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Layouts and Elements v4

Layout 3/7

Layouts and Elements  3/2/14

 I've been tinkering with this on and off for the past month or so. As someone new to Illustrator, I have learned a great deal playing with this project. I still need to create some visual harmony and come up with a methodology for achieving this and then go on to adjusting various letters and ornamental strokes.

I'm getting closer, and would really appreciate any feedback on how to adjust or which words should be adjusted to create a proper hierarchy without too much noise.

Layouts and Elements  1/29/14

Using the Faye's helpful feedback, I decided to go outside my normal thought process and break the linear. In this particular approach, I decided to:

  • add simple shapes
  • change the font to bold
  • alter the main text font
  • keep the tracking and font size the same for the non-keywords
  • altered the fun font – to something that resembles a Jackson Pollock/Ralph Steadman… Not quite as adventuresome as those artists, but it was a free font.

I like the direction it's going I still think it needs some additional tweaking. The visual hierarchy may be slightly off and I'm arranging everything by my eye not guides at the moment.

Maybe too busy?

Wondering if I should distort the shapes and simplify the keywords' typeface?

All thoughts are welcome.

Layouts and Elements  1/25/14

I'm not particularly pleased with either one of my layouts. However, through this exercise I have learned about the various character settings and how even one typeface can be challenging. I gravitate toward simplicity and less elements.

Approach 1

This was intuitive. I utilized the correct sentence structure and adapted the tracking, font size, background, font color and the quotation styles. I prefer this layout to the one below. However looking for any additional thoughts.

Approach 2

This layout is more in keeping with what the class has been reinforcing. I feel little lost without having some sort of grid system or examples of high-end designer quote layouts. This one needs additional work – but I like the color contrast with the pink and yellow…

The visual hierarchy lacks rhythm.

Visual Hierarchy ( Playing with layouts) 1/22/14

 I'm not utilizing my favorite quote – this is one that I like for particular web project that is on the back burner.

Here are two distinct, yet enthusiastic typefaces and I didn't play too much with the type because  I put more time into choosing the fonts versus adjusting size and weight.

However, I'm thinking that I'll be using this in a more traditional aspect (as a rotating tooltip or quote animation) so I'd like to keep it fairly simple. These are two quick ideas. I'm gravitating towards the top font selection however I'm very much open to any thoughts, constructive feedback  or suggestion.

Logo/Typeface Photo 1/11/14

One of the most ubiquitous logos in the Boston area is for a doughnut and coffee company called Dunkin' Donuts. I think the chain has expanded to the Western United States, but its origins are in the Northeast. It's one of those typefaces and logos I've seen since I was young child.

This photo is rather unclear, due drizzle and time.

Since I seem to so many times I thought it would be a good one to quickly  analyze. The colors are exuberant, fun and alive. They suggest wakefulness and colors of the sunrise. Possibly conscious or unconscious the company has its largest stream of customers in the mornings.

Also, many of their doughnuts are colored in  bright oranges, pinks and browns.

The brown I believe stands for the coffee while the other colors represent the doughnuts. The bubbly typeface (slab serif?) and logo complement each other due to the curvature and soft, childlike visual feel. 

Kerning Challenges 1/9/14

I decide to pick both the serif and sans serif to play with and challenge my kerning technique.   I found both of these to be extremely challenging. Some questions arose; where does one start? Without any prior knowledge I look at the word as a whole, then I look at the space between the individual letters and see if there's any rhythmic inconsistency.

From there, I try to adjust the tracking and kerning of individual letters depending upon my sense of balance.

The first example, I had trouble deciding whether the T and Y  should be closer together or distinctly separated.

I decided to give the second letter a feeling that was close to the T... while separating all the rest of the letters with even space. I didn't quite get the look I was going for but it is close.

The second attempt-- I took on the really tough type.  I'm not sure if this is because the typeface is poorly designed or if it is because of all of the glyphs.

 I would really like some constructive criticism. Or perhaps methods of how to best access the whole  word and then go into the details. Thank you to anyone in advance for their time and consideration. 

Typefaces for Adjectives 1/7-1/8/14

Type All Around

Here's some photos of some typefaces I found over the weekend.

Cigar Box

Beer Advert

Mentos Chewing Gum

 Top Shelf Absinth (Red-Bull Indian knockoff Thums Up in background)

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