After Effects for Photography | Chris Converse | Skillshare

After Effects for Photography

Chris Converse, Designer & Developer

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21 Lessons (1h 33m)
    • 1. Using After Effects for Photography

      1:02
    • 2. About the exercise files

      0:40
    • 3. A brief intro to After Effects

      1:48
    • 4. Getting comfortable with the After Effects interface

      6:52
    • 5. Importing Photoshop files

      4:40
    • 6. Importing Camera RAW files

      3:04
    • 7. Exporting Photoshop, JPG and PNG files

      5:25
    • 8. Adding a sunset

      6:05
    • 9. Keying (removing) a background color

      5:37
    • 10. Add a burst of light

      7:01
    • 11. Adding a rippled reflection — Part 1

      7:11
    • 12. Adding a rippled reflection — Part 2

      3:34
    • 13. Double exposure portrait

      6:49
    • 14. Creating a duotone, a tritone, and a pentone

      6:04
    • 15. Mixing channels with the Channel Mixer

      6:30
    • 16. Changing colors with Colorama

      3:43
    • 17. Repeating patterns with MotionTile

      4:06
    • 18. Blending patterns with RepeTile

      4:25
    • 19. Texturizing patterns with Ball Action

      4:21
    • 20. Edging textures with Roughen Edges

      3:57
    • 21. Where to go from here

      0:26

About This Class

A lot can happen to your photographs after you hit the shutter. While color and exposure corrections are something photographers do every day, creating new and special effects offers a whole new world of possibilities for your photos. You might not know it, but After Effects works hand in hand with Photoshop—and it can help you achieve effects that could not be created with Photoshop alone. In this course, join Chris Converse as he demonstrates how to work with this versatile application to add interest to your photos. Learn how to add a sunset to a photo, create a double exposure effect, make dramatic color changes using the Channel Mixer effect, create repeating patterns with the Motion Tile effect, and more.

Transcripts

1. Using After Effects for Photography: Hi, I'm Chris Converse, and I'd like to welcome you to aftereffects for photography. Now this course is going to be very different from other aftereffects courses and that we're going to be focusing on using after effects to enhance, embellish and add special effects. Two photographs now at its core aftereffects is a design tool, and it works just like Photo Shop and the other court Creative Cloud design, APS. And with its support for camera raw, it also joins the ranks of light room and bridge. In fact, aside from a few naming differences, aftereffects has the same basic panels as the other design APS. And the best part is, if you're already familiar with photo shop, you already know the basics. In this course, we use effects toe augment, stylized and colorize some photographs, as well as create textures and patterns that are generated from our images. And don't worry if you've never used after effects before the introduction chapter walked you through the basic panels, makes comparisons between aftereffects and photo shop and shows you how to set up your own workspace. Plus, I'll be demonstrating every example step by step throughout the course, and so I hope you'll join me and using after effects for photography 2. About the exercise files: the exercise files for this course include a series of assets that you can use to follow along with me during the course. I would also occur due to some of your own photographs as well. Now, when you unzip the assets, there will be a few main folders Chapter one, Chapter two and so on. That will correspond to the chapters in the course, and each folder within those main chapter folders will contain a photo in either J Peg or Native Photoshopped format. And so now, if you're familiar with after effects, you can skip ahead to the next chapter and get started. However, if you've never used after effects before, the next three videos will give you a brief overview of after effects, including how to set up a workspace and had it both import and export your photos into and out of after effects. 3. A brief intro to After Effects: aftereffects works in much the same way as illustrator Photoshopped and in design. In fact, the main panels and aftereffects function the same way as panels in the other APS. The only real difference is what they're named the timeline panel in After Effects works like the Layers panel in the other APS. The composition panel is similar to the canvas and photo shop, and the project panel shows you linked files just like a linked smart object in Photoshop or the file Links panel in In Design and Illustrator. And finally, a pre comp or pre composed composition and after effects works like a smart object in Photoshop or a symbol on illustrator, allowing you to have multiple instances of the same artwork throughout your layout. And the best part is, if you already know Photoshopped, you already know half of what you need to know to use after effects. In photo shop, we can apply effects toe layers, then specify the properties. Aftereffects uses the same workflow to apply effects toe layers in the timeline panel. Now, when you first look at the aftereffects interface, it can be a little intimidating, but for this course, were only going to focus on a few panels. The timeline panel, which is where we'll find our layers. The composition panel where we can view and apply effect store photos. The project panel, which shows us all of the linked files as well as compositions and artwork that we may have created and the pre comes can be opened or closed in the timeline panel or open from the project panel now two panels that you won't see in the other design tools that I mentioned are the effects in presets panel, and the effect controls the effects and presets Panel works like the filter menu in photo shop, where you browse and apply effects toe layers. The effect controls panel works like the Layer Styles, dialogue box and photo shop, where you set the properties for the effects Ive applied to a layer. And so now, instead of continuing to talk about aftereffects, let's continue by opening aftereffects up and get started by creating our own workspace. 4. Getting comfortable with the After Effects interface: for this course, I'll be using the Creative Cloud 2019 version of after effects. However, most of this course will work back to some of the creative suite versions of after effects . So let's launch the application. And once it launches, you'll see a screen that will look something like this. Most of the panels will be blank. So just to make sure that we're all looking at the same similar interface, let's come up to the window menu. Let's come down the workspace and let's come down and choose a small screen. So with this workspace activated, you'll see the project panel over on the left hand side. This is where we'll see all of the artwork that we link into our project. Down at the bottom is the timeline panel. In the center is the composition panel, and over on the right hand side will see a series of additional panels. Let's come in here and close some of these panels over on the right hand side. So I see the library panel here. Let's click on the little menu icon. Let's choose clothes panel. Let's do the same thing for preview and for info. Now we want to leave the effects and presets up again. This works a lot like the filter menu in photo shop, and we need to bring up an additional panel, which is the effect controls. So let's go to the window menu, come down here and choose effect controls. And in the small screen workspace, this will show up next to the project panel. It's not a conflict between these two, so I like to have the effect controls next to my effects and presets. So let's come in here and click and drag, and you can drag these panels around the interface, not gonna drag this over here to the left hand side of the effects and presets. Then I'll let go, and that's gonna put the effect controls next to this. And now on my recording screen here. This is a lot smaller than my regular workspace, so I'm gonna come in here and take the effect controls and put this next to the effects of presets. This way I can switch between the effects and presets and the effect controls, and it will only take up the size of one panel. And so once you have the workspace set up the way you like it. I come in here and resize some of these panels a little bit. Let's come up to the window menu. Let's come down to workspaces. Let's come down and choose Save as new workspace and we'll name this photography. Think like OK, now this will show up right here in our toolbar. And so now let's import a file so we can see how the project panel shows us linked files and will create a composition and then placed the artwork in a composition so we can see the composition panel show as well as a layer in the timeline panel. So to do all of this, let's go to the file menu. Let's come down and choose import Choose file, and now you can locate any J peg on your system. I'm going to choose the pyramid at the Louvre, which is a photo that will be using later in the course click open. Now you'll see that photo showing up in the project panel. When you select it, you'll also see a preview here, which also tells you the pixel dimensions. Now, in order to place this into a project, we need to create a composition. This is very much like creating a new canvas inside a photo shop. So the first way we can do this is to come up to the composition menu, come down and choose new composition. You can also click this button here in the center if you're using a creative cloud version of after effects. So in either case, this will bring up the new composition dialog box. So we come in here, name this so I'll just name mine Pyramid down here under the width and the height. This is where you can set the pixel dimensions. And if you're going to be printing your photograph, you want to make sure that you include enough pixels to support the size of your print. And with a quick Web search, you'll find a chart similar to this which will give you that information. And so back in the composition settings for pixel aspect ratio, make sure you choose square. The frame rate doesn't matter. We're not gonna be creating an animation or rendering a video and down here for resolution , this is strictly for the preview inside of after effects. So if you have an older computer that renders rather slowly you can set this to half or 1/3 . This is kind of like setting proxy preview images inside of in design if you're familiar with that. But this is something that you can change throughout the project. This has no bearing on the actual pixels inside of your project. And finally you can come down here and choose a background color for the composition. Now, before I click OK, we want to come in here and add enough pixels to match the photograph that we imported. So from my composition, all come in here and set this to 4890 pixels for the width and 3150 pixels for the height. Again, this will match the J pick that I imported. Then I'll come down here and click OK, Vettel creating new composition Down here in the composition panel, we can see a magnification option. Let's come in here and change this to fit fit up 200%. What's nice about this is if I come in here and resize my panels the compositional dynamically resized. So that's a nice feature. And then over here we can see the resolution. So again, I can dynamically change this, depending on how much processing power I have. And again, this will help sort of speed up aftereffects if it slows down a little bit. So I'll leave this at half and now to import the J Peg. Let's come over here to the project panel. Grab the J Peg Dragon. Drop it. It'll snap into place, and this will not only show the photograph in the composition panel, but we'll also have our first layer in the timeline panel. So now that's the longer way of importing artwork and creating composition. So let me show you to faster ways to do the same thing. So I'll come in here to the composition panel selected J, pegging it delete, which will also remove the layer in the timeline panel. They don't come back to the project panel. I'll select the composition that shows here, click on the trash can. Let's delete that. So now when we're back to the original point where we imported the artwork to create a composition with the exact sizes that we need, let's come in here and simply select the J peg in the project panel and just drag and drop it right into the composition pale. And that's going to do the same thing. It's gonna create a composition for us automatically with the proper sizes. And it'll also placed the J peg on a layer in the timeline panel. So I'm gonna come in here and delete all of these now, And the fastest way to do this is to come over here If you're using the creative cloud version of after effects and click on this option here that says new composition from footage from this dialog box, choose your J pic file. Choose open and after effects will automatically import the J peg, create the composition and place the J peg on a layer in the timeline panel. So again, that last button will do all three of these things for you automatically. And this exact workflow is what we're gonna be using throughout the entire course. And so now that we've covered the interface and how we import artwork, create cops and work with the timeline panel next we're going to talk about some special options we have when we import Photoshopped files 5. Importing Photoshop files: aftereffects can import a wide range of file types, including many graphic file formats, some three D formats and, of course, a wide range of video formats. But when we import photo cell files intact effects, we get a couple of extra options. So I want to show you what's inside this photos up file before we bring us over to after effects. So here I have a smart object, which is an illustrator file brought into Photoshopped. I have a vector shape. Have another smart object of a larger graphic of a tree. We have a text layer, a regular old pixel layer, two adjustment layers and another smart object with the trees in the background. And again, I want to do to see all of the different layer types that we have here so that we can see how this translates over into after effects. So I'll close my photos a pile. Let's go back over to after effects in a blank new project inside of after effects. Let's come up to the file menu. Let's come down and choose import, then file, and they'll come in here and choose the same photo shop. I'll choose open and now will be presented with this dialog box. So what this is basically asking us is how we would like aftereffects to import that photo shop. I'll under import kind. This will default to composition because aftereffects can see all of the different layers inside the photo shop file. There's also composition retained layer sizes, which basically means that aftereffects will create varying sized cops based on artwork that is outside the canvas area. It won't be cropped, and then there's the option for footage. So if we were to choose footage, what this means is after effects will treat the entire layered Photoshopped file as a single piece of artwork. And when we do that, we can choose to bring all of the layers in as a single merged piece of art. Or we can choose a specific layer by choosing this option and then picking the layer. Now it's important to note that aftereffects will treat this as a merged composition. However, the original photo file will not be merged, so Aftereffects always maintains a live link back to the original photos up file. It just means that after effects will treat this as a single piece of parts, which may be something that you want to do depending on certain projects. For this particular example, I want to come in here and change this from footage to composition. Now we have to additional options. Since Aftereffects and Photoshopped both used effects in styles on layers, we have the choice of whether aftereffects will convert these styles from photo shop to after effects or if we would like aftereffects to simply take thes styles from Photoshopped . So for me, I typically like aftereffects to use the styles from photo shop, So I tend to use this option here, merge layer styles into footage again. This doesn't change the original photo shop I'll, but it just allows me to use Photoshopped to make all of my changes and addle of my effects and styling and special effects and after effects. But if you wanted to convert those, you could choose edible layer styles. So again we're going to choose composition, merge layer styles into footage and then click OK, and then once we choose, okay, we'll see. A few things have happened. We have a composition that shows up here, named after the name of the photos up ill and we also have a layer group here and inside of the groups. We can see all of the individual pieces of artwork that came in from individual layers from photo shop. So every one of these items is being treated as its own piece of art. Not to open this composition. We can double click on this. This will open the composition in the composition panel and down here in the timeline panel . By resize this, we'll see all of the individual layers. So this looks exactly like the original photo shop I'll. Every piece of artwork from the Layer group has been positioned on layers in the timeline panel. So again, this gives me a really quick way to build a composition inside of photo shop and simply import it and have it restructured inside of after effects. And as I mentioned before, Aftereffects maintains a live link back to that source. Photos up. I'll so I'm going to switch back over the photo shop and just make a couple of changes. So back inside of Photoshopped, I have the original file opened. Let's come up here and move the logo over here to the left. I grabbed the tree and move the tree over here to the right and then the text layer. I move this over to the left. I'll just make a change in the composition here. Then, inside a photo shop, I'll come down and simply choose file save, then go back to after effects and inside of after effects. I'll see all of the artwork is immediately updated based on those changes we made inside a photo shop. And so now that we've imported J pegs and Native Photoshopped piles next we'll take a look at importing camera raw files, and this puts aftereffects in a completely new group that includes light room, photo shop and Adobe bridge. 6. Importing Camera RAW files: aftereffects includes support for camera raw images just like light room, bridge and Photoshopped so you can import raw images directly into her project. And when you do, you'll see the familiar adobe camera raw dialog box. And once you choose your settings, aftereffects will then open the image with the adjustments and create an ex MP sidecar file just like the other Adobe APS. Which means that the other APS can also open that raw image with the same settings. So let's take a quick look at the camera workflow inside of after effects. So inside of after effects, I'm gonna come up to the file menu inside of a new untitled project. Let's come down and choose Import, then file and then on my desktop. Welcome up here and choose this camera file and then come down and choose open. The next thing L. C. Is thief familiar Adobe camera, Raw interface again, the same interface you'll see in the other adobe APs. Well, come in here and make some adjustments, so the first thing I'll do is increase the temperature a little bit here just to warm this up. So bring us up to about 75 50 scroll down a little bit. I'm losing a lot of detail in the shadows down here. Let's go over here to the shadows. Let's increase that to somewhere around 45 or so. Must've been. Increase the blacks as well, maybe up to run 50 or 60 somewhere in that range. So I can now see all this detail showing up and then down here at the bottom I like to have . My image is a little more saturated, so I'll bring the saturation up a little bit vibrance even more. And then, just to help define some of the shapes in the clouds. Here, let's come over to D. Hayes, and I'll just bring us up to about 18. So again you can make your adjustments based on the camera imager bringing in and your personal preferences. I like the way this is looking. So I come over here and click OK, that's going to import this camera file into after effects, and since I did have the create a composition check box selected, I also get a composition, and now we can see the showing up in our project. So now I go out to the desktop we'll see that we now have an ex MP file or a sidecar file that matches the file name of my camera Raw image. This means any other Adobe application that I open where the sidecar file is present. Next to the camera image. That application will be able to open this camera image with the same settings and now back in after effects. If I want to change the camera import settings, I can come over here to the project panel. I can select the camera image. Then I'll right click, come down and choose, replace footage, choose file, and then on the desktop, I'll pick the same camera image, come down and choose open, and now I'll be presented with my dollar box again. And since the ex MP sidecar exists next to the camera image, these are all of the settings that I just set before. So I'm come in here and make adjustments. Click OK, and the adjustments will then be applied here in addition to being updated in the ex MP file. And so now that we've covered a range of import options next, let's take a look at how we can export our photographs from after effects 7. Exporting Photoshop, JPG and PNG files: The key way we use after effects in non video related projects is to export a composition directly to the Photoshopped format, complete with layers and full transparency. Now, Photo Shop is one of the most widely used graphic applications, and its native PSD format is compatible with a wide range of other applications from other creative cloud applications by adobe toe all kinds of other applications available for both desktop and mobile devices. And in addition to PSD files, aftereffects can also render directly to J Peg and full a pit transparent ping files. Now these aren't the only files that aftereffects can export to, but these are the ones that you'll use mostly in your photography projects. So let's take a quick look at how we can export from after effects to each of these file types. So here, inside of after effects, I have a composition that I want export to a transparent Photoshopped file. And so, for this example, you don't need to follow along. This is actually one of the exercises that would be doing in Chapter one, so I'll start by making my keying plug invisible by clicking this icon here and in the main composition area. You can see the great background. If I come down here to the bottom center and turn on the checkerboard, we can see the transparency that showing here. So to get this out to photo shop, what they need to do is make sure that I have the composition panel selected. I need to make sure that the preview is in full resolution, and then I come up to the composition menu, come down to save, frame as and choose photo shop players. I'll save this to the desktop. I'll name this Greens underscore keyed formats. Photoshopped choose save. And if I go back out to the desktop, I'll see greens key dot psd showing up all double click that file and that will open this up inside a photo shop. So you're inside a photo shop. I can see my layer showing up. I came in here and creating new layer. Fill it with black, put in the background. It's like my greens layers. Maybe move these around. You can see that all of that beautiful transparency has been preserved from the original Aftereffects file and now another format that will support all of the transparency is a pink file, so let's go back to after effects and let's save this file out as a 24 bit ping file. So to do that, we're gonna come up to the composition menu, but the composition panel selected Come down and choose, Save Frame as and choose file. This is gonna bring up another panel inside of after effects called the Render Queue. It will resize this a little bit. So the render queue is basically where aftereffects can render out all of the compositions , whether it's video or a static frame based on what's happening inside the composition panel . So from the Render queue under render settings, we're gonna come in here. If we click on current settings, we can see all of the different property showing up here. These will match the composition settings so we can see the size here, for example, let's say cancel. Let's go back to output module. Let's click on the word Photoshopped. Here. We can choose what type of file we'd like to export out. Let's change photo shop sequence to ping sequence for the video output, make sure we choose RGB plus Alfa, so this means the artwork plus the Alba Channel. Let's click. OK, let's click on the name for output to. This is where the file is gone to be saved. I'll choose the desktop. It was renamed this greens underscore, keyed to save and then over on the far right hand side. Let's come up here and click on Render Aftereffects will export a ping file with all of the transparency. So just to preview this, let's come back to the desktop. Let's open this up inside a photo shop and we could see all of the transparency preserved here as well. So you can use this particular file in any project or application that supports Ping files . And so now that we've looked at exporting to different formats that include transparency, let's go back to after effects and export of J pic file. So have a different file open here and let's do the same thing. Let's select the composition panel. Then let's choose composition down to say frame as well. Choose file again and now inside of the render queue, let's click on the name Photo Shop. Let's change this to a J pic sequence next to the video output. Let's choose format options. Here. You can set your compression level, so nine is fine. We'll leave it there. Let's click. OK, click OK again. Next, we'll choose where to save this. Next click on the file name next to the output to Well, just name this luv pyramid dot J peg. We'll target the desktop Click save, and then let's come over and click Render. Once that's done, will have a new J pic file on the desktop. And again, I'll just double click to open this up inside a Photoshopped to preview this. And now we can see the JPEG file that was generated directly from after effects. Not for the majority of my projects. I used to Photoshopped format. It's faster, and the format is widely supported. However, if you do need a ping or J Peg or any of the other formats that aftereffect supports, you can use the render queue to get a much wider range of file options. So now if you've been watching these introductory videos, then you're ready to start adding some special effects to photography. So grab your photographs and let's continue on in the next chapter 8. Adding a sunset: So here's a photograph of a lake where I was trying to get a picture of the sunset, but I missed it by about 15 minutes. So what we're gonna do is add the sunset back in using the light rays effect. So to create this affected aftereffects, let's come to the file menu. Let's choose new his new project. So in a new untitled project, let's go back to the file menu. Let's choose import Choose file and let's choose the lake that J Peg file from Folder one of the Chapter one folder of the exercise files. I'll keep the option checked here for create composition, then choose open so that will import my J pic file. But the J pic file in a composition, and I can see the J pig file now showing up as a layer in the timeline panel as well. So now let's go over to our effects and presets in the top search area. Let's come in here and search for the word raise. R. A. Y s We're looking for CC light rays under the generate group. Now it's click and drag and drop this right on top of our image and then you'll see this little registration mark showing up here. This is actually the center point of the effect. You can click on this and drag it around and see what happens as we get two more contrast that areas of the photo will see the light rays emanating out from there. So this is a really beautiful effect. So what we're gonna do is let's drag this over to the right hand side. Let's take some cues from the original photograph, which indicates that the sun set was somewhere around this area. So it wouldn't look realistic if we were to put it over here. For example. Let's go over here. Let's set this to about right here. I'm actually gonna bring us down a little bit into the tree area. So maybe to about right here and over in the effect controls, we can see all of the properties that are defined by default. So we have an intensity set to 100 here, for example. So let's come in here and let's increase the intensity a little bit. You can click on these numbers and drag them to increase them so I would increase this by quite a bit. You'd see that That would make the effect much stronger. We're gonna bring us up to about 120. I can type that in hit tab for the radius. Let's increase this to about 50. We'll just drag this up a little bit. This is thesis Eyes of the area that is creating the light race for the warp softness. We're gonna bring this down to zero, so to see what the warp softness does, I'm gonna bring this to an area where this is generating some rays so I can see these showing up here. So the warp softness, if I were to increase this, it actually replicate some of the pixels in that original area because the pixels are sort of being broadcast out at you. So let's come in here and change that down to zero. This will make the light rays much crisper for the shape. Let's come in here and change it from round two square. That will give us the ability to rotate this so the directional option becomes available. I can click and drag and protect this around. I'm gonna come down and just drag this into the trees again. Just a little bit and I'm gonna rotate this little bit. What I want to have happen is I want to have some of the rays coming in front of the trees and just coming across the lake a little bit and continue to move this around until I get some of that effect moves to right about here. So now the razor looking realistic, the further away we get from the radius because if this were actually reflecting on her lens, the light would be much less saturated out on the edges. But in the center here, this isn't looking very realistic. It's too white. So I'm also gonna come up here, just increase the intensity just a little bit. They will bring this up to about 145. And now what we're gonna do is come in here and select this effect. And on the Mac, you can hit command D and on the Windows machine, you can hit control D, and we're gonna duplicate this effect. So talk to close the 1st 1 And in the 2nd 1 what we're gonna do is come down here and uncheck this option that says color from source. What this will allow us to do is at our own color for the light. So once that's unchecked, the color field will become activated. Let's come in here and click on this watch and inside of here, let's pick a medium orange color. So pick a color right around this range and you can see the effects right away. This looks much more realistic, so let's click. OK, I might also come in here and change the direction a little bit. Just angle this around a little bit. So we get some of the rays matching the previous settings of the first instance of the effect so brings to about right here. And finally, to finish the effect, we're going to need to add a light ray on the water as well, because we would see a reflection. So I got ta go closed the second instance of the light rays effect. Let's select it, Commander Control D. Let's duplicate that one more time. Let's bring the intensity on this down a bit. Maybe to around 90. Let's grab the center point. Let's drag this down. The reflection would actually be about right here, above the trees but I'm gonna actually bring this down just a little bit further to about right here, right before the bottom clouds. Then we'll come back, changed the square to round color from source will leave that unchecked, and then let's come in here and set a dark red color. Then we'll choose. OK, so what this is doing is reflecting against the water. So we don't want to have this square shape because we don't want to create the extra raise . But we do want to create the effect of the water reflecting the sun from the eyrie above the trees. And so at this point, if you want to see it before and after you can come down to the timeline panel and on the lakes layer, you can come in here and toggle off the effects, and this will turn on and off all three instances of the light rays effect. Then once you look at the before and after, you can come back here and you can make changes to any one of these instances, and then you can modify the settings until you get in the fact that you like, and so by adding multiple instances of in effect, were able to add a sunset into our photograph 9. Keying (removing) a background color: many times. Your photography may be used in a graphic design project, and designers may need to remove the background. So here's a technique for removing a solid color from your photo. And while you can certainly do this inside a photo shop, I would argue that it can be done much faster and after effects. So if you're following along, created new project inside of after effects. And then let's import the Green Start J pic file from Folder two of the Chapter one folder in the exercise files. And so, once you have your J Peg imported and your composition created, let's come over here to the effects and presets. Let's come in here and search for key lights, so just type in K ey. We're looking for Key Light 1.2 under the key and group. So let's grab this. Let's drag and drop it right on top of the J peg. So now inside of the effect controls, we can come in here and we're gonna be working with the screen color, gain and balance. So the first thing we want to do is pick the color that we want a key. Let's go over here and select the eyedropper, and what we want to do is pick in even color in the background. So I don't want to pick a color where there's some shadows. I want to pick a color, maybe up in the upper right hand corner, right about here, and with one single click, we'll see the color disappear. Not to see the checkerboard in the composition panel. You can come down here next to the active camera, and you can toggle the checkerboard view on and off. The checkerboard view is something that you might be familiar with from photo shop. So if I turn this off, my background color of my composition is gray, and I can see some of the hot spot showing up here from some of the lights from the cameras . Shoot. I have to change the background color of the composition. Let's go the composition menu. Let's come down to competition settings and let's come in here and change this to black click. OK, that's going to really show the hot spot area over here. What's going to come in here and zoom in a little bit? You can hit your period key on the keyboard, with the composition panel selected to zoom in, or the comic E, which is the greater than the less than signs to zoom out. It's gonna zoom in, hit the space bar, click and drag and look at the hot spot area over here and now. The nice thing here is that the hot spot is relatively small. We used a matte finish fluorescent colored paper behind the spices and herbs over here so that we would get a nice clean key. However, you're always going to get a little bit of a hot spot. So to make some adjustments, let's come over here to the effect controls. Let's come in here and play with the screen game. If we were to take the screen gain and lower this were actually lowering the amount of the original color that we sampled here from the background image, and if we were to increase this, the more we would increase this. This will begin to cut in to the original subject matter, although this will get rid of the hot spot. So we want to find a nice balance here. So I'm gonna come in here and bring this to about 110. So 100 and 10 is going to significantly reduce the hot spot area. So it's not touching any of the main subject matter, But we're also keeping all of the detail of the main subject here. Now, the other thing that we can do is it justice screen balance? This controls how much of the color is being removed from reflections on the main subject. And again, since we use that really Matt colored fluorescent paper, we didn't get a lot of reflection, and we're getting a really good key. So I'm gonna come in here and remove the balance and bring this down to zero. So we're not gonna get any extra transparent pixels beyond what might have been in the original reflections. I'll come down here and turn on the checkerboards and see what this would look like in photo shop. And once this looks pretty good, we're gonna make sure that we have the composition panel selected. Make sure your resolution is set to full resolution. This is the preview area. And then let's come up here to the composition menu. Let's come down to save frame as then choose photo shop players, so I'll save this to the desktop. I'll name this greens underscore, keyed, come down and choose Save. And then once that saves, I'm going to go to the desktop. And let's open this up inside a photo shop. So inside the photo shop will have a single layer showing up here with our checkerboard in the background, indicating that this is fully transparent. So to demonstrate this, I'll come down here and the layers panel critic New Layer. I'll fill it with black. I'll move it to the background and we can see remain subject against that background. And now, in this video recording, it may be difficult to see the hot spot in the lower left hand corner. But we're gonna come down here and add a layer mask. So I'm gonna pan over here so that this is much larger on the screen, so I hope you can see it. Let's come back to the layers panel. I'll select the greens that J peg layer. Let's apply a layer mask. I could have the letter B for my brush tool, gonna make sure that my brush is set to something soft down here for the foreground. background color will hit the X key to put Black on the foreground. He's my right bracket to increase my breast size. Make sure I'm on the mask and I'm just gonna come in here and paint the hot spot out from the image. And so once I like that, I can come back to the layers panel. Let's delete that background layer. Let's choose file, save our photo shop pile. And now we're ready to hand this off to a graphic designer who can incorporate this photograph in their design project. 10. Add a burst of light: in this example will be adding a lighting effect toe a photo composite that I got from Adobe stock. And before I continue, I would like to thank the stock team for giving me permission to include this watermarked image in this course. Now I've separated these elements out in photo shop. So before we continue, I'd like to show you the photos up file before we imported into after effects. So here in a photo shop, I want to take a look at the file that we're going to be importing into after effects. Now, you don't have to open this, but I just want to show you what's in here so we can understand how after effects will convert this into its own structure. So in the layers panel inside a photo shop, I have to layer groups one that contains all of the text groups, one that contains the hand which I have silhouetted out. They get the move to Elikann, move this around that I've also created to white layers one in the shape of the text, which is this layer here, and one in the shape of the hand, which is this layer here which also has a layer mask on it. So what we're gonna be doing is applying the light burst effect to both of these white layers. And this will give us that beautiful volumetric lighting effect because the lighting effect will be applied to all of the non transparent pixels. And any time the light bursts through a pixel, finds negative space and then hits another pixel. It's going to compound that light again, giving us that sort of volumetric effect. And then we have a layer group down at the bottom as well, so each the layer groups in photo shop are going to be converted to compositions inside of after effects. So this will be the first time that we've seen nested compositions inside of after effects . And so now that we've seen the structure of the photo shop fire we're going to be importing , let's go back to after effects. Let's create a new project, and then let's go to the file menu, come down and choose import Choose file and let's find the file called Handout PSD in Folder three of the Chapter one folder of the exercise files. And then, as we discussed in the introduction videos when we import a photos up file with multiple layers will be presented with a couple of import options. So what we're gonna chooses under import kind this composition and then let's come down and check the check box here that says, Merge layer styles into footage with these two selected, Let's click OK, and then we'll see in the project panel, a new composition and a layer group. If we open up the Layer Group or the Project group, we can see all of the compositions that correspond toothy, different layer groups we had inside a photo shop as well as all of the individual layers. So let's close that and what we're gonna do is come over here and just double click on the hand composition and that will open up the composition in the composition panel. I'll change my magnification to fit, and then we scroll down and look at the timeline panel. We'll see that the main timeline panel for the main composition matches Theo exact structure we had inside a photo shop. So we see are two compositions. At the top are two white layers for the text in the hand and our background group. So now, with this in place, let's go to our effects and presets and let's come in here and search for the word burst. B U R S t We're looking for CC light burst 2.5 in the generate group, and now what we want to do is apply the light burst to the white text layer. If we were to simply drag this from the effects and presets, it would be applied to the top layer, which would be the text layers composition. So to do this, let's go back to the effects and presets. Let's click on Sisi Light burst, click and drag, and let's drag it into the timeline panel and drop it on top of the white text layer. And then there's two ways you'll know if you've applied it to the right layer. First is on the white text layer. You'll see the effect icon showing up here on this layer, and the more obvious way is if you see this effect showing up here, where the light burst is being applied to that white text. So now with this being applied, let's go to our effect controls. Let's come in here and let's first adjust the center point. So the center point, if we start moving some of these round will show, is a registration mark on the composition. You can click and drag this, and so this is a really great effect, because we can drag this anywhere, and this will affect all of the pixels on that text layer as if they were being bursted with light. So to make this look more realistic, let's come in here and set Theseus enter point to the middle of the moon, which is where all of the rest of the lighting in this composition is being set from. So put this right about here. Next over in the effect controls. Let's come in here and increase the length of the Rays. Right now the default is 50. Let's just drag this up, and the larger you make this, the longer the Rays are from the burst. So I come in here and set this to about 160. There's a couple of different burst options here. Fade is the one that looks the most realistic. However, if you come in here and choose straight, you'll see what happens here the Rays will not fade away. They'll just sort of stay on forever. And then if we come down to center, they will sort of bend and wrap around on themselves. What's really happening is the rays are ending, so they're just sort of curving back. Let's come in here and choose fade. Now. The intensity is actually applied to the color, so it's come in here and check the check box for set color. And the intensity is basically how much the light affects the color. It's almost like the color is a gel. Let's come in here and reduce the intensity down to zero. So we get the full color of this watch. Then let's click on the swatch and let's change the light to a very light blue. So it just sort of matches some of their the lighting and the composition that brings us to about right here. We don't need to make it too dark, but just a little bit of a blue tent. And then, once you like the effect, we need to apply this to the white hand layer as well. So, in the effect controls, let's select the light burst Commander Control see to copy that. Then let's come down to the timeline panel, select the white hand liar and then hit Commander Control V, and this will paste all of the effects onto the hand layer as well. Now, since the hand is behind the type, what I want to do is move the center point just a little bit, so all of the light rays aren't matching exactly. It's all come back here to the center point, and I'm going to increase the value of the Y axis, which will push the center point down just a little bit. And that will give us a slight variation between the burst on the text in the hand. And so now you can continue to experiment with different settings, and you can also apply the light birth to any layer. You don't have to create white silhouette layers in order for this to work. However, to get some of that volumetric effect, I found that creating those white layers first and applying that burst to those will give me a much more realistic effect 11. Adding a rippled reflection — Part 1: In this two part example, I want to Adam or exaggerated ripple effect to the reflection in my photo. So here, in part one, I'll begin by opening the luv dot pyramid file in Photoshop to show you the mascot I've created before we import this into after effects. So basically I have a layer that I've duplicated on the top layer I ever the layer mask and on the bottom layer, we can see the reflection through the hole that's created by the mask. So what we're gonna be doing inside of after effects is applying a rippling effect to the reflection layer. So back in after effects. Let's start with a new project. Then let's go to the file menu. Let's come down and choose Import Choose file and let's find the file called luv pyramid dot psd from Folder four in the Chapter one folder in the exercise files. I'm going to uncheck, create composition. We're going to set that inside of after effects. We'll come down and choose open than for import kind. Choose composition, but the options choose. Merge layer styles into footage and then click OK, and now, in the project panel, we can see our new composition was created. We'll also see inside of this layer group. We have our pyramid and the reflection. Let's come in here and double click on the composition toe open. That in the main composition window will decrease the size of my timeline a little bit here and now. The first thing we need to do is create some artwork that we can use as a displacement map so that we can create that rippling effect. So what we're going to do is to create a blank layer, is go up to the layer menu, come down and choose new, and then come down and choose solid. Now a solid is a way that we can create a blank object inside of after effects that we can then apply effects, too. So for the name, let's name this fractal. We want this to be the size of the composition, so it should default to 4890 by 3150. If it doesn't, you can come down and click on make com size. The color doesn't matter. Make sure you have square pixels and then let's choose. OK, so now in the Timeline panel. We have a brand new blank layer here. We'll also see in the project panel we have a folder called Solids with our fractal solid inside of there. So now, with the fractal layers selected, let's go to the effects and presets. Let's come in here and search for fractal noise. So type fractal. We'll find fractal noise here in the Noise and grain group. And then let's apply this to our new solid. Now let's go over to the effect controls. Let's come in here and first change the fractal type. Let's come down and change this two strings. There's a bunch of different options in here. If you want to come in here and just play with a couple of different settings, you can see what the's will dio. This is kind of like the difference Clouds and Photoshopped, but there are a lot more options, so come down here in two strings for the noise type. Let's come in here and change this to linear, and then we'll also want to decrease the contrast a little bit. What we're gonna be doing is using this as a displacement map. And so what that means is the lightest and darkest areas will create the biggest sort of difference between the displacement amount. So we want to add a little bit of gray here, so it's not too sharp. Let's come in here and decrease the contrast to somewhere around 62 63. And so now, with our fractal properties set, let's now rotate this layer of this solid so that it will better match the perspective of the photograph. So to do that, let's come down to the timeline panel and on the layer for the solid. Let's come over here and check this check box under the Cube, which will turn this into a three D layer. So once we've enabled this, we have two ways that we can rotate this. The first way is to come up to the tools and click on the rotation tool. With this selected, we can come over here and hover over the X axis for the X Y and Z arrows. If I click on this and drag up, we can actually rotate this in three D space forward, and the second way we can do this with a little bit more control is to come down to the timeline panel going to increase mine a little bit. Here, toggle. Open this little arrow next to the swatch color for the fractal Open up, transform. And in here we can see this orientation group, which is enabled because we applied three D to this and then we come in here and we can rotate the X axis, which is the first set of values here. So let's come in here and let's set this to about 280 degrees. I can rotate this back to about right here. We're also gonna change a few other properties here as well. Next, let's change this scale. We want to actually stretch this out a little bit. The strings. We're going to give us a nice water effect, but we want to actually stretch this mawr on the horizontal. So let's uncheck the link which links thescore Ale of the X, Y and Z, and then on the X, which is the width. Let's come in here and increase this to about 500%. I'm gonna click and drag and drag this up, maybe to about 5 20 somewhere in this range here and then let's also come in here and change the scale of the height. We're gonna change this to just about 100 and 50. So bring this to about right here. Then let's click our move tool. Then let's come up here and grab this layer and let's pull it down. We want to pull this down to about right here. We want to fully cover the mask area that we created inside a photo shop so that we can apply this just of the reflection. But we want to make sure that thesis alit is higher than the reflection area. So with all of these in place, I'm going to close up all the properties inside of the layer panel. And now the last thing we need to do here, in part one, is to wrap this solid into a composition. This way, When we used this as a displacement map, we won't be using the black solid but will be using the solid in addition to the fractal effect that will be inside of the composition. And this is much like working with smart objects and smart filters inside a photo shop. That's what we're gonna do is select the fractal layer at the top of the timeline. Then we're gonna go up to the layer menu and we're going to come down and choose pre compose. So we're gonna name this fractal comp, and we want to make sure that we checked thesis condemned Radio button here which says Move all attributes into the new composition. This will take all of the fractal noise effects and put them inside of this composition again so that when we use this as a displacement map, the composition will include all of the fractal noise information. So with that in place, let's come down and click, OK? And so now, on the top of the timeline layer, we now have a composition, will also see that appear in the project panel. And now we can continue in the next video and apply a displacement map to the reflection and use the artwork from this composition here 12. Adding a rippled reflection — Part 2: This is part two of the two part example on creating a rippled reflection in a photograph. So if you're following along, we completed adding a solid tour composition, making it a three D layer and wrapping it into a nested composition. So now we'll continue by adding an effect to the reflection layer and using this nested composition as a map for the displacement. So the first thing we'll do inside of our aftereffects file is hide the fractal com that we created, and we'll just use a little eyeball over here to hide this. Next. Let's come down and select the reflection layer. Then let's go back to the effects and presets and let's come in here and search for the word displacement so I'll just type in displace. So here, under Distort, we'll see displacement map. Now we want to apply this to the reflection layer, so since the reflection layer is selected, we could come in here and simply double click, and that will apply this effect to the reflection layer. You could also click and drag and drop it onto the reflection layer in the timeline panel. Either way, you'll see the effect icon on the reflection layer. So now that this is applied now, let's go to our effect controls. And the first thing we need to do for the displacement map layer is choose which layer we would like to use as the map for the displacement. Let's come in here and select layer one, the fractal comp next for the horizontal displacement. Let's come down here and change this from red down toe luminant. And let's did the same thing for the vertical displacement as well. Now, over in the composition panel, I'm going to zoom up here a little bit so you can see what's happening on my screen, a pen over a little bit. So we're gonna be seeing the displacement happening in this area here, which is where we can see through the mask we created in our photos up file. So back over to the effects and presets. Let's come in here to the horizontal displacement. If you come in here and hover over the value of five and just drag this up, you'll see that the pixels will be warped based on the fractal noise pattern inside of that fractal comp composition, and you can also drag this to negative numbers as well. So for the horizontal displacement amount, let's come in here and set this to about 74. So I dragged this to about right here. Next, let's come down to the vertical displacement. Let's come in here. Let's use a negative number. And let's just bring this down to about negative 48. So somewhere in this range. So I don't want to set the vertical displacement to as high number as the horizontal displacement, since I want toe sort of account for the depth of field and the perspective of the photograph. So I dragged us to somewhere about in this range here, and the other really beautiful thing that's happening here is we're getting some of these reflections here, which actually makes it look like the waves in the fountain are reflecting some of the pyramid above. And you can come in here and adjust the settings toe what you think looks best. It's all coming here and zoom out. I'll choose Zoom to fit. I'll decrease my timeline size a little bit here, and the last option I want to enable in the effect controls is the rat pixel around option and what this will do is fill in some of those gaps that we're seeing based on some of the horizontal displacement. And now, based on the photograph that you're working with, you can adjust the horizontal and vertical amounts for the displacement, and you can also go back into the fractal comp composition and change the properties of the fractal a swell. 13. Double exposure portrait: in this example will use the magnify effect to create a double exposure effect on a portrait. And before I continue, I'd like to thank the Adobe Stock Team for giving me written permission to include this watermarked image in the course. So back in after effects to begin, Let's go to the file menu and create a new project. Let's go back to the file menu. Let's come down and choose import Choose file and let's locate the portrait dot J pic file , which is in Folder six of the Chapter one folder of the exercise files. And once you've located the file, make sure to uncheck create composition. We want to create our own composition size. Let's click open. So now we have a JPEG file imported into the project panel. We have no compositions created and no layers in the timeline panel. Now. The reason we wanted to do this is because we're going to be magnifying this image, and we want to make sure that we don't magnify larger than the original size. So the size here is 3600 by 2400 so let's come up to the composition menu. Let's choose new composition from the composition settings. Let's come in here and name this portrait and let's change the width to half of the width of the original file, which would be 1800 pixels. Hit tab. Let's set the height to half of the original height. There is a new heights 2400 so we'll put this at 1200. Make sure you uncheck lock aspect ratio so you can set these independently square pixels. Everything else can remain the same. That much is okay. So now with our composition created, let's come over to the project panel. Let's grab the portrait that J pic file. Let's drag and drop it and dragged the center point to the center of the composition. It should snap into place. So now with that place, let's go down to the timeline panel. Let's toggle open. The properties will increase my timeline a little bit. Here, Let's open up, transform. Let's find scale. Leave the link checked and let's come in here and change the scale from 100% to 50% Hit tab and your photos should be perfectly positioned inside of the composition area. So again, we're looking at the photo at half the size because we're going to magnify this to create the portrait. So let's hide the properties for the portrait layer. Then let's come in here and let's duplicate that portrait layer. So what? That selected hit commander Control de to create a duplicate and for the top layer, make sure this is selected. Let's come over to the effects and presets and then in the search field. Let's search for magnify so I'll just type M A. G and I that'll be enough to filter down to the magnifying effect, which is in the distort group. So let's select this, and you can double click it since the top layer is selected or you can drag and drop this. Either way, let's apply this effect to the top layer, and now it might not look like anything's happened. But if you come over here to the center and grab the registration point, you CA NBA gin to move this around and this will act like a small magnifying glass over the image. So I'm gonna do is bring this over to be above his face. I'll put it right on his cheek here for a moment and then over in the effect controls. Let's come in here and change some properties. So first, let's go to the magnification. So the default is 150%. By lower this down to 100 you'll see the effect on the composition. It'll match his cheek from the original size. Let's come in here and increase this up to about, let's say, 260%. I'm gonna go a little larger than the original pixels, but it's not gonna be that much larger. Next, let's come over here to the shape the shape is set to a circle by default, which is what I want to keep. But you could come in here and change this to a square. So depending on the type of effect in the photograph you're working with, this might be useful. So I come back and change this to a circle. Next, let's come down to the size. This controls the size of the magnified area. I come in here and increase this, and I won't increase this to a pretty large amount. Gonna bring this up to about 1000 40 pixels. So type in 2040 then click away now we can see more of his face. We're also gonna want to come down and click on this option here resize layer to make sure that we have the extra pixels that we need outside of the composition area. And finally, let's come in here to feathering. So if I come in here and increase the feathering, this increases the sort of blend or the feathering on the outside magnification area. So to make this effect really obvious, let's come in here and add about 190 pixels. That's really gonna soften up those edges. And now the last setting will take a look at is the blending mode so we can come over here and apply a different blending mode for the magnification. So I came down here and select overlay, so I really like the way the overlay looks. However, the problem I have is, if I come over here and change the center point, I'm changing the center point of where the original magnification is being sampled from, and what I'd like to do is take the magnification area and move it over here to the left hand side of the photograph. So to do that Let's come back over here to the blending mode and let's change this to none . So what that's basically doing is it's on Lee showing me the magnification area. It's not showing me the original photograph, So if I come down to the timeline panel and hide the underneath layer, I'm only looking at the magnification for the top layer. So it basically separated the magnification from the original image. So now down in the timeline panel, let's come down here and let's turn on our blending modes. It's this little icon here if you don't see them. So over here in the MODES column, let's come in here and set the mode to overlay. And then let's come over here and select the top layer. And now I can simply click and drag this and move it around That can position this where I'd like it to be in the composition area. So this in place I come over here and change a few other properties. I might increase the size a little bit, which is the size of the magnification area. I might also increase or decrease the magnification itself, and then I got an come over here and just move this to where I want this to show up. So by combining the magnify effect with a second copy of the same layer, we get a lot of control over creating our double exposure and being ableto fully edit all of the properties that create this effect. 14. Creating a duotone, a tritone, and a pentone: in this example will take a look at this cc toner effect, and this is an interesting colorizing effect that quickly replicates to color printing techniques as well as three and five custom color renditions of your photograph. And so, if you're following along with me, start a new AFTEREFFECTS project, then go to the file menu down to import, then file, and this will be in Folder one in the Chapter two folder of the exercise files. So once you've selected this, come down and choose open, then I'll drag this into the composition area to create a new composition. Then let's go over to the effects and presets and let's come in here and search for toner T o N E r. This will bring up thesis C toner effect inside of the color correction group. So to begin, let's click and drag this and drop it on top of the J Peg file. So here you'll see the default, which is a tri tone. So to begin exploring this effect, let's come over here and change the tones from tri tone to do a tone. So this will replicate the photograph in two colors. So if I come down here to shadow. Let's come down here and click on this. Watch the blacks watch and let's come in here and just change the color. So if I move this around, you'll see that all of the colors that were being replicated in black are now being replicated in this color. Come in here and just move this around little bit. Change the colors. She'll choose a sort of dark blue here. Click OK. We can also come in here and change the highlight colors. Click on the whites, watch and come in here, and we can mix the two colors together. Maybe pick a yellow gold color something. It would be a good complement. Or maybe something here where this little bit of green. So you have any number of combinations that you can choose between the highlight color and the shadow color. And this could be a really great technique to style eyes, a photograph to match some corporate branding. So now let's take a look at the tri tone settings, so undertones. Let's change to atone to try tone. Let's come up and click. Reset. Now we'll come in here. The mid tones are the only ones that show a particular color. We have white and black as the highlight and shadow default. So if I click on the middle swatch and come in here, we can dramatically change the overall color range of the tri tone. Come in here and choose blue again. Or maybe something in the greens. So I think what I'll do is let's come in here and choose something in the violets. Still to something somewhat in the middle. Let's click. OK, let's come up to the highlights in here I'll click on the eyedropper tool. I'll eyedropper the mid tone violet, and then I'll drag this up to the left sort of Dagnall here to pick a lighter sort of violet color to match the mid tone. Click OK, and then for the shadows, we can come in here again, maybe sample the purple of the violet. Let's make it a darker color, and I could make something that looks kind of like a do a tone. But I have three different colors. Or of course, we can come in here and dramatically change the colors, even changing the lightness values. So I'll click. OK, here, Let's go back to the highlights. We'll click on this. What I'm gonna do is come in here and set this to a slightly darker blue. Something down in this range. Click OK for the mid tone color. Let's come in here and let's set this to a sort of light yellowy green. Drag this up to about right here. Pull the color down a little bit. Maybe something around in this range and then for the shadows. Let's come in here and let's set this to sort of a medium pink color. Grab the pink. Bring this to about right here. Bring this up. Gonna mix this a little bit here, and I'm gonna go back to the green and let's come in here and just push a little bit more yellowing here. And that's going to react with the paint, giving me this sort of orangish color in the background here. So again, there's any number of combinations that you can use to replace individual colors using the C C toner effect. And so now, when the effects controls, let's come up here. Click reset. More, more time. Let's change this to a pen tone, and then let's come in here and change any of these five colors. So to begin for the highlights, let's come in here. Let's change this to a dark blue and you can see that affecting the shell. Let's click OK, next for the brights. Let's come in here and let's set this to a light blue. So I want this to be somewhat close to the highlights color, but just a lot later in value. We'll come in here and select a color around right here. Then I'll drag this up a little bit. Maybe into this range here. Maybe it's not quite a saturated, and we can see the effect showing up here. Let's click OK. Next. I want to make the mid tone a sort of light red wine color. Let's come in here and choose a color here. Let's go down below the reds into the pinks a little bit. Make this a little bit darker. Get this to about right here. Click OK, next for the dark tones. Let's come in here. Use the eyedropper. Let's grab the color. We just previously made for the mid tones. And then let's drag this down to make that a lot darker. So what this is doing is giving me sort of a do it own effect in the background while still having what looks like a duo tone effect on the Schellas. Well, because again, we have five colors to play with here, let's look OK. Then let's go back to the shadows and I'm gonna come in here and set this to a really dark violet. Well, this drag this down really far here. Now the violent will give me a nice interplay on the background, reddish pink colors and then again keeping a shell in the blues. And as you can see, there's an endless number of combinations that you can use to stylized your photos. So experiment with your own photos and different color combinations that will let you stylized your photos to do things like match corporate branding or maybe matching illustration style. Or just use this to add your own unique style to your photos 15. Mixing channels with the Channel Mixer: in this example will take a look at the Channel Mixer effect, which will allow us to make dramatic color changes to our photo. And we'll also be using adjustment layers and masking tools to effect a different areas of this photo. And so, if you're following along with me, let's start with a new AFTEREFFECTS project. Then go to the file menu, choose import, then file and let's locate the file called holly aquila dot jpeg from Folder two of the Chapter two folder of the exercise files. So once you find that, let's come down and choose open credit composition, which will give us our JPEG file down here in the timeline on its own layer, and then to set up our file so that we can use the channel mixer two different times with two different masks. Let's apply the effect to an adjustment layer, so let's go up to the layer menu. Let's come down to new come down and choose adjustment layer, and that will show down in the timeline panel here above the J peg layer. So with the adjustment layer selected, let's come over to the effects and presets and let's come down and search for Channel Mixer . It's all type channel and down here in the color correction group, we can see Channel Mixer. So let's click and drag and apply this to the adjustment layer and down in the timeline panel. Make sure that the effect is on the adjustment layer and not the Jay Peak, and you can see the effect icon right here and now over in the effect controls. You'll see all of these settings. Here. You'll notice that the red, red, the green green and the blue blue are all set to 100. These are the main RGB channels, and then in the Red Group you'll see that we can mix red and green and red and blue. In the Green group, we can mix green and red and green and blue. And then in the blue group, we can mix blue and red and blue and green, so to see what this does if you come in here and just play with some of these settings, maybe come over here to Red green and just drag this up a little bit. You'll see what starts to happen. We start to push red into the green channel, and you can even do this with negative numbers as well. So set that back to zero hit tab. So what I want to do is I want to make the clouds a really sort of violet color. So what we're gonna do is come in here to the green blue setting right down here, and let's drag this to negative. 78 will drag this down a little bit. And once I get down to that range, you can see the violet showing up here in the clouds. Now, I like the look in the clouds here, but I don't want this to affect the rest of the image. So what we're gonna do is add a mask to this. So the first thing I'll do is come down here to the magnification and I'm going to zoom out , gonna zoom out a good amount to about 6% here. I want to be able to see all of the sort of negative space around the composition. And now, with the adjustment layer is selected. Let's come up to the toolbar. Let's click on the vector shape here. Let's select the rectangle tool. And if the layer is selected Gonna get the cursor out here to the left hand side if I click and drag were actually drawing a mask on the adjustment layer. If I had no layers selected, this would create a new shape layer. But since the adjustment layer is selected, I can click and drag. And now, when I overlapped the image, you'll see the adjustment layer is now being masked inside of this shape. So what I wanna do is make sure that the shape is pretty tall, so it goes much beyond the bottom of the composition. Down in the timeline panel. Scroll this up a little bit. You can see we have a new mask object assigned to the adjustment layer. Let's toggle open the mask and let's come down here to the mask feather. So right now, if I were to click away, I'll hit V for the move tool. Click away. For the moment, you'll see that this creates a hard edge for the mask of that adjustment layer. Let's come back. Let's click on the mask to select it for the masked feather. Let's unlinked the vertical and horizontal settings. Let's come in here and add 1000 pixels. So type of 1000 press return. Let's click away, and what this is going to do is add a feathering on that effect. That's 1000 pixels tall, so it will start 500 pixels below and go about 500 pixels past the edge of that mask. So now we have this nice Grady int from the Channel Mixer effect affecting the holly Aquila J pic file underneath. And so now, with that in place, let's close up all of the properties for the adjustment layer. Let's select that layer. What's that, Commander Control de to duplicate that layer. And now what we want to do is move the mask on this copy of the adjustment so it's toggle. Open the properties, open the mask and now if you click on the mask object. If you have the show mask button highlighted here and you're in the move tool, you'll be able to come in here and Marquis, select the different points of the mask. Hold the shift key. I'm going to move these upward at the space bar to pan down, and I want to make this Masco much higher than the top of the composition that I'm gonna pan down in a marquee, select the bottom two points and I'm gonna move these up to about right here, right above the sunset. So now the second adjustment layer is going to affect only the top portion of the image. So what the adjustment layer selected? Let's come back over to the Channel Mixer and let's come in here and make some adjustments . So for the red green value, I want to bring this up to about 89. Just click and drag this so right about there, let's come down to the green blue. Let's set that back to zero still type zero and then press return, and that's gonna give me a nice sort of orange color across the top. Here, I can click away pan over. I might just move my timeline down and choose fit so I can see it's a little bit larger. And so now what we're looking at is to adjustment layers using the Channel mixer, and the bottom one is affecting the clouds and coloring them more violet, and the top one is affecting the upper clouds above the horizon line and making them a little bit more orange And so now that you see how quickly you can push colors from one channel into the other, try these effects on some of your own photographs and see what interesting combinations you can come up with for enhancing your photographs. 16. Changing colors with Colorama: the Color Rama effect is interesting because it lets you colorize an image kind of like Sisi Toner, except that you get to define as many colors as you like, and you can assign them to any range in the original photo. And there's a lot of presets to get you started. And so if you're following along, start with a new AFTEREFFECTS project, then go to the file menu. Choose import, then file, and we're looking for the pipe organ dot jpeg file in Folder three of the Chapter two folder of the exercise files. And so once you find the file she's open, create a composition. And then, once we have the composition created where you can see the J pic file as a layer in the timeline panel, let's come back to the effects and presets and in the search bar, Let's come in here and search for Kalorama. It's all type color within a and under color correction group will see Kalorama. Let's apply that to our JPEG file, and the very first set of presets is probably going to hurt your eyes over in the effect controls. We can see the input phase and the output cycle. The input phase is how the output cycle colors are being applied to the image, so the default is based on intensity. If you come in here and change this to green, for example, it will only be applied based on the greens in the original image. Same thing for the other different channels. I'm gonna leave this on intensity. Let's come down to output cycle. Let's open this up, and here you can see a color wheel, which indicates the range of the photo and the color that's being applied to each range. You can also move these around. So if I were to take the yellow and move this close to the red and same thing with the violet, you'll see that effect showing up in the main composition panel here. So those ranges of the original photograph are being affected by these colors. Then, similarly, I can come down here and move these around this way to get rid of a color. You can click and drag and move the color completely off of the range. We'll do a couple of these, and to add a color, you can click on the edge of the wheel, and this will bring up a color palette. You come in here and choose a color, we'll choose a dark blue click. OK, and now that color is going to be at it now. The other thing you can do is when you select a color, you can change the opacity settings. So for the light blue right here, I click on this and dragged this down. This will create a transparent area for that blue color. That was not a lot of blue showing up. There's maybe a little bit over here, but let's come in here and do this to the red. So select the red, then come in here and grab this and move the transparency down. And so what's happening here is that transparent color is now showing the original image. So there's an incredible range of options for not only specifying colors and ranges but setting the opacity of those colors as well. So, over here under the preset palette, let's come in here and change some of the presets. So first, let's come in here and select ramp red, so this would create a black to Red Ramp or Grady int. Can you can also come in here and modify these as well or change the opacity. And then let's come back here and just pick a few other options. You can go to Caribbean, have you come down to fire, and as you pick each one of these, you'll see what the effect looks like in the composition area. And so now, just like some of the other color effects, you can apply endless combinations to your individual photographs. So load up some of your own photos and begin playing with some of these settings to find the exact style that you want for your photograph. 17. Repeating patterns with MotionTile: The motion tile effect lets you create a repeating pattern from a photo and includes options for setting vertical and horizontal offsets to the pattern. And so to explore this effect, let's go to the file menu inside of a new AFTEREFFECTS project. Come down to import, choose file and then locate the sunflower dot PNG file that's located in Folder one of the Chapter three folder of the exercise files. And so once you find this, select it. Don't click on the create composition option. Choose open and then inside of the project panel inside of after effects. Select the sunflower dot PNG file and note the dimensions. This is 1500 pixels by 1500 pixels. So what we're gonna do now is create our own composition, and we're gonna make it double the size. So go to the composition menu and choose new composition. Or you can click this button here in the center composition panel. Either way, inside of the composition area, let's name this sunflower pattern and for the width, let's set this to 3000 and then the same for the height 3000 pixels, square pixels. Background. We'll leave it at black. Let's click OK, and we now have a composition that's twice the size of the sunflower dropping file. So now let's select the pink file. Let's drag and drop it and put it right in the center of the composition, and it should snap into place. And so now, to fill our entire composition with this sunflower photo, let's come over to the effects and presets. Let's come in here and search for a motion tile so type in motion, then click away under stylized. Let's find the motion tile effect. Let's drag and drop this on top of the Sunflower Ping file. And now, over here in the effects and presets, Let's come in and take a look at some of these settings, and so first we'll take a look at the tile width. If we come in here and change this from the default of 100% and scrub this down, you'll notice that as this gets smaller or less wide, we can see that the images tiling inside of the main area. Let's come in here and set this down to 50 hit tab for the height. Let's set this to 50%. I'll press return and So now we have the original sunflower showing at 50% of its original size and since its motion tiling inside of its original tiling area, we can see all of the replications here. So if we come down in, the effect controls down to the output with the output with defaults to the sides of the original ping file. However, since we're repeating this, we can come in here and change the output with. So if I come in here and just drag this as we make this wider, you'll see that we get Mawr replications or tiles of that artwork. Let's come in here and set this to 200% at a tab. Let's set 200% for the output height. Let tab again. And so basically, we now have our original tile or the original pink file, with the output within height set to 20% is bringing us out to the entire width of our composition, which again was twice the size of the original ping. So now let's come down here and take a look at the phase option. We come down here and click on the phase option and drag this what this does is offsets every other home, and we can do this either in a positive or negative degree setting. And if we come down here and check the box for horizontal phase shift, this will affect every other row instead of every other column. So what I'm gonna do is uncheck horizontal phase shift and let's come in here and set the phase shift degree to 180 degrees, and that will give us an even amount of offset for each column. So with motion tile, you can create a repeating pattern at any size, all from the same photograph, and the original photo does not have to be transparent. So try this technique out on any of your photographs to see what kind of patterns you can create with your own images. 18. Blending patterns with RepeTile: the rep. A tile effect works a lot like motion tile, combined with some kaleidoscope type of controls. So we'll start with a photo that's not very interesting and create something unique using this effect and so back in after effects. Let's start with a new untitled project, then go to the file menu, Choose import, then file, and then we'll locate the file called Tree dot J Peg, which is going to be inside a folder two of the chapter three folder of the exercise files . And once you've located this, don't click on the create composition option here. We're going to create our own composition. Then let's click open. So now, instead of after effects, we concede that showing in the project panel, we can also see here that this is 2000 by 2000 pixels. So what we're gonna do is create a new composition that's going to be double the size, and you can create a new composition by clicking on the new composition button here or going to the composition menu and choosing new. Either way, let's come in here and name our new composition tree and let's come down here and set the width and height to 4000. With that in place, let's click. OK, then let's go over to the project panel. Let's locate the tree Dajae pic file, Click and drag and drop this J pic file right into the center of the composition. It should snap into place. And so now let's go over to our effects and presets. Let's come in here and search for reptile. It's all type party P E. That'll show here under the stylized group, Let's apply that towards a peg. And now what we need to do in the effect controls is increased the size of the tile herbal area. So by default it's going to be the 2000 by 2000 pixels, which matches deejay pig size. Let's come in here to the expand, right like a menu and click and drag. Unlike the motion tile, this is actually going in pixels and not percentages. So we're actually adding, in this case, 235 additional pixels. Let's come in here and add 1000 extra pixels than a tab. But the expand left. Let's have 1000 and then 1000 for the expand down and 1000 for the expand up, so we're adding an additional 1000 pixels for all of these, which is going to make this tile 4000 by 4000 pixels. So now that we're feeling the entire composition area, let's go back and change some of the properties. So first under tiling, the default is repeat. Let's come in here. Just play with a few different settings. Here's the flip horizontal, maybe flip 45 degrees. And as you come in here and play with these, you can see what the effect is in the composition area. So the one that I like is the rosette. Let's come in here and change that to Rosette so we can see this does a little bit of a rotation as it sort of spirals around. But we also get these hard edges, so if I click away, we can see all of the edges here between all the tiles. So let's come in here and let's change the blending border. So if I come in here and just drag this up a little bit, you see that we can actually create a blend between all of this seems, and this gives us a really beautiful effect, especially on all the corners. And so now that I have my pattern created, let's go back to the effects and presets. Let's come in here and apply to additional effects. Let's add levels and hue saturation. So type in levels under color Correctional. Apply this and then let's go back to the effects and presets. Let's come in here and search for Hue saturation again under color correction. So apply that as well and now in effect, controls for the hue saturation. Let's come in here and I like my images to be a lot more saturated. So I'm gonna come in here to the master saturation and bring this up to about 65 or so. Somewhere in this range, maybe a little bit less about 62. Let's close this up. Let's go to the levels setting and for the levels. What I want to do is just change the black input and output. It's gonna come in here to the whites, and I'm gonna pull this down a little bit. That's gonna darken up the overall image, and then I'll come up here to the Gamma. I will increase this a little bit and then I'll just go back a little bit and just change some of these settings, and I really just want to make the colors look more interesting for this new pattern. Now I think some of the most interesting patterns in reptile come from photos that have different values and colors in the corners, and you don't have to use a square photo. So load your own photos and after effects and see what kind of patterns you can create using rep. A tile. 19. Texturizing patterns with Ball Action: the ball action effect has some really interesting controls returning your photos into textures. This effect recreates your image out of colored spears and allows you to control the size of the spheres and even disperse and twist them in three D space. So I'll use this effect to make a photo look like it's being broadcast on an oversize outdoor display. And so, if you're following along, start with a new untitled project in after effects. Then go to the file menu, choose import than file, then locate the file called Swan Dodge a Peg, which is located in Folder three of the Chapter three folder of the exercise files. Once you find the file click open Next Great, a new composition based on that J pic file. So I'll grab mine from the project panel and just drop it into the composition area. Then let's go over to the effects and presets. Let's come in here and search for ball and under simulation will see, see, see ball action. Let's apply that towards a pic file now. Already, you can see some changes taking effect. Now, your preview resolution and the scale of your composition can really affect the way this particular plug in looks. So right now I am looking at 19.2%. So I recommend coming in here and changing this 200% which were really seem up here. So I'll pan around and find an area of the image I want to see in my composition area. And then you also want to make sure that you're looking at the full resolution as well. Now, let's go over here and take a look at some of the properties in the effect controls, so the first option is scattered. If you come in here and change this, this actually will move all of the spheres around, and a really low number will actually have a pretty big impact. So if I come in here and just put 0.1, for example, you see that the spheres will move around just a little bit. So I come in here and change this to maybe 0.3, click away the move a little bit more and then let's jump down here to the grid spacing so that the fault this five I'll come in here and use my down arrow and change this down to four, then three, then two, then one. So this will control the spacing between all of the individual spheres. So I bring this up to about seven. For now. Let the tab key to get on the ball size, hold the shift key and hit the down arrow, and this will drop the's by 10. So these are the spheres at 90 and then 80 and I'll just keep going. So if you have a smaller spear size and a larger grid spacing, you can see the Spears really start to spread out. So I'll bring the grid spacing down to four. Hit the tab key. Gonna bring the spear size up to 50. Then let's go up to scatter and let's bring this back down to zero. This will give me a nice even row vertically and horizontally of all of this fears. And so, with this in place, let's come back to the effects and presets and let's come in here and add some additional effects. So I come in here and add the hue saturation. Still typing. Hugh will apply hue saturation. Let's come down here and set the master saturation up a little bit again. I want to make this look like an outdoor sign, so that's gonna be emitted light. So these will look like sort of individual little pixels, so I'll bring us up to around 75. Then let's go back to the effects and presets. Let's add a levels effect. Type in levels will find that down here under color correction. Let's apply that and for the levels. Let's just come in here and decrease the white. So decrease the weight and put a little bit gonna push the black input up. And then for the Gamma. I'm just going to come in and bring this down a little bit, which will make this a lot brighter. And since I'm working on a smaller screen, I'm going to come in here and reduce my magnification down to 50% so I can see more of the image that I'm gonna go back to the levels and under the hissed A gram settings. I'm gonna come in here and decrease the lightest areas for the channels and not coming here to the mid range and just push that back up just to make this a little bit brighter. And so now that I can see more of my image in the composition. I could make more adjustments to make it look more like an outdoor sign. So the ball action effect can be used to create all kinds of effects, many of which may not even resemble the original photo that you started with. 20. Edging textures with Roughen Edges: the rough edges effect allows you to create a wide range of edges for your photos, with lots of options for fractal and smooth edges. So if you're following along, start with the new untitled project inside of after effects. Then go to the file menu, choose import, then file, Then locate the windmill dot J pic file, which is located in Folder four of the Chapter three folder of the exercise files. When you find that you can select it, she is open. Then let's create a new composition based on that J pic file. So I like to grab the J Peg from the project panel and just drop it into the composition panel. Then let's go to the effects and presets and let's come in here and look for rough and edges. So type in the word rough and we'll see rough edges in the stylized group. Let's apply that, and now it might be a little bit difficult to see depending on your magnification. So I'm gonna come in here and change mine to about 50% and I'll just paint over here a little bit. So in the upper left hand corner, we can see the default settings for the rough edges. So to make this a little bit more obvious, first, let's come over to the border settings and change this from eight to 150. That's gonna make the border much larger, and now we can see how all of these properties are changing this effect. So now let's come back to the edge type. Ruffin is the default. If you choose any of these options with color, you can pick a particular color here to sort of mix with the effect. So if I click on this watch, I can change this from a rusty red color to blue or yellow or green, and you can see that effect showing up here like cancel on that. Let's come up and change this to a cut. Then I'll come down and change us again, too spiky and again. You can come in here and just keep changing. These photocopy will actually fill the entire area with the color that you have selected choose photocopy color, for example, in committee ER and changed that as well. So it's come in here and let's change us back to Ruffin. Let's come down to the edge sharpness. This controls how sharp the edges are that are being applied to the edges on the effect. If I drag this down to zero, they'll get much smoother. I drive this up to two. They'll get much harder or sharper, so leave this at about 1.5. Next, we have the fractal influence. There's actually a fractal noise that's being applied to the border. And so if the influence of the fractal is zero, we'll get a smooth border around our photo. Or, if I come up here and increase this 21 will have the fractal taking effect and we'll get a much rougher edge. Next. Let's come down to scale scale controls the size of the fractal that's being applied. We dragged us down. It will be a much smaller fractal, much more noisier effect. And if I bring this up, it'll make the fractal larger, giving me a much more wavy effect. So bring this down to about 53 and close up some of these. So for the stretch, with our height, you can actually stretch the fractal on one of the axes, so if you go to the right, you can stretch it on the horizontal or to the left. We construct it on the vertical welcome back ends up that 20 Next is the offset value. This controls the beginning point of the fractal. Next is the complexity. If we bring this down, we'll get a much less complex edge. And if I bring this up to six, we'll see that the edge will be much more complex or much more detailed. And then finally, there's an evolution option where you can come in here and move this around, and this will just change where the fractal starts. You might want to use this if you're gonna create an animation. And now, when you like the edges you've created, save your composition as a Photoshopped pile or a ping. And as we discussed in the intro videos, the edges will be completely transparent so you can add in another background. Or you can use this in another photo composite project 21. Where to go from here: so help. You found some of the examples in this course inspiring, and I hope they motivated you to enhance your own photography with after effects. And don't limit yourself to only the effects and settings that I used in this course. Experiment with different effects and techniques on your own photos. And remember to add enough pixels to your compositions so that you can use your creations for any medium. And so what? That I'll conclude this course on using after effects for photography and, as always, thanks for watching.