Drott Peterson

Drott Peterson - student project

Drott Peterson (66)

Virtues:

-Bought Donuts for the Office

-Volunteers at a Food Bank

Vices:

-The way its been, is the way is should be. Period.

-A belief that going to the gym cancels out all the junk food

Questions (Now):

  1. What’s your favourite game?
  • Nothing is better than Friday night poker at Johnny’s
What was for breakfast this morning?
  • The usual, porridge with raisins
Are you religious?
  • On Sundays.
What is your profession?
  • Police Officer
What gives your life meaning?
  • Knowing I’ve had a great career and I’m leaving my legacy to the next generation.
What type of traveller are you? Sporadic or an Over Planner?
  • I’m the best of both, I know where I like to go, and what to do when I get there
Where did you go to school?
  • Besides the academy? Nowhere.
What period of history would you like to live in?
  • Nothing beats the present.
Does life have a purpose, and if so, what is it?
  • Work hard and make a difference.
What did you want to be when you grew up?
  • Nothing but what I’ve become.
Do you regret anything?
  • That one time I was walking the beat, I didn’t help that kid, hope he turned out okay.

Questions (Past):

  1. What’s your favourite game?
  • Poker
What was for breakfast this morning?
  • Porridge
Are you religious?
  • When I have time.
What is your profession?
  • Police Officer
What gives your life meaning?
  • Going to work every day.
What type of traveller are you? Sporadic or an Over Planner?
  • I plan. Vacations are too short to waste time.
Where did you go to school?
  • The academy.
What period of history would you like to live in?
  • The future.
Does life have a purpose, and if so, what is it?
  • Yes, show up on time and do your job right.
What did you want to be when you grew up?
  • I wanted to be like my granddad. 
Do you regret anything?
  • Life’s too short for regrets.

Questions (Future):

  1. What’s your favourite game?
  • I enjoy playing poker. This one time in Vegas I was playing this tourney and knocked out Donny Tran. That was a great day.
What was for breakfast this morning?
  • Eggs on rye with a fried portobello mushroom and some roasted tomatoes. I was never much of a cook, but this is easy enough.
Are you religious?
  • Yeah, going to church keeps me social. Plus, the ladies at the nifty sixty group are pretty and cute and just what I’m into.
What is your profession?
  • Well, I’m retired now, but in the day, I was a cop. That was fun.
What gives your life meaning?
  • *sigh* I don’t know.
What type of traveller are you? Sporadic or an Over Planner?
  • Sporadic. What is it the kids say? I’ve learned to live free.
Where did you go to school?
  • Well besides the academy, I wasn’t really into school. But now I’m learning every day. Just last week I was at this gardening class and I learned how to pot a tomato plant. Wish I had done more of that when I was younger, my knees still hurt from that.
What period of history would you like to live in?
  • Ahh.. I’d like to see how my grandparents grew up. I can’t imagine what that was like without these phones and things.
Does life have a purpose, and if so, what is it?
  • Yeah, stop and smell the roses. Really, I know its cheesy, but life gets away from you, it’s not all about that extra dollar.
What did you want to be when you grew up?
  • You know, when I was a kid there were these guys on bikes who would ride through town and deliver milk every morning. I would’ve liked that. I like the cool breeze in the morning and watching the sun come up. 
Do you regret anything?
  • I wish I had a wife.

 

First Person, Drott:

Today was different, even though it had started out the same as any other off day I’d had in the past 40 years. I’d enjoyed my oatmeal before indulging in a second cup of coffee (black, no sugar). But they’re was a freshness I wasn’t familiar with yet. Yesterday I retired. The whole force had been there to see me off, they’d given me a fake ‘retirement’ badge and sent me on my way with a new suitcase stuffed with lewd bathing suits, bottles of tanning oil and more condoms than I’d ever hope to use. So, after a routine walk around the block, I’d headed downtown to the local farmer’s market for a fresh cut steak. The market was quiet for a Thursday, but the spring air gave the venue a breath of life. My ears sharpened as a voice came, rising above the market’s din. A few rows away, I saw a recognizable delinquent fending off some accusations. I wanted to rush over and scold the boy myself, but then I remembered, my job was over. Oh well, I thought, it was probably just a box of strawberries. When I gathered what I’d come for, a large steak from my favourite butchery, a box of new potatoes and a pound of local asparagus, I headed for the exit. My car was in sight when I was stopped by the sight of a young lady handing out drink samples. Normally I would have scoffed at such an offer, coffee that was bulletproof? As I sipped the creamy concoction from the thimble sized cup, I pondered: Well, if I’m not wearing a vest anymore, maybe some change will be for the better.

 

Third Person, Annika:

Annika and her flower stall had been a constant at the market for many years. Today her stall was sparsely decked out with her spring collection: daffodils, primroses and orange and purple tulips. She didn’t sell them for herself, the meager profit was donated to the locale foodbank. As Drott passed her booth, Annika smiled, a well practiced greeting. As usual, Drott didn’t notice. Despite how attractive she found his strout figure and stoic personality, she had lost hope of ever gaining his attraction. She remembered their friends laughing once. Her and Drott had been the only singles left in their group of highschool friends. They had to be together. Annika had never moved on from that moment, instead she pined, refusing advances through her late twenties and then in her thirties. She had waited, but for what? Drott  She watched as Drott came back into view, heading towards the exit. He stopped and accepted a sample from one of the young ladies. Annika knew she could never have the life she craved but she still couldn’t help asking: why her, why not me?