Sorry, your browser is not supported
To have the best experience using Skillshare, we recommend that you use one of these supported browsers.

Alex Larry

The Blonde Phantom

66

5

Create Faux Rotoscoped Animation in Photoshop

My Story

Whether you're folks well familiar with film and video, or simply any other creative wishing to try animation, I come to you as someone with a film and video background and encounters in practical animation.  I'm not trained as an animator.  I'm simply a film grad trained to understand, with hands-on discipline, certain animation techniques.  For this class then, I'd like to share a digital method I've toyed with that uses influences from two practical techniques. 

Faux rotoscope is a weird kid that pretends to be two animation techniques at once- sort of. The obvious one technique being rotoscope animation, which is basically the tracing of live-action footage, frame by frame, to create new seperate footage.  The other technique is drawn-on-film animation, which is creating imagery directly onto film stock, transforming the footage into something else entirely.  

Now we will not be drawing or tracing anything in this class.  Saving you the hassle of getting a drawing tablet, or a scanning nightmare, this method will allow for better time managment and ease.  I promise.  Maybe a more traditional spin-off of this class could explore the real time consumption of animation in the future, but not today.

My first Faux Rotoscope was born 4 years ago for a class project.  Given the chance to actually do traditional rotoscope, using a beast of an animation machine called the Oxberry, I unfortunately couldn't relish in the moment.  Forced to living off campus and having to commute, during the second half of my sophomore year, inconvenienced many after-class activities like this.  So, in order to get my traced frames done on time for the class, I ended up using a good two days and Photoshop to help me make something pretty awesome.  

Applying only in-program filters, layer adjustments and free textures to each frame, I was able to create the vibrant watercolor segment linked above.  The original live-action footage was shot in the 70s and was acquired by my teacher from his father.  It was the music video for the group Mungo Jerry and their most popular song "In the Summertime."

The Gist

What people will accomplish in my class will include a brief introduction to the video elements of most current versions of Photoshop, a new method of creating unique imagery, sans any do-it-all plug-ins, and transforming a 10-second video clip into something fantastic.  There may or may not be some popping into a non-linear editing program, but I'll have to see.   I'll be providing links to libraries to free HD video and high resoultion texture downloads, as well as showing you how to make textures too. I can promise I won't require you to actually shoot anything, not unless you're more than comfortable and capable of doing it.  You could even use video content you might have on hand even!     

Class Video Outline

Google Doc

Comments

Please sign in or sign up to comment.