Ink Portraits of Wild Animals/different approaches

Ink Portraits of Wild Animals/different approaches - student project

Thank you for the class. This was really hard. It is one thing to watch the video but another one to sit in front of a white sheet of paper and try to do it. I have done a Sumi-e class many years ago and that was the only time where I used a brush with ink (usually I use markers in connection with watercolors) but you do very specific lines/techniques in Sumi-e so what I have done here  was pretty much new to me. The thing I struggled with was I kept on wondering how to do light/dark areas. If I just wanted to do line work or if I want to put colors down like I have seen in other projects and what do to with the areas where I can't see much fur detail (for example the snout). I put some solid colors down on the snout but wasn't sure about it but once its down you can't take it back.

I tried to vary the lightness/thickness/density of the lines. I only used brushes (mostly number4) and Sumi-e ink. The photo is my own, it was taken in a wild park in Germany.

And by the way I'm amazed by your fine lines in your project examples, where these all done with a brush?

I would have liked to see some demonstrations made with markers and the brush marker. Just a small suggestion.

Here is my photo I used:

Ink Portraits of Wild Animals/different approaches - image 1 - student project

My pencil sketch. To place the eye took me forever:

Ink Portraits of Wild Animals/different approaches - image 2 - student project

 And my final painting:

Ink Portraits of Wild Animals/different approaches - image 3 - student project

  I tried a couple more. First I did a Hippo with markers. It is very hard just to do something in black and white and I doodled/experimented around a lot with it (many times I thought about throwing it away). At the end I decided to add some washes after all just enough so you could see better what was above and under the water...I hope. I didn't fill everything in. I tried to keep a balance.

Ink Portraits of Wild Animals/different approaches - image 4 - student project

  

Ink Portraits of Wild Animals/different approaches - image 5 - student project

Ink Portraits of Wild Animals/different approaches - image 6 - student project

And I did another bear with ink and brush. This one took the longest. I put some washes down first but ended up with layers up on layers. I think you can probably go on forever with this type of painting. What irritated me a little bit is that sometimes the ink would dry up much lighter as what it looked like before when it was wet and melt right into the background (but other times it would stay dark...).

Ink Portraits of Wild Animals/different approaches - image 7 - student project

Ink Portraits of Wild Animals/different approaches - image 8 - student project

Sandra

Watercolor Artist and Illustrator