25

29

I wrote him a letter (Final Draft)

Thank you reader for taking the time to read my short.                                                                                                 Any and all feed back is thoroughly welcome.

 

Step One:

I chose  the poem, 'Hannah Armstrong' and a mention of 'Anne Rutldge' from Spoon River Anthology. I resonated with the mother trying to help her sick child.

After reading a good amount of 'Spoon River Anthology' poems, then doing research on the book,  I came across some very interesting information in that two of the poems had a direct link to Abraham Lincoln.  This fully intrigued me.  

One of the poems was about Hannah Armstrong, an actual friend/relative of Abraham Lincoln. The other, about Anne Rutledge, who in his younger and single years, was a romantic interest of his.

I resonated with Hannah, she a parent trying to do whatever it took to help her sick child  and that nothing or nobody was going to prevent her intersession on his behalf. She reminded me of a moving train, at first it goes slow but once it gets momentum, you could not stop it even if you tried.  

Step Two: 

Draft Two: FINAL

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5bvmXIo6vV2c2owY2pnZ1MwRHM/edit?usp=sharing

.

Draft One;

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5bvmXIo6vV2NjVCSGpvR2xlQTQ/edit?usp=sharing

With this information in hand, I proceeded. Today, June 17; it took me eight hours to write my short plus a few hours of editing. Now it's done and in a PDF format,  ready for feedback.

.

Step Three: Logline: 

A distraught mother unable to help her sick son in the army, reverts to her last resort; contacting the United States President.

.

Hannah Armstrong

I wrote him a letter asking him for old times’ sake


To discharge my sick boy from the army;


But maybe he couldn’t read it.


Then I went to town and had James Garber,


Who wrote beautifully, write him a letter.


But maybe that was lost in the mails.


So I traveled all the way to Washington.


I was more than an hour finding the White House.


And when I found it they turned me away,


Hiding their smiles. Then I thought: 


“Oh, well, he ain’t the same as when I boarded him


And he and my husband worked together


And all of us called him Abe, there in Menard.”


As a last attempt I turned to a guard and said:


“Please say it’s old Aunt Hannah Armstron, 


From Illinois, come to see him about her sick boy
In the army.”


Well, just in a moment they let me in!


And when he saw me he broke in a laugh,


And dropped his business as president, 


And wrote in his own hand Doug’s discharge,


Talking the while of the early days,


And telling stories.

.

While thinking about which poem from 'Spoon River Anthology' to choose, I kept in mind:

#1 -  Budget and how to make it as low-cost as possible.

#2 - I wanted an upbeat story, nothing morbid and depressing or full of angst. 

#3 - Closely follow the poems heart beat.

June 18:

Ooops - I just read in the FAQs about keeping all the drafts. This final submission is pretty much the same as the very first PDF I uploaded. The only difference is some typo corrections and some name changes for clarity; Guard was changed to Security Guard  1 & 2. Door Guard 1 & 2 -- 2 was changed to Sad Door Guard. I added a sentence to one of the dialogues of The President for more of a punch. Changing some words in action to make it more clear what is going on and where it is going in the scene. Tomorrow is another day and if I have time, will fiddle with the 'project cover photo.'. Good night.

Comments

Please sign in or sign up to comment.