Christian Flores

Leather Craftsman & Apparel Designer

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The Eaglephant Tee

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The Eaglephant Tee was an idea I conjured up in my head a few years ago. Mythology and hybrid animals have always fascinated me since the early years of my life. I remember re-watching Dumbo with my nephew one day and thought to myself, "Why not make Dumbo 'cool'?"

Having a history in doing freelance art for cash in the past, I decided to pick up a pad and pen again (after many years) and sketch out the idea. After getting the composition down, I then redrew the idea onto a very subpar Samsung Tab 3 using an application called Autodesk Sketchbook Pro. And all I had at the time was a very shitty 99 cent stylus.

My initial purpose for this crazy concept was to make a chest piece tattoo for myself. The drawback, however, was finding an artist that could actually replicate the illustration onto my chest at an affordable cost. And that was definitely a long shot here in Los Angeles. An exceptional tattoo artist usually charges around $200 per hour. And this illustration would definitely take... well... awhile! In any case, I was in no dire need to spend that much money on some ink.

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So the next best idea was to turn it into a t-shirt graphic, of course. The art itself was "built" for the upper chest area to begin with; and that's exactly where I wanted it printed on the shirt. So after getting it done through the process of direct-to-garment (DTG), I was happy with the outcome of my very first graphic t-shirt. I had a small run of tees printed for my brand Mojo Bazaar and was able to "unleash the beast" to the public. And to my surprise I was able to sell all thirty shirts! The only tweak I would make for a re-issue of the shirt is adding my brand's name somewhere onto it. I fought with myself in the beginning with this because I wanted my art to speak for itself. But as Jeff explains in class, nobody would know who made the shirt which defeats the purpose of marketability if your logo ain't on it.

People have asked me what the deal was with the broken tusks on the Eaglephant. My answer to that is: Sometimes majestic beings have to go through trials and tribulations before they can take flight. 

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