Barre Chords for Guitar | Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy | Skillshare
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22 Lessons (1h 42m) View My Notes
    • 1. Course Introduction

      3:19
    • 2. What Is A Barre Chord?

      8:19
    • 3. Notes on the 6th String

      6:01
    • 4. Quiz on 6th String Notes

      2:48
    • 5. Notes on the 5th String

      4:44
    • 6. Quiz on 5th String Notes

      2:14
    • 7. 3 Main Barre Chords 6th String

      14:16
    • 8. 6th String Major Exercise

      7:25
    • 9. 6th String Major Quiz

      2:30
    • 10. 6th String Minor Exercise

      2:42
    • 11. 6th String Minor Quiz

      2:19
    • 12. 6th String Dominant 7th Exercise

      2:49
    • 13. 6th String Dominant 7th Quiz

      2:46
    • 14. 3 Main Barre Chords 5th String

      14:22
    • 15. 5th String Major Exercise

      3:35
    • 16. 5th String Major Quiz

      2:15
    • 17. Minor Exercise 5th String

      2:36
    • 18. 5th String Minor Quiz

      2:05
    • 19. 5th String Dominant 7th Exercise

      2:44
    • 20. 5th String Dominant 7th Quiz

      2:54
    • 21. Barre Chord Exercise 1

      5:45
    • 22. Barre Chord Exercise 2

      3:08

About This Class

If you are a beginner or intermediate guitar player who knows how to play open chords but hasn't learned to play barre chords this class is for you.  Playing and understanding barre chords is going to open up endless possibilities for songs. You won't just be stuck down at the end of the neck playing open chords. You'll be able to play major, minor, and dominant 7th chords all over the neck. 

I took a lot of time putting this course together for you. There are guitar neck charts all through the course videos that show you what I'm playing on the guitar. I think the charts will really help you learn the chords a lot faster and make the course easier to follow.  

I designed the class so that you learn something new. Then you have an exercise with that new item. Then you take a quiz on that material. I put the course together this way so it would be very interactive. You'll spend most of your time playing in this course instead of just listening to me talk. 

Barre chords are a simple concept that are tough to master. This course will help you learn your main barre chords that will help you be able to play millions of songs.   

What will you learn in this lesson?

  • Notes on your 5th and 6th string
  • Major, minor, and dominant 7th chords on the 6th string
  • Major, minor, and dominant 7th chords on the 5th string
  • You will play many exercises with the chords that you learn
  • There are many quizzes in this course on the material 

Why should you sign up for my lesson?

  • My name is Chris Rupp and I'm the founder of the GuitArmy.
  • I've been teaching guitar full time for over 20 years.
  • I have taught more than 35,000 individual private guitar lessons.
  • I teach guitar students online all over the world.
  • I have a bachelors of music degree from the world renowned Berklee College of Music where I studied with some of the best guitar players on earth. 
  • I created a successful line of guitar instruction DVDs that sold very well and garnered the attention of the "As Seen on TV" folks.
  • I love teaching guitar and helping students become better musicians through the guitar.
  • I will answer your personal questions and help you with learning the material in this lesson.

With GuitArmy guitar lessons on Skillshare you will learn: basic open chords, power chords, barre chords, scales, major scales, minor scales, learn to solo, improvisation, beginner guitar lessons, intermediate guitar lessons, advanced guitar lessons, guitar riffs, rock licks, guitar licks, rhythm guitar, songwriting, modes on guitar, how to read guitar tablature, play a guitar solo, triads for guitar, and much more. 

Why should I take your class and not just learn from YouTube?

You can try to learn guitar from YouTube but eventually you'll figure out there's so many videos out there it is very hard to put the information together in a coherent way. I have students come to me all the time that are tired of watching random guitar videos on YouTube and don't know how to put the information together. I have a whole series of courses here on Skillshare that will help you get down the basic skills for guitar. You will learn everything from one teacher and not random people on YouTube. I think you will find it to be a much better learning experience.  

Student Testimonial

Hi Chris, thanks so much for reaching out! I'm about halfway through lesson 10 of your Beginner lessons via Skillshare, so I was researching more of your teaching, and what's next... and found your GuitArmy! I've gotta tell ya, something about your explanations, your method of teaching, and the detailed resources provided, you've connected so many dots for me -- it's appreciated beyond words! I'm mostly self-taught, regret that I started so late in life, and have tried other online resources, but yours has been the most comprehensive! As a corporate facilitator to adult learners myself, I just wanted to express my gratitude!

Mel

Transcripts

1. Course Introduction: Hi. My name is Chris Rock Bottom, the founder of Guitar Me, and this course is called Bar Chords for Guitar. This course is geared towards the late beginner to intermediate guitar player. If you've learned your open chords and have tried to play some songs, you will quickly realize their courts that you don't know how to play. Most likely they are bar chords. There comes a time in every guitar players life when you need to learn bar chords. With this course, you will learn how to play major, minor and dominant seventh chords based off of the six string and the fifth string. That's a total of 72 different chords you will be able to play. I designed this course to be much more interactive than my previous courses. First, you're going to learn all the notes on the six in the fifth string, so your fist during that isn't a may. Be a whole step to be on the second fret. BNC are always beside each other to see is on three never gonna go up to D on the fifth fret. Then I'm going to give you a quiz on the notes for the first note of this quiz on the fifth string. I would like you to play the notes. See? See? It's going to be right here on the third. Fret you now. I would like you to play the note F I will show you how to play the bar chords on the six and fifth string. You move up your first finger now has to become kind of like the nut and bar the hallway across all six strings. Think this is an e O. I move this up 1/2 step. This would be an f major gene g sharp a So on and so forth. Now let's take it a little closer. Look at exactly how to finger. You need minor here. Someone, a bar across strings one through five. And we'll let my first finger mute out the six string right here. Take my third finger and put it on the fourth string. Seventh friend take my pinkie and put it right behind this third finger. But Pinkie is gonna go on the third string seven threatened, and then my second finger is gonna go right here. Get this half, which is the mind, then I will give you an exercise to play along with to 34 After each exercise, you will have a fun quiz to take to see if you can play the bar chords all over the neck The next what I'd like you to play is an F seven or F dominant seventh F seven is gonna be played right up here on the threat we owe a. So you can see from these video clips, I put a lot of time into creating this course. This course is more charts embedded in the video than any of my previous courses. I think you're really going to like this course, and more importantly, you're going to learn an incredibly valuable skill for guitar. I look forward to seeing you inside the course. 2. What Is A Barre Chord?: So what is a bar chord? Ah, bark. Or it is simply accord that you use one finger toe. Hold down multiple notes. A good example of a bar chord would be this a minor seventh where I'm taking my first finger and I'm holding it down or barring across all six strings, I'm thinking my third finger putting on the fifth string. Seven. Fred on this. See right here. So what's happening is five out of the six strings are being played just with my one finger , only holding down more than one string with my one finger and then the anyone that's not being barred is this number here. This e through this a minor seventh, I think, is a great example of what a bar court is. There's many different types of bar chords. I just think this one's the easiest one to demonstrate. You know exactly what you're doing when you're barring knows, So why do you need to play bar chords in the beginning, when you're first learning to play guitar, going to spend a lot of time playing all these open words, G c. A minor thes e major e minor, but eventually, when you go to play songs, you're gonna find that there's always been it. It's not always, but a lot of times there's gonna be one or two chords in there, Uh, that you can't play using an open chord if you're in the key of C when it gives the four quartets have, so you can try to play this little try and playing for no version. But it's basically just kind of all different kind of easy ways to avoid playing a bar chord. But eventually to play songs, you're going to need to know how to play a bar chord. You can use a cape. Oh, on that. If you look up how to play lyrics and chords for a lot of songs, you'll see a lot of will say Use cape on the third front of the fourth Fret on. That's basically one of songs in a key where you're gonna end up having to use a lot of bar chords. But to use a Cabo, maybe you can get away with G, C and D. That kind of thing mostly open chords. But eventually, to be a decent guitar player, you have to learn about a place and bar chords. It will make your life a lot easier. And my advice is just go ahead and start working on them. They're gonna take a long time to get down. Long time. Meaning a couple months, maybe. But just start, just start playing them, and eventually your hands would get used to him, and you'll find it very easy. And there will be a great benefit to your guitar playing. So what are the benefits of knowing how to play your bar chords? The benefits are in this course. I'm going to show you how to play major minor, dominant seventh chords based off of the six string and the fifth string. The benefit of that is you instantly can play 72 different chords. If you need to play an F court, do you play right here? Right here. You need to play a B minor chord. Yet this option this option. Maybe you need to place a a c sharp seven. Why can play here back to play right here? The main benefit is that you can play any major minor or dominant seventh chord not anywhere, not just anywhere on the net, but in two different places as well. So to me, that's a huge benefit. So now when I look at the lyrics and chords, I don't have to be afraid that it says F sharp seven. Well, how do you even do that? Because the bar chords a removable. If I can play this f sharp seven by moved up, one fret. This is the new G here, so this is a G seven g sharp seven. So by knowing one bar chord form, I can slide it up and down the neck and play 12 different chords instantly, which is a huge benefit. Sames. If I think this is a d cor here based on the fence during this is D flat soothe. Biggest benefit is that you instantly know out of play 72 different chords and any major minor or dominant seventh chord that comes up in a song you'll have that covered. So how do you practice bar chords? My advice would be to first start by just getting used to using your first finger on holding down all six strengths. I noticed that what I was teaching students they could usually get the other fingers down, but really, it's the strength that's needed to bar and squeeze all six strings at once. That's really what the student needs toe work on if you can't play mark words. So what I suggested doing is starting on the first friend and just working up. It's basically I look at it strength drink. It is not fun. It's not exciting. It's not really musically. You have to think about it two months. You think you could get back down, up and down eso in the beginning, Every time I pick up a guitar, I want to practice. My courts would practice this skill. The biggest thing is, when you're playing these bar chords, you need to drop your wrist down. Uh, when you play an over foreign, you know you have your hand kind of like almost like a grip, like your palms coming in again when you go to play a bark or you have to drop your wrist down because to get that squeeze, you're gonna need Teoh be squeezing between your thumb, which should be about in the middle of the neck in the back and then your first finger. So to be able to get that nice hard squeeze. Your thumb needs to be where you are in a position to squeeze really well, so, uh, seems kind of weird. But what I have found that with students that practice this for a week into doing this, that they're much more ready than once they were able t able to strum. And here all six strings. They were much more ready and found the bark, or it's much easier. So that's the first thing I would do to start practicing bark words. The next thing I would do is take a bark or that I learned, say, Major Gordon and I would just play it anywhere on the Net. Did you need that? Used to the width of the France? Down here, the friends are much wider. War spread out, appearance along tighter. You know, if you're playing an acoustic, probably playing a lot of bar chords above the 12th fret given electric, you try, but it starts getting much tougher up past the 12th fret. I usually try to 12 friend, but you just want to practice moving around and playing random courts. And as you're playing those random cords, identify what the court actually if I just grab this war and I looked down, I know this the c sharp. So that's a C sharp major born that way. You're not just only practicing, how does toe hold this? This major corporate, You're actually kind of No, not relearning, but making sure that you know what cord you're playing by Know where all your notes are. So if you're like me, I like to approach things systematically. Eso what I How I would practice these bar chords is I would probably go around the circle Offense says, Let's see if I want to practice Ah, major chord based off the six string starting on C Wade dio up 1/5 musically up 1/5 is a G so that I would play a d e b. What I'm doing is I'm going up 1/5 each time. And if you don't know how to do that, you know, in your head. But then I attached my circle of fifths chart to the project and resource sections of this course so that you can basically, just so you know, look at the pdf for printed out on then you kind of systematically go through in any court you're practicing, you can systematically go through and play all 12 possible examples of that court. So I would do that based off the fifth string and then the six string as well. Um, so that's to me, That's what That way I know I haven't missed anything. Yes, you can just play them randomly. Anywhere on that will probably get the job done as well. But if you're a little more interested in some organization than the circle of fence is the way to go. So we've talked about what a bar court is, what the benefits of bar chords are and how to go about practicing. Now let's go to the next lesson and actually start learning out of play some of these cords 3. Notes on the 6th String: in this lesson, We're gonna be going over where the notes are on your six string. This is really gonna be important that you understand where all your notes are because you're gonna be basing half of your bar chords off the six string. So you really need to know where the notes are, So why don't we go ahead and take a look where the notes are on your six string? So when this first section, we're gonna take a look at where all your natural notes are on your six string and we're gonna start with the This is your six string right here. This is your first straight. So your thickest one is your six string. So we're gonna start with this open E nine f is gonna be right here on the first fret. The notes e and F are always beside each other on your guitar. So no matter where there's any great jersey, have you you know, you know, you never, always beside each other, So three open is going to be if it's gonna be right here on the first friend. Then we go up here to G on the third front way have a after G. The musical alphabet is back to a so a is right here on five. B is right here on seven. And then the news B and C are always beside each other, just like Ian F. So B is right here, See? Has to be right beside me and C C is on eight. Then we're gonna go up to D on the 10th fret and then we're gonna go up T e on the 12th Fret. That's where your double dots are. I have a bird here, but, you know, if you I would imagine you have double dots going down the neck. So that is one active we started on any. We went toe half steps on. We come to another year. If I want to continue up the neck, it's gonna be e f on 13 g on 15 A on 17 b on 19. I can you see anyone 20 But then then I'm kind of out of friends here. If you have a 24 friend and you can go up a little higher, let's go ahead and review those notes again. We have me have G a, B, C D and continuing a little higher f e a c and that's where all the natural notes are. Now, let's take a look at where your Sharps are on the six string. All right, When you sharpen know basically what you're doing is you're raising it up 1/2 step or up one fret. So here's where f is. So if you need to play an f sharp, you think where f is and you go up one room so f sharp is right here. G sharp is gonna be right here because this is where G is on the third fret G Sharp is right here by doing a sharp A's on five. So I'm gonna go up to the six friend, all right? And then I'm not gonna ask you where be sharp is or because B Sharp is the same a c. So let's go ahead and take a look at where see? Sharpest and C is on eight. C Sharp is going to be on nine. Andi is on the 10th for it's a d Sharp is gonna be on the 11th. So if we continue the friends going up higher efforts right here, so f sharp is going to be on 14 g sharp is gonna be on 16. 18 is gonna be a sharp and then appear on 19 is gonna be worth C sharp. So let's go ahead and recap the sharps. We have f sh r g sharp in a sharp C sharp d sharp f sharp g sharp C sharp. Now let's go ahead and take a look at where our flats are on the six string. All right? When we flat a note, we let's say we're gonna take this g right here, and I need to sharpen what? We went up 1/2 step. I say this is up because the pitches going up have step. All right? Now, if we need to fly to know, we're gonna lower and 1/2 step. So this is a G right here, and I go down 1/2 step or one friend. Then this is where G flat would be. So we have g flat, then we have a flat right here, because a is right here on the fifth threats were flat and have a flat. And then we have B flat right here on six. And I'm not gonna sure see flat is because that's the same as be I'm not gonna do that to you, But I can't ask you where d flat is. Here's D on 10. So we have d flat right here and then e flat is right here at the 12th. Fret so E flats going to be on the 11th threat. If we continue up past the 12th fret, we're gonna have G flat right here on 14. We're gonna have a flat on 16. Not on 18. We're gonna be flattened. That d flats gonna be up here on 21 like I mentioned before. If you have more frets than you might have another note or two that you can get Teoh eso Now, let's go ahead and let's recap the flats. We have g flattened with a flat beam. Len t fled when Chief Glenn A fled b Flynn and then deflect. Oh, and that's where all your flats are on the six string. So that's where all your notes are on the six string. And the next last thing I'm gonna give you a little quiz on there's no. So why don't you go ahead and move onto the next lesson? 4. Quiz on 6th String Notes : Alright, it's time to take a quiz on the notes on the six string. How this is going to work is I'm going to pick a note saying a you're gonna pause the video . Then it'll say, Pause on the screen and you find where you think the A is, which is right here and then you want pause the video and then you check and see if you are correct. I'm gonna ask you 10 different notes. You know, we're not really doing any grading or anything here. It's just basically a way for you to check your knowledge and see if you actually are able to figure out where the notes are. So why don't we go ahead and take the quiz? All right for this quiz on the notes on the six string. If I ask you where to play G, I'm going to be looking for basically notes between the Open and the 12th Fret. I understand that there's a G up here on 15 but I'm just looking for all the answers are gonna be from Fred 0 to 12. So I would like you to play the note. A A is gonna be right here on the six string. Fifth threatened. Now, I would like you to play the note E. There are two correct answers to this. It could be the six string Open. We have any work of the E upon the 12th fret So all right, now, I would like you to play the note. G g is going to be right here on the third Fret now, How about play me a d d is gonna be right here on the 10th. Fret, um, Now, play me an F If it's gonna be right down here on the first fret you. Now I would like you to play me A C c is going to be right here on the eighth. Fret. And now I would like you to play me a d Sharp. De Sharp is right here on the 11th. Fret Now play me a g sharp g sharp is gonna be right here on the fourth Fret. Now play me a B flat B flat is gonna be right here on the sixth fret. And the last note of the quiz is e flat. He flat. It's gonna be played right up here on the 11th front So that was your quiz on the notes on the six string. I hope you did well if you didn't do so great. Just go back and review the notes another time. 5. Notes on the 5th String: I think this lesson we're gonna be taking a look at where your notes are on the fifth string. Just like I mentioned with your six string. It's very important to know where all your notes are. You're gonna be building the other half of the bar chords based off of the fifth string. So why don't we go ahead and take a look at where the notes are on your fifth string? So your fifth string is the a string that is an open A And what we're gonna do here is we're gonna go up and we're gonna take a look at our natural notes that get started here. So you're festering that a may be a whole step to be on the second fret. BNC are always beside each other's to see is on three. They were gonna go up to D on the fifth fret and for Dede of the whole steps, we're gonna Teoh half is on the right here on the eighth. Fret G is gonna be on the 10th fret. They're gonna be up to a again when you're double dots, double dots right there, and you should have some kind of double dots or some kind of marking on breath number 12. All right. And if we continue up further, we're gonna have to start again. A That bees on 14 I see is 15 is 17 appear on 19 gonna e and then I just have room for F You Let's go ahead and recap the natural notes on your fits drink as is hanging. Seen Dean M Jean A be seen Dean Teoh. So that's where your natural notes are on the fifth string. Now, let's go ahead and take a look at where the Sharps are. All right? So they opened a new job in a sharp that we're gonna go up one fret or raise it by half. Step's right here is a sharp and then we're not gonna do be sharp, cause that's the same a C. But C sharp is gonna be on four right way. Have d sharp on six many and e on seven f Funny. Have sharp nine g sharp here on 11. And if we keep going up, we have a on 12. So a sharp from young 13 we're gonna have C sharp on 16. 18. We're gonna d sharp. Who may have e and f. So then f sharp. It could be up here way appear on 21. And that's where your Sharps are on your fifth strings. And now why don't we go ahead and take a look at where your flats are? Okay, for the flats. What we're gonna do is we're gonna say this to be right here. And if I need to flat that be, I'm just going to go down. I have step or lower the half of lower and 1/2 a step or go down one friend. All right, So the first friend, the first flat we have here is a B flat will be on to. So we flew in Latin that we're gonna have a B flat on the first fret. All right, then we have the sea. So the next flight is gonna be a D flat, which is going to rain your own four d. We have e near on seven. So we get back to six. That's gonna be e flat. We have any F g is on 10. We need to flatten that my G flat is gonna be on nine. Right there. An eighth land we have on 11 continuing up. We have a A and B right here so we can play me. Plan 1 13 then we have a B C. D is on 17. When we come back to 16 we could get d flat, then appear we have t o. Plant is right here. Then we have e f. My 21st friend here is gonna be a g flat. So let's go ahead and recap the flats. We have be England de flatten evil and an enemy of Chief Island. A Fline beef. Lynne D fled. He fled in a G flat. That's where your flats are on the fifth string. So that's where all your notes are on the fifth string. Now let's go to the next lesson and take a quiz on those notes. 6. Quiz on 5th String Notes: in this lesson, I'm gonna be quizzing you on the notes on the fifth string is gonna work just like we did on the six string. I'm gonna pick a letter, say e you pause the video, you find where you think he is. Then you want pause the video and then you see, if you are correct Now, let's go ahead and take that quiz on the notes on the fifth string. For the first note of this quiz on the fifth string, I would like you to play the notes. See? See? It's going to be right here on the third. Fret you now. I would like you to play the note. F f is going to be right here in the eighth. Fred. Now, I would like you to play the note. A. There's two correct answers for this. You can have innate in the open a defense ring open where you could have played a on the 12th fret writer who now go ahead and play the letter. D d is gonna be right here on the fifth string. Fifth fret You okay? Now, I would like you to play the new G. G is gonna be right here on the 10th fret. And the next note is B flat B flat is gonna be found right down here on the first fret. And next note is f sharp. F sharp is gonna be right here on the ninth. Threatened next note is D flat D flat. It's gonna be right here on the fourth fret. The next note is a flat. A flat is right here on the 11th fret. And the last note of this quiz is going to be a B. So be is gonna be right down here on the second friend. So that was your quiz on the notes on the fifth straight. 7. 3 Main Barre Chords 6th String: There are three types of bar chords that you're gonna need to know how to play based off of the six string. And that's what I'm gonna teach you in this lesson, Theo. First court we're gonna take a look at is a major bark. Orders are based off of the six string. For me, the easiest way to think of where does this come from is if you already know how to play an E major chord chart down below if you don't know how to play. Uh, so the easiest way for me to think about this or tell a student it's just this cord moved up the neck. So what happens? You can't just take this court and just move it up here. If this is an e chord, just move it up half step and then it's enough corn. What has to happen on the cool side of court? What has happened here is your first finger needs the bar across here on act basically is the nut. Because when I'm playing this board, you need a bunch of open strains, have a couple of strings strings 12 and six, or ringing open eso. That's uh, you know, the not here is taking care of them. So when you move up, your first finger now has to become kind of like the nut and bar the hallway across all six strings. Think this is an E O. I move this up 1/2 step. This would be an f major FDR gene G sharp A So on and so forth. Now, let's take it a little closer. Look at exactly how two fingers. All right, the finger, this major bark or the first thing I'm going to do, I'm gonna create this cord off the fifth right here. This is a right here. So this is gonna be in a major court. I can really do it anywhere. I could do it up here. You know, it doesn't really matter. I'm just choose in the middle of the neck. So the first thing I'm gonna do is I'm gonna bar my first finger the whole way across all six strings. One of the things that I talk about in how to practice this court is you have to be able to hold that finger down, strum all six strings, be able to hear them things is gonna take a lot of practice, but eventually you will get it. Um, so that's the first thing you do. You barred this finger, the hallway across all six trains. Then we're gonna take our third finger and put it on the fifth string seventh fret right here on E. They're gonna take her pinkie and put it back behind my third finger here on the fourth String seven threatened that I would take my my my middle finger here. My second finger. I'm gonna put it on the third string. Sixth fret right here on the sea shop on. Then the my first finger's gonna take care of the A here. So we'll take care of the notes that you're not playing with your other fingers, which happens to be on the 1st 2nd and six string. I know. So I generally tell people press down as hard as you need todo Generally I tell people pressed down maybe too hard on, then. Kind of lighten, lighten up to the point where when you start to hear kind of get muted out, then you're pressing your you know, your not pressing down hard enough. So I think it's important to kind of. You have to figure out the exact right pressure you need, because these are these are these courts are tiring. I get very tiring. I really tire out your hand pretty quickly, so you need to learn the right amount of pressure on. Actually, if you press too hard, it'll actually make some of the notes. Shark s. Oh, yeah. You need to figure out just the right amount so that you don't tire your hands out and you're not pressing so hard that there the notes are going sharp. All right, so now let's get through. And I'm gonna basically tell you how how this is a bar chord and kind of analyze this court that's actually learn how this has created. All right, So when we have a major chord, the chord tones for major court are 13 and five. So here's how a major scale goes. You could look at the chart down below because 123456712345671 twos up here. So when you play a major court, it all has to be roots thirds and fits. So what was when you play this court, what you're actually playing is in this specific instance A is one C Sharp is three and he is five. So what we're actually playing is were playing 151351 because in a major corn it has to be all ones threes and fives. So that's why this is a major chord here. If I went through and I told you what notes I'm playing, I'm playing a than E in a sea shar e an impact on. That's why this is an a major for something else I want to mention about this cord is your thumb placement. When you play open corns, your thumbs kind of it could be in here. You kind of have your palm or in against the neck and it feels, has a its really grippy. You can just kind of grabbed the the guitar playing my own records. When it comes to bar chords, I'll see students having the thumb appear unless you have gigantic hands. You basically your thumb needs to be down in the back of the neck because you need to be able to press pretty hard to play that that court. You need to go squeeze really hard. So you're gonna end up having to drop your wrist down so that you can comfortably reach across. You can't hold it like this. Um, unless you have, Like I said really big hands. But even then, you really need to drop your wrist down. Said these fingers can reach in properly. You're just not gonna be able to pull it off. It's gonna feel very strange if you're gonna try toe, play it like this with your thumb. So you're gonna need to drop the wrist down and press. Basically, your thumb is gonna have to be right behind where your first finger's barring across. So what I would do is I would grab this corn and then just have fun with it. Just starts strumming it and practice moving in around way. You can practice strumming, practice up using the corn generally when I move from one to the next. What you What you don't want to do is take your hand off and completely rebuild the course . You just don't have time for that. So, uh, you just lift up and slide down. I just slide. I kind of target my eyes. Target where I want to go next. Then I just thought, Don't really worry about whether it sounds good. Plain wrong. Just move your hand around a lot just because your hands gonna need to get used to What does it feel like to play that up here versus down here on the second front? Feel different because of the with of the friends? Just play a lot playoff in and play em all over the neck. All right, The next court, we're gonna take a look at is a minor chord. The major chord was like this. Turn it into a minor chord. All we do is we just take off our middle finger where this court comes from. If you play an e minor court way, just slide that up. You know, we're kind of using the nut here to take care of strings. 123 and six way. Slide that up. We have to bar across their This would be an f minor G minor, A minor B minor. Right now, let's take a look at how to build that chord. Okay, to build it, we're going to start with barring our first finger across the way across the fifth fret I'm doing in a minor again. We're gonna do them all in a minor s So we're gonna once again borrow Waycross. I want to take our third finger and put it on the fifth string seventh. Fret on this E right here. Take my pinkie and put it on the fourth string seven. Fred on this A And then that's it. Um, it just I just bar this away across. Put those two fingers down, and then strings. 123 and six are open. All right, Now, let's go ahead and take a look at how this court is created. Music theory wise. All right, so if we took, say, an A minor scale one to flat 345 flat six, flat 712 flat. 345 flat six flat 71 maybe two flat. Three appear. Uh, So what? We're gonna do it? Analyze, You know, what are the notes And how do they function here to spell and a minor? Try it. It's a CE or one flat three and five. To create a minor court, we're gonna have all one's flat threes and five and the easiest way that you figured out how to play. That is just what we're doing here, where we have a rude offense, a room a flat third of fifth and then the root again. So that's music theory wise. That's how that is created. Any minor chord you play is going to be a ones flat threes and five. And like I mentioned with the last chord, you want to move it around, get a little. Sometimes you'll notice me. I'll put my finger down. If I'm not thinking, sometimes I use this finger toe lay over top of my first finger to help push down. I don't typically do that, but I think that I have in my finger kind of flailing around. I just think sometimes it I kind of just keep it up against my first finger. That's how you play in a minor bar chord. Now we're gonna take a look at how to play the third form. We went over major minor. Now I wanna go over dominant seven. So if you remember how to play the major way, we're playing it like this. And at the root fist through 3rd 5th we're gonna do to change this to a dominant seventh chord. All we do is take Pinky off. We take that off. What that does is takes this route here. It turns it into a flat seven reminder set. So if you know how to play an E seven chord, like right here, you play like this, you know, kind of pretend here. We're boring across if I just move it up. No, sudden. This is F seven with 77 g seven and then a said, Let's take a look at exactly how we're fingering that. All right, I'm gonna do it up here on the fifth. Fret once again and we're gonna bar the whole way across the six. All six strings on the friend take my third finger and put it on this E right here, which is on the fifth string. Seven threatened. Then on the fourth string, I'm going not planning. I'm gonna let my my first finger here. Get this G right. So it is playing for its 57 on five again. And then on the I'm gonna put my second finger on the third string. Six fret on the C sharp. That's the third right there. So that's how you play you Just to me, the easiest. Why I tell students is just think of a major court and take your pinkie right now. Let's go through and analyse what those numbers are. All right. Any dominant seventh chord? You typically have a root of fifth, a flat, seventh and 1/3. So, um, we're going to see how to play in a mix of Lydian scale cause 123456 flat 712345673 So don't get too caught up in what is a mix of lady in. You know, I don't know what that means. That's basically the fifth mode in the key of D major. And that probably sounds really confusing. But I'm just amusing that scale because this corn, this is a core that can come out of ah, makes Lydian Scale s. So I thought it would be appropriate to show you how the numbers work. Eso So if we get through and analyse, I have mentioned that in a dominant seventh chord, we generally know didn't need a root 3rd 5th and flat seventh. So if we get through it. Analyze this. We have a room This aid thin here. Is he this g Here is your flat seventh of your minor Seventh way Have a root here with a C sharp is the third is the fist back to a here on top, which is the root 15 flat 7351 That's kind of technically how it's working. And this chord you want to move around like I did with the other courts? Just I think, if you're thinking well, this court cat sounds kind of strange. Doesn't sound right because this court is specifically designed. When you hear in your ear wants to hear some kind of resolution. It's because this court, it's not major. It's not minor. It's a little of both. It has the major third, but then has a minor seventh. So what it does, it creates a little bit of tension that your ear wants to hear the result. So this a seven you're here kind of wants to hear it resolved to. Indeed, if you're wondering what is this kind of strange court? There are three main types of cords you really need to get down on guitar really well. And that's major minor and dominant seventh chords. And this is one of the three that you need to get down. And that's how you're gonna play your three main bar chords based off of the six strength. 8. 6th String Major Exercise: in this lesson, we're gonna be practicing some major bar chords. So let's take a look at the cords that we're gonna be playing. All right, So we're gonna practice some major bar chords, and how this is gonna work is in the bottom, right hand corner in the box you're going to see on top, you're gonna see four letters. That's gonna be the core progression. And then down below those four letters, you're going to see a larger letter. And that's gonna be what court I'm currently playing. So as I'm playing along Not sure exactly which court I'm going to, you know, you'll be able to see by the large letter of what court? Amman. On another note, when you're playing this, you're going from one bar chord to the next. I would suggest not taking your hand off and then completely reforming the court. When you go to the next court. What you want to do is you basically kind of want to slide down. So I'm not changing my cord for model, not changing my hand. Say if I'm gonna go from this to this be what I'm doing is I'm lifting out and then sliding my fingers up the friends. Sometimes you're going to get a little bit of string noise. I think at this point, if you're just beginning the practice in play these bar corns, you know, welcome that string noise. It's gonna be a lot easier for you to put up with a little bit of string noise from your sliding than to rebuild the court each single time. It's a lot tougher on if you if you can't stand the string noise that when I suggest is between courts. What I would do is I would mute with my right hand here and slide up. Basically, what you want to do is just lift your fingers off the strings just a little bit and then moving on on on with muting in between. You can really keep it asylum. You need to do something like that. If you were recorded, you hear a lot of E wouldn't don't worry about the string sliding the noise here because you're really just focusing on being able to move around and play different major bar chords. So now let's go ahead and play through our first for set of four courts. I will say that these cords are completely random. They are not intended to sound good. Eso just strong through them. And don't worry about if you're thinking Well, this is not a good sounding chord. Progression is not supposed to bay because it's all made. It's all bar chords. It's all major bar chords. They're not all in the same key. So this is just merely practice. So let's go ahead and take a look at our first progression. All right, we're going to play. The corporation is gonna be g being half on and then see you. All right. So I'm also as as I'm playing the courts down below, you will see the cord where it is on the on the neck as well. So if you're kind of lawsuit, you're not sure what, Fred, I'm on, you know, Just look at the chart down right below, and you will see exactly where I'm at on the guitar. All right, So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to just strum each scored four times. I'm going to basically do quarter notes and audio three for if I used to find that really boring or too hard, you know, you could do if you wanted. You could just do whole notes. 234 You know, that might be easier for you, because, you know, you're not able to strong quarter notes and then change. So I suggest Do what everyone you could do a thing that's that's more exciting. More interesting for you. That sounds sounds nicer, but we're really focusing, really? At all on the right hand here. It's all about getting your left hand here, provided that your right hand person getting your left hand here to be out show, you know, able to play the chords. All right, here we get 34 way. Something I should mention if you're unable to play for you, strumpet. Four times played these 44 notes on, then you know, if you just you don't have the time to get to the next court that I suggest maybe any do three. Maybe just 12341 I picked a C chord trying to pick the random court. Um ah. And if one be taking one beat, the switch isn't good enough. Then maybe take two. Maybe g 023434 This'll is probably gonna be a solution. That's probably work better for you in the very beginning. But I'm just gone just playing through all force for quarter nets. But just realize you can do 3211 basically be gone. One Teoh, 34 That's probably the least that you would Dio is just strong at once and get to the next court and try to make a you know, the next downbeat of the next measure. All right, now, let's go ahead and play that through that core progression Will more time 12 three. All right, now, let's take a look at our second chord progression for the second court progression. I wanted to make it not harder, but I wanted include a couple sharps and flats. So it's gonna go a major toe F sharp major to see sharp on down to B flat through this B flat. I could have caught a sharp because they wrote this, and that's an Armani spelling it. This is either be flattery sharp. I just want to get a flat in the mix, all right, so let's go ahead and strum that corporation. All right. Now let's go ahead and play the chord progression, and we get one, too. 34 way. Let's play through that one more time. 12 34 way. And that was your major bar chord exercise. 9. 6th String Major Quiz: in this lesson. I'm gonna quit you on some major bar chords based off the six string. And how this is gonna work is I'm gonna pick a bar chord, say, maybe a G made your bar chord. You will pause the video. You will get the cord where you believe it is. You'll play and then you run, pause, and then you can see if you got it right. So let's go ahead and begin the quit. The first major bar chord I would like you to play is a g major. All right. And you play G major right here on the third Fret your G major bar corn. Now, I would like you to play a B and you're gonna play it. Be right. Appear on the seventh. Fret right here, you. Now, I would like you to play an F major bar chord. If you're gonna play down here on the first, fret right here like this. You. Now, I would like you to play in a major bar chord. You're going to play in a major bark word right here on the fifth. Fret Know now, how about you play a C major bar chord a C major Barker's gonna be right here on the eighth . Fret. That's where C is right here. Now go ahead and play in a flat major bar chord. A flat can be found right here on the fourth Fret Now, I would like you to play an F sharp major bar chord. You can play f sharp right down here on the second friend. And the last major bar chord I'm going to ask you to play is a B flat and B flat is gonna be found right here on the six fret or beef lattice. So that was my quiz on the major bar chords based off of the six string. If you didn't do that, great, then go back and watch the video on where the notes are on the six string, you know, kind of relearned them and then go ahead and take the quiz again. I'm sure you'll do a lot better 10. 6th String Minor Exercise: in this lesson, we're going to be practicing some minor bar chords. All right, if we take a look at our first minor bar court exercise, its gonna be a minor G minor d flat minor. All right, now, let's go ahead and play that chord. Progression. 12 34 way. Let's go ahead and play that one more time. 12 three, four way. Keep in mind that these are random cords. They're not any specific court progression, so they're not going to sound like they sound great together. They're just kind of random cords. All right. Now, let's go ahead and take a look at our next court progression. So let's take a look at our next court progression. We're gonna start with an F sharp minor thing. Good. A sharp, minor, thin C minor and demon way Dio. 12 three. Let's go ahead and play through that one more time. 12 three. And that was your minor bar chord exercise, with the bar chords being based off of six straight 11. 6th String Minor Quiz: in this lesson, I'm gonna be quizzing you on minor bar chords based off of the six string. Let's go ahead and take the quiz and see how many you can get. Right? The first miner bar chord I would like you to play is going to be a C minor. C minor is gonna be found right here on the A threat. The next bar chord I would like you to play is a G minor. G minor is gonna be found down here on the third friend. Next minor chord would be a B minor. B minor is gonna be found right here on the seventh Fret look like this. And then the next one that you're supposed to play how about an F minor? If minor could be found right down here on the first friend Now, I would like you to play an A minor. A minor is gonna be right here on the fifth. Fret is right here right now. I would like you to play a D minor de Miner could be found up here on the 10th fret because we have the right. Here is a B c. D. So it's got the radio for me to get my middle finger out of the way there. But just normal. I just kind of holding hanging out here. You all right? Next. I would like you to play a G sharp minor bar chord. G sharp minor is gonna be found right down here on the fourth fret way. The last court I'd like you to play is a C sharp minor. And C sharp minor is gonna be found right up here on the ninth. Fret. So? So that was your quiz on the minor bar chords based off of the six string. 12. 6th String Dominant 7th Exercise: We're gonna be practicing some dominant seventh bar chords in this exercise. So let's go ahead and get to it. Okay? Your first court progression for your dominant seventh bar chord exercise is going to be D seven going down here. G seven Theun B seven on F. So let's go ahead and play. 12 three. Let's go ahead and play through that one more time. 12 34 All right, the second core progression you're gonna play, it's going to start with the C seven. I'm going to go to a D sharp. Seven. Uh, we're gonna do in a flat seven on a G flat 71 more time. That C seven d sharp seven a flat seven on G Flats Way, Dio. 1234 Let's go ahead and play through that one more time. 12 34 And that is your dominant seventh bar chord exercise where you're basing the roof off of the six straight 13. 6th String Dominant 7th Quiz: Now that you've learned how to play a dominant seventh bar chord based off of the six string, let's go ahead and take a little quiz and see if you can figure out where they are on the neck. The first dominant seventh chord I would like you to play is going to be an F seven. You're going to play F seven down here on the first front like this with export. I'd like you to play is a B seven B seven. It's gonna be right here on the seventh. Fret look like this. Now, I would like you to play a C seven c can be found right here on the A, friend. So that's where we're going to base our bar courts. We're gonna put our fingers crossed. That is a C seven. Next. I would like you to play in a seven. A seven is gonna be right down here on the fifth. Fret you now. I would like you to play an F sharp seven f sharp. Seven is going to play down here on the second friend. Next. I would like you to find a C sharp seven c sharp. Seven can be found appear on the ninth Fret because that's where C Sharp is here. I always remember the C Sharp is my last dot or bird, in this case, my last Not before the 12th fret. That's where I know that the night friends and I always I always think of C c. C sharp is the night Fred or D flat, right? So that your C seven c sharp seven Right? Next. I would like you to play an A flat dominant seventh or in a flat seven chord, and that's going to play down here on the fourth fret. And for the last time, the seventh court, I'd like you to play. It's going to be D flat seven. And once again, that is going to be found up here on the ninth. Fret this was just see sharp seven a couple seconds ago. And now I'm asking you play d flat seven on. That is gonna be the exact same thing because this is ah, this is why you can call this never here either a c sharp or a D flat. Either way, this is where you gonna play your D flat seven court. So that was my quiz on the dominant seventh chords based off of the six string. My advice is, if you need work with any of the three chords toe practice playing the chords around the circle of bits. 14. 3 Main Barre Chords 5th String: in this lesson, I'm going to be showing you how to play the three different main bar chords that you're gonna need to know based off of the fifth string. So the first court we're gonna talk about based off for the fifth string here is we're gonna talk about how to play a major bark or where this comes from. If you're not playing a chord. Looked like this. What you're doing, you're taking this court on your moving it out. What happens is you know, you have to move this note up with it as well. So your way. Move everything up. Mean me, C c sharp d Why did we ever need to do that? What happens if you're in the key of F four chord, which is B flat? You can if you want it, you could play only strings. 23 and four. Try it. But if you want to play the fool bark or great, have the route in the bottom. Sometimes you're just gonna have to know how to play major chords that aren't open courts s . So that's what we're doing here. So it's basically the form just moved up, and I'm gonna do all the all the bar courts based off the fifth string Kind of right here where I did a for the six string I'm gonna do d since right here in the middle of the neck eso We're gonna take a look at how to play a D major. Looks like this. Let's go ahead and take a closer look at exactly how I'm playing. So the first thing I'm gonna do is I want to take my first finger and I'm gonna bar from strings five through one. No, some some guitar teachers like to tell people just bar the whole way across on, and I'm okay with that. What I have found over time is if you if you teach students to always be playing the six string as well. What? Technically what it's doing is here is the root of the court. You're putting 1/5 in the bottom kind of thickens up the cord. Um, so it doesn't hurt anything. But what I have found from teaching people over the years is that students be They start to think that this is the root of the court. So if I say you know, playing whatever. Say it, G, don't come down here and go you really This is really a C chord, but they think it's a g major chord because of they get there so used to playing and thinking about what they're doing on the six string. So what I teach my students is, uh, what you dio start on the fifth string with your first finger, and I want you to have your finger Just touch the six string just a little bit. It's got a flesh mute. You just gonna mute that out If you want to do all the way across, that's fine. But just realize that the root of the court is off based off of the fifth string. All right, so that's the first thing we're gonna do it bar this loathe. Next thing I want to do is I'm gonna take my third finger here and I'm gonna bar it, lay it down over strings three to about a 43123 and four if you reverse it. Now, this, to me, is the hardest, easy cord you're ever gonna learn. When I was first learning, I remember practicing this over with my over and over with my teacher. And remember my hands shaking as like a young teenager trying to play these chord progressions and play this chord. My hands like getting weaker. A weaker eso just realize that this court kind of hurts at first until you build up the muscles in your forearm. Uh, this is gonna be a really annoying court to get down some places, some books and you'll see videos where people suggest use fingers 23 and four. Here. That's not the worst. It's fine. But I think this court, to me, is a lot harder to grab in this one. This one's only two fingers. Once you get it down, it's much quicker and easier to grab. But I understand in the beginning you may want to just try something different. Another thing that I've had students do is they'll use their pinking helped push down on the third finger. I'm not opposed to that. E don't need to do it anymore, but in the beginning I may have done that as well, just to get a little more pressure. So this one of those cords where it's not gonna sound probably too great for a while you're gonna practice for a while in practice, you know, really squeezing hard s so that you're able to play it, and it sounds good. Now you'll see a lot of chord charts of stuff that say you're supposed to play this note. We're right here on top. Do to me that. I think even on I think on my court chart for this course I don't have it. That and the reason that is, is because it's pretty hard. You have to push down hard. Then you actually have art. Your finger ups. You have to be barring an arching at the same time to get out of the wen for this. This a right here, this route on the top. I'm sorry. That's not a route that would be a which is the fifth of a D corn moon. So what? I'm teaching a student. I don't even deal with the first string. I say just let the first string get muted out by by your third finger here. You're not going to keep it. You don't want what? What you don't want to do is you don't want to keep it pulled down. Hard to get this beyond time? No, it sounds like 1/13 that it's just a It's just not in the court. Sounds okay. It sounds nice, but this note is not part of a D major corn. So what you want to do is you just press down hard and then just lift your finger up just a little bit. Just a mute out that first drink if you're able. Teoh, I've had some students over the years that they're double jointed and they can take this this finger and bend it almost up in a 90 degree angle. You can do that and easily get it out the way. Then feel free to play this and they're back behind. You know this finger. But I wouldn't worry about it, especially in the beginning when you're just learning how to play the Korb. I would just bar this finger and bar this finger across drinks 23 and four and just moving around right now. Let's take a look about music theory wise. What's going on here and why does this work? All right? So as I mentioned what I played a major chord based off the six string, we have to have all routes. Thirds and fits. So I would use ah d major scale. I can use other scales that would work for this as well. But I think a major scales one that makes the most sense. So a d major scale, right? Here we go. 123456712345671 So if we look good through and analyse Well, what My actual plane here, everything I'm playing has to be a root third or fifth. So this finger is getting this d right here, which is the room. Eso what I bar these down across. I'm getting the fifth, which is a room which d in this f sharp right here, which is going to be the desert. So it gives 1513 And if you're if you're talented enough, you could get this five up here on the top s. So that's technically why this is an a major chord. All right, so that's music. Fear wise. Why? This is an A major. My advice is just practice it all 12 threats anywhere practice moving around would be really good for you. Thescore comes in really handy when you have to be major court. Try to play some kind of weird configuration and a lot of times in songs. If I'm going from a G court on the next course, see get played as an open board times on this planet as a bar chord, especially if it's accord where I'm doing auto. Ah, rhythmical thing. It really allows me to control the cord and do a lot more muting with the open. It's much harder when you open strings ringing. You just have to have a lot more control. Eso with the bar chord I can really control. I can control all the muting so much easier by just lifting up on my finger. Isn't it automatically deadens all six straight way? That's how you play the major chord based off of the fifth strain that's going and take a look at the minor. The minor chord based off of the fifth string looks like this. So what? It actually looks like it looks like here's a major court on. If you took this court and just moved it over, you become a minor chord based off of the fits drink. So where this comes from if you know, playing a minor chord, You take that chord, just move it up. One fret, and then bar crossed. You end up with a B flat minor for your a minor. Let me see. Minor. So this is really this is one of the main cord You really need to get down. You have to have your majors down. And you also have to have your minor to me there, you know, to show you three different cords which are all your main. But the major minor are absolutely You have to know how to play these. All right, so let's take a look at how in figuring that first thing I'm doing just like I did with the major corner and barring across, um, I'm doing gonna do the minor here. Someone, a bar across strings one through five. And we'll let my first finger mute out the six string right here, take my third finger and put it on the fourth string seventh friend take my pinkie and put it right behind this third finger. But Pinkie is gonna go on the third string. Seven threatened, and then my second finger is gonna go right here. Get this half, which is the minor. That's on the second string six threat. And then on this court, where I was saying when you played a major court, I'm not too worried whether you can play this note or not on the minor corn you can play because you have this finger being arched. As long as you arch that out of the way of the first drink, you should hear that. Be able to hear that. No, on the first string. So that's how you physically play the court. Now, let's take a look at what's going on. Music theory wise. All right, I'm gonna use D minor scale as an example, we're gonna get 12345 flat six, flat 712 flat. 3456 flat seven. When we have a minor chord, we're gonna be using all routes flat, thirds and fits. So if we get through and take a look at what we have, we have a room. Here we have 1/5 another route, a minor third, a flat three and then a five. Note wise, it's DF a dispelling a d minor. Try it. So we have seen a way. So that is how you physically play the cord. And then I told you about how music fear wise how it's created, Uh, you know, like I mention with all the other court just moving around. Don't worry about how good it sounds, because you're really just working and working your hands and getting used to, uh, what it feels like to play at the different Fred Areas. The last bar chord we're gonna take a look at. Based off of the fifth string is dominant seventh chord. You play eight and a seven like this one is just moving it out. You could call it in a form. That's what some people call them. Just taking that a seven sliding Let's take a look at how I'm figuring that. All right, Like the other chords I'm gonna bar my first finger across strings one through five, meting out the six string. Take my third finger here. We'll put it on the fifth string, sent friend getting playing the fifth of the court and then my first finger is going to get the third string fifth fret, You know, with my bar here, e my pinkie and put it on the second string seventh friend right here on the sharp end. First finger is gonna get that a on the first string with the bar here. Oh, you right. So that's how to physically play it. Now, let's take a look at the music theory that's behind. So once again, I'm gonna use a d mix Illini in scale to talk about the chord tones the D makes Lydian scale goes 123456 flat 71234567 All right, so and what you need You need ones, threes, fives and flat Seventh. So when I play this way, go through and analyse How do you know what notes like? What are those notes in the mix of Lydian Scale? We have someone. We have a five. We have flat seven way. Have three way Have the route. So when you play this, you're playing all ones threes, fives and flat. Seventh, if you like What? Why does it have to be that order? This is just the order that makes the most sense for your fingers. So once again, that's rude. Fifth flat 7/3 51 5 flat 735 So if I had to place a in F seven, I find where f is on that string and then I just play the corner. Oh, I need to find C C seven find to see that I play. That on, of course, works with any of them. If I had to play a D major, I find the major D minor and G seven, and that was how you played the three main bar chords based off of the fifth string. 15. 5th String Major Exercise: in this lesson, we're gonna be playing to four bar chord progressions using major bar chords based off of the fifth string. Your first court progression is going to be You're gonna start with an F corn down here to a C court 10th fret for G E o down here the fifth fret for dio. All right, Now let's go ahead and strum that court progression. I'm just gonna be using quarter notes, but you can use whatever you like. You just remember that this is really about building up strength and getting the court to sound good. So, you know, it doesn't really matter what rhythm you're playing. I'm just keeping a basic here with, um, just some quarter notes. Here we go. 34 Let's go ahead and strong through that court progression again, we dio 1234 Now let's take a look at our second corps progression. It's going to be B flat down here on the first front and going up to e flat on the six French way of F sharp up on the night, friend C sharp down here on the fourth way. Let's go ahead and strong that one, too. three. Now, as I have mentioned in some of the other videos that people watch, these cords air just kind of random. It's just kind of forcing you to jump around the neck. This is not a corporation that is supposed to sound good. They're just random major chords. Let's go ahead and strong that core progression more, more time. 12 34 So that was your major bar chord practice. Using major chords based off of the fifth string, you just have to remember that this cord is, to me one of the probably the hardest basic chord to get down. The hardest part is, you know, barring three strings strings 23 and four with just only your your third finger this route , this one requires a lot of practice. So don't be worried or upset if you can't get it right away, it's gonna take a while until you put up in a hand strength to really be good at it. 16. 5th String Major Quiz: in this lesson, I'm going to be quizzing you on some major bar chords based off of the fifth string. The first major bar court I would like you to play is a C major bar chord based off of the fifth string. The sea is gonna be played right here on the third fret. The next court I would like you to play is an e major. E Major is gonna be right up here on the seven threat. The next court I would like you to play is a g g major is gonna be right up here on the 10th. Fret do next. I would like you to play a D major D major is gonna be found right down here on the fifth front. Mm. Next. I would like you to play a B flat B flat. It's gonna be right down here on the first, friend. Next. I would like you to play E flat. E flat Major is gonna be played right here on the sixth friend. Next. I would like you to play C sharp. Major C sharp is gonna be right down here on the fourth friend. I should mention when I say Play a C sharp or play a C sharp major to me, they're the exact same thing. When you hear someone say Play me and half play a G Play a C because there's nothing after that like C minor C Sharp Dominant seventh flat 9 13 When you just here just one ladder and nothing after it, you assume that it is a major chord. And the last major court I'm going to ask you to play is F sharp Major and F Sharp Major is gonna be played right up here on the ninth froth. And that was your quiz on the major bar chords based off of the fifth string. 17. Minor Exercise 5th String: in this lesson, We're going to be playing minor bar chords based off of the fifth string. All right, let's take a look at our first minor chord progression. We're going to start here on the fifth fret with a D minor. They're gonna get down here to be minor on the second fret and then up to E minor on the seven. G minor on 10. Once again, I'm just gonna be using quarter notes to strum this. Here we go. 12 34 Let's go ahead and strong through this one more time. 12 34 The next court progression we're gonna strung through it's gonna be a sharp minor. Going to see minor f minor and e flat. Now let's go ahead and strong through the core progression. 12 34 Go ahead and play through that corporation one more time. 1234 And that was your minor bar chord exercise where you're basing the minor chords off of the fifth string 18. 5th String Minor Quiz: in this quiz, I'm going to be asking you to place, um, different minor bar chords based off of the fifth string. The first miner court I'd like you to play is a B minor. B minor is gonna be played right here on the second front. Next, I would like you to play an e minor. The miners gonna be played right. Appear on the seventh fret with next court. I'd like you to play is G minor and G minor can be found right up here on the 10th threat. And with the next one is D minor. De Miner is right down here on the fifth. Fret. All right. And the next one I'd like you to play is a flat minor. A flat minor is gonna be found way appear on the 11. Friend. I have to play it appear because I can't without d tuning, I can't play in a flat. This ring already open is a So a flat is the any place I'm going to play this barcode appear on the 11th friend next court. I'd like you to play is an e flat minor e flat minor is gonna be right here on the six friend next court. I'd like to play is a sharp minor. A sharp miners would be found right here. You could also call that a B flat minor as well. All right. And the last miner bar court I'm gonna ask you to play is f minor. If my heart can be found right here on the a threat with and that was your quiz on the minor bar chords based off of the fifth strength. 19. 5th String Dominant 7th Exercise: in this lesson, we're going to be practicing a dominant seventh bar chord that is based off of the fifth string. The first chord progression we're gonna strum through. We're going to start with an F seven up here on the A threatened. They want to get down here to the fifth Fret where d seven is way down to be seven on the second friend in the fourth quarter is gonna be an E seven on the seventh. So let's go ahead and strum through that court progression. Here we g 012 34 Let's go ahead and strum through that again. 12 34 Now let's take a look at your second chord progression. We start with a C sharp dominant seven Eyes on the fourth friend. We're gonna get in G sharp seven, which is way appear on the 11th friend. What's harder to grab? Especially if you're gonna be on an acoustic and then we're gonna go to an E flat dominant seventh, which is on the six way. I'm gonna play G flat dominant seventh, which is up here on night, friend. Oh, all right, let's go ahead and strong through that one, too. 34 way. Let's do that one more time. 12 34 That was your dominant seventh bar chord exercise, where we're basing all the cords off of the fifth string. 20. 5th String Dominant 7th Quiz: in this lesson, I'm gonna be asking you to place in different dominant seventh bar chords based off of the fifth string. The first bar court I'd like you to play is a B seven or be dominant seventh. You may hear me refer to the dominant seventh chord is a B seven or be dominant seventh to me, they're exactly the same, and you'll hear people refer to those as either one as well. So the 1st 1 is I would like you to play me a B seven. Maybe seven is gonna be played right down here on the second friend. That's what I'd like you to play is an F seven or F dominant seventh F seven is gonna be played right up here on the A threat. And the next one I'd like you to play is a D flat. Seven D flat seven is gonna be played right down here on the fourth Fret. Ah, it's a D flat seven. Or if you call it a C sharp seven as well, right. The next one would be an E dominant center. Any 7/4 will be played right appear on the seven froth next one is gonna be a G seven. A G seven is gonna be found up here on the 10. Friend. Gets a little harder to play once you get out of here. Way to squeeze a little more. Kind of tighten up a little, but G seven is right down here on the 10th friend. Right. The next one I'd like you to play with BC seven si seven is gonna be found right down here on the third friend. What? I played the court. Sometimes when I strong, um, kind of stop it on the second string and 1/3 of the court there on then other times you'll hear me, you hear me strong the whole way to the first string on Get that. The fifth on the top there. So it doesn't matter to me whether you strung strings two through five or one through one through five. Yeah, just in case you're wondering, why am I not strumming the whole way? The whole all six strings, That's what's going on. All right, so the next one I would like you to play is an f sharp seven and f sharp seven is gonna be right up here on the ninth threatened last dominant seventh chord I'm gonna ask you to play would be a d seven. A. D seven is gonna be right down here on the with. That was your quiz on the dominant seventh bar chords based off of the fifth string. 21. Barre Chord Exercise 1 : in this lesson, we're gonna be learning how to play a basic court progression in G major using the bar chords that we've learned in this course on the fifth string and the six strength. And first we're gonna play it down here and then we're going to go ahead and play it up here. Basically, I'm showing you how you can play the same court progression easily in two different places by knowing your bar chords. All right, the chord progression that we're gonna be working within this lesson is G major on. Then we're gonna go to E minor on C Major D Major, We're gonna play first down here. They're going to go up here and play it up higher. All right, let's go ahead and strong through that. I'm just gonna play quarter notes. Here we go. 12 34 G made. Let's go ahead and strung through that again. 1234 No, I'm just choosing to go through and play each 14 times. You could play each 12 times if you want it. I think just by changing how you're playing the court takes on a whole different sound like I could palm mute and arpeggio court a little has a totally different sound. I could play something that's a little more place more on a little more syncopated like it just depends on, you know, cor progressions A pretty universal, you know, just by changing the amount of beats that you play them and the rhythm that you play that can sound totally different. All right, now let's take that same court progression and we're gonna play it up here. I'm gonna start on G here upon the 10th for I'm gonna get the major t minor and see Major d made you so it's the same exact chord progression. I'm just changing. You know, I'm not playing sea based off the fifth straight. Now I'm playing Sea based off of the six string were kind of basically reversing out what we did. Um, with the first chord progression. Let's go ahead. Strung through that 1234 Let's go ahead and strong through that one more time. 12 34 I should mention when practicing core progressions by you can't get 1234 and then quickly switched to the next one. What? You probably aren't. If you're just learning bar chords, you're probably not going to be ableto quickly Switch between the bar chords, so just take your time. You know, just sit there. One zoo, three more. All right, Getting my next core. There's nothing wrong with taking time and setting up the next board because you're gonna have to do it Hundreds, if not thousands of times until your hand knows exactly where to go and you don't have to look. You don't think about it. It just magically goes there. It just magically grabs the cord, you know? So don't worry about you. Maybe you have to take one or two beats, maybe one three for three, for, you know, maybe have one or two beats to be able to keep in time to play for progression. You could always just get a metre and a mountain, said it like maybe 40 or 50. Do it real slow and then, you know, slowly increase it up. The bottom line is when getting down bar chords there what probably the hardest thing you're gonna have to do. That is just basic on guitar, So take your time, there's no hurry. Just practice him a lot and understand that it's gonna hurt your hands and that you're gonna have to practice, um, a lot until they get better. Might take three months, six months. But I just keep powering, throw it and I promise they will get a lot better. So that was bar chord exercise one where we took a core progression g major and played it in two different places. This is a skill that you will find in the future very helpful for playing other people's music. We're creating your own music. 22. Barre Chord Exercise 2: in this second bar court exercise, we're going to be playing a chord progression in C minor. And we're gonna be using the bar chords based off of the six in the fifth string. And we're gonna play it in two different places on the neck. The quick progression we're gonna be using in this bar Chord exercise number two. As we're gonna start with C Minor Way, we're gonna go to an F minor. We're gonna do a B flat, major G seven. All right, let's go ahead and play through the core progression. 12 34 Let's play through that core progression one more time. 12 34 All right, now we're gonna go up here. We're gonna play through the core progression up here. Let's take a look at how we're gonna do that. We're gonna start with C minor here on the A threat. Then we're gonna move over to the fifth string and doing have minor based off this F right here on the A. Friend. They were going to come back and do a B flat major based off the six string off people every year. And then we're gonna do it G seven, which is based off the Miss G here on the Fist during 10th. Fret like that. All right, now, go ahead and play through. 1234 Go ahead, do that one more time. 1234 So that was bar chord exercise, to my advice would be to take some of your favorite songs and go ahead and play through the song, or at least the main sections, the verse in the chorus using only bar chords and then try to do what we did in this lesson where you play it in two different places on the neck. Um, it's just fun. The corporations won't sound exactly how the song goes because, you know, the artist might be using all open chords, but it's still a very good exercise to Dio.