Fix Perspective and Lens Distortion in Adobe Lightroom & ACR - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class | Helen Bradley | Skillshare

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Fix Perspective and Lens Distortion in Adobe Lightroom & ACR - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

teacher avatar Helen Bradley, Graphic Design for Lunch™

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

8 Lessons (43m)
    • 1. Fixing Perspective and Lens Distortion in Lightroom and ACR Introduction

      1:32
    • 2. Pt 1 - ACR Perspective fix

      5:21
    • 3. Pt 2 - ACR Fixing Keystone Distortion

      4:36
    • 4. Pt 3 - Lens Distortion Fixes

      3:43
    • 5. Pt 4 - Lightroom Perspective Fix

      7:30
    • 6. Pt 5 - Lightroom Fixing Buildings

      6:55
    • 7. Pt 6 - Lightroom Lens Distortion

      4:20
    • 8. Pt 7 - ACR and LR Finishing touches and Wrap Up

      8:42
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About This Class

Graphic Design for Lunch™ is a series of short video courses you can study in bite size pieces such as at lunchtime. In this course you'll learn to fix perspective problems and lens distortion issues in your images. You will learn to use the new Transform tool in ACR and Lightroom Classic and also to fix an image if you have an earlier version of the software. This is a before/after comparison of one image we'll work on and which includes a trip to Photoshop to create missing detail:

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Meet Your Teacher

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Helen Bradley

Graphic Design for Lunch™

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Helen teaches the popular Graphic Design for Lunch™ courses which focus on teaching Adobe® Photoshop®, Adobe® Illustrator®, Procreate®, and other graphic design and photo editing applications. Each course is short enough to take over a lunch break and is packed with useful and fun techniques. Class projects reinforce what is taught so they too can be easily completed over a lunch hour or two.

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Transcripts

1. Fixing Perspective and Lens Distortion in Lightroom and ACR Introduction: Hello, I'm Helen Bradley. Welcome to this graphic design for lunch class fixing perspective and lens distortion in Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw. In addition to teaching Illustrator and Photoshop, the graphic design for lunch series of classes also includes some photo editing and photo management classes. These are taught for both Lightroom Classic and Adobe Camera Raw as both applications share the same base code. This means that within one class, you'll simply focus on whichever application you prefer to use. Today we're looking at perspective and lens correction techniques in both Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw. We're going to look at what perspective problems are and lens distortion. I'm going to show you how you can fix them in both these applications. If you're watching these videos using your browser, you're going to see a prompt which lets you recommend this class to others. Please, if you're enjoying the class, do two things for me. Firstly, give it a thumbs up, and secondly, write just a few words about why you're enjoying this class. These recommendations help other students to see that this is a class that they too might enjoy. If you'd like to leave a comment or a question for me, please do so. I read and respond to all of your comments and questions, and I look at and respond to all of your class projects. If you're ready now let's get started fixing perspective and lens distortion issues. Firstly in Adobe Camera Raw and then in Lightroom. 2. Pt 1 - ACR Perspective fix: The first image we're going to look at in Adobe Camera Raw is this one. It was shot in the shortage Brooklyn area of London, where there's a lot of really interesting street art. But one of the penalties of shooting street art is that it's very difficult often to get straight on to your subject. This one was shot at an angle by necessity. I want to fix that now. I'm going to make sure firstly that I can see the entire image. I'm saying what I'm looking at and I want to square this building up. Now the first thing that you should do when you're looking at these images is go to the lens correction tools. Now, this panels have changed a little bit with the most recent version of Adobe Camera Raw. If you're working with an older version of Adobe Camera Raw, the upright tool might well be still in here, but this is the latest version and it's been moved. We're going to look at that in a minute. But just be aware that your panels might be a bit different. You'll go to the Profile tab and then select, Remove Chromatic Aberration and enable profile corrections. What happens then is Adobe Camera Raw goes and reads from the image metadata, the lens that you are using, and it adjusts the image to take into account what it knows about the lens. Now, if you're shooting with a very unusual lens, you may not have that available to you, but most lenses will be able to be track this way. Now, not really liking the fix here if you haven't looked down this line here, when I enable the profile corrections, I'm actually getting some bowing of the edge of this building, so it might need to fix that up a little bit lighter. Now that I've done that, I'm going to the new Transform tool. Now, in earlier versions of Adobe Camera Raw, this Upright tool is going to be available from the lens correction, but now it's in the Transform tool. You'll have four options. The newest version has a fifth. We're going to look at that as well. The first option is just auto, and you can click on that to see if you can fix this image. It's done a reasonably good job. We've got a lot more of a straight image than we had before, but it's not perfect. This option here is level, so it's only applying a level correction. This is not really helping here at all. Then we have the vertical option, lets us go back to nothing at all. We have the vertical option which allows a level and a vertical perspective fix. Again, it's made an attempt to fix the image, but it's not really what I'm looking for, so I'm going to disable it. Then we have full, which is applying level horizontal and vertical fixes to the image. In the case of this image, it's done a really good job. If I were using an older version of Adobe Camera Raw, I would probably just accept that because I'm not going to have this new tool and this would be a pretty good fix. If you've got a pretty good fix but it still needs a little bit of tweaking, you can also adjust the image using these sliders here. Now we're going to do an image manually using those sliders in a few minutes, so I'm going to leave those for now, but just be aware that they're available. Right now, I just want to disable this fix and I want to go to the newest fix, which is in the new version of Adobe Camera Raw, and similarly in the new version of Lightroom. I'm going to click on it to select it. This is a guided fix and the guides are going to come from you. What I'd become a royal saying to you is if you show me where these lines are, I will fix the image according to what it is that you are seeing. We got the chance to put four lines in the image. What you're going to do, is to apply these lines, down lines that you see in the image that are important to you. I'm using this side of the building. The first time he put a line down you won't get anything happening but the second time things are going to start happening. I'm going to use this side of the building as well. Just clicking and then just positioning align like a click and position. You can see now that Adobe Camera Raw has adjusted the left and right edges of this piece of street art according to the lines that I've drawn. Well, I want to adjust the building top as well, so I'm going for my third line. I'm just clicking in go for line, and then with the left mouse button still held down, I'm just swinging it around. Then Adobe Camera Raw is adjusting the image to that line. Just going to say if fit in view is going to give me anything else, it's not, so this is basically what the image is looking like. Now I could add another line if I want to across the bottom. This would be the fourth and last of the lines that I'm allowed to create. Again, I'm just going to drag it across that bottom edge and just let the image adjust accordingly. You now have this additional option of using a guided fix where you're actually going to drag out the lines that show Adobe Camera Raw or Lightroom what lines are important to you that they're vertical or horizontal in the finished image. 3. Pt 2 - ACR Fixing Keystone Distortion: This is the next image that we're going to fix. It's a picture of the pavilion or part of the pavilion of Brighton in the UK. These targets, if we were to draw a line through these, the lines would eventually join together. That's not the way the building was constructed. So what we're saying here is what's called a keystoning effect. The top of the building is closer together than the bottom of the building. You'll get that sort of keystoning effect whenever you're at, say, ground-level and shooting up at a tall building, the top of the building is going to be much smaller than the bottom. Now we can fix that using the tools here in Adobe Camera Raw. In earlier versions of Adobe Camera Raw, you're going to find those on the lens correction panel, in most recent version transform tool. Now in this case, we're going to manually adjust this one, and the slider that we want to use is the vertical. It allows us to either push in the top of the building or pull it back out again. So I'm going to adjust this so that the lines through these towers are pretty much vertical. I'm going to turn my grid on so that I can see the lines. I'm using them to just work out if I've got this image adjusted well or not and I think that's a pretty good adjustment. I'm just going to turn my grid off for now. Now, one of the things that Adobe Camera Raw and Lightroom do when you use this vertical adjustment is they tend to stretch the image a little bit as well. If we want to bring the image back, we can use the aspect tool here. Squeeze the image in, in one direction, and in the other direction, you are going to expand the image back out again. So it becomes a little plumper than it was, and probably a little bit more like what the actual pavilion looks like. Now there's also, again, new in Adobe Camera Raw, the most recent version with this transform tool, is this offset x and offset y. With the offset y, you can see that we can bring the image down. So I'm just going to drag here. I'm going to bring the image down so that these towers are inside the picture, they're not falling off the top there. I'm going to bring this image out a little bit too, I still think it's a little bit on the tall and skinny side. Now before we leave this particular image, let's have a look and see what we've done. We've actually straighten these targets here, so that they're pretty much parallel to each other. The problem with that kind of fix is that at some point, they start to feel as if they're about to peel off backwards, they're about to fall off because they have been over fixed. So when you're fixing buildings like this, because I expect to see some keystoning, you may want to back the fix off a little bit. So take it back a little bit, not all the way. So you're not removing the entire fix, but you're making these targets just slightly bend inward so that the eye doesn't feel as if they're about to fall off in this direction. Before I finish up with this image, I want to show you what you can do with these edges in the image if you don't want to crop the image. We're just going to take this image into Photoshop. I'm going to select the corners here, the corners that are currently showing transparency. I'm using the magic wand tool. I'm going to click on this area. I'm going to hold the Shift key and click on this small area here, so I have both of them selected. When I'm using the Content Aware Phil, I like to add a few extra pixels. I'm going to choose, select, modify, expand. I'm going to expand this by about five pixels and I'll click Okay. That just aids into the image a little bit. Now I'll choose Edit and then Phil. I'm going to select content aware from this dropdown list and just click Okay. What Photoshop does is it makes up the missing pixels. It looks at the areas surrounding where that transparency was and it just makes up some image to fill that in. So it's saving us from having to over crop this image when we can use Content Aware Phil to just to fill it in. That's a tool that you can't use in Adobe Camera Raw or in Light room. So whenever you get that sort of transparent error, you'll probably want to take the image into Photoshop and just use that Content Aware Tool to fill those areas in. 4. Pt 3 - Lens Distortion Fixes: Before we finish up with our look at Adobe Camera Raw, let's look at this particular image which was shot with a point-and-shoot camera. The actual object that has been photographed is a six by six inch sheet of paper. So obviously we're getting some case styling in this image, similar to the case styling that we saw in the image of the pavilion at Brighton, and so we need to fix that. In later versions of Adobe Camera Raw, we'll click the Transform tool. In earlier versions of Adobe Camera Raw, we would go to the lens correction tool. Here it's the vertical option that we need. So I'm just going to turn my grid on and this is going to drag on the vertical and use the grid to just check my alignment here. This is looking pretty good except for the fact that along the line, along the edge of this sheet of paper here and here, there is some billowing out. What this is called is barrel distortion. It's a blowing out of the edges of something that should otherwise be straight. Now the opposite of this is what's called pincushion distortion. That's when the edges are sort of sucked in. We can fix these forms of distortion using the lens correction feature in Adobe Camera Raw. I'm just going back here to the Lens Correction tab and I'm going to Manual. The distortion can be fixed with this distortion slider. In one direction, it just compounds the billowing out, this barrel distortion. In the other direction, you're forcing pincushion distortion and sucking the edges in of this image. So applying some form of pincushion distortion is a fix for barrel distortion and vice versa. But of course we don't need it quite so much, so I'm just going to back this off, and I can click on the grid to see the grid if I wanted to check to see that I'm getting a good result. So I've got a plus 11 setting here and that's a pretty good setting. I'm just going to check and make sure that I am seeing the entire image which I am. There's another problem which is a little bit harder to say, but which is typical of images shot with point-and-shoot cameras and also with cheaper lenses and macro lenses on cameras, and that is that there's a little bit of vignetting. The corners of this image are a little bit darker than the middle. So there's a vignetting slider here that you can use in the lens correction tool that will help you fix this. Just be aware that the purpose of this vignetting slider here is to fix lens problems. If you want to apply an actual vignette to an image as an effect, then you want to go to the Effects menu or the Effects panel and use that vignette. Because that's the one for adding vignettes. This is the one for fixing lens problems. It's applied to the entire image. So it's not a post crop vignette, this is a vignetting that's applied to the corners of the image out of the camera and so if you crop this image, we will be basically cropping most of the vignette fix out of the way because the area that you're retaining doesn't have those problems in it anyway. What I'm going to do is just drag to the right on the vignetting slider to just lighten the corners of the image. If you need to, you can adjust the midpoint so you can take it to the left or to the right. It's not really necessary in this image. It's pretty much a problem all the way around. That's a fix for the distortion that you may encounter when you're shooting macro with, for example, a point-and-shoot camera. 5. Pt 4 - Lightroom Perspective Fix: Before we get started looking at the Lens Correction fixes in Lightroom, I just want to draw your attention to a problem that I have and I suspect that a number of you will also encounter. On this computer, I have upgraded to the most recent version of Lightroom. But I don't have the transform panel which tells me that this update has not worked correctly on this computer. It's something that people are reporting across the internet. I've tried uninstalling Lightroom and re-installing and I still can't get the transform panel. Now if you're working with an earlier version of Lightroom, you also won't have a Transform panel anyway. Let's see what you will have. Your going to have this Lens Correction panel and inhere in basic the tools for Enabling Profile Corrections and Removing Chromatic Aberration, which we're going to look at in a minute. There are also the upright options, but what you don't have here is the guided Upright. Because it's not available in earlier versions of Lightroom and it's also not available in some of the installations of CC 2015 right now. If you don't have a Transform panel, you're going to find the Upright tools are going to be in the Lens Correction panel. Now also in the Lens Correction panel, you've got the Manual area. This is where that Distortion adjustment is. That's always going to be here in the Lens Correction panel. It's one of the things that didn't get moved to the new Transform panel. But you've also got your Manual adjustments here. Just be aware if you don't see your Transform panel, then you're going to need to look for your Lens Correction panel, and most of the tools that you're going to need are going to be here, say for the ones that just simply aren't available, in the installation that you have of Lightroom. I've now moved to another computer that has the more recent update of Lightroom CC 2015. This one has the Transform panel in it. This is a different computer where it was successfully able to be installed. We're going to adjust this image and I'm going to start with Lens Corrections. I'm going to select Remove Chromatic Aberration and Enable Profile Corrections. Chromatic Aberration is a blue or purple fringing that you might see in areas of the image. Typically you'll see it where the sky and a building intersect, for example. You just click here, you give Lightroom a chance at fixing that for you if it finds that. Profile Corrections allows Lightroom to look at what it knows about the lens that you're using, and it will identify that lens automatically from the metadata in the image. It's isolated here my timer on 28-200 lens. It will adjust for the things it knows about that lens's behavior. Now if you've got a bit of distortion say barrel or pin cushion distortion, you can adjust that here in the Manual area. You can just adjust to the left to add some barrel distortion which will solve pin cushion problems, and the other way. This is pin cushion distortion, and by adding some pin cushion distortion you can actually adjust for barrel distortion. Now, I don't have a lot of distortion showing here, so I'm just going to double-click on the word amount just to zero this out. If there is anything, there's a slight inward bow here but I need to fix the rest of the image before I even look to that. That's the Lens Corrections panel. Now we have the Transform panel. These Upright options here in the Transform panel, could well be on your Lens Correction panel in other versions of Lightroom. You may or may not have the guided option. At the moment we're looking at Off, so we're going to click on Auto, which is an automatic adjustment. It's done a pretty good job. We can see here there's still an angle on the wall, and there's an angle across the top here. Will go to level, and that's the level adjustment it's not really doing much more than just leveling off this image. Vertical will allow some vertical adjustments, you can see here that these edges, there's vertical lines in the building are adjusted, but the horizontal ones are not. We'll just go back to Off, and we'll have a look at full. It's made a pretty good job of this image, and if I did not have the Guided option available, this is the one that I would use. Now once you've got full set, you can also adjust the aspect ratio and you can adjust the scale too. If you think there's a little bit of the image that's missing, you can just dial back the scale and you can reveal those areas. Of course, we'd need to come in here and fix the errors which are going to be transparent because of the image bank straighten up. But let's just go back to Off, and let's have a look at the new Guided options. If you have them available, this is how you're going to use them. You'll click on Guided, and this loupe opens up. You can see here that I've got Show Loupe selected. The loupe just allows you to get a very close look at the area that you're working in. That might be of value to you particular if you're working on say, panoramas or really large images. Now, you can show the grid or not as you wish. What you're going to do is you get four lines that you can draw any image. Here the first line I'm going to draw is along the side of this buildings. I'm just going to click and drag out this line. Now if you don't get it in the right place, you can just move it into position. Nothing's going to happen when you click and drag out the first line, but it will happen when you click and drag out the second. Now the loupe is, I'm finding really annoying, so I'm going to turn it off. I'm just going to drag out this second line. As soon as I let go the left mouse button, the whole image is going to adjust. We're getting virtually what we had before in the vertical adjustment. But we're only halfway to fixing this. Let's go across the top of this building. I'm going to add a third line here, I've got four lines, this is the third. Now, Lightroom has adjusted that line that I've just drawn across the top of the building. If I want to put a forth one in, I could come down here. These lines are just telling Lightroom what I want to be perfectly horizontal and to be perfectly vertical in the image and Lightroom is then adjusting according to my guide. I'm telling it what's important to me, and it adjusting to those guides. This is a slightly different result to the result we got with full. It's a more personal results, it's Lightroom listening to what I want to say in my image. If I'm happy, I can just click "Done". If I'm not happy, I can just come in and move or remove any of these lines. Now as with the other tools, you can still use things like Aspect, you can squeeze the image up or stretch it as required, if you think it needs to be stretched or squeezed a little bit, and you can also adjust the scale. You can bring it in a little bit if you're not seeing enough of the areas of the image were cut off. But if you want to get rid of those areas that are not filled in that are going to base transparent, you can just enlarge the scale. I'm going to bring the scale back a little bit here. For this image, this is a good fix. But of course, I've got area's missing around the image. We're going to say in the next video how we would fix that because we are going to encounter those with another image, and we'll take that one into Photoshop to fix those areas that are missing. 6. Pt 5 - Lightroom Fixing Buildings: The next image that we're going to look at is an image of a building. Again, as with all our corrections, we'll come in here first and apply the Chromatic Aberration fix and the lens Profile Corrections. Then we'll go to the Transform tools, whether they be on the lens correction panel, or here in the new transform area. Now, with this one, we're going to do it manually. What we're looking at is these towers or these towers around the tower on the pavilion in Brighton in England. If we were to draw lines through these towers around the edge, we would find that those lines would converge. In actual fact, the way the building was designed, that's unlikely to have been the case. They should be parallel lines. So we're going to adjust for that. Typically, when you have an effect like this, which is called key stoning, the fix is to adjust the vertical. What I'm going to do is just drag on the vertical toll. If you're not sure which way to go, just drag in both directions. One of them will fix it, and one of them will make it worse. In this case, we're going to the left. The grid that's forming over the image is this going to help me work out how far I need to go. Because I want to line these towers up to these gridlines while I'm going to do that at least for now. Now, once you've done that, you might find that Lightroom stretches your image a little bit, so you can reduce that stretching by widening the image if you like by adjusting the aspect. Dragging to the left makes the building stretched out in a horizontal direction, and dragging to the right stretches that further in a vertical direction. I'm going to bring it back a little bit in the horizontal. Now, also new to this Lightroom version, if you've got this transform tool with the guided upright options, is this x and y offset. Now, in this case, we can use the y offset to bring the image down. I'm just going to drag to the left and that brings the image down, and for me, that's allowing me a little bit of breathing room around the top of the towers. I certainly don't want the towers to go over the edge of the image. That wouldn't be a nice look at all. You can also adjust the scale if you want to. So we could bring this in a little bit. By adjusting the offset, we can maximize the amount of the image that we have available. We won't be using horizontal here. Horizontal is typically used when you can't photograph and image face-on. It just twists it around, so you can see what it does to the image. It twist a little bit, but we won't get any value out of horizontal here. Rotate would just rotate the image around. That's needs a little bit of straightening that way you can do that, but we don't need that either. Now, there's one thing I want to do it before I go and fix these problem areas in Photoshop, and that is to have a look at those towers. If you fix the towers as I have done and adjust them so that they are pretty well aligned over the grid that appears on the image, you may find that you get an over correction effect. Because these towers are now strike, and because our brains know that buildings, when we look up at them, tend to converge a little bit at the top, we can get the feeling that with this over correction, these towers are actually peeling away and are at risk of actually falling outwards. Well, the fix of I like to do is to back off this vertical a little bit. So I've gone from zero to minus 31. I certainly don't want to remove the fixed, but I do want to back off a little bit so the towers are slightly tilted inwards. I'm going to back this off to about, say 25, and then I'll readjust my offset. That's a better fix. The towers are not perfectly straight. They do converge slightly, but a lot less than they did to begin with. I can test this by pressing the backslash key. This is the original image. You can say the towers are converging, this is the fixed image. They've been pulled out a little bit, but not overly for. Now having done this, I'm going to take this image to Photoshop so that I can fix these missing areas. To take this image to Photoshop, I'm simply going to right-click it and choose Edit In and then choose Photoshop. Now, this particular image started out as a JPEG image, so I'm opting to edit a copy with Lightroom adjustments. Of course, you want to take the Lightroom adjustments with you in any case, because there the adjustments that you've made that have caused these areas of the image to be missing down here. So I'll just click "Edit." Over here in Photoshop, I'm going to the magic wand tool. That's the simplest tool to use to select these transparent areas. So I'll click once in this area, hold the Shift key and click again here. Both those transparent areas selected. I'm going to enlarge them slightly with select, modify, expand. I'm going to expand them by five pixels and click "Okay." That just adjust slight areas to make them a little bit larger. I find that the results of the content we fill are better because of that. We'll choose Edit and then Fill. From the content drop-down list here we're going to choose Content-Aware and we'll just click "Okay." What Photoshop does is it then goes and creates some content in those missing areas of the image. So when I just click away from this, press Ctrl or Command D to deselect the selection, you can see that Photoshop has mocked up some portion of the image that makes this now a full image. It saves us from having to crop the image heavily to get rid of those transparent areas, or having to build it up by hand ourselves. Now, when you finish up in Photoshop, when you're done with the image, just click to close it and select Yes to say that. This will take you back to Lightroom with the fix in place in the image. Here we are back in Lightroom and you can see that the image has this extra data in it. But we haven't lost our original. This is the original image that we sent to Photoshop and this is the fixed version that we got back. The way that Photoshop and Lightroom interact with each other when you send an image from Lightroom to Photoshop and then close and save it from Photoshop is that you always maintain your original, but you get a duplicate image that has the changes in them. It's a really nice method of working between Photoshop and Lightroom, and I actually have another class on that, round tripping from Lightroom to Photoshop and back again and also Adobe Camera Raw to Photoshop. If you haven't watched those and if you're trying to get that process done, I strongly suggest that you might want to watch that video class. 7. Pt 6 - Lightroom Lens Distortion: The final image that we're going to fix is this one. Again, we're going to start with lens corrections. Now, there won't be any profile corrections for this because it's a JPEG image that was shot with a point-and-shoot camera and there is no metadata in this image to help Lightroom fix it. So profile corrections is not of any help here at all. This was a six by six inch sheet of paper, so it's suffering from the exact same problem as the building. There's a case dining affect visible here and it's caused by the photograph being taken from an angle not straight on to this sheet of paper. To fix it, we're going to the Transform tool but if you don't have those tools here, you'll go to Lens Correction panel where you're going to find them. Again, just like the building we're going to adjust the vertical. I'm just going to swing this image around, so it's a little bit straighter on the edges. You can experiment with the horizontal to see if that helps at all. I don't think that's going to help here at all. I think that's probably the best that we'll be able to do for this particular image save for the Boeing. You can see here that there's a outward bend on the edges of this image, and that's called barrel distortion. We go to the Lens Correction tool in a manual area, is the distortion fix. What that allows us to do is to fix both barrel and pin cushion distortion. Barrel distortion bends outwards, pin cushion distortion sucks inwards, and they're actually the direct opposite. So the fix for barrel distortion, is to apply some pin cushion distortion, and what you're going to do is suck those edges in, so they're no longer bowed out. That's going to be the fix for this image, but just be aware that in the opposite direction is a barrel distortion effect, which is going to help you if you have a pin cushion problem with your image. Let's go and apply that. I'm thinking plus 10, plus 11, something like that, is a good fix for this image. Now, there's one other problem in this image is a little difficult to say, but the edges, particularly this top edge up here, is much darker than the inside of the image. What's happened is that this image has been shot with a point-and-shoot camera in macro mode, and there's some vignetting. Now this is lens vignetting, this darker halo around the very edges of the image. You solve it by using the Vignetting tools in the Lens Correction panel. There's another set of Vignette tools in the Effects panel. The one in the Effects panel is what's called a Post-Crop Vignette. It's applied to an image as a positive effect, something that you want to see on the image, and it applies to the cropped image. This lens correction vignette is a correction vignette. It's not a special effect, it's just cleaning up an image that has problems out of the camera. So I'm going to drag to the right, and that will add some lightning around the edges of the image. Probably doesn't have to go that far, but dragging to the right, we'll add some lightning around the edges, and if you find that your lens vignette is a lightning effect and you need to apply some darkening, then you'd simply take it the other way. You can see here, that's a very typical vignette there for a lens problem. I'm going to wind this back a little bit to fix the vignetting that I know is in this particular image. There are the tools that you can use in Lightroom depending on what version of Lightroom you have installed, you may only have a Lens Correction panel, more recently, you may have the Transform panel. That may or may not have the guided upright option available, again, depending on the version that you're using. In the next video, although I'll be using Adobe Camera Raw, I'm going to take an image from Adobe Camera Raw, fix it there using the tools that you've seen in Lightroom. So you'd be able to follow along with this in Lightroom. But having done that, we're going to take the image from Adobe Camera Raw into Photoshop, and we'll just see how we could finish off the image, by building back in the pieces that are missing from the original. 8. Pt 7 - ACR and LR Finishing touches and Wrap Up: Before we finish up with our perspective fixers, I'm going to show you how I would take this image and fix it up so that I can get the entire quote and this wonderful piece of stencil art. You can do this the exact same way in Adobe Camera Raw and in Lightroom, but I'm just using Adobe Camera Raw for this example. But even if you're using Lightroom, you can do the exact same thing. Now, I'm going to start with the transform tool here and I'm just going to draw my lines out because I want to get this element here to be square or rectangular but not the trapezoid that it is at the moment. I'm just dragging out my lines and then I'm going to drag these two side ones here. Now I've lost the bottom of my image here, so I'm going to use my offset Y tool to just move it up a little bit because I want this entire typewriter in the final image. I probably want to expand it just a little bit. I think that it's probably a little bit too wide, so I'm just going to narrow the aspect a little bit. If I'm happy with this image at this stage, I'm just going to click "Open Image" because I want to open it in Photoshop. Now if you're working in Lightroom, you're going to right-click on the image. You'll choose Edit in, and then you're going to choose to Edit it in Photoshop. You'll want to edit the image with the Lightroom fixes in it obviously because you want it to look nice and square like this one does here. Now we're in Photoshop. I want to get the whole of this piece of stencil art out. I'm going to make a duplicate of this image layer. I'm just going to drag and drop it onto the New Layer icon and I want to just make a general selection around the area of this second copy of the image that I want to use. You can see here that what I'm missing is this bottom corner of the typewriter. I'm going to grab a fairly sizable chunk here. This is a piece of this top version of the image that I want to keep. I want to get rid of everything else, so I'll choose, Select and then Inverse, and I'll just press "Delete". This is what I'm left with on this layer here. I'm going to press "Control" or "Command D" to de-select the selection. I'm going to the Move tool and I'll choose Edit, Transform, Flip Horizontal. That just flips this across so that I can use this as the bottom part of the typewriter. I'm just going to move the image into position. I'm going to display the version of the image underneath. Now these aren't lining up perfectly, so I'm going to the top version of the image, the pace that I'm just looking at here and I'm just going to move it into position. If you need to say what's underneath, just dial down the opacity of the top version so you can move it into position. Just make sure that it's lining up really nicely. Then of course, take your opacity back up again because you don't want to lose that. We've got a bit in here that we don't need. I'm going to this layer and I'm going to click to add a layer mask because adding a layer mask is the best way of editing this particular layer. I'm going to the brush tool. You can see that my mask is white so I need to paint in black. I'm just going to select here to make the paint black. I'm using this huge paintbrush from something else that I was doing a few days ago. I'm just going to drop down the Brushes Tool here and I'm just going to select a nice soft brush. It's also way too big so I'm going to use the open and close square brackets to adjust its size. The open square bracket just allows me to size that down. I'm painting on my mask. It's got this little box around it. I'm just going to paint out that area there, just make sure that has all gone. This area here is looking a little bit light. You'll see that the rest of the image should be quite a bit darker. I'm actually going to blend it in a little bit by just using the mask there to blend it in. But I think I need to darken this edge of the image. To do that, I'm going to add an adjustment layer. I'll choose the Layer, New adjustment layer. I'm going to choose Curves and I'll click "Okay". Now I want this curves adjustment to only affect this layer. I'm going to click here to create a clipping mask. So the curves adjustment is only going to affect the layer that has this little piece of the image in it. I want to darken it, so I'm going to just drag down on the curves layer. Now, right now I'm not worried about what's happening in the middle of the typewriter. I'm worried about these bricks here. I'm just going to focus on them until I get them to be a sort color. I think that's pretty good. Now the curves adjustment layer has its own mask. I already have black as my paint so what I can do is select its mask and then just remove that adjustment from the part of the image that doesn't need that extra darkness and leave it in position in the area that does need a little bit of extra darkness. I can just flip between black and white and just paint that in. I get a more even display here. Now I've got a hole in the bottom, so I'm just going to fix that now. I'm going to make a stamp layer. I'm going to click on the top most layer, hold down Control Alt and Shift, that's Command Option Shift on the Mac and press the letter E. That creates a layer that is the composite of all the visible layers below. We're going to turn those off. Going to this layer, I'm going to make a selection using the magic wand tool of this area here. This is the area that I'm missing bricks for. I'm going to enlarge this a little bit, Select, Modify, Expand. I'm going to expand this by about 15 pixels. Click "Okay". Now I'm going to choose Edit, Fill. Content-aware click "Okay". Control or Command D to de-select the selection. We started off with an image where this was highly skewed and where this particular typewriter stencil art was incomplete because there was something blocking it out and we've been able to get the entire image back using the perspective correction tools in Adobe Camera Raw. But of course you could have used Lightroom and then a little bit of Photoshop magic for just putting this thing back together. Your project for this class will be to take one of the images that I'm giving you or an image of your choice and to apply some perspective correction fixes to that image to fix whatever it is that you see in that image. If you want to do this particular image, please feel free to do so. It's a really nice little image for working with some Photoshop techniques as well as the upright tools in either Adobe Camera Raw or Lightroom. Post an image of your completed project in the class project area. I hope that you've enjoyed this class and that you've learned a little bit about using the perspective correction tools and also the lens distortion removal tools in Lightroom and in Adobe Camera Raw. As you were watching these videos, you will have seen a prompt which lets you recommend this class to others. Please, if you enjoyed the class, do two things for me. Firstly, give it a thumbs up and secondly, write in just a few words why you're enjoying the class. These recommendations help other students to see that this is a class that they too might enjoy. If you'd like to leave a comment or a question, please do so. I read and I respond to all of your comments and questions and I look at and respond to all of your class projects. My name's Helen Bradley. Thank you so much for joining me for this episode of graphic design for lunch, and I'll look forward to seeing you in an upcoming episode soon.