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Nautical Narratives

Being a graphic designer and photographer, I tend to look for the graphic elements of a photograph. Once captured, I like to explore the graphical aspect of the image further by stripping it back to its raw elements of form and light.

I was out with my iPhone, at just approaching dusk, when the water in the marina suddenly became calm and mirror-like. It was then that the reflections were revealed and these great ripple patterns of the surrounding yacht masts started to dance on the waters surface.

I captured a bunch of these, but this one was my favourite.

Initially, I liked the heiroglyphic aspect to this... like a secret language. I wanted to explore cropping into the image and first made a very 'Instagram-esque' image. Increasing contrast, saturation, and adding a vignette.

Then I wanted to strip the image right back to the rawest form... essentially the squiggly lines. So I cropped further, and increased contrast to isolate these aspects. I added a little 'grunge' filter, some 'structure', reduced the saturation, increased contrast again, and added a fairly intense 'tilt-shift' blur, to pick up the central lines, and then rotated the orientation, to further exploit the 'narrative' aspect of the image. This now starts to take on the look of written script, and less photographic style.

Further exploring this, and reducing it right back to light and shade, true form. Stripping out all the photgraphic aspect, and essentially turning this into a piece of graphic design, derived from a photographic source.

The third image is all about contrast, and brightening to remove any trace of the original photograph. When all of the photographic elements are removed it starts to emphasize what had originally caught my eye... the rhythm of the reflection on the water. Like a heartbeat, or a spoken narrative captured as an audio soundwave. The rhythm of the water itself. 

All the images were edited in Snapseed.

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