Scott Prather

Graphic Designer

192

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Layout & Lettering through the years

Here are some examples of layouts I found interesting through the years. 

1870

1. Ad to sell aromic hand soap. 

2. I really like how they started experimenting with the composition of type. I think it’s interesting they put the lettering inside the triangle.

3. Its clear that the entire middle section is hand rendered. The unity of this with the serif and sans-serif fonts has a nice unity compared to what I’ve studied in previous decades. 

1900

1. Ad selling tonic for athletes. 

2. Layouts around this time starting being image driven. Hiring illustrators and artists to create photo realism to bring in something new from the stale b/w ads or former decades. 

3. To many different types of typography here. However, angling the font under his arm does help a little with hierarchy.

1920

1. German ad selling cigarettes. 

2. This layout is heavily relying on the imagery. Bringing in product imagery at the end to raise brand awareness for the consumer. 

3. It sort of helps that I can’t read the typography but again, there is some competition up there. Not sure if the red or yellow typography is supposed to be read first. 

1930

1. Ad selling womans under garments. 

2. I am surprised how the layout structure here is clean and minimalistic. 

3. I like how they have started experimenting with cleaner, thinner fonts. I feel this ad is ahead of its time considering the other things in print during this time. Also, experimenting with iconography here as it interacts with the name of the brand is interesting and again, ahead of its time. 

1940

1. Ad selling Lucky Strikes. 

2. This layout is interesting because they broke the mold with the girls head going past the image boarders. 

3. The typography here is very hand written which is different from other ads I’ve been looking at. I like how they used color and size to accent “lucky” and “level.” 

1950

1. Ad selling a Volts Wagon. 

2. This almost reminds me of the ad from the 1930”s I showed earlier because of the use of simplicity and minimalisim. 

3. I think it’s interesting that the header is one word. They really went for less-is-more here. Body copy is a stale and editorial. 

1960

1. Ad selling Budweiser. 

2. This layout is basically all illustrative. 

3. I like how they just use the name of the product big and bold right at the top. Keeping the rest of the copy to a minimum helps the reader focus on the product. They can then read the small paragraph on the right if they want to. However, it’s not important. 

1970

1. Ad for McDonalds. 

2. This layout uses minimalisim and typography. 

3. The use of the typography on the left hand side is kind of nice. A little sloppy and fat-looking. To much copy on the bottom and not sure why there are all their indents. However, the whole concept of this ad is attractive. 

1980

1. Ad for tourism to Jamaica. 

2. This layout uses a strong visual and simplicity. 

3. I love how they started this ad with a strong visual. However, not a lot before this ad made the typography integrate with the photos. For me, this changed the landscape of typography and what it was capable of. Opened a whole new paying field.

2000

1. Ad promoting the NBA. 

2. Strong visual layout with simple bold font. 

3. I like how the typography here is simple, clear, and bold. It integrates with the photo in a way that allows it to stand out without being to distracting from the actual images. 

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