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A Bakery in Paris

Whew, what a journey! This project was the first of its kind for me, from custom designing letters to working that intimately with the Pen tool (which I've never been overly fond of). I made a decision to commit to see this project through, whatever the challenges, and I'm so glad I did! It's been a great learning experience!

It took me a bit to decide on a direction, but I really appreciated SImon's instruction to let go and dream. I landed on wanting to design a bakery logo, and then things started clicking.

My initial sketch:

Vectoring my sketch was actually surprisingly easier than expected after watching the vectoring video. I really liked the concepts shared about how fonts are constructed (i.e. aiming to eventually have all your points on N, S, E, and W edges). After the sketch was vectored, I immediately saw the space under the middle of the word as a perfect home for "patisserie."

This was when the real challenge began. As I said, being newer to all of this, the making thicks and thins and the shape of the curves of the S and e were especially hard for me. Here are a couple of versions of the project (most of the changes being on the S and e curves): 

Initially, I did the thicks and thins how I had remembered Simon explaining (1st and 2nd versions above). However, after tinkering with the S and e for awhile and still not being happy with them, I went back and re-watched the video and realized that I had forgotten the part where he cut points of the S curve, pasted in front and then just stretched that curve with the handles of the bounding box. So, I re-did the S using that trick and came up with the S in the third version above, the S in the final version. Also, I realized that the e needed to have more of an oval shape and needed some work on the curve below, so I tinkered using circles and ovals as guides.

The last major effort was working on the flourishes of the S tail and e tail (making sure they complimented each another). After a lot more tinkering, this was the result I ended up with:

And, final roughened version how I imagine seeing it used:

Makes me hungry! Thanks for all the great pointers, Simon!

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