Rennard Westley

Writer armed with an arsenal of life experiences.

106

35

When The Levee Breaks

(Step 1) SOURCE TEXT: 

The poem 'Fletcher McGee' from Edgar Lee Master's Spoon River Anthology (pg. 13). 

Two things stood out about this poem - the relatability of Fletcher as a man worn down by a seemingly unhealthy relationship and the conclusion - 'And then she died and haunted me, and hunted me for life' - as I wanted to explore those ideas literally. Fletcher strikes me as a subdued man pushed temporarily too far and forced to live with permanent damage that resulted.

(Step 2) SCREENPLAY: 

1ST DRAFT: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1bHwYMOnxtKZTd4c1FKVmM0YWc/edit?usp=sharing

2ND DRAFT* (7/12): https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1bHwYMOnxtKNjI0UHpSWmNQbkk/edit?usp=sharing

FINAL DRAFT: 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1bHwYMOnxtKRXRsaGdQVnB6T3c/edit?usp=sharing

(Step 3) LOGLINE:  

When a ghost catches up to him, a haunted man in need of forgiveness must finally confront his past to move forward – no matter how terrifying a face-to-face meeting might be. 

[The juxtaposition of his wife's poem, Ollie McGee, struck me as equally fascinating. The length of the poems reflects the length of their lives in the adaptation. I also believed that beauty was a central theme in both poems. Ollie, even in death, is preoccupied with her looks as she claims she was robbed not of her life, but of her beauty. I hoped to use the daughter to contemporize the work a bit and to leverage her beauty (and mother's resemblance) as a way to exemplify the haunting mentioned in Fletcher's poem.]

Comments

Please sign in or sign up to comment.