way. Something like this would be fine. Then hit "A" to select all faces, hit "G, Y" and move it to the left side until it goes through the wall. Something like that. Let me recap. We created our windows here and replace it right inside our wall, then we duplicated that object. We extrude it out this way, then we moved these windows shapes to the left side until we see that it goes through the wall. It looks very good. Since we use the modifier, you can see that both our windows are ready. Now I'm going to get back to the object mode and also I'm going to go to the solid mode just like this. As you can see now we have two large boxes here that went through our wall. Now we can simply use another modifier, the Boolean modifier, to subtract these boxes from our walls. The way we do that is like this. We select our room, we add the Boolean modifier to our room, then using this object, we select this eyedropper and we hover over our windows shapes that we just created, left-click to select them and make sure that this difference option is selected. So far, so good, but we are not done yet. Now I'm going to select these windows shapes. I'm going to head over to the object properties panel. From here, let me go to viewport display and if I scroll down, I'm going to change this display as option to wire. Now as you can see, we just subtracted our boxes from our wall, and that's exactly what we need. If I just hide my windows, look what happens. You see, there is nothing here that's because we use the Boolean modifier. I'm going to unhide these windows. Now what we need is a frame for our windows. To create a frame, we can simply select our windows, this object, duplicate it, hit "Shift and D" "Escape" to cancel its movement. Let's call it windows frame or let's say frames. Then I'm going to go to the front orthographic view so hit "Number 1" on your Numpad. Let's zoom in, go to the wireframe mode and enter the edit mode. Now I'm going to hit "A" to select this face and then I'm going to insert it. Hit "I" to insert it this way. You can write the value 0.1, hit "Enter" and then I'm going to create a few loop cuts here. I'm going to hit "Control R" or "Command R." Let's create one loop cut vertically here and one loop cut horizontally this way, just like this. Then I'm going to bevel these two edges that we just created. I'm going to select this edge, hold down the Shift key, and select these two edges, then hit "Command D" or "Control B" to bevel them. Just like this, not too much, a little bit. Something like this would work perfectly. Then I'm going to select these four faces and remove them. You can hit "Delete" on your keyboard and choose delete faces so that we get only this frame. Now hit "A" on your keyboard to select your frame. Now I'm going to go to the right orthographic view. Hit "Number 3" on your Numpad, then hit "E" and extrude it out. Something like this. Our windows are ready, if I just enter the solid mode and the object mode, you can see that we have our frames and also we have the windows object here right in the middle. Later when we want to apply materials to all these objects, we can simply decide which objects should have which material. I guess that's all. I think they look pretty good. All right, guys. That's all for this video. I know we went through a lot of things, but if you do everything step-by-step as I explained, you should be able to get this result. See you in the next one. 33. Modeling - Couch: [MUSIC] In this video, we're going to create a couch together. Let's get into it. First of all, let's decide on the position. Well, I think if we put the couch right here next to the windows, it would look great. First I'm going to place the 3D cursor right there. Let me go to the top Orthographic view by hitting "Number 7" on my keyboard and then hold down the "Shift" key and right-click somewhere around here, just like this, and now our 3D cursor is placed right here. Then I'm going to add a plane, so hit "Shift and A", go to Mesh, add a plane. Again, let's go to the top Orthographic view and I'm going to scale this plane a little bit. Let's hit "S", then scale it along the x-axis, so hit "X" to lock it along the x-axis and scale it just like this to make it larger, and then I'm going to scale it along the y-axis as well. Again "S", "Y", and try to scale it down, something like this looks great. Our plane is ready. However, you need to keep in mind that you should always apply your scale when you scale something in the object mode. I already explained the reason. So if you scroll up here, you can see that our scale is not set to 1, 1, 1. Later if you want to add some modifiers to it, or maybe we could bevel something, it would be problematic. I'm going to hit "Control A" on my keyboard to open up this apply window and I'm going to click on "Scale" to apply scale. Now as you can see, we have 1, 1, 1, perfect. Then I'm going to go to the Edit mode, and I'm going to move this plane up a little bit. Let me go to the front Orthographic view. From this side, I'm going to hit "G", "Z" and move it up. Just like this. Something like this may be a little bit more. "G", "Z" and move it up. Great. Here we're going to place our legs, but for now let's work on the plane. Now I'm going to extrude it out, so hit "E" and extrude it up like this, maybe a little bit more. Something like this should work perfectly and then let's see what we need. We need two handles on the sides. We need to create some loop cuts here. Let me go to the top Orthographic view. I'm going to hit "Control R" or "Command R" to enable the Loop Cut tool. I'm going to increase the number of loop cuts to two just like this. Left-click to confirm and hit "Escape" to confirm their position. Now while these two edges are selected, hit "S", "X" and scale them all the way to the sides just like this. These two faces are going to be our handles and we need one more loop cut right here for the back of our sofa. I'm going to hit "Control R" or "Command R", left-click and move it up to somewhere around here. Left-click to confirm and that's all. Now what we need to do is this. We need to select these faces. Let me select my face select tool, select this left face. Hold down the "Shift" key and click on these faces one by one. Then I'm going to extrude them up a little bit so let me go to the front Orthographic view, hit "E" and extrude them up a little bit. Something like this should work. Then I'm going to select these faces on the back, hit "E" and extrude them up again. I think it looks very good, but we're not done yet obviously. Now let's work on the cushions. Well, I think we can create three cushions here and two cushions for the handles. Let's get us started. We're going to use the same technique that we used for creating these windows. We select this face, we duplicate it, hit "Shift and D" just like this, then hit "Escape" to cancel the movement, then separate it, hit "P" and click on "Selection". As you can see, this duplicated face has been placed in the outliner as a new object. Now I'm going to go to the Object mode, select this new object, get back to the Edit mode and now what I'm going to do is this. I'm going to create two loop cuts here. Hit "Control R" or "Command R", create two loop cuts, confirm their position and I'm going to select these two faces and remove them. You can hit "Delete" on your keyboard and hit "Delete Faces". So far so good. Now let me zoom in a little bit. What I'm going to do is this. I'm going to select this front edge and I'm going to move it out a little bit, so hit "G", then "Y" to move it along the y-axis and move it out a little bit, something like this. Now what I can do is this, I can simply select this face, hit "A" on your keyboard, extrude it out just like this. It looks very good and then we can use the Array Modifier to duplicate these cushion. Let me add the Array Modifier to it. Just like this, increase the count to three but here we have a problem. The problem is, there is no space between these cushions. How can we fix that? Well, it's very simple. What we can do is this, let me disable this modifier for a second. I'm going to select this side face. I'm going to hit "G" and "X" to move this face along the x-axis a little bit to the left side. Then I'm going to enable this Array Modifier once again and as you can see, we have some empty space right here on the right side and we can simply increase this factor x value to get some empty space between these cushions, maybe 1.05. Let's see if it works. It's too much. What about 1.04? I think it's still too much. Let's set it to 1.3 and then while this phase is selected, hit "G", "X" and move it to the right side a little bit. I think now it looks very good. Now let's create some cushions for our handles. We are going to use the same technique here. I'm going to select our couch, enter the Edit mode, select this face, duplicate it, hit "Shift" and "D", hit "Escape", and then separate it, hit "P" and click on "Selection". Enter the Object mode, in the outliner you can select this duplicated object, again enter the Edit mode, select this face. You can hit "A" on your keyboard and what I'm going to do is this. I'm going to go to the top Orthographic view and let's scale it up along the x-axis. Lock it along the x-axis this way and then I'm going to select this edge like this and move it along the y-axis, hit "G", "Y" and move it out, something like that. Finally hit "A" to select this face, "E" to extrude it out just like this. Now it looks very good. I'm going to mirror this cushion on the right side. The way I can do that is this. I am going to add the Mirror Modifier to this object here. Just like this, we have a cushion for the other side of our couch. So far so good. But our couch doesn't look good at all because right now we have just a few boxes sitting on top of each other or next to each other and that's not what we want. We need to use the hard surface modeling technique that I showed you before when we created our surfing board to make this couch look more realistic. Let me rename my objects first. I'm going to select this couch, and let's rename it to couch and then let's select these cushions and rename them to cushions. Also these two cushions and let's rename them to maybe handles. Perfect. Let's select the couch object and I'm going to add the subdivision surface modifier to it. Let's set the levels viewport to two and the render to three. Then we can hide these two objects temporarily until you're done with the couch. What do we need to do here? Well, we need to add more details to this couch to make different edges sharper and it's so simple. We just need to add a few loop cuts to this couch. While it's selected, I'm going to enter the edit mode, and then let's see what we need. I'm going to hit Control R or Command R to select the loop cut 2. Then I'm going to create two loop cuts here to make these edges sharper. Let's increase the number of loop cuts using my mouse wheel, left-click to confirm, and escape to confirm their position and while they are selected, I'm going to scale them. Hit S, X and scale them all the way to here and as you can see now, these edges are sharper. That's exactly what we needed. Well, maybe I can make this edge a little bit sharper as well. Let me hit Command R or Control R and create a loop cut this way, move it to the right side just like this. What else? I think we need one loop cut here as well. Let's create one here just like that. Maybe we need a few loop cuts here for the handles but before I create them, let me just go to the object mode and just right-click on it and click on "Shade Smooth" to make it smoother. This way we can clearly realize what we need. I'm going to enter the edit mode once again. Let me go to the top orthographic view, then I'm going to hit Control R or Command R to create two loop cuts here, left-click to confirm and hit Escape to cancel the movement. While they are selected, hit S to scale them, and X to scale them along the x-axis just like this. It looks very good now. I'm going to do the same thing here on the right side, so Control R or Command R, create two loop cuts, left-click, hit Escape, and then S, X and scale them to get something like this. So far so good. Maybe I can make this edge sharper as well. I can hit Control R once again and create one more loop cut here and move it up like this. I guess it looks very good and we don't need to work on it anymore. Now let's work on the cushions. I'm going to unhide the cushions and let's select it. Let's select this object, right-click on it, Shade Smooth, and add the subdivision surface modifier to it now. I'm going to increase the levels viewport to two and the render to three. Now let's enter the edit mode and we are going to add a few loop cuts here as well. I'm going to go to the top orthographic view so that you could see it clearly. Let's hit Control R or Command R and I'm going to add two loop cuts here, left-click and Escape to confirm, and then S and X to scale along the x-axis to somewhere around here. Now let's create two loop cuts this way. Hit Control R or Command R, left-click, Escape, S, Y to scale them along the y-axis, and let's make it this way. Pretty good. I think we can create two loop cuts here as well. So let me hit Control R, make it two, left-click, Escape and that's all. We don't need to do anything else, I guess. Our cushions look pretty good and enter the object mode now. Great. Now let's unhide the handles, these two cushions, and do the same thing. Just right-click on it, Shade Smooth, add the subdivision surface modifier to them, increase the levels viewport to two and the render to three, enter the edit mode and let's add a few loop cuts here. We need two loop cuts this way. I'm going to add them right there, left-click to confirm, hit Escape to cancel the movement, and then scale them along the x-axis just like this and maybe one loop cut here. Let's see what we will get if I add one loop cut here, maybe two would be much better. So I'm going to hit Control Z or Command Z and add two loop cuts instead, left-click to confirm, hit Escape, and scale them along the z-axis, design just like this. Our handles look fine but maybe we can modify our couch a little bit. I'm going to select the couch, enter the edit mode, and I'm going to add a loop cut here to make this edge sharper. Hit Control R or Command R this way, left-click and move it up just like this. Now our couch looks great, but we're not done yet because we need to create the legs as well. For the legs, we can use a circle. You can use a cylinder as well, that's totally up to you, but I prefer this circle. Hit Shift and A, go to Mesh, and add a circle. It's too large and also if you open up the redo panel, you can see that the number of vertices is set to 32. I can decrease it to 12, we don't need many vertices here. I can hit S and scale it down. Maybe I can go to the wireframe mode so that you could see it perfectly. Hit S, scale it down, something like this would be great, then apply the scale, hit Control A, apply the scale and then hit G and move it to the corners. Somewhere around here would look great. It's placed right on the floor. However, if I go to the solid mode, you can see that this circle is not filled. Therefore, whenever you create a circle, you need to fill it before you extrude it. So I'm going to enter the edit mode, then I'm going to hit A to select all these edges, and to feel something, you need to hit F on your keyboard. Hit F, now as you can see, a face has been created and you can simply extrude it out. Let me go to the front orthographic view, hit E and extrude it out. Just like this, our leg is ready. I can right-click on it, Shade Smooth, add the subdivision surface modifier to it, levels viewport is going to be two, render three and then enter the edit mode and add two loop cuts this way. Left-click to confirm, hit Escape, and scale them along the z-axis to make these top and bottom edges sharper. If I zoom in, you can see them clearly. Our first leg is ready. Now what we can do is this. We can use the mirror modifier to create the other legs. Let me add the mirror modifier to this leg but since we move this object, in the object mode, you can see that the origin point is placed right here which is not what we want. But fortunately, the origin point of our couch is placed right at the center. So we can simply head over to the mirror object section, we can use this eyedropper, hover over our couch, and left-click to use its origin point as our mirror. Immediately you can see that a new leg is created. I just need to enable the y-axis as well, just like this. Our couch is ready, now what we can do is this. We can parent all of these objects to keep everything organized. So I'm going to select all the objects one by one. However, the last object I'm going to click on is going to be our couch because the couch is going to be the parent element. Hold down the Shift key, select these cushions and these handles, and finally the couch. As you all remember to parent them, you need to hit Control P or Command P and click on "Object Keep Transform". If you want to scale it up or down to make it look better proportionately, you can simply select the parent and then hit S and scale everything up and down. You may ask, why did I choose this couch as the last element to be our parent? That's because when we created the first plane, I tried to keep the origin point of that plane on the ground. This way when we use this couch as our parent, when we scale it up or down, the scale happens in relation to this origin point, just like this. Keep that in mind, that's the reason. I think everything looks good. We don't need to do anything else and we can wrap up this lesson. I hope you enjoyed it and I'll see you in the next video. 34. Modeling - Desk & Chair: In this video, we're going to create a desk and a chair, and we're going to place them right here. Without further ado, let's get into it. First of all, I'm going to go to the top orthographic view by hitting number 7 on my keyboard. Then I'm going to place my 3D cursor here. Hold down the Shift key and right-click right there. Then let's hit "Shift" and "A" to add a plane right here. I'm going to go to the top orthographic view once again. Let's scale this plane a little bit. Let's hit "S" then "Y" to scale it along the y-axis and scale it this way. Something like this looks great. Then I'm going to scale it along the x-axis, so S, then X, and scale it like this. Nice. Now, I'm going to enter the edit mode. I'm going to hit "A" to select this face and then "G" to move it up, "Z" to lock it along the z-axis and move it up this way, somewhere around here. Let me go to the front orthographic view to check it out. I think maybe a little bit lower. So G, Z, and move it down. Somewhere around here looks pretty good. Then let's extrude it out. Hit "E" and extrude it out like this. It looks very good in my opinion. What else do we need for this desk? We need a few drawers. I think we can create three different drawers here. Let's select this face. I'm going to choose the Face Select tool, select this face, duplicate it, hit "Shift" and "D" then scape, and finally separate it. Hit "P" and click on selection. I'm going to go to the object mode. Here we have two objects, so let me rename it. I'm going to select the first object and rename it to Desk. The next one, I'm going to rename it to Drawer. One this drawer object is selected, I'm going to enter the edit mode, hit "A" to select this face. Maybe I can go to the right orthographic view by hitting number 3 on my notepad. This way I can simply scale it down. Hit "S" and scale it down this way, just like this. Again, S, Y to scale it along the y-axis, and then G Y to move it to the left side. I think it looks very good, maybe a little bit more. Hit "S", "Z" and scale it along the z-axis, G, Y, and move it to the left side, and that's all. Our first drawer is ready. Now what I can do is this. I can use the array modifier, and instead of factor X, we're going to need factor Y. I'm going to set factor X to zero and set factor Y to one. Increase the count to three because we need three different drawers. Then I can adjust the y-value here to get my desired position. I think everything looks good now. Let me see them. Yeah, that's perfect. Now I can extrude it out. Hit "E" and extrude it out just like this, and that's all. Now this drawer requires a handle obviously. Let's enter the object mode. I'm going to hit "Shift" and "A", and add a UV sphere here to our scene. Scale it down. Hit "S" to scale it down, just like this. Right-click on it, click on Shade Smooth to make it smoother. Then I'm going to go to the front orthographic view, hit "G" and bring it up right here. I'm going to scale it down, hit "G", and put it right there. Let's go to the right orthographic view, then hit "G", "Y," move it to the left side and place it right at the center. Then add the array modifier, increase the count to three, set the X factor to zero, and the Y to one. Then you can increase the Y factor dramatically so that you could get the desired position. I think it looks very good now. Great. Our drawers are ready, but maybe I can select this handle. I'm going to go to the front orthographic view. Let's move them inside a little bit so that they look attached. Hit "G", "X", and move them inside. Now they look great. So far so good. Let me rename it in the outliner to a Handle. What else do we need? We need four legs for our desk. For our leg, we just need maybe a plane or a cube. I prefer the plane. Let me go to the top orthographic view. I'm going to scale it down. Hit "S", scale it down to make it so small, something like this. Then hit "G", move it right here. Then let's go to the front orthographic view by hitting number 1 enter the edit mode, and extrude it out. Hit "E" and extrude it this way. But while this top phase is selected, I'm going to scale it a little bit. Look what happens. Because I want this top part to be a little bit wider, I'm going to hit "S" and scale it up like this. Nice. Let me check it out. It looks great. Now I need three more legs, and you know what to do. You just need to use the mirror modifier. I'm going to go to the top orthographic view. Let me go to the wireframe mode and I'm going to add the mirror modifier to our leg, and I'm going to set the mirror object to our desk. I am going to select our desk and then set the axis to X and Y. Just like this, our desk is ready. It looks great. Let me rename this object to Legs, and now I'm going to parent them. First, I'm going to select the legs, hold down the Shift Key, selected drawers, hold down the Shift key, select the handles, and finally select your desk, and then hit "Control" key and choose object, Keep Transform. Just like this, they are parented. We can simply scale it down or up. Our desk is ready. Maybe I can scale it down a little bit. I'm going to hit "S" and scale it down this way so that we could have better proportions. Now, what we need is a chair. But before we create the chair, let me reposition this desk. I'm going to go to the wireframe mode and hit "G", "X", and move it to the left side, all the way to the wall just like this. How can we create a chair? Well, I'm going to show you a very cool technique. It's going to be so simple, but you need to do it step-by-step. For the chair, we just need a plane. Therefore, I am going to hit shift and A, add a plane here, go to the top orthographic view by hitting number 7 on your keyboard. Scale it down. Hit"S. I'm going to scale it down to something like this. Then I'm going to hit G and bring it here, somewhere around here. Let me zoom in. I'm going to scale it a little bit along the x-axis. So hit S, X and scale it this way. Perfect. Now what we need is this; first we need to apply the scale. I'm going to hit Control A to apply the scale. Then let's enter the edit mode and let's bring it up a little bit. Hit G, Z and move it up. I want the origin point to be placed right at the bottom. It's very important. Let's move it a little bit more. Hit G, Z and move it up. Maybe somewhere around here. Looks good. Then what we need is this. We just need to select this edge and extruded out. I'm going to select it, hit E extrude it. Lucky to align the z-axis. Just like this, it looks very simple, but we're going to make it look much better. Now what I'm going to do is this, I'm going to select this top edge and this edge. These two. Hold down the Shift Key to select them simultaneously. Then I'm going to go to the top orthographic view by hitting number 7 on the numpad. Then I'm going to scale them along the y-axis, so hit "S, Y, and scale them this way so that we could get such a shape, but we're not done yet. The next step is to bevel this part. I'm going to select this edge, hit Control B or Command B and try to bevel it. But you need to increase the number of segments using your mouse swill. Let me increase it to get a smooth curve here, something like this would be enough. We don't need more segments. Now what I'm going to do is this, I'm going to select the Vertex tool. Let me select this vertex, this one, this one, and this one. These four vertices, these top ones and these bottom ones. I'm going to bevel them. As you know, to bevel vertices, you need to hit Control B or Command B and then V to select the vertex tool, and now you can simply bevel them. Maybe you can increase the number of segments to make it rounded, something like this. Now we need to add thickness to this chair. We have two ways to do that. We can either select all these phases and extrude them along their normals, just like what we did with the walls, or we could use a modifier, the solidify modifier. What's the difference between them? Well, I already explained the difference between using a modifier or changing your mesh in the edit mode. But let me repeat that. If I select all these phases and I hit Alt and E, and extrude them along normals, like this. Once I confirm it, it's done, my geometry is changed. This is a destructive way of modeling and it's fine if you are 100 percent sure about the thickness of your chair. However, if you're not sure about the thickness. What you can do is this. You can add the solidify modifier here to your shape and you will get the exact same result, but with one difference. This is a nondestructive procedure. You can always adjust the thickness however you want. Just keep that in mind, it's very important. I'm going to set the thickness to 0.01. It's fine, and I'm going to enable even thickness. It's also very important. Great. I'm going to enter the object mode now, and let's call this object chair. You may think that we're done but we aren't. Well, as you can see here, we can still see all these phases. It's not good. Let's fix that. First I'm going to right-click on it and I'm going to click on Shade Smooth. But as soon as I do that you will see something strange happens. You see our object doesn't look very good. You see all these highlights and shadows. To fix this issue, we can use another modifier right now, what do we need to do is this. We need to smooth this part, but we need to keep these edges around this object very sharp. The modifier we didn't talk about yet is called edge split. If you add it to your shape, you will see that it will keep the edges sharp and it will smooth out all other parts. Here we can adjust the edge angle, by default it's set to 30 degrees. Just like this our first part is done, now we need a few legs for our chair. Because right now it's floating. For the legs, I'm going to use a circle, hit Shift and A, add a circle to our scene just like this, and I'm going to open up this redo panel. The number of vertices is set to 32, it's fine. I'm not going to decrease it. Then I'm going to scale it down, hit S and scale it down, make it so small. Let's go to the top orthographic view, and then I'm going to go to the wireframe mode. Let's move it, hit G and bring it right here. I'm going to go to the front orthographic view now. Our circle is placed right here. Now we need to fill it. If you remember, our circle is empty, I'm going to hit A to select all these edges, then F to fill it the phase. Now let's go to the front orthographic view once again and extrude it out, hit E and extrude it this way. But it's too tall, I guess. Maybe I can make it shorter, something like this would be fine. While this top face is selected. I'm going to hit S and scale it just like that. Maybe a little bit more S and scale it. Great. Let's go to the solid mode and I'm going to enter the object mode to see what we've done. So far so good, our first leg is ready. What we can do now is this, we can select this chair. I'm going to go to the front orthographic view. Let's enter the edit mode. It's very important. I'm going to move it down without changing the position of our origin point. We need to do it in the edit mode. Enter the edit mode, hit A to select everything. Hit G, Z and move it down. Great. Now you can get back to the object mode, and I'm going to select this leg that we just created. If I zoom in, you can see all these edges. I'm going to right-click on it and click on Shade Smooth to make it smoother, it looks very good now. Then I'm going to go to the right orthographic view and let's rotate it a little bit. Hit R and rotate it this way. Then hit G, Y and move it to the left side, then go to the front orthographic view and rotate it this way. Then hit G X and move it to the right side, somewhere around here. I think I can make this surface a little bit thicker. Let's increase the thickness to something like 0.02. I think now it looks much better. For the other legs, we can simply add the mirror modifier to this leg right here. We can select the mirror object. It's going to be our chair and enable the x and y-axis. Just like this, our chair is ready and it looks beautiful. However, if I zoom in, you can see that we get these highlights here. That's because of the shade smooth option we used. To fix that, we just need to add the edge split modifier to these legs. Let's rename it in the outliner to legs. Finally we need to parent them. I'm going to select these legs, hold down the Shift Key, and select this chair, this top part hit Control P, and Object Keep Transform. Now, if I select this parent and I want to scale it up or down, I can simply do it. I'm going to go to the top orthographic view and maybe I can rotate it a little bit to make it look more interesting, and I can put it here, but I think our desk is too big. Maybe I can select our desk and scale it down, hit S, and scale it down to something like this. We can adjust the scale of our models later, but I think now it looks very good. All right guys, that's all for this video. I hope you enjoyed it, and I'll see you in the next one. 35. Modeling - Computer: Hey, in this video, we're going to create a computer together. What I have in mind is something like an iMac and we're going to place it right on our desk so let's get started. First, I'm going to go to the top orthographic view by hitting number seven on my notepad, and I'm going to place my 3D cursor here right on our desk. Let me hold down the shift key and right-click here. Then I'm going to add a plane shift on a go-to Mesh and a plane here and let's scale it down. It S, scale it down to something like this. It shouldn't be too big. Confirm, and then I'm going to scale it along the y-axis, S and Y, and scale it this way. Something like this should work. Now, what do we need to do is rotate this plane. I'm going to hit R, and I'm going to rotate it by 90 degrees along the y-axis. I'm going to hit Y and then 90, then I'm going to move it up, hit G, Z, and bring it up. Keep in mind that I'm in the object mode. I think it looks good. Let me go to the writer too graphic view. Maybe I can scale it along the y-axis, a little bit more, S, Y, and scale it this way. Now, as usual, we need to apply the scale, hit Control-A, and apply the scale and if I go to the object property panel, you can see that our scale is set to 1, 1,1, and that's exactly what we need. Right now we are working on the body of the computer and the body of the iMac. Let's go to the front orthographic view and I'm going to extrude it out so hit Tab, enter the edit mode, hit A to select this face E, and extrude it out this way to the right side. Something like this should work perfectly. Let me zoom in. I'm going to tap out and then we need to use that hard surface modeling technique we used for this couch and for our surfing board. We need to add the subdivision surface modifier to this plane. I'm going to increase the levels viewport to two and the render to three and also I'm going to right-click on it, shade smooth to make it smoother. Now we can enter the edit mode and we can add a few loop cuts to get our desired shape. Let me zoom in a little bit and let's see what we need. But I think we need to loop cuts here and here. I'm going to go to the right or too graphic view hit Control R or Command R and let's create two loop cuts. Left-click to confirm scape, to confirm their position. Then while this phase is selected, or let's say while these two edges are selected, I'm going to scale them along the y-axis, it's S, Y, and scale them this way. Good. I'm going to add two loop cuts here as well so Control R or Command R and increase the number of loop cuts. Left-click to confirm, hit escape, and then scale them along the z-axis this time to get such a shape, something like this, looks great. However, I want these edges to be very sharp. Just like an iMac. I'm going to go to the top orthographic view and let me zoom in and I'm going to add two loop cuts here. Let's add one loop cut first, just like this, and move it all the way to the edge and one more, this way. As you can see, our edges are very sharp now and that's exactly what we need. The body is almost ready. However, I'm going to work on the back of this body. What I'm going to do is this, I'm going to select this face. Let me select my face tool, and let's select this face right here. Then I am going to scale it down, hit S, and scale it down all the way to here and now I'm going to move this face down, hit G, Z, and move it down to here. Finally, I am going to bring it out so hit G X to move it along the x-axis and bring it out. Something like this should work. By the way, this is the old iMac. If you want to model the new iMac, you don't need to do this step. But I wanted to show you this technique. You can always select a face, scale it down, move it down, and bring it out to create such a shape. Our body is ready. Now we need to move on to the screen part because an iMac is divided to two parts, the steel parts right at the bottom and the glassy part right here. How can we create this part? It's very simple. We are going to use the duplication technique that I showed you before. First, we're going to select these faces, these front phases, all of them, and then we are going to duplicate them. Hit Shift and D then hit Escape, and finally, you need to separate it. Hit P, and click on selection. If I type out, I can click on plane 001. This is our duplicated object and then I'm going to enter the edit mode, hit A To select all these phases. I can simply extrude it out, Hit E, and extrude it this way, not too much, by the way, something like this. However, we don't have sharp edges, therefore, we need to add to loop cuts here. Let me go to the top orthographic view and zoom in. I'm going to hit Control R or Command R to select a loop cut tool, create two loop cuts. Left-click to confirm scape, then S, X and scale them. Let me see if our edges are sharp enough. Yes, it looks very good. The first part is done as you can see, what we need to divide this object into two parts, the bottom part, and the top part. I'm going to go to the right orthographic view. I'm going to enter the edit mode. Then I'm going to add a loop cut here. Hit Control R or Command R, create a loop cut, bringing it down to somewhere around here. Left-click to confirm. Then I'm going to select this bottom part, but not these front faces because we have the side faces and also the back faces. What we need to do is this, we need to go to the wireframe mode, select all these phases. Then let me select the Face, Select tool, and select these bottom faces. Now we don't need to duplicate these phases, we just need to separate these phases from this object. So I'm going to hit P and selection. If I go to the solid mode and to the object mode, you can see that now we have two separate sections, and it looks very good. Later when we apply materials for our objects, we can apply a separate material to this bottom part and another material to this glassy part. The only thing left for this computer is the leg, so let's see how we can create the leg. For the leg, we can use a plane as well so let me put the 3D cursor right here, hold down the Shift key, and right-click here, then add a plane. There it is. Make sure that you add this object in the object mode, hit S to scale it down to something like this. It should work perfectly and then I'm going to enter the edit mode, and I'm going to select this edge here. Let me select the Edge, select Tool, select this edge, go to the front view and I'm going to extrude it out so hit E, Z, and extruded this way, not too much because later we're going to bring the body part down. Somewhere around here should work. While this top edge is selected, I'm going to extrude it once again, but this time aligning the x-axis. So hit E X and extrude it out to get something like this. Now let's tap out and then I'm going to select this plane, plane one and plane two is body parts, and I'm going to bring them down. Let's go to the wireframe mode so that I could see my plane, hit G, Z and bring it down to somewhere around here, it looks good. Maybe we can move this edge up a little bit so I can go to the object mode and to the solid mode and let's select this object, select this face, hit G, Z, and move it up. Let me see if it looks good. Maybe a little bit more G, Z, and bring it here. Now it looks very good. The other thing I need to do is this. I need to select this edge here right at the bottom, and I need to move it, align the x-axis, hit G, X, and move it here a little bit more to somewhere around here. Not too much by the way and y and this edge is selected. I'm going to scale it to make it wider. Hit S and scale it this way. I did it a bit more. It looks very good. The last thing I need to do here is to just select these edges, this top edge here and this bottom edge hold down the Shift key to select them simultaneously and I'm going to bevel them, Control B and bevel them and increase the number of segments using your mouse wheel to make it around it. Something like this should work and left-click to confirm. I'm going to go to the object node and now we need to add thickness to this leg because it doesn't look good. It's just a simple plain and to do that, I'm going to go to the modifiers panel. Let's use the solidify modifier here to add some thickness to it. I'm going to increase the thickness here to maybe 0.1. It looks good and then I'm going to right click on it, shade smooth, and we will get the same issue as we got for our other objects, and you know how to fix it. You just need to add the edge split modifier to make these edges sharp, and the rest of this object smooth. That's exactly what we needed. Maybe I can decrease the thickness a little bit to 0.08 and finally, I'm going to select all these elements one by one and parent them. Let's start with the body part. I'm going to select the screen, hold down the shift key, this bottom part, the main body object. and finally the leg. Hit control P, object keep transform, and I'm going to rename it in the outliner to computer. You can call it whatever you want. However, I need to move it up a little bit because it's somehow inside our desk, so hit G, Z and bring it up. If you want, you can go ahead and scale it. But I think maybe we could make this leg look even better by making these two corners rounded as well. Let's give it a try. I'm going to select this leg, enter the edit mode, and I'm going to select the vertex select tool. Select these two vertices, hit Control B, then V to bevel them. I think it would look much better. Our computer is ready. Now, I'm going to move it a little bit, go to the top orthographic view, hit G, and bring it may be here. Let me see. Here, it looks good. What else do we need? Well, for the computer, we need a mouse and a keyboard. I'm going to show you how to create the mouse, but not the keyboard, because I already prepared the keyboard for you. You are going to do it by yourself as a challenge, because if I show you everything, later if you want to model something without a tutorial, it would be very hard for you. This is going to be your exercise. But for the sake of this course, I already prepared the keyboard. Then I'm going to show you how you can use objects from other blender finds and other blender projects. Let's suppose I want to bring the keyboard here. I can go to file and here we have an option called append. It allows you to add another object to this project. I'm going to click on it, and here is the keyboard find that I already created for you. You can select it, just double-click on it, and you will see these folders. Just ignore everything except this object folder. Open it up. Here, you will see all objects. I'm going to hit A to select them all and then click on append. As soon as I do that, this keyboard object is added to my project, and it's placed right here, right at the center. Since my 3D cursor is placed on the desk, I can hit Shift and S to open up this pie menu, and I can click on selection to cursor. There it is. Here is the keyboard. I'm going to go to the top orthographic view, hit G, and move it to the right side a little bit. But it's too big compared to our screen, but I think my computer is too small. I can select the computer, hit S, and scale it up just like this. Something like this, maybe a little bit more. Here it looks much more realistic in my opinion and I can select the keyboard, hit GX and bring it here, and I think it looks very good. Well, let me show you how this keyboard is created and how you can do it by yourself. I'm going to go to the top orthographic view. This keyboard is nothing, but a plane with thickness. If I go to the front orthographic view, you can see it right here. I'm going to bring it up, hit G, Z and bring it up. Here is our plane with thickness. It's very simple, and these keys are also planes with thickness and I made them brown that using the Bevel tool. You can create one key like this and then use the array modifier to duplicate it. Once you are done with all these objects, you need to select them all and parent them. However, you might ask, how would you know how many keys you may need and where you should place them? Well, that's a very good question. In this case, you need to use a reference image. You can just google, for example, Apple keyboard and find an image as your reference, download it on your computer, and then you can add it to your scene as a reference image. Let me show you how it's done. Let's suppose we want to place that reference image here. Make sure to go to the top orthographic view first, then hit Shift and A and go to image. From here, we have an option called reference. If I click on it, you can find the image that you downloaded, select it, and click on load reference image. This reference image is so big as you can see it's been added to my scene. While it's selected, I'm going to scale it down just like any other object here. I can rotate it, hit R, Z, 90 just like this, hit enter. It's placed right here. I'm going to go to the front orthographic view and bring it up a little bit, hit G and Z so that we could see it perfectly. If I zoom in, you see this is my reference image. I can bring it here and I can create a plane according to this reference image and I can make all these keys just like what I see in the picture. Once you are done with modeling this keyboard, we can simply remove it from here and that's all. Make sure to model this keyboard by yourself. However, you can also get access to this keyboard in the resources section, so you can download it and add it to your project. All right. But what about the mouse? I'm going to show you how you can create a simple mouse. Well, for the mouse, we just need a plane. It's going to be so simple. I'm going to place the 3D cursor right here, hold down the Shift key and right click. I'm going to add a plane here, hit Shift and A at the plane, scale it down to something like this. Then I'm going to scale it along the x-axis just like this. Maybe a little bit more. Don't forget to apply the scale because we're going to make these vertices rounded. I'm going to hit Control A and click on scale to apply the scale and now let's enter the edit mode and I'm going to add a few loop cuts here. Let's hit Control R and try to add two loop cuts this way. Left click to confirm and escape and I'm going to add two loop cuts here as well. Left click to confirm and hit Escape to cancel the movement. Now, I'm going to select the vertex select tool. Select these vertices right at the corners, and I'm going to bevel them, hit Control B, then V, and try to level them to something like this, and now it looks very good. Then let me go to the object mode, select this plane that we've just created. I'm going to bring it up a little bit along the z-axis, hit G, Z and bring it up. Enter the edit mode and I'm going to add some curvature to it using the proportional editing tool. Let's select this face select tool, select this face right in the middle, and enable the proportional editing tool. Make sure that the fall of type is set to smooth. Then hit G. Z. I'm going to use my mouse wheel to adjust the size of fall off like this, and move it up just like that. I guess it looks very good. We don't need to do anything else. Now, we can enter the object mode, right click on it, click on shade smooth to make it smooth. Then let's add the subdivision surface modifier. The levels view port is going to be two and the render is going to be three. Finally, we're going to add thickness to it. Let's use the solidify modifier like this, but it's too much. Maybe I can set the thickness to 0.006. However, we have these issues. We just need to add another modifier here, the H split modifier, to make these edges sharper. Our mouse is ready. We just need to bring it down. Let me go to the front orthographic view, enter the edit mode, hit A, disable the proportional editing tool, hit G, Z and bring it down until it sits on our desk just like this. Maybe a little bit more. Now, I can call it mouse and I can rotate it in the top orthographic view, hit R and rotate it, hit G and bring it somewhere around here. All right guys. Our computer set is ready. I hope you enjoyed this lesson and I'll see you in the next one. 36. Modeling - Carpet: Hey everyone. In this video, we're going to go ahead and create a carpet, or let's say a rug together. Let's get into it. First of all, I'm going to reposition my 3D cursor because I'm going to place my carpet right here. Let me zoom in a little bit. I'm going to hold down the Shift key, and right click here. Now that my 3D cursor is placed in the right position, I'm going to hit Shift a, and add a circle to my scene. It's too small, so let me scale it up a little bit. Maybe something like this would be fine for this large area. Then I'm going to enter the edit mode, and I'm going to extrude these edges out. First I'm going to select this edge select tool, hit A to select all these edges. Then E, Z, and extrude them out. Just like this, something like this should be fine. Then I'm going to fill this area. Hit F to create a large phase here. For the next step, what I'm going to do is this. I'm going to insert this face again and again and again until I get many phases here. While this top face is selected, I'm going to hit I on my keyboard to select the insert tool, and let's move my mouse to create a phase, left click to confirm, and repeat this process many times. I'm going to hit I to insert it. Again I, I'm going to do it quickly just like this, and I will let you know why I'm creating so many different phases in a second. Now as you can see, we have many faces. For the next step, I'm going to enter the object mode, and I'm going to add the subdivision surface modifier to this object to make it smoother. Let's increase the Levels Viewport equal to two, and the Render to three, and finally, I'm going to right click on it, and click on Shade Smooth. This is going to be our base object. But right now it doesn't look like a rock because we don't have those hairs. In order to create hairs, we can use a powerful feature of bender called the particle system. First make sure that your circle, this object is selected, I can go ahead, and rename it in the outliner to carpet. Then we need to head over to the particle system. You can find it right here, right under the modifiers panel, and as you can see there is nothing here, because we need to add a particle system to this object by hitting this plus button, so I'm going to hit it, and you will see many properties here. We're not going to go through all of them because there are many things you can achieve using the particle system. But let me explain to you in simple words, what a particle system is. Well, a particle system allows you to scatter objects across another object. For example, you can create a simple and small leaf. Then you can try to use the particle system to scatter it across another shape, for example, a branch of a tree. This is one use case. There are many different things that you can use the particle system for, but in this case, we are going to use it to create hairs. Here, as you can see, we have two different tabs. We have the Emitter, and Hair. In this case, we're going to use the hair because obviously we are going to create some hairs, but the emitter allows you to just take one object and scatter it across another object, as I explained before. But for now, let's head over to the Hair tab here, and you will see this strange looking shape. Don't worry, we're going to fix that. Here under the emission, we have the number of hairs, we have seed, we have hair length, and segments. Well, we don't need to adjust the seed, we need to adjust the number here and hair length. Let me adjust this value because it's too much, our hairs are too long. So I'm going to set it to maybe 0.1 just like this, and then I'm going to increase the number dramatically. Right now we have 1,000. I'm going to set it to 15,000, just like this, but we're not done yet. If I zoom in, you will see that we have many hairs, but the problem is they are just sitting vertically on top of our carpet. That's not realistic. We need to somehow randomize their position. Well, to do that, first, I'm going to enable this advanced option. So just check this checkbox. As soon as I do that, this velocity option appears, I'm going to open it up. We're not going to change the normal, you can if you want, but for now I think this value looks fine. What I'm going to adjust is this randomized. If I increase this value, you will see their location, and their position will be randomized. That's exactly what we need. I'm going to set it to maybe 0.01, something like this, and also here under the source, I can increase this jittering amount like this. That's all. Our carpet is ready now, maybe we can decrease the hair length a little bit because I think it's too long. I'm going to set it to 0.05. Something like this would be much better. Well, obviously, we cannot see the final result yet, but when we render our scene, you will see that it will look great. I highly recommend keep experimenting with all these properties here to see what each property does. But for this tutorial, I don't want you to feel overwhelmed with all these complex options because most of them are not needed for the projects we work on. All right guys, that's all for this video. I hope you enjoyed it and I'll see you in the next one. 37. Modeling - Pot & Plant: [MUSIC] Hey, in this video, I'm going to show you how you can create a flower pot and a plant to be placed right here, right next to our couch. Without further ado, let's get into it. First of all, we need to put our 3D cursor right here. I'm going to go to the top orthographic view by hitting number 7 on my Notepad. By now you all know how these hotkeys work. I'm going to hold down the Shift key and right-click, and then I'm going to start creating the flower pot. Let's hit "Shift and A". For the flower pots, I'm going to need a cylinder. You need to keep in mind that when it comes to a 3D modeling, there are many ways to achieve the same thing. We can create a flower pot using different ways. But for this tutorial, I'm going to keep it as simple as possible. I'm going to hit "S" and scale it down to something like this. Let me see that. It looks good. Let me go to the right orthographic view and I'm going to move it up, but not here. I'm going to move it up in the edit mode. Let's hit "Tab", hit "A" to select everything. Hit "G, Z" and bring it up just like this. So far so good. Now what I'm going to do is this. I'm going to select this top face. Let me select the face, select tool, select this top face and scale it. Hit "S" and scale it just like this. Let me zoom in. Then I'm going to adjust the shape of it a little bit. Maybe I can create some loop cuts. Let's hit "Ctrl R" or "Command R", and I'm going to increase the number of loop cuts using my mouse wheel to something like this. Left-click to confirm and hit "Escape." Then I'm going to select one of these loop cuts. Hold down the Alt key on your keyboard and click on this edge. As you can see, the whole loop cut is selected now. Let me zoom in. Now I'm going to enable the proportional editing tool here, and I'm going to scale it. Now I'm going to hit "S" and let's adjust the fall off and try to scale it just like this to get such a shape. I really like this shape. Left-click to confirm. That's all. Our base model is ready. Now we need to adjust it somehow to make it look much, much better. First of all, let me go to the Edit mode, hits "A" and bring it up because a few of these phases are inside the ground. Disable the proportional editing tool. Hit "G, Z" and move it up like this. Then I'm going to select this top face and I'm going to inset it. If I hit "I" and try to inset, I can get such a shape just like this. Now I can go to the right orthographic view and now let me go to the wireframe mode so that you can see what's going on. I'm going to hit "E" and I'm going to extrude it inside, not outside. I'm going to extrude it in like this, maybe a little bit more. Let's see "G, Z" and bring it down. Let's go back to the solid mode. Now what I'm going to do is this, I'm going to select these two loop cuts here and here, and I'm going to bevel them. Hold down the Alt key on your keyboard. Click on one of these edges, not the face. I'm going to select this edge 2. This loop cut is selected. I'm going to hold down the Shift key and Alt, and then left-click on one of these edges. Perfect. Now let's bevel them. Hit "Ctrl B" or "Command B". Try to bevel them this way. I'm going to increase the number of segments using my mouse wheel to make it rounded just like this. It looks great, doesn't it? Now let's right-click on it and click on "Shade Smooth" to make it smoother. However, we need to add a modifier to it, edge split to make these edges sharper. So far so good. The next step is to create the soil here. What I'm going to do is this. To create the soil, I'm going to enter the edit mode. I'm going to select the Face Select tool, and let's select this face, then duplicate it, hit "Shift" and "D", hit "Escape" to cancel the movement and separate it hit "P" and click on selection. I'm going to enter the object mode, and I'm going to select this duplicated layer. We can remove this edge speed modifier from it. We don't need it anymore. Then I'm going to enter the edit mode, hit "A" and just extrude it out, hit "E" and extrude it just like this. Now I can add the subdivision surface modifier to it, increase the levels of report to two and render to three. However, here we have a problem. As you can see, we don't have smooth edges here. That's because we don't have many faces and many edges for this subdivision surface modifier to make it smooth. Let's go to the top orthographic view and select this top face. Make sure that you only select this top face. I'm going to zoom in and I'm going to insert it to create more edges and more faces. Hit "I" and insert it. Once again, "I" and inset it. Just like this, you can see that we have smooth edges now. Maybe I can scale it up a little bit, and that's all. Our soil is ready as well. Now we can get into the plants part. Well, we can create the plant by ourselves, but it's a very time-consuming process. I'm going to show you how you can utilize some useful add-ons to create plants in Blender. Well, first of all, let me explain what an add-on is. An add-on is just a third-party script, an additional script that allows you to add more functionalities to Blender. You can download add-ons from different websites, you can purchase them. However, the blender community also create some free add-ons and you can simply install them here. You don't need to download them. If you click on the "Edit" menu and go to the preferences right above the input, you can find this add-ons option. Here you can look for different add-ons. As you can see, there are many add-ons that you can install. I already installed a few of them, and one of them is called Sapling Tree Gen. If you just look for Sapling, you will find this Add Curve Sapling Tree Gen. Just check this checkbox and you are good to go. You don't need to do anything else. As soon as you check this checkbox, then you can hit "Shift and A." If you go to curve, you will see this Sapling Tree Gen has been added to your curve option. This option allows you to create a plant and I'm going to show you how it works. Let's click on it. As soon as I click on it, this plant appears here. It's huge, isn't it? You may or may not like the appearance of these branches right now. But the good news is you can adjust it easily. But you need to make sure that when you create it, you shouldn't click somewhere else because we can only adjust it in the redo panel here. I'm going to open it up. If I click on it, you will see this redo panel has many properties that you can adjust. We are not going to talk about all of them. If you want, you can go ahead and experiment with many different options here, but I'm going to show you the most important ones. Well, here you can adjust the scale. You can make it smaller or larger. Here we have something called branch distribution. You can decrease or increase the number of branches here. I'm going to adjust it to maybe something like seven or 7.5. It looks great. I'm not going to change the branch rings, if you want, you can adjust it. I'm going to set it to zero for now. You can adjust these values like custom shape. You can adjust them if you want. Here right at the top we have the Settings option. If I open it up, there are many options like geometry, branch radius, branch splitting, branch growth, leaves, armature, animation, etc. Right now I'm going to go to branch splitting. We have something called split angle. You can adjust the angle between these branches just like this. You can adjust it however you want. I'm going to set it to something like six. I really like it. You can adjust different things here, different angles. I think it looks very good now and now it's time to add leaves to these branches. I'm going to go to the Settings drop menu and let's go to the leaves option. From here we have this checkbox called Show leaves. If I just check it, there you go, our leaves appear. You can adjust the leaf shape here to something else according to your needs and according to your preferences. I really like this first one, you can adjust the number of leaves, you can decrease it, you can increase it. I'm going to set it to 130. You can modify these properties as well and also the leaf angle. I'm not going to adjust them right now. I think it looks pretty good. Maybe I can go to the geometry. From here, I can adjust the branch distribution a little bit to something else. I'm going to set it to maybe 10, and that's all. We don't need to do anything else. I think it looks very good. Now I just need to reposition it. Let's select it here, hit "S" to scale it down. Then since our 3D cursor is placed right here, we can hit "Shift" and "S" and click on selection to cursor. Just like that, it's placed perfectly. I can now go to the right orthographic view and I can bring it up, hit "G", "Z" and bring it up this way. Just like this, we've got this beautiful plant here, but maybe this flower pot is too big. I can select it, hold down the Shift key and select the soil, hit "S" to scale it down to something like this. It looks much, much better now. Now I'm going to parent these two. I'm going to select this soil, hold down the Shift key and select this part. Hit "Ctrl P", object, keep transform. All right guys, that's all for this video. I hope you enjoyed it and I'll see you in the next one. 38. Modeling - Shelves & Books: [MUSIC] Hey, in this video we're going to create a few shelves here. Also I'm going to show you how you can create some books. Let's get started by creating our shelves. To create a shelf, you can simply use a plane and then extruded out or you can use a cube and try to scale it, that's totally up to you. I prefer the first way. I'm going to use a plane and then I'm going to extrude it out. Let me go to the top or geographic view. Now I'm going to put my 3D cursor here. Hold down the Shift key and right-click here. Then hit Shift and A and add a plane. I'm going to scale it down just like this. Then I'm going to hit S and scale it along the y-axis just like that, so far, so good. Then let's go to the wireframe mode. I'm going to hit G and X and move it along the x-axis, just like this. Now I'm going to enter the edit mode, hit A to select this phase, E to extrude it out. Something like this should work perfectly. Then I'm going to enter the object mode, hit G, Z, and move it up. I'm going to place the first one, maybe here. Let me go to the top orthographic view. Then I'm going to move it along the y-axis as well. Hit G, then Y, and move it here. I think here it looks very good. I really like it. Let me go back to the solid mode. Here is our first shelf. Now I'm going to use the array modifier to add another one one under it or above it. It doesn't matter. I'm going to set the factor X to 0 and factor Z to 1. It's going to be placed above it and it's totally fine. I'm going to increase this factor Z to have some empty space in-between. I think it looks very good now, maybe a little bit more. Let me go to the right orthographic view. I'm going to enter the edit mode and I'm going to scale it along the z-axis. Hit A to select all these phases, hit S, Z and scale it to get something like this. Now it looks much better in my opinion. Then finally in the object mode, I can hit G, Z and bring it down, then G, Y and move it here. Later we can adjust it as well if it's needed, but for now it looks very good. Let's rename it in the outliner to shelves. Great. Now here I'm going to put some books. To create a book you just need a cube and then you can scale it and modify it however you want. Also you can select the faces around it and extrude those faces along their normals to create the cover. It's very simple. That's why I'm going to show you how you can utilize another useful add-on in Blender to create decorative objects. I'm going to go to Edit, Preferences, go to Add-ons. From here, just look for Archimesh and just check this checkbox, Add Mesh: Archimesh. As soon as you do that, if you hit Shift and A, go to Mesh, you will see this option appears Archimesh. You can use these pre-built objects like room, door, rail window panel window, cabinet, shelves, etc. But there is one more group here called decoration props. One of them is book. You can just click on it and you will see that some books appeared here. Let me undo this. I'm going to put my 3D cursor right here on top of this shelf so that you can see those books easily. Once again, go to Mesh, Archimesh declaration prompts and books. I'm going to zoom in. As you can see, this add-on allows you to create these books easily. The cool thing is that you can adjust many properties in the redo panel. For example, you can adjust the book size, the width, the depth, the height, everything you want, and also number of books here. Just like this, you can set it to nine for instance. Here you have this randomness option. It's very useful because usually do in your library, you don't have some identical books with identical width and heights. You can use this randomness property to get some random dimensions. For example, I can adjust the Z slightly to 0.1. As you can see, the height of these books has been randomized. The last option here is called Create default cycles materials. These books by default have materials and you can randomize the color of these books as well. If I just change this color to something else maybe be, you will see one color for all these books. However, if I increase this randomness value, look what happens. I can randomize these colors. It's so cool, isn't it? You can use this option. However, I'm not going to use it because later in our upcoming videos, I'm going to show you how you can actually randomize the colors manually by yourself so that you truly understand what's going on. Now I'm going to uncheck this checkbox. I'm going to set the number of books to maybe 13. Yeah, it looks very good. What about the width, depth, and height? Well, I think the width looks fine here. I am going to adjust the randomness here. To make everything randomized, I need to adjust the X. I'm going to set it to 0.2 and also the Y to 0.3. As you can see, everything is randomized. Let's increase this Z to 0.2. It looks very good. As you can see, 13 books have been created in the outliner as well. Now I'm going to select them all and let's parent them. Hit Control P or Command P and then hit Object-keep-transform. Finally, I'm going to rotate them. Let's go to the top or geographic view. It's R, Z and rotate it by 90 degrees, just like this. These books are going to be placed here on the first shelf. Let's hit two G, Z and bring them down. I'm going to go to the front orthographic view, hit G and put them right here. Maybe hit G, Y and move them to the left side. Maybe I could select my shelves and I can increase this Z factor a little bit. I think now it looks much better. All right guys. That's all for this video. We created our shelves and books. In the next video, I will show you how you can create some additional objects in Blender. See you in the next one. 39. Modeling - Secondary Objects: Hey. In this video. I'm going to show you how to create different objects to fill your scene a little bit, because right now this shelf is empty, so we can put a few objects on it and also, I'm going to create a lamp for this desk and I'm going to place one painting on this wall. Let's get start it. Here for this shelf, I'm going to place a frame and a flower pot here. Let's start with the frame modeling. I'm going to go to the top orthographic view, let's put the 3D cursor here, hold down the shift key and right-click. Then I'm going to add a plain, scale it down, just like this, I'm going to zoom in. Then I'm going to scale it along the y-axis, hit "S", and scale it this way. Now, I can simply rotate it along the y-axis, so hit "R", "Y" and rotate it by 90 degrees. Let me go to the front orthographic view and zoom in. Now, I'm going to bring it up, hit "G", "Z" and move it up, just like that. The first part is done, then let's apply the scale. Hit "Control A" and click on scale to apply it, enter the edit mode and extrude it out. Hit "A" to select the face, "E" and extrude it out just like this. Next, I am going to insert this front face, hit "I" and insert it inside like this and then extrude it in, hit "E" and extrude it inside. This is going to be our base for the frame, we just need a leg for it. To create the leg, what we can do is this, we can select this face right at the back, then we can insert it, hit "I" insert it this way, all the way to the center. I am going to left-click to confirm, then hit "S" to scale it down like this, then let's hit "S" and scale it along the y-axis to make it wider and that's all. Now, I'm going to go to the front orthographic view and I'm going to extrude it out, hit "E", and extrude it this way and left-click to confirm. Hit "G", "Z" and bring it down, just like this. Let's enter the object mode, rename it to frame. Just rotate it like this. I'm going to move it down here, but we need to enter the edit mode, select the bottom face and move it up. Let's go to the wireframe mode so that we could see it, I think it's selected already, if it's not, make sure that you select this face, hit "G", and bring it up like this. You can check the angle you're looking for. I think it looks very good. Let's go back to the solid mode and our frame is done. I'm going to go to the object mode, let's go to the top orthographic view and I'm going to rotate it this way. Hit "G" and bring it here, so our first object is done. Now, let's create the flower pots. We are going to use the same technique that we used for this part here, so you already know what we're going to do. Let's go to the top orthographic view, hold down the "Shift" key and right-click to put the 3D cursor here, "Shift A" and add a cylinder here, scale it down, hit "S" like this. I'm going to scale it down. Then let's go to the right orthographic view, enter the edit mode, Hit "A" to select all these faces, "G", "Z", and bring it up like this. Then I am going to select this top face, hit "S" and scale it to make it look like a pot, nice. Insert it like that and exclude it in, hit "E" and extrude it in. It's going to be empty, we're not going to put anything inside, so what I am going to do is this, I'm going to select this face inside, hit "S" and scale it, and I can move it down even more. If I go to the wireframe mode, you can see it here, I'm going to hit "G", "Z" and bring it down just like that. But we're not done yet because I'm going to go to the object mode and I am going to scale it down, hit "S" to scale it down and I am going to scale it along the z-axis, so let's scale it down a little bit more then hit "S", "Z" and scale it this way to make it taller. Now, it looks very good. Then I am going to right-click on it, hit "Shade Smooth", and add the edge split modifier to make these edges sharper. It looks very good, we can make it look even better by beveling these loop cuts. I can hold down the "Alt" key on my keyboard, select this edge, make sure that your edge select tool is selected, hold down the "Alt" key and click on this edge. Now, hold down "Alt" and "Shift" and click on this inner edge. Now, that these two loop cuts are selected, I'm going to hit "Control V" or "Command B" to bevel them. I can increase the number of segments to make this beautiful pebble. It looks very good. Great, our flower path is also ready, so we are done with this shelf part. Now, I can rename these objects, let's see what we have. We have the frame, we have this cylinder too, it's going to be our flower pot, nice. This one is going to be named pot, so let's call it pot. Great, as I said, I'm going to place a lamp here on this desk as well. Let's put our 3D cursor here. I am going to hold down the "Shift" key and right-click right here, then add a circle, hit "Shift" and "A", go to mesh and click on "Circle", I am going to scale it down, hit "S", and scale it down and make it so small. Let me zoom in. Now, I'm going to enter the edit mode and let's fill this circle, hit "F" to fill it then extrude it out, hit "E" and extrude it this way, just like this. I think it looks very good. While these edges are selected, I'm going to bevel them, so hit "Control V" or "Command B" and try to bevel them and it's going to be the leg of our lamp. It looks very good, I can right-click on it, click on "Shade Smooth" and then I'm going to add the edge split modifier to make all these edges sharper. Perfect. What else? Here right at the center, I'm going to put one vertex and I am going to extrude it. How can I do that? Well, there are many ways we can do it, you can just enter the edit mode, select the vertex tool, select one of these vertices, duplicate it and put it here or we can use another add-on. If you go to the edit Preferences and add on section here you can look for add and you will find many options, we have add curve, extra objects, we have add mesh, archimesh that we already installed, and also we have add mesh extra objects. Make sure to check this checkbox, Add Mesh: Extra Objects. As soon as you do that, whenever you hit Shift and A and you go to Mesh, you will find these additional options here. One of them is called Single Vert. It allows you to create one single vertex. If I click on Add Single Vert here, a single vertex has been placed right at the center. Now I can go to the front orthographic view. It's placed right here. If I hit A, I can select it, then hit G, Z, and bring it up. As you can see, this little vertex is placed right here. Let's hit G, Z, and bring it down. Keep in mind to select the vertex select tool here, not the edge or face, otherwise, you can't select it. Now as I said, I'm going to extrude it out. However, I am going to do it in the right orthographic view. Let's hit see 3 to go to the right orthographic view. Now I'm going to hit E, Z and extrude it out. Let me zoom out. I'm going to hit G, Z and move it up. It's going to be much, much taller, something like this would be fine. Then hit E, Y and extruded along the y-axis like this. That's all. Here we are going to place a lamp later. Now, I'm going to select this vertex and I'm going to bevel it, so hit Control V or Command B then V, and try to bevel it to make it rounded. I'm going to increase the number of segments to make it completely rounded and left-click to confirm. The first part is done. Now what do we need to do is this. Right now we have a Mesh. We basically have a few edges, if I enter the edit mode, you can see we have a few edges and if few vertices, so there is no thickness here. Well, we can add thickness to it using one of these modifiers. For example, skin, but it's not going to look great here. Instead, I'm going to show you a very cool technique that you can use for creating these kinds of shapes and also some wires if you need for any projects. Once you've created this mesh, you need to convert it to a curve. To convert it to a curve, you need to enter the object mode, select this Mesh, right-click on it, and then you will find this Convert To option. From here click on "Curve". As soon as you do that, here in the outliner you will see this curve icon appears because now this is not a mesh, it's a curve. As soon as you convert it to a curve, you will see this curve property panel appears. I'm going to go to this property panel. Here we have many properties, but we are interested in geometry. If I open it up here, we have two sections, this top part and this bottom part. We are interested in this bottom part, and I'm going to increase the depth value by default it's set to 0. Look what happens when I increase it. There we go. That's what we were looking for. As you can see using this technique, we can easily and conveniently create such an object, but we're not done yet. We need to make it smoother. Now, we need to turn it back a mesh. But keep in mind that this is a destructive procedure. As soon as you convert your curve to mesh, you can no longer adjust the depth here. Make sure that you are satisfied with all these values. Then right-click on it, go to Convert, convert it to mesh, and it's actually a mesh now. You can enter the edit mode and you can see all these phases. Great. Let's enter the object mode. Right-click on it and click on Shade Smooth, perfect, everything looks great. The last thing is to add a lamp here. Let's hit Shift A and add a UV sphere to our scene. It's so big, I'm going to scale it down just like this. I'm going to go to the right orthographic view, hit G and bring it up. Let's place it here. I'm going to scale it as well. I think it looks very good. I just need to make it smoother. There it is, our lamp is ready. Make sure to parent them. I'm going to select this shape, hold down the Shift key, select this one and the leg hit Control P, Object (Keep Transform), and that's all. Let's rename it to lamp. Now you can simply scale it down or up. Maybe we can rotate it here a little bit to make the scene look more interesting, and I'm going to bring it here. So far, so good. The last thing I'm going to create here is a painting. Well, I'm going to put a painting on the wall. Let's download it from the Internet. I'm going to go to a website called unsplash.com. You may or may have not used it before, but I'm going to show you how it works. Just go to unsplash.com and here you can download royalty-free images. You don't need to worry about purchasing licenses and anything. You can just look for your desired image, download it, and use it. If you can, it would be very nice of you to give the photographer credits. Here right at the top in the search bar. I'm going to look for art. From here, just look for something very interesting. Let's download this. You can just click on this little icon and download maybe the medium-size, not the original. The original is too big. I'm going to download this one and just put it in a folder that you can easily locate it. Great, but how can we put it on the wall? Well, we can use another add-on. We're using many add-ons but believe me, they are so helpful when you're trying to achieve something complex or when you want to do something very quickly. Let's go to, Edit Preferences. Here, look for, Import Export: Import Images as Planes. Just check this checkbox and then I'm going to hit Number 3 on my keyboard. Hold down the Shift key and right-click on the wall to place the 3D cursor there. Then hit Shift A, go to Image, and you will see this new option, Images as Planes. Just click on it. Go to your assets folder where you saved that file that you just downloaded. I'm going to select it and click on Import Images as Plane, but you won't see anything here. That's because we are in the solid mode. If you want to see this image, you need to go to the material or preview mode. I'm going to go to the material mode for a second. After a few seconds you can see that our image appears. Now let's rotate it. Hit R Y, 90, then R X and 90, hit "Enter". The good thing about this object is that this is like a plane. You can simply enter the edit mode, hit A to select this face and extrude it out, hit E and extrude it this way. You can adjust the thickness however you want. Now I'm going to go to the solid mode and let me reposition it a little bit. Hit G and put it here. Hit S and scale it up G and put it right here. I think it looks very good. All right guys, that's all for this video. I hope you enjoyed it. We are done with modeling and now it's time to apply materials to our objects. See you in the next video. 40. Applying Materials: Hey, in this video we're going to apply some materials to our objects. Also, we're going to talk about something new called textures in Blender. Let's get into it. We already talked about materials before and you know how to apply a material. We're going to quickly go ahead and apply some materials to our objects, and then we will talk about textures. Let's start with our room. I'm going to select this object, which is our room in the outliner. Let's go to the materials tab. I'm going to add a new material to this object. I'm going to hit New here and let's call it room. I'm going to give it a very, very light yellow color, something like a yellow or creamy color. But to preview our materials, I'm going to go to the material preview mode here right at the top. I'm going to click on this little icon. Let's rotate this lighting a little bit just like this so that we could see the shadows better, perfect. Let's click on base color. From here, I'm going to give it a very light yellow, something like this. Not too much, but I think it looks very good. If it doesn't, we will later come back to this material and we will adjust it. Now let's move on to the other objects. I'm going to select this carpet. Let's click on New here and let's call it carpet. Hit Enter. For this carpet, I think we can make it something like orange or maybe brown. Let's give it a brown color. Something like, let me see this, but it's orange. I'm going to decrease its brightness here using the slider to make it brown. I think it looks very good, maybe something like this. By the way, the hex color code of this brown color is 875832, if you'd like to get the exact same color. What else? Well, let's move on to our couch. I'm going to make our couch orange. Please feel free to give these objects whatever color you want, but make sure that your colors are harmonious. I'm going to keep this scene very warm. That's why I'm using brown, this light yellow, and for the couch, I'm going to use orange. I'm going to select my couch here and I'm going to create a new material, and let's change the base color to orange, something like this, not very vibrant. I think it looks very good. Now I'm going to decrease the roughness a little bit to make it more reflective, to convey this feeling that this couch is made of leather. I'm going to decrease this roughness a little bit to make it more reflective, maybe 0.3. Now let's select other parts of this couch, like these cushions, and I'm not going to create a new material. I just want to open up this materials drop-down here and choose this one. I forgot to rename it. Let's go ahead and call it couch. Now let's select these cushions and give it the couch material. Perfect. What about the legs? I'm going to select the legs and let's give it the couch material. Then I'm going to duplicate it using this duplicate button here. Let's give it another name, maybe legs. Just go to base color and decrease the brightness to make it very dark, just like this. I think everything looks good. Now we can move on to the plant here, and this pot, let's start with this pot. I'm going to select it. Let's hit New here. I'm going to call it pot. I'm going to make it white. I just need to open up this color picker. I'm going to increase this brightness just like this. Maybe I can make it look a little bit more reflective. But I think right now the roughness looks good. What about the soil? I'm going to select it. I'm going to create a new material and let's give it a name, soil. This one is going to be brown obviously. Let's make it very dark. Also, it's going to be brown, something like this, maybe a little bit darker. Yeah, it looks very good. What about the branches? Branches are going to be brown as well. What I'm going to do is this, I am going to give it this soil material, then duplicate it, and let's rename it to branches. Then I can make it a little bit lighter, just like this, to see the difference. For the leaves, I'm going to use green. I'm going to select this leaf object and let's create a new material and give it a name, leaves. I'm going to change the base color to green, but it's too vibrant. I'm going to decrease the brightness just like this, a little bit more. Maybe I can adjust the color here as well. Something like this should work. Maybe a little bit darker. Yeah, I think it looks very good. Later when we add light to our scene, we can always come back and adjust all these properties, so don't worry about it. These are just our initial materials. What about the window frames? I'm going to select this window frame and I'm going to give it a new material. Let's give it a name. It's going to be frames and it's going to be light yellow, just like this, to indicate that it's made of wood. I think it looks very good now, what else? Well, now we can go to these shelves. I'm going to select the shelves. Our shelves are going to be white. I'm going to create a new material, let's call it white, and the base color is going to be pure white. We don't need to do anything else. This flower pot should also be white. I'm going to select it, and I'm going to choose this white material from this drop-down menu. Our frame is going to be white as well. I'm going to select the white material here. However, I'm going to select this face here in this frame and I'm going to make it darker. The way we do that is like this. I select this object, enter the edit mode, select the face you are trying to change its material, go to the Materials panel, and just add a new material. This is a new slot. I'm going to hit New here. Let's call it gray, Enter. You need to click on this Assign, to assign this new material slot to this phase. Otherwise, it won't work. It's very important. I'm going to click on Assign and then I can go to base color and just decrease this brightness to make it dark gray, just like this. It looks very good. Here we have some books. I'm going to get back to these books in a few minutes. But first, let me assign a few materials to our computer and also this mouse and this lamp. For the computer, I'm going to select the body and let's give it a new material. Here I'm going to call it computer body, just like this. What I'm going to do is this. I am going to make it metallic. I'm going to increase this metallic property here just like this maybe to 0.7. Also, I'm going to change the base color to something like this, like silver, not pure white. I think it looks very good. The hex color code is B7B7B7. Now we can select the monitor, this part, if you remember, we divided this surface into two different parts. I'm going to give it a new material and let's call it monitor. It should be black because the computer is turned off. I'm going to change the base color to black or maybe dark gray, something like this. It could be black, but I prefer a very dark gray just like this. This surface is going to be very reflective because it's made of glass. What I need to do is this. I need to decrease the roughness all the way to zero, and as soon as I do that, if I just orbit around my scene, you can see the reflection of my scene here. Great. What about this bottom part? I'm going to use the exact same material that we used for this body part. I'm going to select this bottom part and let's give it this computer body. Also, the leg is going to be computer body. Perfect. Now let's select our mouse. It should be white. I'm going to give it a new material. Let's call it mouse. Just like this, it's going to be white, so I'm going to make it pure white. Also, it should be reflective because the top part is made of glass. So I'm going to decrease the roughness to zero. We don't need to do anything else. What about our keyboard? I'm going to select the keyboard. The keyboard that I prepared for you already has some materials, so you don't need to apply new materials, but if you created your own keyboard, you can just select the surface, give it a material, make it a white, or maybe silver. For the keys, you can use a pure white color. What about the lamp? For this lamp, I'm going to select this leg. Let's give it a new material. Let's call it lamp leg, and then I'm going to make it metallic. Let's increase this metallic property value to one. Also I can make it more reflective, so let's decrease the roughness to maybe, zero is too much, maybe 0.3. I'm going to select this object and give it the same material. It's going to be lamp leg and our lamp is going to be white. For now, I'm going to give it a new material, and let's call it lamp, and just change the base color to pure white. Great. So far, so good. Well, now we can move on to these books, because I'm going to show you another way of applying materials to your objects. I want these books to have random colors. You can go ahead and try to manually assign a different color to each book one-by-one. Or you can choose a set of colors and try to apply those colors to these books randomly using the technique I'm going to show you. I prefer the second way because it's much quicker and it's more efficient. How should we do it? Well, if you remember, we used an add-on to create these books, but right now they are not connected. We just parented them. If you remember here, we just parented these books. They are not connected in any way. Therefore, what we need to do is this, we need to create a material and then we need to apply that material to all these books. Let's go ahead and do that. I'm going to select this first one, Book 0, and I'm going to create a new material and let's call it book. As I said, all of these books should have the same material, but how can I do that? Well, one way is to just select Book 1, go to this drop-down menu and select Book and go to the next object. Or you can select all these books, these children, I'm going to hold down the Shift key to select all these books, then hold down the Control key or Command key, and click on this Book 0 as your last element. You will see this book material appears. You can click on this little icon right here, and we have a few options to choose from. We can click on Copy Materials to Selected. This way, this material will be assigned to all these selected objects. It's much quicker. I'm going to click on Copy Materials to Selected , and we are done. Book 1 has the book material, Book 2, Book 3, etc. The first step is done. But if I go ahead and change the base color here, look what happens, all these books have the same base color. But you may ask, how can we get a different color for each book when we are using the same material slot for all of these objects? Well, now it's time to show you another section of Blender. If you take a look at these workspaces at the top, one of them is called Shading. If I click on it and I select this Book 0, you will get into this environment. This is a new workplace, specially designed for shading. Shading means basically giving your objects different materials or textures. This environment is node-based. You may have no idea what it means, but I'm going to show you how it works, so don't worry. I'm going to just expand this bottom part. If I select My Room, for example, and I go to this material panel on the right side, you will see that this principled BSDF shader is selected by default. As we already discussed, there are many shaders you can use, and this principled BSDF shader is basically a combination of the most important shaders in Blender. Each shader allows you to give your objects different characteristics, for example, if an object is made of glass or if it should glow. So most of the time we need to use principled BSDF because this is the most comprehensive shader in Blender. However, sometimes we may need to use one of the other shaders here or many of them to achieve something else. If it's needed, we need to go to the shading workspace and we need to create different nodes and connect them together. This node-based environment allows us to create different node. For example, here, this is a node. We can create another node here and then we can connect these nodes using these lines. Once they are connected, we can achieve our desired result. We're not going to get into the details here because it's going to be so complex. But when we start talking about textures, you will clearly understand what's going on. Basically, this is our principled BSDF shader, and I can adjust all the properties of this material here, just like what I have here. There is no difference. We have base color, we have subsurface, we have metallic, we have roughness, everything is the same. However, here we can connect these properties to different nodes, and that's exactly what we need to do now. We need to give these books random colors. I'm going to select the first book, Book 0. Here is our material, as you can see, it matches the material properties on the right side. Let me zoom in here. The way we can achieve that is like this. We need to create another node here called ColorRamp. To create another node, you just need to hit Shift and A, or you can just click on this Add and you will get access to all these options. But if you just hit Shift and A, here you can look for different nodes. Also we have this search bar, which is quite helpful, and we're going to use that. But in case you know what you're looking for exactly and where it's placed, you can just go to, for example, Input and look for RGB or any of these properties. There are many properties here and we're not going to talk about them because it's not needed at this stage. But now we just need to look for the ColorRamp node. I'm going to look for ColorRamp here. ColorRamp, great. Hit Enter and just like this, I can place it wherever I want. I'm going to left-click to confirm. I can reposition it later. The position of these nodes doesn't matter, so don't worry about it. Here, this ColorRamp allows us to create different kinds of gradients using this slider. Just like this, you can select one color, go to this color picker, increase the brightness to see all the colors and select one color. For example, this blue, something like this and then you can select the next color and give it another color just like this to create a gradient. But it's not what we want, because we want our books to have different colors. What we can do is this. We can open up this linear drop-down menu, and from here, we can choose the Constant option. This way, we won't get a smooth transition from one color to another. I am going to select two colors harmoniously. My first color is ready. This one looks good. Maybe I can adjust it a little bit. I'm going to click on this plus icon to add one more color. It's placed here. I'm going to change it to maybe this blue. I'm going to add one more color. Let's give it something like this. I think we need one more color. I'm going to select it and I'm going to change it to something like this. It looks very good, perfect. Now, how can we connect these nodes together? Well basically, each node has different properties, like we have base color, we have roughness, we have subsurface, etc. Each property has an input. Here, as you can see, we have this yellow circle, and for this color, we have a yellow circle as well. It means that they have the same datatype. We can connect them together. That's exactly what we need to do. We need to connect this color to the base color, but nothing changed. That's fine because there is one more node we need to use in order to change the color of these books randomly. Let's go ahead and add that node here. Well, I'm going to move to the left side and I'm going to add a new node, hit Shift and A. In the search bar, I'm going to look for object info. Hit "Enter", and place it right here. This object info node allows us to get the information of each object separately and assign a different value to them. What we can do is this, we can connect this random property to this factor, and just like that, you can see that we have random colors applied to our books. That's exactly what we were looking for. There are many things you can achieve using these nodes. There are many different nodes that you can use to create procedural textures, but we're not going to get into those topics as they are more advanced. Great, so far, so good. But our books are not ready yet because we need to select the paper part of these books and assign a different material slot to them to make them white. How can we do that? Well, while these first book is selected, I'm going to go to the layout workspace, hit "Tab", and I'm going to zoom in here. What I'm going to do is this. I'm going to go to the viewport shading that I can see all these books clearly., and I'm going to select all the faces except the cover. This face, the face behind it, right here, and the face right at the bottom. Instead of manually selecting them, what do we can do is this, we can select somewhere else and then hover over this face and then just hit the L key on your keyboard. All these faces are selected. The bottom, this face behind it, and this top face. But how? The shortcut L allows you to select all the faces that are connected together. That's exactly what we did. We selected all these phases that are connected, then we create a new material slot. Let's give it a name. I'm going to call it paper, and then assign, set the base color to pure white. Now we can get back to the material preview, and you can see that this book is done. But what about others? Well, now I'm going to right-click on this Book 0 click on "Select Hierarchy" to select all these children. Hit tab to enter the edit mode, and now we can adjust all these objects together since they were selected already. What we can do is this, I'm going to go to the solid mode, click somewhere else, hover over this top face of the second book, hit "L", hover over this phase, hit "L" and go on. Just like this. I'm going to quickly select all these paper parts of these books. Perfect. If I go to the material preview now, you may think that you can hit "Assign" and everything should work, but it doesn't. Why? Because this paper material slot has been added to this first object, not to these objects. First, we need to select this object as well. Let me go to the solid mode, hover over this face and hit "L". It's very important to select it last. Now just select this paper. Click on this little icon and click on "Copy Material to Selected", and now click on "Assign". If I go to the material preview, everything is done. You can go ahead and select each book, and you can see that each book now has two different material slots, book and paper. Great, our books are ready now. Now we can talk about textures. What is a texture? Well, a texture actually defines how an object looks, how it feels, whether it's soft, whether it's very rough, whether it's reflective or not. Basically the characteristics of that object. Let's suppose you want to have a wall made of bricks. What you can do is this. You can create a simple wall like what we have here. Then you can add a brick texture to it to make it look more realistic, to make it look like a brick. But how can you use textures? Well, first you need to download some textures. You can purchase some paint textures on different websites, or you can download some royalty free textures from different websites. There are many resources out there that you can use for your projects. One of them is called ambientCG. Let me show you the website. Here it is. It's called ambientcg.com. If you go to this website, you can go to the material section. From here, you can look for many different textures. For example, we have bricks, we have a wood, we have stone. There are many different materials and textures here. For example, you can click on this bricks and then you can choose the quality of these textures. If you want it to be very high-quality, you can use 8K or 4K. But for these projects, I personally prefer 1K because of the file size, it's going to be too heavy. So you just need to download it on your system. Once you download it, the texture you are looking for, you can go to Blender and then you can use that texture. But how? I'm going to show you how. Let me create a new project. Here is a new project, and I'm going to apply a texture to this cube. Here we have a light as well. I'm going to select this cube. This cube by default has a material applied to it. If there isn't, you can just click on this new and give it a new material. I'm going to call it texture. You can call it whatever you want by the way. Let's scale it up, hit "S" and scale it up. Then to apply the texture to this cube, you need to go to the shading workspace. From here, you need to locate the texture folder that you just downloaded. You can just click on this little arrow to look for different folders on your system. Once you've found it, you open it up here. I already downloaded a few textures. We have bricks, we have booed. Here we have wood floor. We're going to use these two in our project, but this one is just for this example. I'm going to open it up. Here you will find a few images. Basically, a texture is a 2D image that could be projected onto a 3D object. As simple as that. But you may ask why we have many different images here. The reason is to make a texture look realistic, we need to have at least three different images. We need to use the color image, which is this one. We need to use the roughness, which allows blender to know how reflective this texture should be, and also the normals, which is this file and this one, and it actually defines the depth of different parts of that texture. Let me show you how it works. As I said, we need three different images. We need the color image. If you just drag it and drop it here, a new node appears and its name finishes with the word color. It's very important. Always pay attention to the name of your images. This color image should be connected to our base color using this input. I'm going to connect it. As soon as I do that, you can see that our cube is using these bricks' texture. However, it doesn't look realistic. That's because we need two more images here to make it look realistic. Right now, Blender doesn't know whether this texture should be reflective or not and it doesn't have any information regarding the depth of these bricks. We need to add those two images here as well. The next image we need to add here is the roughness image. The roughness is this one. I'm going to just left-click and drag it. Just check out this name, make sure that it ends with the word roughness. The roughness should be connected to roughness property here. Just connected. However, I need to mention something. Each of these nodes has a property called color space. By default, it's set to sRGB. You need to make sure that only your color image has this sRGB color space. The roughness and the normal image that we will add should have the non-color space. I'm going to open it up and set it to non-color. It's very important because this roughness property can't process the color data. That's why we use this Non-Color color space. The last image we need to use is the normal. Here we have two different normals. It doesn't matter which one you use. For now, I'm going to select this one, drag it, and drop it here. You may think that we can simply connect it to this normal property, but you're wrong because here we need to first convert it to a value and then we can connect it to this normal. How can we convert it? Well, first, make sure to set the color space to non-color. It's very important. Then I'm going to hit "Shift" and "A" and I'm going to need a new node. If I go to Vector here we have a node called Normal Map. I'm going to click on it. This is going to be our converter. I can connect this color input to this color property here. Then here we have normal. We will connect this normal to this normal property. Now we are done. Let me show you how it looks. Let me go to the Layout Workspace and then go to the Materials Preview. If I orbit around it, you can see that it doesn't look very realistic. That's because we can't see the effect of our light here. Because we are in the material preview. To enable the effect of our light, we can just click on this little icon and just enable Scene Lights and Scene World, just like this. Now I'm going to select "My Light" and hit "G" and move it around. As you can see, it looks very realistic now. Can you see all these shadows? That's because we added those two images, roughness and normal to our nodes; hit "G" and move it around. Basically, that's how you add a texture to an object. This is the simplest way of adding a texture to an object. There are many different things you can do with your texture. But for our project, we don't need to get into those details. Now that you know how the texture works and how you can add it to your object using this shading workspace, let's go back to our project that we were working on and try to use a few textures there. All right, great. For this project, I already downloaded two different textures from the ambientCG website. You can get access to these textures in the resources section. Just download the resources file before you work on this project. If you want to use your own textures, you can go to ambientCG.com or any other websites and download a texture you are looking for. For this project, I'm going to add a texture to my floor, a wood texture, and also I'm going to add a texture to my table and this chair. Let's get into it. I'm going to start with the floor. I'm going to select this room, enter the edit mode, select the "Face," select "Tool", select this floor face and give it a new material slot just like this, and call it floor and assign it to your floor. This is the first step. Then go to the shading workspace. Here, from the assets, I'm going to use this wood floor that I already downloaded. I'm going to drag and drop the color image first, connect it to my base color, and then I need the roughness. Make sure to change the color space to non-color, connect it to roughness. Then the normal, first, I'm going to change the color space to non-color and add a converter. Go to "Vector" "Normal Map", put it here, connect the color to the color input, and connect the normal to the normal input. We're done. Just like this, we added a texture to our floor. It looks very nice, doesn't it? Now let's move on to the table. I'm going to select my table. I'm going to create a new material slot and let's call it maybe desk. From here, I'm going to go to the other folder, which is this one. I already downloaded it. Let's drag and drop this color image first and repeat the same process, connect it to the base color. Then I'm going to drag and drop this one, which is roughness. Set the color space to non-color, connect it to roughness. Finally, normal. I'm going to add a converter, which is called a normal map. Just like this. Let's connect these two properties and these two properties. All right, nice. Now I'm going to select the drawers and these legs, and I'm going to give them the same material, which is called desk, and also the handles. It's going to be desk and the legs as well. Just like this. But we are not done yet. Let me show you what happens now. I'm going to go to the layout workspace. If I zoom in here, look what happened here. Well, our texture looks good on the surface, but on the sides, it stretched. That's normal because we are projecting a 2D image onto a 3D object. Most of the time you weren't getting to this issue. But if you face this issue, that's totally fine. We can use another workspace in Blender, which is called UV Editing. I'm going to go to the UV Editing workspace. From here I'm going to select all these phases. Hit "A" on your keyboard and you will see this normal image on the left side or another image from your texture. You can simply change it to something else. It doesn't matter which image you choose. But in this case, we are using this Wood 61. I am going to choose that so that you could clearly understand what's going on. This desk has different phases. The reason our texture was stretched on these sides is because it's not mapped correctly on our object. What we need to do is this. We need to unwrap our object into a 2D surface and then Blender can easily project that 2D image onto that 2D surface and it will wrap it up, again. It may sound complicated, but let me show you how it's done. Once you are in the UV Editing Workspace, hit "A" to select all these faces. Then at the top, you will find this UV menu. Then from here, choose Smart UV Project. Just click on it. You don't need to adjust any of these values. Just hit "Okay". As soon as you do that, you will see on the left side that something changed. Now we don't have one large face. We have different faces. That's because our object has different faces. Right now, Blender can know that this side should use this area of this texture, the other side, this area, the other side, this area, and so on. Now if we get back to Layout, you will see that it's not stretched anymore. It's stretched on these drawers and also these legs because we need to unwrap them as well, and we will do that. But on this surface, it looks very good. Now let's select the drawers and go to UV Editing. Hit "A" to select all faces. Go to the UV menu and click on Smart UV Project. Hit "Okay". It's done. Now we can go ahead and select this leg. Go to UV Editing, hit "A" to select all faces. Click on Smart UV Project and Okay, and it's done. Now nothing is stretched anymore. It looks very good, doesn't it? I'm going to use the same texture for this object as well, for the chair. I'm going to select my chair and let's choose this desk texture. If I zoom in, you will see that it's not mapped perfectly. You see here, that's because we need to unwrap it. While it's selected, go to UV Editing, hit "A" to select all faces, and then go to UV, Smart UV Project, hit "Okay", and now it's mapped perfectly. If I go back to Layout, you can see that it looks very good now. However, we still have this problem, as you can see on the side. That's because we used a modifier, the solidify modifier, and it cannot work very well when we are using a texture. What I propose is this, we apply this solidify modifier here, just like this and also this edge split. We go to UV Editing, hit "A" once again to select all these faces, click on UV, Smart UV Project and Okay. If I go back to Layout, now it looks very good without any issues. Okay, perfect. For the legs, however, I am going to use a simple material. Just add a material slot to it and let's call it chairs leg. Change the base color to dark brown. Something like this should work. That's all. Actually, we applied all the materials and all the textures we wanted to apply to our objects, except one material that I will talk about in the next video. All right, guys. I hope you enjoyed this video. I know there were a lot of topics we went through. However, make sure to explore these options one by one to really understand what's going on. Because whenever you use these features for the first time, it's always compl