Video Editing With Adobe Premiere Pro For Beginners (2024) | Jordy Vandeput | Skillshare
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Video Editing With Adobe Premiere Pro For Beginners (2024)

teacher avatar Jordy Vandeput, Filmmaker and Youtuber

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      2:06

    • 2.

      Starting a Video Project

      7:43

    • 3.

      The Workspace

      8:56

    • 4.

      Basic Editing Workflow

      11:25

    • 5.

      The Timeline

      8:39

    • 6.

      The Effects Controls

      10:42

    • 7.

      Layers and Blending

      9:43

    • 8.

      Cropping and Reframing

      9:56

    • 9.

      Slow and Fast Motion

      9:04

    • 10.

      The Toolbox

      13:25

    • 11.

      Transitions

      11:01

    • 12.

      Text and Graphics

      13:44

    • 13.

      Text Transcription

      8:49

    • 14.

      Templates

      8:22

    • 15.

      Masking

      9:29

    • 16.

      Creating Animations

      8:01

    • 17.

      Custom Transitions

      7:47

    • 18.

      Audio Enhancing and Effects

      7:04

    • 19.

      Editing and Sound Design

      13:24

    • 20.

      Audio Mixing

      16:34

    • 21.

      Color Correction

      11:39

    • 22.

      Color Grading

      8:47

    • 23.

      Export Your Video

      6:46

    • 24.

      Conclusion

      1:51

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About This Class

Learn professional video editing with Adobe Premiere Pro. A beginner course to get you started with basic editing techniques, text & graphics, audio enhancing, transitions, video effects and so much more!

Learn how to get started with Adobe Premiere Pro in this interactive and hands-on course. Updated for the 2024, it covers the latest features and tools.

By the end of this course you will understand the user interface and perform a professional video editing workflow. You can create and animate graphics and text, enhance audio and mix music, color correct video clips and more.

FOR WHO IS THIS CLASS?

Any creative person who likes to start editing great videos using a professional tool. If you’re not into slow manuals or long explanations of how things work, then this course is perfect for you. With student results in mind you’ll be able to start editing in no time. Don't feel overwhelmed, but get comfortable with Adobe Premiere Pro instead!

SPECIAL OFFER!

Thank to our sponsor Audiio, all students get 2 premium music tracks for free + 70% discount on a year subscription. Follow this link: https://cinecom.info/Audiio70

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Jordy Vandeput

Filmmaker and Youtuber

Top Teacher

Hi, I'm Jordy and I hosts one of the biggest YouTube channels about filmmaking & video editing; Cinecom.

With more than 2.5 million subscribers, we publish weekly tutorial videos. After graduating from film school in 2012, I immediately began teaching online where my real passion lays.

I've never liked the way education works. So I wanted to do something about it. With the classes I produce, I try to separate myself from the general crowd and deliver a class experience rather than some information thrown at a student.

Take a look at my unique classes, I'm sure you'll enjoy :-)

See full profile

Level: Beginner

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Oh hey guys, I was just doing some maintenance work on premiere. I found the toolbox, it was kind of missing. I'm Geordie by the way, and you might know me from the Sinc or Premier Basic Youtube channel where me and my team teach Premier Pro to millions of people around the world. Now we work close together with Adobe to better understand premiere and where it's heading to. But if you're like me when I started video editing about 15 years ago, you are overwhelmed at the moment. You know that premiere is an amazing and professional video editing tool. But launching that program for the first time just gives you anxiety. So many buttons, tools, and bells, and whistles. I mean, where do you even start? Well, don't worry, we're going to do this together. Step by step, we'll explore this amazing program. And before you know it, you're making amazing video edits. Working with sound and music, animating graphics or text color, correcting those bad shots, or fixing audio issues. You'll be applying effects to your video screening, awesome transitions. Understand the toolbar right here and what all of these things do. All in all, just feel really comfortable with Premiere Pro and that is my goal. By the end of this course, I want you to know the technical side of things, but also the creative side, like what makes a good edit. You're going to learn it all in this course and I'm super excited to do that together with you. Oh, but I do have to warn you, I'm a little bit crazy. This is no ordinary premiere course. What you see behind me is literally the inside of premiere pro, like when you place a clip in the timeline, it actually comes from me. First, I've got a very hectic job in here, and it doesn't always go so smooth, but I'm sure it's going to entertain you. I mean, that keeps the lessons exciting, right? Learning should be fun. And I'm going to take care of that throughout this course. I'm also going to give you some tasks. So I might ask you to cut up an interview and then come back to the lessons. It's important that you immediately try the new techniques that you've learned. That's why as part of this course, you can download all of the media end project files that I'll be working with. That way you can follow along. It's gonna be a very hands on course. Alright, let's do this guys. I am super excited to start exploring Premier Pro together and get you started with professional video editing. I hope to see you back in a moment. 2. Starting a Video Project: Oh, hey, you've joined the class, how cool is that? I was just working on the inside of premiere. All is working well, so we are good to go. It's a professional tool and if you're still doubting if it's the right choice or not. Well, professional video editing is kind of the same over all of those different programs. So once you know how premiere works, you can more easily switch over to something different like the Vinci resolve or final cut pro. But you were here to learn premiere, which is a good choice because it's one of the most used video editing tools in the industry. So without further ado, let's get started guys. What I've got right here on my desktop is a folder called Iceland's Travel Video. And it holds all of my media files I want to use to edit with. You can download all of this, by the way, so that you can follow along with this course. You can edit your own video with the demo footage that I'm using, and you can even upload that to Youtube to show it off to your friends. So what do we have in here? We've got an assets folder which holds some effects videos. We've got some images as well, which we can use. We have a folder called audio in which we've got the music track provided by our channel sponsor Audio. More about them laterinoscurse because I've got a very cool deal for you guys. We've got some sound effects a lot which you don't have to worry about right now. It is for later ins course, so just ignore that. And finally we've got a folder called video. Basically all of my video files. And I've organized that in different folders too. We can see we've got a camera folder, a drone folder, and finally an interview folder. And that is the first step of starting your project. You want to make sure to be organized. What I do is organize all of my media into one folder. So that means whenever I'm going to drag that folder onto a different drive, perhaps I want to take that with me on a plane, on a different computer, who knows what? It always stays intact because if I have some media files outside of that folder, which I forget to take with me, then it won't be able to locate those files and you will see the famous media offline more about my T shirt soon. So okay, you have organized all of your media files and the way you do that doesn't matter. This is the way that I do it. If you want to have a different folder structure, then that is up to you just as long as you are organized and that everything sits within one folder. All right, we can now open up Adobe Premier Pro. I have the beta installed. Don't worry about that. It's just so that this course will stay relevant for as long as possible so that I am working on a brand new latest features. Alright, you'll be welcomed with this screen right here, which basically just asks you to create a new project file. Premier wants you to create a new project before you can get started. I know that some other programs allows you to immediately get started. Well, Premier don't it wants you to save an actual project file. And that is what we're going to do right now. So were you going to hit new project? You can also open up an existing one if you want to, but for now it's the first project. Let's hit new projects. The premier has changed a lot over the past years and their philosophy of how you edit videos has kind of changed. On the top left here, you will see import, edit, and export. Before we only had the edit tab, but now I want you to think about importing your footage that editing it and then exporting it. And it did get some feedback from both beginners and professional videoturs that we don't really like this so much. It makes things more complicated and you will see in just a moment why that is. So chances are that Abe is going to update this again in the near future, but for now we're stuck with this. So what is this? We can see we've got a whole bunch of video Eclipse right here that isn't even from us. Like this is not my footage, guys. This is what everybody sees. If you install premiere, you can locate all of these sample media files by clicking here on the sample media on the left hand side. Basically, Adobe gives you a whole bunch of media files that you can use to practice width. But you've got this course, you've got my footage, so you want to use that instead of this. But their idea is that you first browse to your footage. So we've got some on my desktop, so let me just click on that. And here we have that Iceland Travel video, which I can open up. Here are those folders that we've explored before. Let's head over to video and then open up camera for instance. So here we have a whole bunch of video clips from Iceland. And I can just view them through here through my import tab, See what they are about. I could select them like this and perhaps select a few more. And you can see them here piling up on the bottom. These are all of the clips that I have selected. Now the idea is that we already start thinking about what we want to import before we even start creating the projects. And on the right hand side we can choose how we want to import that. Because there are a whole bunch of options that we can do with our footage. Like for starters, do we want to copy the media, Like if we have inserted our SD card into the computer. We can also browse directly to that within premiere and choose to copy all those media files within that folder that I've created. It's the Iceland Travel video folder, so we could enable that right here. Then we've got an option to create a new bin so we can put all those selected media files already inside of a bin. We can already start creating a new sequence. You don't even know what a sequence is, don't worry about that. And we can already start automatically transcribing the audio that is spoken within these media files. Now I'm going to be honest guys, if you are starting out with premiere, this could be very overwhelming. And for professional video editors like me, this is just bloated with stuff that we don't need. So I don't know why Adobe made it like that, but it is this. And we got to deal with it unless we choose not to import anything. And that is what I'm going to choose. So I'm just going to de select my clips right in here so that I have not anything selected. And when you don't have anything selected, the import setting Stap will just be entirely ignored. So that means all of this here in your entire screen makes absolutely no sense. The only thing that we're interested in is a little panel here on top that says project the name. And let's go for that. And I'm just going to get this, the name of the video lesson itself. So that's going to be lesson number two, starting a video project. But you can give that a different name as well, like my Iceland Video or whatever your project calls. And then you want to choose where you want to save that project from the drop down menu here on the right. And I'm going to choose a custom location. Click on that. And I'm currently on my desktop. That is good. Right here is my Iceland travel video. And like I said before, I want to have everything within that folder. So that's what I'll do. I'll double click on it and I'm going to create a new folder in here. So right click New Folder, and I'm going to call that Projects. Since I'll be working with multiple projects, I want to put them all in a different folder. Now typically you are not going to work with multiple projects if you've traveled to Iceland, you're probably just want to have one project called Iceland Travel Video. But I'm going to make a different project for every single lesson so that you guys can better follow along. All right, so let's choose that folder. It's Select Folder, And that's it. Now I'm just going to click on Create. Remember, I don't have any video file selected, so nothing will be imported. And here we are, welcome inside Adobe Premier Pro. How exciting is this guy is? More bells and whistles. No worries. So I'm just going to minimize premiere for a second because I want to show you guys now in my Iceland travel video folder. I've got that folder Project. And within there you will find your premiere project now that you have just created. So everything you do, all the cuts you play, all the effects you put on your videos is saved within that project. All right, so now you're probably stuck with the question. Jordy, you've skipped importing, how do we start editing now? How can we import media files? Well, there's a much better way of doing that, which I'm happy to show you in the next lesson. Thanks for watching. 3. The Workspace: Welcome to Adobe Premiere Pro. We have just created our project file and are now ready to start video editing. As you can see, we are now currently in the edit tab on top. This is where we are going to do all of the editing. We're going to slice up the videos in here. We're going to do motion graphics, audio mixing, color correction, and whatnot. All of that happens in here. Now, as you can see, premiere exists out of different panels. If I click on these, you will see the blue outline appear around them. Now, panels like these offer different functionalities, which we'll get into it in a moment. But you can take any of these, like for instance, the effects controls, and just drag that over to a different location. We can dock that right here next to the program monitor for instance. So now we have two tabs here on top, but we can also take that and dock it in between like so. So now we have three panels next to each other. We can make them smaller like that. We can make them bigger. These panels are just different windows that are docked together. And you could, even if I'm going to maximize my premier, and drag one of these panels outside of the program, make it appear as a completely different floating window. If I want to dock it again, take the name right here, effects controls, and dock it somewhere else. Like for instance, right here. Now let me just maximize Premier again. I can also go ahead and right click on any of these panels, for instance info and choose closed panel. I can do that for media browser as well if I want to. And let me just drag some more panels around like that. And this one perhaps here. And oh, no, I messed my work space up. I closed some panels that I shouldn't have closed in, and I put some windows on different locations where I don't want them to be, and I don't know what the default settings were anymore. This is a mess. Well, don't worry. As you can see here in the top, we've got a menu called Window. Clicking on that reveals all the different panels that we have. So if you buy mistakenly closed any of these, for instance the audio track mixer, you can just click on it. And there we go, it is back. And in the worst case scenario, let's go back to window. I can go to Work spaces. And from here I can go all the way down to reset to safe workspace. As you can see, I'm currently in the editing work space, which is a default workspace. And by going back to reset, I can reset it back to the default workspace. So don't worry if you've messed it up, you can always reset it. But that means that we can also customize a workspace. We can close certain panels that we don't need. For instance, the library panel is something that I don't need. The info panel also not Markers, also not history. Also not. I'm not going to work with audio clip mixer just yet. Let me disclose that too. Metadata, not interested. There we go. I've got a much cleaner workspace to work with right now. And I could go ahead and go to Window and Top workspaces, and then choose to save this as a custom workspace. So let's do that. Here at the bottom, you can say Save as new workspace after I had made my adjustments. So I click on that and I can give that a custom name right now, for instance, workspace Jordi, which is my name. Alright, let's hit on. Okay, there we go. And now if I go back to window and top workspaces, you'll find your own custom workspace here on the bottom. If I want, I can always switch back to something different. Premier made a whole bunch of presets. For example, I can go over to Color, which is made for color correction. I can click on that workspace and it's going to change according to that. But okay, let's go back to window workspaces and then choose Editing. Now I did close a whole bunch of panels when I was still working in the editing workspace. So that's why you don't see them appear here, but they are saved within that workspace, so I can always go back now window workspaces and then say reset to safe layout. See that we are currently working in the editing workspace. There we go. This is a default setting. So as we've talked about before, every panel offers a different functionality, and along this course, you will see what those functionalities are like. For instance, we've got the toolbar right here. And the toolbar really just offers a whole bunch of different tools that we can use within the time line. We've got a whole separate lesson about that, but that is the entire functionality of that panel to give you different tools. But let's see what else that we have in here. So we have the project window right here. Let me just enlarge that a little bit more because the project window can be seen as the heart of Adobe Premiere Pro. This is where you are going to gather all of your media files, where you can create new files. And as well like graphics or where you can create a sequence. More about that in a moment. Now, in the previous lesson, we've seen that we've skipped the entire import process. So we're going to have to import our footage right now. And there are a couple ways to do that. You can either go to the menu on top Choose File and then go over to Import. This is a very classical way of doing it, but we can also just double click in an empty space here in the project window. So just double click and it will open up your browser as well. Just close that again. There is another way of doing it, and that is true, the media browser over here. If you can't find media browser, you can always go to the window on top and find media browser from here. Anti media browser is just what the name says. From here, we can Browse through our computer and look for the media file. So I could go over to my desktop, which is in my C drive. Then go over to users Sinc and then Desktop. There we go. Here's my Iceland Travel video. I could right click on it and choose Import from there. That is one way of doing it here and that is the way that I like doing it. And I also think that most video editors do it that way. If we go back to the project window, we can just drag and drop files in here. So let me just open up my folder, Here it is, the Iceland travel video. And for now I just want to import all of my assets. Hold down control to also select the audio folder. And finally, the video folder. Don't import the lot folder because that is going to give you an error. You cannot import lots, it's for later in this course. And of course you don't want to import the project into the project, that's just project exception. You don't want that to happen. So with these three folders selected, I'm just going to take them and drag them into the project folder. It's going to take some time for Premier to process those video files, but once they are imported, you will see that you have beautiful folders as well. It's going to take over the structure that you have so I can expand these folders and see the exact same structure that I had before. And that's the entire idea. You want to reflect everything that you have on your computer inside Premiere as well. Now the project window itself offers some more possibilities to further organize your media. For instance, I can create an extra folder by just clicking either on the button down below new bin or I can always also right click in here and then choose new bin. We have the same options in here. Doing that, I have a new folder and I can call that for instance, Footage. There we go. And I'm going to put all of my footage folders in there, so just select all of them and drag them inside the footage folder. That way you can further organize or tweak your organization. Inside Premier, you can browse your media files by expanding the folders or collapsing them again. But you can also change the view instead of list view that we are currently in. We can also change the view here on the bottom to icon view. So if we do that, you can see that we have icons now instead of a list, we can always go back to here by clicking on list view. It's up to you what you want to work with. Let's open up the Footage folder Now, double click on it, and as you've seen here, Premier automatically opens it up in a new tap. So we still have the project window here, but we also have the footage window now here, which is basically also just a project window, it's the exact same thing I can go up. Which basically brings me back to the second tab right here, which is my root folder. Now if you don't want from here to constantly open up new tabs, because it will do that. If I'm going to open up the video folder, for instance, we have another tab open. Well, a different way of doing that. And let me use first to close those windows as we've seen before. We can just right click on them and choose closed window. Do that for the footage panel as well. There we go. Go back to my project window. What I can do is hold down my control key on my keyboard and then double click on the folders to open it up in the existing panel. And I can go back by clicking here on this button on top. All right. Let me just browse to my footage folder. Video and finally drone here. I have a whole bunch of drone footage as you can see. And if I want to zoom in a bit more than that, I have a little slider here on the bottom which allows me to make the stub nails a little bit bigger. I can also make my panel bigger like that, which is more easily to work with when you're going to select your footage. And that is, in essence, what the project window is all about. And the next lesson I want to start editing. I want to create a timeline. I want to chop my videos up and start making an actual edit. Oh boy, am I excited for that. 4. Basic Editing Workflow: Welcome to the most exciting lesson of this course. Because in this lesson, you are going to learn how to actually edit your videos, you know, in a professional video editing program. Like from here, it works different than with those amateur or beginner apps. So it's time to get serious guys. Alright, we've already explored the project window, so we are familiar with that. Now we need to bring our media files into some sort of a timeline so that we can put them on top of each other, next to each other, and whatnot. Well, here on the right hand side, we can find timeline, but you can see here that it says no sequences. We also can't really see a timeline in here. That is because we have to create a sequence first. And there are two ways of doing that. You can drag your media files right in here as it says, or we can create a custom sequence. And we're going to explore both ways, the two ways. So here on the bottom right of the project window, you can find the new item button, from which we can create a new sequence. Or we can also just right click in an empty space, go to a new item and choose sequence. And here we are greeted with a whole bunch of options. You see eventually your sequence is going to turn into a new video file as well. So we need to have certain settings like the resolution and the frame rate. Mostly, you firmly heard about four K and GD before. Well, those refer to the resolution of your video clips. A certain camera can shoot in a certain resolution, but we can also choose those settings here in premiere. So we have a couple of presets to choose from, as you can see here on top, we have some HD presets, so we can work in NDP, which refers to the number of the actual resolution. And there are some different frame rates that we can choose from, such as 25, we have 50, and at the bottom we have some four K resolution sequences. Now for the daredevils under you, you can also go to the setting step on top, and make your own kind of sequence. You can make a custom sequence here, and it starts with the time base here, which is basically just a frame rate of your videos. Here in Europe and in Asia, we are most used to working with 25 frames per second when you go to the cinema. Those movies are usually shot at 24 frames per second. And if you live in the US, you are probably familiar with 29.97 frames per seconds. Now, that odd number comes from the old days where the frame rate of videos were bound to the frequency of the electricity nets. That was because video was projected on these old CRT televisions. And if you're as old as me, you know exactly what those things are. But today, it really doesn't matter anymore what kind of frame rate you choose. Because we upload every videos probably for the web, for Youtube and stuff, and on Youtube we can choose whatever we want. We can go for ten frames per second or 60 frames per second. But what is the difference between these two? Well, as the name implies, you have 60 frames per second, so that means it's pretty smooth. So that means if I'm going to wave my hand and I'm going to capture that within a second, I can capture 60 frames of my hands. So that means my hand will go super smooth. But if I only get ten frames per seconds, my hand will be very choppy if I'm going to move my hand around in ten frames per seconds. So you think by yourself, you know, let's just go for 60 frames then, because that is the smoothest option. Well, here's the thing. You can only have as many frames per seconds as your input videos are. You see these clips right here that you import into Premiere Pro? If this clip is only 30 frames per seconds, then I can put it inside a 60 frames per second sequence. But I won't see it as 60 frames because it's only 30. It's like with everything, the speed of something is always as fast as the slowest item in the chain. Now for the Web, you are typically going to work with either 30 frames, 25 or 24 frames per second. And since most of my footage that I've shot in Iceland is shot in 25 frames per second, I'm going to choose that. If you are not sure what your footage is, let me just cancel that window. We'll come back to this in a moment. You can always browse to your media, make sure that you are list few down here. And then you can see here on the right side a column with some more information about your video clips. So right away I can see that all of my clips shot in Iceland are at 25 frames per second. I do have one clip in here that is 60 frames. And we'll talk more about that any future lesson. But having a greater frame rate allows us to do some fun stuff like slow motion. If I'm going to scroll a bit to the right side, we can find some more information about the resolution as well, like right here. This is a four K resolution, 3,840 by 2000 hundred 60. Let me just collapse that again. And let me just create that new sequence again. Go back to that same window, head over to settings. I'm going to stay working in 25 frames, which is good. And for the frame size, I'm going to choose that four K resolution. And honestly, that is everything you need to know. Don't worry too much about all of the other settings as you are starting out. None of these things really matter that much. Let's go to the bottom now and give that sequence and name, for instance, my Iceland video. It's completely up to you how you name that. Click. Okay, there we go. Look at that. We've got a timeline now. And in the project window, you can see that our timeline, or our sequence, is an actual item. That means I can delete this. There we go. Now, Our timeline is gone. No worries. I can just create our timeline again. Go to sequence. Settings, 25 frames, four K resolution. Called that my Iceland video again. And there we go, our sequence is back. But I can also create another sequence. We are not bound to one time line or one sequence. We can work with multiple. So I can just go back to here new item sequence. And let's give this one a different name. For instance, horses, because I did shot a lot of horses on my travel trip. And I might want to make a different, like a second video about the horses alone. And so I can do that now. I have two sequences. And you can see here in your timeline that we have two tabs now of both sequences. If you close one of these, don't worry, Just double click on them in your project window to open it up again in the timeline. All right, that is all fun and games we're going to explore working with multiple sequences later in this course. For now, let's close horses and also going to delete that sequence. And let's just focus on one sequence now. All right, we want to bring our media files into this timeline. Let's do that. I'm going to browse to my video folders. Let me just double click on it. And let's open up camera. Here we are. Here are all of my video files. And if I move my mouse over these, I can see a preview of these video files. Now, there are two ways of bringing these into the timeline. I can just take them and drag them into the timeline like so. And I want to zoom in a little bit more so I can see better what's going on. I can use the scroll bar here on the bottom and take this outer part to just move that inward. In that way, I'm just zooming into that timeline to get a better view. I can also expand the video tracks themselves. You can see here that we have different video tracks. We've got V 1v2v3 and so on. The same thing for the audio tracks, and in between here we can just take that and expand that video track a bit like, so the same thing goes for the audio track. We can just expand that a bit. Give it some more space so that we can actually see what's going on in here. All right, so now we have that entire clip in the timeline. But maybe I don't want that because if I'm going to play back this video clip by hitting the space bar on my keyboard here in my program monitor, we can then see what's going on. But you know, it's pretty long. I just need like a small part of that clip and, you know, there are different ways of doing that. We can start trimming this clip. That means we can just take the outsides and just trim a part of that clip. Don't worry, we are not deleting anything. We are just making selections here. And that is what video editing is all about, you just make selections. I can cut off a piece from the beginning as well. There we go. So now I'm just left with this clip here in my timeline. And I do have a gap here in the beginning, so we want to close that. Just take that clip and move it back to the beginning. So this is one way of editing. Just drag your clips into the timeline and let me just zoom out a bit. Again like that. And we can trim off apart from the beginning, trim a part off from the ends, and make my selection that way. But there is a different way of editing, the professional way, Me just delete all of the clips in a timeline. And let's go back to my project window here. Let's start with the first clip right here. And what I'm actually going to do is just double click on it. Doing so, we'll open it up in the source monitor right here. The source monitor is this place, the videos that are in your project window. So I can play them back in here. I can just press play to play the video back in the source monitor. And let's say that I want to have like this part of the video. What I can then do is make a selection in here so I can say, alright, my video has to start at this point. I'm going to set an endpoint at that point. And there is a button down here that says Mark in. Clicking on that will create an endpoint. And everything after that endpoint will be selected. I can then scrub forward in time and set an out point with this button right here, mark outs. And now only that part of the video is selected. And what I can do now is simply take that video from the source monitor and drag that into my timeline. And only that selection that I have set right here is being imported into my timeline. This means that I can make multiple selections of the same clip. Because maybe I also like something on the right here where we focus more on the sun. Let me set point as well. There, go a little bit further in time and set an out point and drag that part as well into my time line next to it. There we go. By way, if you want to zoom in and out on your timeline, there is an easier way of doing that, and that is by holding down your old key on the keyboard, and then just using your scroll wheel on the mouse to zoom in. And by not holding down Alt, you can just scroll sideways like that. All right, so let me just select an Ner clip. Let's say this here, which is kind my wife, she's walking here in the snow. And let me just look for a nice part like here. I'm a little wobbly at the beginning, so maybe like this part looks pretty good again in and out point. But there's a faster way of doing that with your keyboard point from in, so let's press the key on your keyboard. There we go. We set point. Go forward in time and set an out point. You guessed it, The key on your keyboard, in and out. The first two most important short key, short learning right now. All right, let me just drag that into the timeline as well. There we go, and we are editing guys. Let's select another one. Here's one of those horses that I was talking about. Alright, point out, point. Drag it into the timeline. This is what editing is all about, guys. They're constantly making selections and placing those selections into the timeline. And don't worry, we are never cutting a piece off these clips, never touching our actual source clips which are in the folder on the computer, they will always stay intact. The clips from the project window will always appear here in the source monitor, and then clips in the time line will always appear in the program monitor. That is the difference between the source and the program monitor. And now I want you to practice that. I want you to make some selections and put them in your timeline. Get used to that editing technique, and then I'll see you back in the next lesson where we are going to go over some troubleshooting because you might run into some problems, and I know already what those problems are probably going to be. 5. The Timeline: Welcome back. If everything went well, you just edited a video inside Premiere Pro and nothing major happened, Everything went butter smooth. But if not everything went so well, you ran into problems. And I probably know which problems those already are. So in this lesson, I want to focus or troubleshoot some of those issues. And I'm going to start off by looking at the timeline. The timeline window itself is pretty straightforward, although we have a whole bunch of buttons here on top as you can see. But also all of things are going on on the left side too. Now, it's not necessary to know every single thing of those if you're starting out, but there are a few which I do find important. First of all, if you're going to move clips around, you'll see that they kind of like snap against each other. And that is very useful if you're editing. But you can also disable that feature by disabling the snapping option here on top this little magnet. So just disable that. And now you can move clips around without them snapping. Everything that we do inside premiere is non destructive. That means every cut that we place on a clip, everything that we remove will never be touched on the source material itself. So the clips that are on our hard drive, everything you see in here is a link. So let me browse to my source clips on my computer right here, and I'm going to delete one of these clips here. Let me just do that. There we go. Now let's go back to Premier and see what happens. Boom, Premier is gonna give an error. It's basically saying, hey, the media file is offline. I can't find it anymore because I'm linking to it. And this window right here is basically going to help you to locate that back and make that connection again. But for now we're going to close that because I want to show you where you can locate that window as well. You can see here in my timeline as well that the media is offline. It's basically the same thing that happened to my T shirt. You know, I had a beautiful design which I had on a USB stick, but I forgot to plug that US best again when I was printing my T shirt. So this came out media offline. That's a joke by the way. Some people actually believing that. So anyways, my media is of line, How can I link it back? Well, very easy. You just want to locate the file that is missing. So it's also missing within the project panel, obviously, right click on it and choose Link Media, which will open up that same window that we had before. So this is the media file that is missing. Make sure it's selected and click on Locates. And then you want to browse to that media file. So just say to Premiere where it is, because maybe you didn't deleted it, maybe you just placed it somewhere else on your hard drive. In this case, I deleted it. So what I'm going to do here is just head back to my Explorer and hit control Z to undo my action. And put that clip bag in there, Alright. Minimize that. And here it is, it's back in my browser. Select that and hit, okay. And there we go. My file is linked again. And that is the entire reason why you want to put your entire project on all of your media files within one single folder right there on my desktop. That way I can take that folder with me, put it on a hard drive or something, give it to my friend who knows what. It will always stay intact. All of my media files, everything sits in there. All right, let's minimize this. I'm going to delete everything in my timeline because there's something else that I want to show you. And for that, I'm going to go over to my interview folder. So let me just close here, the camera bin. There we go. By the way, you can also just click your scroll wheel on your mouse. If you click that little button in the middle. It'll also just close those tabs as you can see here. There we go, close. Let's go over to video in an interview. There we go. Here we've got team on, he's talking in front of the camera. So that means we have audio and video going on in that video clip. So if I drag that into my timeline, I can do it like that and oh, what's that premiere is giving me a pop up. We don't like pop up, so let's explore this. What is going on in here? So it is an empty timeline right now. And I'm dragging a new clip in there. And Premier knows that. Premier knows that it's empty and it's going to ask me, hey, I see that your settings from your clip is different than your sequence settings. Yeah, I've set my own custom settings, and I remembered that it puts 25 frames per seconds for my sequence. But my source clip is actually 30 frames per seconds. So premier is going to ask me, hey, should I make your sequence the same as your source video, also 30 frames? Well, no, because I have set a custom frame rate, so I want to keep it that way. So let's say keep existing settings. There we go. And there we have Timon, he's talking. You can see the wave forms here on the bottom. If you can't see those wave forms, you might want to expand that video track a bit like so that is going to reveal the audio wave forms. And if we're going to play that back, we should hear Timon. I'm Timon. I'm an Arctic Explorer. Look at that. He's Tim on an Arctic Explorer. All right, now there are some problems that could occur. I'm going to delete that clip again. There we go. And here on the left hand side of the timeline, we can see two input selections, one for audio and one for video. If we disable the one from audio, and I'm going to drag a video into the timeline like so, you will see that the audio track doesn't come with it because I have disabled that track, a very common mistake. All you need to do is make sure that your input is selected. And the same thing happens with your video. If you don't have that selected, the video track will not come with it. All right, so what if we're editing? So typically we do that by double clicking here on the clip, opening it up. And the source monitor, let's say that I'm making a selection. Let's say this part right here, and I only want The video part. I don't need the audio and the video, only the video. So instead of just dragging that entire video from Ear into my timeline, what I'm going to do here is locate these two buttons on the bottom. And I want to drag the video only to my time line like that, look at it. Or I can also say the audio only into my timeline, like so I can just place that anywhere else if I want to. All right, that is great. Why do you want to do that? Well, maybe you're doing a B roll edit. Let's quickly make a video edit with some nice drone shots perhaps and put a song underneath that. I'm going to go back here to my video folder drone. Let's open that one up and let's see what we have in there. So we've got some mountains really cool. We're going to make an In selection. Out selection only need the video, so just drag that into the timeline like so keep existing settings. Al right, what else do we have? Here are some nice mountains. There we go. By the way, I shot all of these myself in my trip to Iceland. Beautiful country. If you've never been there before, definitely worth it. It is a cinematography paradise, alright? And we got three shots and a timeline looking really good. I can play them back here looking really nice. But let's add a song to that. I'm going to go back here because I also have an audio folder, and within I've got a music folder, and within there we get two songs. These songs here come from our channel sponsor audio and they were very kind enough to provide us with these songs. That means that you guys can also use these songs completely for free. However they are for personal use only now on top of that, they also wanted to give you guys 70% discount on an entire year subscription at audio. It is an incredible music and sound effects library where you can find hundreds of thousands of songs and license them for commercial use as well. So definitely check it out guys. I'm going to leave a link to audio. It's a very special link that gives you that discount somewhere here, down below this course. Oh, and by the way, if you've purchased a complete Sinica bundle which comes with all of our courses, video packs, and whatnot, you get free updates as well. If you have purchased that bundle, you can actually get an entire year completely for free at audio. So thank you so much audio Al right. We've got two very good songs. If we double click on them, obviously we don't see anything in the source monitor. However, we do see the audio waveforms which helps us to kind of like see the song. For instance, right here we get a little drop into the music and then it starts again. At this point, let's quickly listen to that. Chelly, this is a good song. Really nice, really good. Alright, well, maybe I want my song to start from this point. So I'm just going to set my cursor right here. Set it pin point. And I'm going to drag that underneath my edit like so. Right. And I want to start right where the music starts. So I'm going to trim this a little bit shorter like that. All I'm doing now is just moving my point up, by the way, keep in mind editing in from here is just making selections and that's going to make more sense once we're going to work with the tools here from the tool bar. But okay, there we go. We got ourselves a first edit with some nice shots and a nice song underneath. Look at that beautiful Iceland, isn't that cool? Alright. And with that, you know how to troubleshoot some of the problems that you might run into, so they will never occur again. And the next lesson, we are going to explore some video effects. Oh, I'm super excited for that. 6. The Effects Controls: Well, I got to say so far you are doing a great job. So congratulations for that. You already know how to edit in premiere, which is quite amazing. So we're going to take that a step further and start exploring how to work with video effects. So this here is where we left off from the previous video. We put some shots here in a timeline as well as the song. However, I'm just going to delete that entire sequence because I want to show you guys something. So right now we don't have any timeline. So what I'm going to do is right click, go over to New item and choose Sequence. And from here I'm actually going to go over to the HD preset. Let's just go for that 25 frames per seconds. Let's give that a name. For instance, HD Iceland Video. And hit. Okay. Now let me go over to my Footage folder and look for something nice. Let's go over to video and let's take camera. And from here let's look for a nice shot. Perhaps the sheep right here. Double click on that, you view the shot. And this is looking quite amazing. All right, let me make a selection from here, set an endpoint, go a little bit forward in time and set an outpoint. And then drag the video only to my timeline. There we go. And no, I don't want to change my sequence settings. I chose to work in an AGD sequence. So let's keep it that way. It keep existing settings and oh no, what is going on there? Let me just zoom it a little bit more on my timeline so that we can see the clip a little bit better. And I'm also going to expand my video track here. You can just hoover your mouse into that video track here. Hold down the Alt key on your keyboard, and then just use your scroll wheel to zoom in and out on that track itself. But as you can see, the clip itself is also looking kind of zoomed in. Like why is that? Why is it not looking like the source material? Well, that is because we have created an HD sequence, but we are putting a four K image in side. You see, this is the size of my clip, which is four K resolution, but I'm putting that into an HD resolution sequence. I'm only seeing that middle part of my clip and not the entire clip. Makes sense, right? So what I want to do is kind of like downscale my clip so that it fits within the size of my sequence. All right, so let's see how we can do that. Within Premiere Pro, you want to locate the effects controls, and it's right here next to the source monitor. Just click on that. And like always guys, if you can't find any of the panels that I'm working with, maybe you close them by mistake. Well, you can always locate them from the menu, a top select window, and then from here, effect controls. Right? So we're in the effects controls, but we don't see anything in here. It's pretty empty. And that is because we have that selected E clip. It also says it's here, no clip selected. So let's select our clip in a timeline. There we go. And a whole bunch of properties are appearing right now. These are settings that we can change about our clip. These are default settings, like the position right here, and we can change the position by just clicking and dragging that number. We can move the clip sideways, as you can see right here. Or we can also just click on that and enter a number, for instance, 300, and change the position value that way. Right here is our scale option. It's currently 100% and we know that a four K resolution is twice as much as an HD resolution. So I know that we have to change the scale to 50% There we go. Now you do see this black border right here. And that is because we were playing around with the position previously. Now you can kind of like better see what's happening to the clip. Now if you want that clip to be back in the middle where it's supposed to be, we can reset this value by clicking here on this icon or that reset parameter icon next to it. Click on that, and there we go, it's back in the middle. And the same thing goes for any other property. If you want to set it back to the default just like the scale, just reset that value like that. All right, let's set that back to 50% because we've got some more options in here and we don't need to change everything manually by working on these values. We can also just select the motion property here on top. This is a motion group property by the way. You can also collapse that if you want so and expand it back to see all the properties that are linked to the motion. But if we select motion, you'll kind of see like an outline, a figure here in your program monitor around the clip. Let me just make a little bit more room for that so we can see it better. And that means that we can visually change any of these properties right in here. So I can just take the outside like that and just drag it smaller. I can take one of the corners and just rotate that clip. And my computer is just doing great with that clip now. It should go smoot my computer for some reason, doesn't want to do that smoot. Anyways, we can also just take that clip and bring it somewhere else. And I'm really sorry for the shoppiness here. I don't know what's going on. You know, that's the thing with premiere. One day it works, Yatterday, it doesn't. There's also a reset option for the entire motion group. So if you've been playing around with all of these settings, you can just reset the entire group like so. All right, looking good guys. I'm going to reset the scale back to 50% because I want to work with this clip this way. All right, finally we have capacity and time remapping, which are both going to be for a separate lesson, apacity already for the next one. So stay tuned for that one. But I want to add some different effects in here. Like I want to make this shot perhaps a little bit more blurry. Or perhaps add a little bit more contrast to this shot, because let's be honest, it looks pretty flat. Well, to do that, we're going to have to go over to the effects library and we can find that. Right here somewhere. It's off my screen. So I have to press these arrows here on the right side and then find effects. This is the effects library. You know what I'm going to do. I'm going to close a few taps that I don't need, like libraries, info markers and history. Don't need those. All right, let's explore what we can find here in the effects library. So we've got presets, Lumitry, presets, audio effects transitions, video effects, and video transitions. So Lumitry is the color correction engine within premiere. Again, that has later in this course, so we're going to skip that for now. The same thing for audio effects. So let's head all the way down to video effects right here. And let's just expand that folder and see what we can find in there. So we get a whole bunch of groups, basically these are folders in which we can find different effects. Now you'll see that I have a bunch of more effects that you guys don't have, such as all of these RGtrapcoidRG universe things. Well, those are third party plug ins for a red giant, in this case that I installed into my computer. So you can also find additional effects online, sometimes for free, sometimes paid, that offer a specific functionality. But now let's just stick with the default effects in here. So I want to do some color correction. Add a little bit more contrast to that clip. Well, let's go over to the color correction folder right here and see what kind of effects that we have in here. And there we go, I see an effect called brightness and contrast. Take that and just drag it over to your clip like so. And you will now see that in my effect controls, that effect has been applied to my clip brightness and contrast. And just like with the motion property, I also get a few properties to change my brightness and contrast. So let's change those values. So contrast, let me just increase that slider and see what that does. There we go. Adding a little bit more punch to my shot. Looking great. And I might want to increase the brightness a little bit too as well, just to make that shot pop a bit more like that. All right, this is great guys. Let me play back the video and see how that looks. Isn't that looking great? Love those very cheap. All right, let's look for another effect, guys. I'm going to go over to, let's go over to the distort folder this time. There's one thing here that attracts my attention and there are these little icons here next to these effects. What are they? Well, these effects with that icon next to it are GPU accelerated. And that's just a fancy word for saying, whenever I apply one of these effects to my Eclipse, I'll be able to play it back in real time, just like I'm doing here with the cheap. I can just play that back without any issues. But now let's take an effect that doesn't have that icon next to it. For instance here the turbulent displace. Just take that, drag it onto the clip. And now it's being added here into the list different effects. So the turbulent displaced effect comes with a whole bunch of more options. And I'm going to go over all of these because really these effects are very specific, but you can always fool around with them. And that is definitely something that I can recommend to you. If you want to explore the video effects library more, just drag and drop a whole bunch of effects onto your clip, Change the settings and just see what they do. I mean, already this effect is doing something to my shot. As you can see, it's kind of like displaced all over the place. Let me just increase the amount a bit more. Let's perhaps set that to 200 so we can really see a difference going on in there. Look at that. That's ugly, Al right, But now let's try and play back the clip and see what happens. Okay, It has trouble. Yeah. No, that is not going well. All right. So did it really start immediately when I pressed the space bar and it had like a little choppiness in the middle. That's because my computer is having trouble now to render that effect. And we can tell because there is this red line here above the clip. And that red line is telling you, hey, this clip right here cannot be played back in real time or it cannot be played back smoothly. And when I'm going to go back here to my effects controls, you scroll down a little bit more. I'm going to disable that troubling displaced effect for one moment here. We can do that by clicking on the Effects button next to the effect itself. So just click on that. And now it is disabled for a moment. You can now see that that line is now yellow. Yellow means that we can play it back in real time. So then how can we make sure that if we enable that effect again, that we can play it back in real time with that effect? Well, in order to do that, we're going to have to pre render our video. And that is very simply done. If you go over to your timeline here, just hit the return key on your keyboard like that. And it will now render everything that is in red. And now it does play back very smoothly. And you can see here that the line is now green. Green is essentially the same as yellow, which means it can play back in real time. But it also means that that clip has been rendered. What it basically did was export that clip as a video file in the background. So it's somewhere on your computer right now. But it's using that small little export to play back the footage better. So that means if I'm going to change something here, let me just select that clip again and I'm going to go over to my trouble in displace and change the amount to 100. That means now that my new setting does not match with the rendered clip, so my timeline indicator is back to reds, which means I'm going to have to render again. So every time you're going to make changes to an effect, you're going to have to re render those clips. And that is how effects work in Adobe Premiere Pro. If you want to delete any of these, you can just select them and hit the delete key on your keyboard like that. All right guys, for getting the hang of this really awesome. And the next lesson we're going to place some clips on top of each other and actually make use of those different layers in the timeline. 7. Layers and Blending: Okay, who imported these two clips? Anyone? I don't know what to do with these. Next to each other? On top of each other? Come on. So someone just imported two clips into Premier, but I don't know what to do with them because I can put them next to each other, but I can also put them on top of each other. You see these are layers. You know, maybe the person who imported this doesn't know that you have multiple options. Let me show it to you guys how that works. So currently I have no timeline whatsoever. I just deleted the sequence that we were working with in the previous lesson. Because I'm going to show you guys a different way of trading, a sequence. I'm going to select any of my drone clips right here. I'm just double click on them to see which one they are. This one looks pretty cool. So let me just drag that here now into empty space in my timeline. And it will automatically create a sequence with the same video settings as my source clip. And we can find the sequence back right here. And I'm going to rename that by just clicking on this layer. And let's call that my Iceland video. All right, so we've got one clip in the timeline right now looking good. Let me go back to my drone folder and let's see what else that we happen here. Let's take this shot right here and just drag that into the timeline. There we go. All right, so now we have these two clips just playing next to each other. And you know what, I'm going to trim the first clip a little bit shorter like that, so we have similar sizes. There we go, let's drag all of them here to each other. Let me just zoom in a bit more. So there we go. We got them next to each other right now, but we can also put them on top of each other. But Geordie, why would you do that? While there are multiple reasons to do that, I mean, first of all, let's just do that. I'm going to take the second clip criteria and just drag that on top of the other one. Now do make sure that as you're doing that, as you can see here, the audio is not jumping to a different track. It is in fact overlapping with the other audio tracks. So that means we're going to delete a part of the audio of that first clip. So if we're going to let go right now, you can see here, what happened. This here is my first clip and this here is my second clip. So if I don't want to cut off a piece of the audio of the second clip, let me just undo my action by pressing control Z. What I have to do is first make room for that, place the audio on track number two. So this is audio track number two. Let's make that a little bit bigger as well. And then drag the video on track number two as well. And now they both overlap each other. All right, so now that we have both on top, nothing really happens because, you know, it's like putting two pieces of paper on top of each other. You can only see the top one. However, if we're going to move that second paper a little bit to the site, we can see the bottom layer. And that's exactly what we can do here as well. So with the top clip selected, I'm going to go over to the effects controls and change the position property, or I'll just select the motion here. And let me just drag that clip a little bit more to the sides. There we go. We can now see the bottom clip. And that's really cool, because that means that we can show two videos at once. All right, let me just undo that action because we have a separate lesson about working with multiple videos. What I want to show you is this option right here, the opacity which we skipped when we were talking about the effects controls. So the capacity is really just the capacity of your layer. If I'm going to set that to 50% it becomes transparent. And now we can see both clips as well, but the first one is transparency. And that's really cool because what we're doing right now is actually just blending two clips together. And we can do that with the capacity. This is one way of blending the clips. I can change that to 80% have a different blending intensity, but let me just set that back to 100% I can also change the blending mote. Currently it is set to normal, which is just normal. Just the club as it is. But I can open up that drop down menu and choose from a whole bunch of different blending motes. For instance, I can take darken and darken will just do that. It's going to take the darker part of your video and show that, but leave out the brighter part. And you can see here that my mountain in the back is still visible, but the water here, which is much brighter, is nuts. As I scrub through that video, you can kind of see what that does. But I can also change that to lighting, which is going to do the opposite. It's going to remove darker parts, but only keep the brighter parts, which was definitely like this little puff of cloud, that waterfall cloud right here in some other brighter areas. Now, mixing two clips like these could be nice for a creative project like a music video, But there are multiple use cases of working with such blending modes. And one of them is working with video effects. Let me show you, right, I'm going to reset the capacity property of that clip like so, and I'm just going to place that here next to my other clip. Let's also place the audio track there. By the way, there is no audio with these drone shots. I mean, there is audio but it's empty, so that's why you don't see any wave forms in them. Anyways. Let me go back here into my folder. Just go up one, and here we can find the assets folder. We can find effects. Now effects, these are just video clip, these are MP four. These are not something special, these are just plain video clips. But these are special clips. If I'm going to open up one of these, let me just take here the purple light leak effect. As you can see here, what I did was basically just chine a light into my camera to create this kind of thing. But it's something that you can find online as well. You can look for light leak and you will find hundreds of difference of light leaks that you can use inside Premiere. So what I'm going to do is take the video only and drag on top of my clip like that. So we're only working here with the second clip. And we just align my video playhead over there so we only see the light leak effect. But let's go back to the effects controls now. With that clip selected, I'm going to go over to the capacity properties and change the blending mode. So what I want to do is remove all the darker areas and only be left with that purple glow. And to do that, I can change my blending to lighting. Yes, but I can also go for screen. You see all of these blending modes right here are going to leave out the darker areas, but just like in a different way, I would just say play around with them. But the screen option is one of the most used as well as the leaner Dodge at these are the two most used when it comes down to working with light leaks and stuff like that. Let's change it to screen. There we go. And now it seemed as though this light leak is just part of that shot. Like the sunlight is shining its light into the lens of the drone. How cool is that? And you can experiment with different blending modes. Let's change it to Ad, for instance. Which is going to make it much harder, much more puncher looking really good as well. And you know, we can stack as much as we want. I'm going to take that other light leak effect as well and just put that on top of everything else. There we go. We are using three video layers right now. And by the way, if the audio is not as important, you can actually move this middle line right here, a little bit to the bottom to make some more room for your video tracks. Alright, but that one selected on top. Let's go to the effects controls. Change the blending mode to screen. And now we are mixing both that green and that purple together. You know, maybe I want that green to be more on the other side of the clip, on the right side. So I want to flip over that entire clip. Now I could start fooling around with the motion properties like like rotate that and reposition and whatnot. Or we can also go over to the effects library. Let me just close a few folters here. Effects library. There we go. And I'm going to use the surge bar on top to look for an effect because I know what the name of it is. It is called flip and we both have the horizontal and vertical flip. We want to take the horizontal flip, take that and put it on the green light leak. And Ben, we've got it now on the other side of our shot. So are we limited to three video tracks? No, absolutely not. We can go back to our video files. Let's instead of effects because only have two anymore. Let's go, let's go for video again. Let's go to camera and let's see what else we have in here that we can blend. You know, perhaps let's make it fun. Makes absolutely no sense. But we're going to take these cheap right here and put them on top. Now you can see that I'm putting them in a non existing video track. But that is okay, because if I do that, it will automatically create a new one for me right here. Now we've got video track number four. And I can just take that club drag. And again, at track higher, and now we have video track number five. So we can create as much video tracks as we want. All right, so let me just change that blending modes to, I don't know, like screen, there we go. Can we see the sheep Like a little bit coming through here. This could be something for a very creative music video about cheap. All right. You know what? That makes no sense. Let me just delete that. You get the idea. We can create as many video tracks as you want. And the same thing goes for audio tracks as well. By default we get three audio tracks, we can add more to there as well. And that's going to be very useful once you're going to do sound design, which we're going to check out as well later in this course. But basically, we're going to stack a whole bunch of audio clips together to create a new sound ambience. You know, in some of my project I would utilize over 50 audio tracks, so it's definitely going to be useful once you're going to be more familiar with video editing. All right guys, you are getting pretty familiar now with premiere, aren't you? You know how to utilize the timeline very well Now, work with different tracks, you can move clips around, you can blend them and create some really creative stuff. You know what, go and practice now for a little bit, try to, you know, put some video effects onto the clip, see what they do, Try to put some clips on top of each other and work with different blending modes. And just see what you get experiments and be creative guys. 8. Cropping and Reframing: All right guys. We're going to continue working in the timeline, but instead of blending clips together, we are going to like have multiple clips appear in the same clip. And let me just show it you. So I'm going to drag a few E clips here in my timeline. Let's start with this one which we haven't used yet. Double click on it. Look for a nice starting point and a nice ending point. There we go. And we're only going to drag the video for now into the timeline. Let's keep the existing settings. All right, let's make some more room here. And I'm going to drag another clip in there. Let's go over to, let me see here, what we have. This here looks really nice. All right, it's also end point, forward in time, out point. And drag it into the time line. There we go. Now perhaps I want to trim that clip a little bit out like so, so that it is the same length as my bottom clip. So like we've seen before, two papers on top of each other, we can only see the top clip appear now in a program monitor. Now what I want to do is create a split screen so that we can see both clips at the same time. Now in order to do that, we're going to have to go over to the effects library again. So let me just look for that. It's not this one. Let me just close a few things. Here it is, the effects library. And I'm going to look for the effect called crop Take that and I'm going to drag it on top of my top clip. All right, select it. Go over to the effects controls in which we can find the properties of the crop effect right here. And just like with the motion property, the crop effect is also something that we can just select and then visually change in the program monitor. So as I've got that selected, you can see that outline here around the clip. Moving one of these lines here, we'll just crop away a certain part of that shot. Now, I don't want to crop it like this because my most interesting information in that shot is here in the middle and not so much here on the right side. So I actually only want to use like this part and perhaps like cut a piece here off that other side. There we go. And so now the idea is to go to the motion properties here to the position. Just move that clip up to the right side like that. So now we had the two shots next to each other. But I noticed that it's not really in the middle, like this line right here, it should be in the middle of my shot. And I can kind of like try to aim that and kind of like guess if it's in the middle or not, But there's a better way of doing that. You see I want to click here on this little tool range here on the right side which says Settings. Just click on that, which is going to open up a whole bunch of settings that we can change about the program monitor. And one of those things here is the safe margin. If I can find it here it is, safe margins. So just enable that. We're just going to create this box and we're going to work more with that as well in the future discourse when we're going to create graphic animations. But for now it's already useful because we can see these two tiny lines here, which represents the middle of the shot. We also have that horizontally right here and there. So that helps me to kind of like move this crop into the middle of my picture. There we go. Now, don't worry guys, this is just an overlay when you're going to export your video that will not be burnt into your video. Obviously, it's just a guides to help you. Alright, Looking good. Or at least the right side dust. The bottom does not so much. Let me just make it a little bit more space. There we go. I'm going to select the bottom clip now. And just like with papers, I can move that now to the left side too, because it's underneath the other clip, so we can see both the waterfall and this nice canyon. And there we go, we have created a split screen. Let's flate this back looking awesome. And of course, at all time, you can go back to that range setting right here and just disable safe margins once you're done so that the guidelines are not in the way. Look at it guys looking really good. And of course you can create multiple split screens. Perhaps have like four videos, one in each corner. That is possible as well. Or like 1,000 videos. That is up to you if your computer can handle that. Al right, But I doubt it. Alright, going good guys. I want to go over to a next technique, the last technique for this lesson, and that is the reframing. It's something that Adobe is super proud of. And I have to admit, it is pretty cool. So what I'm going to do here is go back to my project window. I'm gonna write Click in here, go over to New Item and choose Sequence. Now what I'm going to do here is head over to the settings on top because I want to create a vertical video. And currently the frame size is set to 1920 by 1080, which is the default HD resolution. So if we flip those two numbers, see that the horizontal site is 1080 and then the vertical site is 1920. We have the portrait mode, or the same as my phone, which is currently charging because the bad red is almost dead. Anyways, I'm going to give that sequence and name, which is gonna be Iceland for socials, you know, very typical to make a video for social media. All right, I'm going to go back now into my camera folder and I'm going to look for something that is moving so that we can use the auto reframe, which is a pretty cool option. Okay, so here we have something. The first drone shot, let me just double click on it to select a part. So it's kind of like panning to the right side, which is pretty cool. But there's this mountain here in the back that I want to keep in the middle at all time. So I'm going to select apart from there, so I'll just point, Go a little bit forward in time and then select out Point. There we go. Drag that video only into the timeline. And yes, I want to keep the same settings that I had set myself. Let me zoom in. All right, there we go. So as you can see here now, we get a portrait program monitor. And as we play back that video, it looks good. But all of a sudden here my mountain kind of gets out of the frame. And that's not what I want. I want that mountain to stay within the frame at all time, so we're going to have to do some kind of an animation. Now, luckily, we don't need to do that manually. There is an effect within premier, it does that entirely automatic. And so let's find that in the effects library. And he's going to look for reframe in here. And it is right there. Transform auto reframe, so just drag that onto your clip. It is also GPU accelerated, or we should be able to play this back pretty smoothly. So let's select that clip and head over to the effects controls and see what is going on here within the effect settings. So there is a button Colt analyzed, but I think it already did that. If it didn't, you can just press that again and it will automatically do its magic. All right. Let me just select the auto reframe here for a moment so we can see the edge around the clip. And so that we can also better see what is going on. And as I play my clip here, you can see that that frame is animated. How cool is that? So automatically it recognizes a moving shot. And it's going to make sure in this case that this little little gap here between these two mountains stays in the middle. But we can also offset that a bit, which we can do here with the reframe offset. So just move that shot a little bit more to the right side. We have the mountain here in the middle. And now if we played this back, that mountain should stay in the middle at all time. And that is working pretty good. So if you have videos that are shot horizontally, like the normal way of filming, something between a put down on social media, that is for portrait mode, you can use the auto reframe effect to make your subject stay automatically in the middle of your frame. So here we can already see a great example of utilizing multiple sequences. I have created a video edit here in my Iceland video that is just horizontal, a normal video. But then I want to make a version for social media. That is why I'm using a portrait sequence settings together with the other reframe effects. Now let's assume that we have created an entire video edit in normal horizontal modes. And now we want to take that entire edit and put that into a vertical video like, do we have to go back to our other sequence and start copying and pasting all of these clips in here? Well, no, we don't. Let me go back here to my project window. As we know, a sequence is just an item in the project window as well. So what I can do now, actually let me just go back here to my Iceland for social sequence. I'm going to delete that clipping here. And what I want to do now is take my normal, My Island video here, which is my horizontal video. And just take that sequence and drag that into the vertical sequence. There we go. We're going to say keep existing settings. So this here is an entire group, it is green. Which tells you that this is actually a sequence that we're looking at. I'm just zooming a bit more on that. I can select it, go over to the motion property, and I can move that up to the site. You can see here that we have that whole vertical video in there, but we're only seeing like a part of it. Let me just reset that again. And what I could do now is go to effects library and look for the auto reframe. And just drag that on the entire sequence here. So it's currently doing its thing. There we go. And it recognizes that there are actually two things going on. If you are going back to our normal video edit here we have a split screen. Two videos that is not really so useful for a portrait video. So you can see here that it automatically just chose one of those parts and it will automatically stay on that clip as you can see. So actually the auto reframe effect doesn't need to have much adjustments. It sometimes just works straight at the box. Now, pretty cool. As well as that, we can also just double click here on this sequence. In this sequence. And that brings us back to that main sequence. And there's a fancy word for that's putting a sequence into another sequence. And that is called nesting. So this here is a nested sequence. It is nested within another sequence. All right? You know what guys, my coffee much here is empty, so I'm going to grab myself under coffee. In the meantime, I want you to practice this. I want you to make a small edit in a normal sequence, then create a vertical sequence. Put your original sequence in there. Create a sequence section or a nested sequence. And then throw the auto reframe effect onto it. And perhaps you might want to offset the position a bit, maybe not, who knows? That is the surprise of the auto reframe effect. Alright, see you in a bit. 9. Slow and Fast Motion: Alright guys, I have back with my coffee that always makes me super happy and will energize me again as if I wasn't energized enough already. Alright, let's get started guys. I hope you just enjoyed working a bit in premiere with different later scrapping and then using that auto refrain function. Now we're going to take a look at slow motion and fast motion. So what I've got right here in premiere is just an empty sequence. But I want to do something here. It's clearly set to 25 frames per seconds, as you can see. But I actually want that to be 30 frames per second. Now imagine if I were to have an entire edit in that sequence. I don't want to delete that to recreate a new sequence, so don't worry, we can always change the sequence settings afterwards. Just right click your sequence here. Go over to sequence settings, and from there, change anything that you like. So we can also just change the resolution and stuff like that. So for now, let's just change the time base to 30 frames and hit. Okay, there we go. Now let's browse here to the footage folder because I've got something special on here. Go over to video camera and here on the bottom we can see a clip called Timon jumping. And if you are in list view, you can see the details of that clip. And it's currently set to 60 frames per seconds, but we are working in a sequence of 30 frames per second. So that means we could stretch out that clip, making it slow motion, and actually utilize 60 frames per 2 seconds. Or in other words, 30 frames per seconds. All right, let me just visually show that to you guys. I'm going to double click on that clip to open it up here in my source monitor. And from there look for the part where man is jumping over the rock. That is Timon, by the way. He hosts the Premier Basics channel. He does a really good job at that. The same way as he's jumping over that rock. Wow. Without touching it, he's so fierce. Alright. Set an endpoint, go forward in time, and then set an outpoint. And I'm going to drag the video here into my timeline. There we go. Yes, keep the existing settings. Go a little bit to, because I just move that clip here, all the way up to the right side at the beginning. There we go. So if we play this back now, you'll see that it just will run at normal speed. So nothing here isn't slow motion, but we can make it go in slow motion by simply right clicking on that clip, going over to speed duration. Click on that, which will open up a pop up box from which we can define what the speed has to be. We can do that at a certain percentage, or we can specify the duration exactly what you want it to be. Usually, you'll never really work with that. There's a different way of doing that, which we'll see in a moment. So let's just set that to 50% which is half the speed Click. Okay, And there you go. You can now see that your clip has become longer. I have to zoom out a little bit. We have made the clip twice as long, so that means we are utilizing 60 frames per 2 seconds now. And let's play that back. As you can see now, Timon is jumping insular motion over that rock. So beautiful. But we can also make that go faster. So select that clip, go back to speed slash duration. And this time perhaps set the speed to 200% so that is twice as fast. Let's plate his back now. Wow, super fast over that rock. So that is how you can make your clips go slow or go fast. But there is so much more that we can do here. Let's say that I want to slow down that clip even more. I'm going to write, click on it again and head over to speed slash Duration. And instead of choosing 50% I'm going to choose something different this time. And let's pick 10% Now, there's going to be a problem though if I hit, okay. I mean, Premier is able to do that, but I don't have enough frames per seconds to fill in that gap. Let's play it back to clip, and you'll see what is going on. As you can see, it stutters a lot. And that is because we are missing frames. It's only using a couple of frames per second, and that's why the video is playing back. So choppy. That is the entire reason why you need to shoot your videos at 60 frames or even more to get smooth slow motion. However, there is an option to to kind of take extra frames inside premiere, and it's easily done. Let's go back to that menu, right click on it. Go over to Speed Duration. And right in here we have an option on the bottom that says time interpolation. That's clearly set to frame sampling, which is really just do do nothing. But we also have two other options which is frame blending and optical flow. Basically, frame blending is going to blend or transition from one frame to another. Let's hit okay and see how that looks. All right, let's play that back. But before we can do that, we're going to have to render the video, because as you can see here, our line is red. We've learned how to do that. Just hit Return. There we go. And now the video is playing back more smoothly. However, there's this ghosting going on as you can see in between those frames. Here you can see very well what is lacked. Let me just zoom in a bit more like that. It is blending the different frames together to make it appear more smooth, but there's an even better option. Right click again. Go over to Speed Duration. And this time change that time interpolation to optical flow. Hit Okay. And as before you want to render your clip. And I just love rendering because that means in the meantime, you can drink coffee. No, it is done. All right. Let's go back to the beginning here, play it back, and it looks super smooth right now. Premier is doing some magic. Now, there is a lot of detail going on, definitely here in the background, and that is why we're seeing these weird distortions around the legs of Ton, but here in the sky, it actually looks pretty good as you can see because we don't have much detail going on in there. So it really depends on your scene. If or if not, you can use optical flow. All right, let's explore that menu a little bit more. I'm going to right click that clip again. Go over to speed slash duration. And you know what, Let's just set that back to 50% and the time interplaationt back to frame sampling. And let's see what else that we have in here. There's an option called reverse speed enabling that, that's just what it says, reverse the speed, so now man is jumping backwards over that rock. But as you can see, my computer has some trouble playing that back even though this line is yellow on top. So that means premier is, is lying to me. If that happens, guys, you also want to render your video. However, because that line is yellow and I hit the return key, nothing really will happen because it thinks that it doesn't need to be rendered. So we're going to have to force render it. And in order to do that, we're going to go to the menu on top, click on sequence, and for near click on Render Into Out. Which is good. You're going to force everything in your time line to be rendered. All right, now the line is green and if I play it back, Timon is smoothly jumping backwards over that rock. How amazing now sometimes you want your clip to be at a specific length. And we've seen before if we right click on that clip, go over to speed slash duration. We have that option down here to specify the length. But we'd like to work a little bit more visual, so there's a different way of doing that. I'm going to disable reverse speed for now and I'm going to set it back to 100% here. So now we are working with the clip as it was. There's no slow motion, no fast motion, nothing going on in here. Guys, just team on jumping in normal speed over that rock. But I'm going to go over to my tool bar right here and I'm going to look for the rate stretch tool which exactly as the name says, is going to stretch your clip. And we can find that back here under the third tool. If you click on that and hold down your mouse, it will reveal a couple of more tools and one of them is the rate stretch tool. Select that. One short key by the way for that is the R from rate stretch tool. That was a giveaway and now we can just grab that clip here on the end and just drag or stretch that out longer. Now keep in mind guys, we are not trimming the clip here. We're not cutting a piece off or revealing more of that clip like we did before. We're actually stretching the clip. And you can see that as well here on the clip itself. It currently says 60.67% That is the speed change that we've just done with this rate stretch tool. So now if we play this back, it is playing in slow motion and we can stretch that even further like that, it's now 40% or we can make that go faster. You stretch that faster to say, so now it is 200% There you go, fast team one, but there you have a different ways of adding fast motion or slow motion to your clips. Now in the next lesson, we're going to explore a couple more tools from that tool bar because there are some really exciting ones in there. We're not going to explore everything because in reality you don't use everything. But there are a couple of ones in there which are very useful. 11. Transitions: Ah, ah, sorry guys. I was just fixing something under the hood of premiere. 'cause it was crashing. But it's working now, so we're all good. So in this lesson I want to take a look at transitions. What I've got right here on my timeline is Timon talking. We have some shots of Iceland and a nice song. Let me just play it back real quick so that you can see what we're going to work with. Hey, I'm Timon. I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland a rolling n this go alright, looking good. But we could use some transitions in here. To find the transitions, we've got to go over to our effects library right here. And there's a folder called audio transitions. And in video transitions, let's start with the one in the audio because the first thing that comes to my mind is that the transition between Tim on talking here and my timeline and then the music starting is a little bit too hard. You can tell that there is a cut. And as a good video editor, you want to make sure that people or your viewers never notice that there is a cut going on. So how can we fix that? Let me just zoom in a bit more on that. The audio just stops here immediately, so I want to like faded out a little bit. And we can do that with a transition. So let's have a look here. In the audio transitions, we've got a folder called Cross Fate. And if I open that up, we get three different kinds of cross fates. And really these are just different ways of how you fade out. You can do that exponentially, you can do that at a constant power or at a constant game. Most of the time. We're just going to work with the constant power, which is absolutely fine to apply this transition. We just drag that here, not onto the clip, but of course on the end of the clip like so. And just let's go. You can see here the transition starts at this point. But I can also just trim that smaller so that the fading starts right here. All right, let's do the same thing for the music. Drag the constant power on there. There we go. And, you know, maybe I want the music to fade in a little bit longer, so let me just drag that out a little bit like that. Let's have listen to Iceland Swim. All right. Looking good. However, there's this silence part here in between. So what I'm going to do here is actually move my music a little bit more up to the left side. So I tell I kind of overlap right here as you can see. Let's play this back. I recently went to Iceland Slip. That is perfect. The two audio tracks are now more transitioning over into each other. All right, let's explore video transitions. Right now I'm going to collapse this folder here, and let's open up the video transitions folder. And we got a whole bunch more in here, but I'm going to start with the dissolve because there's one in here which is the cross dissolve, which is kind of like the default transition. And we can tell that it's a default because it has this blue outline here around that transition. That means it's also bound to a shortcut. So what I could do is basically take this transition, let's just place that in between two clips. For now, For example, I want to transition from this one here to this one. I can take that transition and put it in between these two clips. There we go. If I played it back now, they fade in on each other. But let me just delete that transition for a moment. What I can also do is just select that cut right here in between these two clips. And hit control D on my keyboard, which is going to add that transition to it. And it's always going to take the transition that has been set as a default. If I want, for instance the dip to white, for instance, the default, I can right on it and say select it as a default transition. And now this one here is a default. So if I remove here, the cross dissolve, and now hit control D, it'll add the dip to white. Let's have a look. All right, looking good. And just like with the audio transition here, we can also like make that longer so that the transition just takes longer. It goes much slower right now or we can make that very fast and just have it like flash, kind of like a photograph flash going off. Pretty cool, right? All right, let me just remove this here for a moment because we have some more. Very awesome. Oh no, wait, you know what? Let's just keep it there. I'm gonna hit Control Z. Let's work on a different clip here because there's a ton more transitions in there. And what I want you to do guys is just really go through these transitions, see what they do, see if you can find something cool in there. There are some in there like for example, Page Peel, which are kind of like coming from the '90s, They're still in there. You can see here that my timeline here turns red on top. That means this effect or that transition is not GPU accelerated. And that's because it's just an old transition, like people no longer use this right here. It's still from the '90s, so let me just remove that transition. Oftentimes, a simple transition is always the better choice. You know, a simple dip to white like here, which is kind of like a flash, looks very good. Or perhaps here within the dissolve, there's something really cool in there called the morph cut. Let me just drag that onto. In between the two clips. There you go. And the morph cut is doing something more. It's actually going to morph between the two clips. So it's going to take some time for Premier to analyze that in the background. It needs to look at the two clips and see how it can morph that. So we're going to wait until the analyzing here is complete. In the meantime, I'm going to scroll a little bit back here in my timeline. Let's look here at this cuts. So I want to add a transition in here. Let's scroll a bit down here in my transitions. And let's look here at Wipe, for instance, we have a band wipe. I never used that before. Normally, you don't really use these transitions that often because like I said before, simple things are always the better things. So let's have a look what Band Wipe will do. So I cannot drag that in between the two clips now, because they are on separate tracks. I need to have them on the same track in order to create a transition. But I can't put it on the end of the clip. So it will just basically just kind of fade out as you can see here with these bands. And then it will just cut to the next clip. I could add the band wipe also to that second clip on track number one. And now this will happen. So we transition out and now we transition back in. Now we transition, we got to keep something in line. And to showcase that to you, I'm just going to zoom out a bit. Scroll all the way to the right side in an empty space to better demonstrate. So I'm going to go back to here to my project window and I'm going to open up my footage folder. Let's go to video. And here in my camera folder, let me just change the view here real quick so I can take something out of this here. Let's take clip number one and I'm going to create an endpoint right here. And set the outpoint all the way on the end of the clip. Just drag that into the timeline. And I'm going to do the same thing here with a second clip. Let's take this one here. Perhaps I'm going to make it start from the beginning. So endpoint there, go forward in time. And then hit outpoint there. So let's drag this one into the timeline too. So what we have right now here is the first clip that actually ends on the end of the clip itself, like there's nothing more there. If I move the second clip up for a bit, I can't trim that out because there's nothing else there. And the same thing occurs with the first clip. I can't drag that out. There's nothing more there. There is, however more on the right side, you can see here, I set my out point somewhere in the middle. So that means I can trim it out. And what I'm basically doing is just moving up that endpoint. But I can't do that with the endpoint right here, because that is the start of the clip. So if I were to place a transition between these two, let me just do that. I'm going to go over to the effects library. And let's just take something here. For example the radial white. I'm going to drag that in between the two clips. And I can do that, but Premier is going to give me a warning, insufficient media. This transition will contain repeated frames. It's okay. So basically, if we're going to take a look at this transition, you will see that my video just will stay still. Let me just play that back there. Have you seen that? Let me just make that transition even bigger on both sides so we can definitely see it. All right, what's going on here, guys? At the beginning, my first clip just stays still. And 1.5 of that transition, my second clip starts playing. But my first clip now is kind of like freezed or it doesn't play anymore. Well, that's because the transition needs to show a part right here as well from that first clip. Because we are transitioning from one to another. But it doesn't have anything else behind that clip because my out point was actually set to the end of that clip. I hope that makes sense. All right, so we can transition and there's insufficient media. But from here we'll just freeze the last frame in order to do that. You can also see here that this transition has diagonal lines which represents that there is not enough media to make the transition possible. Right, Let's have a look at our morph cut because I think in the meanwhile it should be done. It should be ready. Yes it is. All right, let's play this back. All right, that is very ugly, but that's the morph transition, you know? And just like with clips itself, if we select them and go over to the effects controls where we can find all the properties. We can do the same thing with transitions as well. Just select it, in this case, the morph cut. And now we can see a whole bunch of options for that transition. We could re analyze that transition. If for example your morphut doesn't look really good, you can analyze it again, hoping for a better result. So that's pretty much it for transitions or let's say basic transitions. We can make more advanced transitions as well. We're going to have to make them more custom, which is later for in this course. It's going to be really exciting. Most of the time we're just going to use simple dissolve or you know, dip to white, dip to blacks, those kind of transitions. If you're working with these, keep in mind that you always want to keep your transitions as simple as possible. So I'm just going to delete this morph cut. I don't really like it, and since I moved my audio clip here to the left side to make that transition here a bit better, I'm also going to trim my last clip a bit more so that it ends here as well. And you know what, I'm going to make that edit here fade out on the end control D to add the default transition. And just for the sake of this lesson, let's add a small dissolve between these two clips here as well. I'm going to go back here into my video transitions. Right click on cross dissolve and set dads back to the default transition. Let's do that now. Control D, there we go. All right, let me just play it back. I'm going to lead here this example on the right side. Let's have look here what we have now with some transitions added to it. Hey, I'm Timon. I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland Swim Eyes, the ruling nk al right, looking really good. The music is fading out gently. We have a nice transition here with the interview and the music starting. And that flash here in the middle looks really good. Alright, thanks for watching and I'll see you back in the next lesson. 12. Text and Graphics: You know, there's still a couple of tools on the tool bar which we haven't covered, such as the type tool to create text and the pen tool to create graphics. So let's look at how we can do that. So right here in my time line, I've got a little gap in which I want to create a graphic. Now I'm going to go first to my project window, open up my footage folder, go to Assets, and then here, images in which we can find a background image and a logo. I'm going to drag here this background image of these mountains into my time line like that. Trim that a little bit shorter so that it fits here in between this gap. Alright. Now, usually with images, they have a different resolution size. Oftentimes they are bigger than the standard HD or four K resolution that video has. So what I want to do here is select my image, go over to me effect controls, and just scale that down a little bit so that it fits more within my program monitor. There we go. All right, Next up, I'm going to take this logo right here and just drag that on top of my mountains background and trim that as well. All right. With that selected, I'm going to change the position a bit more to the left side because what I want to do here is add a text next to that logo and perhaps create like a background shape layer. In order to do that, we're going to have to take the pen tool here in the toolbar, all the way on the bottom or the type tool, click on that. And then just go to your program monitor and click where you want to add the text. And let's call this my amazing Iceland video. Taking back the selection tool, we can grab that text and move it anywhere we want. Now as you can see here in a timeline, a new text layer or a graphics layer has been added. This here is the text itself. So we know that we can select that. And let me strim that first. There we go. We can select that layer, go over to the effects controls, and here we can find all the properties. So that means we can also find all of the styling properties. If we expand here, the text property, we can find all the different parameters like the color, the font size, and everything like that. But Adobe has introduced a new panel for that, which makes it more user friendly to change all of these settings. And that panel is called the Essential Graphics. And we can find that if we go to the menu on top select Window. And then from there choose Essential Graphics. There we go. I'm going to make a bit more room here in my interface like that. And we can see the exact same options right here as we have in the effects controls. Now on top of the essential graphics, we can find two taps. We've got browse and we've got edit. The browse tap allows us to look for templates. We can also create custom templates, which we're going to take a look at later in this course. Or we can go to the edit tap, and that means we're going to edit the text that we have selected. Now if you don't see any options down below here, that means that your text layer is not selected. And that is because this is not really a text layer in a timeline, but it's a graphic layer. And a graphic layer can hold multiple graphics. We can put multiple text layers in there, but also multiple graphics layers. And we can see that here on the top. Currently, we only have one text layer within that one graphics layer here in a timeline. And if I select that like this, we don't see any settings, so we got to select that layer. All right, let's explore this. I'm going to go pretty fast over this because it is pretty straightforward. We are familiar with these options, guys. And we get some position controls right here and capacity control and whatnot Down here, we can change the font. Let me just change that real quick to something like REL. There we go. We have an option down here to change the styling, such as make it all caps. We can change the fill color from here, choose something that we want, or I'm going to press Kencil. We can also take the color picker. And what I'm going to do actually, is take the color logo right here. There we go. And furthermore, we get a stroke option. If you want to add a stroke around it, we can add a background, which even gives us some more controls to perhaps make rounded corners if you want to have that in your backgrounds or I'm going to disable that. We can add a drop shadow here as well and we get some more controls and how far the distance of that drop shadow has to be, how much it has to be blurred out or how thick the drop shadow has to be. So we can really go ahead and design a custom graphic right here inside premiere. But most of the time, good graphic design comes down to simplicity. And that's why I, you're going to keep it as it, I'm not going to enable one of these options. Just keep it simple. Perhaps even scale that text up a little bit more like that and reposition it next to that logo. This looks pretty good. All right. Now we can't really read the text as good, so I want to create this rectangle here behind the logo and the text. Now I want to showcase you guys something. I'm going to deselect my layer in the timeline for a moment. And now I'm going to go to my toolbox here and take the rectangle tool. If I click and hold, I also can select the ellipse tool and the polygon tool which work exactly the same. For now. I'm just going to take the rectangle tool and I'm going to draw a rectangle here over my text and logo. And as you can see here, a new graphic layer has been added into my time line. This year is a rectangle. However, as I said before, we can add multiple graphics into one graphics layer. And to do that I'm going to delete that rectangle for a moment. I'm going to just simply select my previous graphics layer. And now I'm going to draw my rectangle. As you can see, nothing new has been added to my timeline. But if we're going to take a look at my essential graphics panel, we can see the shape layer in there now. So we get two layers here inside one graphics layer. So that way we can be more organized and not end up with 1,000 layers. All right, so I'm going to change my shape one name of that layer. Two backgrounds, so that I know what kind of layer it is, what is that back Browns backgrounds, there we go. And we want it to be in the background. So obviously I'm going to drag this below my text so we can see the text. All right, looking good. And again, we get some options down below here to change the look of that rectangle. We can give it rounded corners here as well. Or we can change the fill color. We can add a stroke, a drop shadow, and all of that juicy stuff. I would just really recommend guys to go through all of these design settings to get more familiar with them, see what they do, and see what they are. I will change the fill color here to white. There we go. And I'm going to change the shape of my rectangle a little bit. I'm going to take my selection tool here from the toolbar and make sure that my background layer is selected so that I can stretch it out like that and cover up the entire graphic like this. Now I want my logo to be on top of that background as well. It's currently behind it, and we can see that here in the timeline. It's underneath my graphic layer. Now, there are two ways we can bring it on top. We can either bring that logo here, actually on top of the timeline. But as I said before, we have a graphic layer in which you want to put all of our different graphic layers. So we can do that as well with images. What I'm going to do is just delete here this Arctic logo from my timeline. But I'm going to make sure to select my graphics layer so that I can see the different layers within and from a project window, I will just simply drag that logo into the graphic and I'm going to put it above the background. Poof, there we go. It's now inside that graphic as well. And I'm going to change the position of that with the logo selected. Push that a bit more to the left side. Now perhaps guys, if you are creating graphics, it's always a good idea to click here on this little range to go to your settings of the program monitor and enable the safe margins. That way you get some guidelines which might help to design something better in there not needed for now. So let me just disable that again. Now I want to see through my background layer. So what I'm going to do is just simply select it, which I can also do from the program monitor. Just click here on the background to select that layer. And I'm going to find the capacity property right here and just decrease that a bit so that we can still see the mountains through that background. Looking great guys. Now the great benefit of having all of your different graphic layers within one graphic layer so that I can now just take that and move it to a different position like over here. And now I'm utilizing this background, this video background here instead of the mountains. I'm not dealing with a whole bunch of different layers. Just one that I can place wherever I want. All right. There's one last tool that I'm going to show you guys from the toolbar to create graphics, and that is the pen tool. Now, again, we want to make sure to select our graphics layer before we're going to create a new graphic so that it sits within that graphic layer. And let's take that pen tool right now. Basically, the pen tool is exactly the same as a rectangle tool. Only with the pen tool we can draw custom shapes. So let me just do that real quick. I'm going to try and draw a mountain on top of my rectangle here. I'm not a great drawer, so don't put your hopes up high. All right, Goa click here, then click again there to create this rectangle. As you can see, look at that, We're creating mountains. Oh, this looks pretty bad. Okay, it doesn't matter. I can also click and drag. So if I want to have like a curved mountain, for some reason, I can just click and drag, as you can see. And now we get these steel levers which allows me to add a curve into my path. I'm basically just creating a custom path that is a strange looking mountain, but it doesn't matter. Maybe like a bigger mountain here. There we go. All right. I think we're almost there. Just one more. Perhaps like a smaller mountain here to stop with. There we go. And you want to close your path, of course. So I'm just going to click a few times here and click again on my first point to close that gap. So this here is now my custom shape. And you can see it here back in my essential graphics here on top. It's my shape two, I'm going to call that mountains. There we go. And I'm just going to place that here all the way on the bottom behind my backgrounds. Now I want these mountains here to be part of my rectangle, so I don't want to see here at the bottom of that. So what I can try and do is decrease the capacity and try to match it. But you will always see that these are two different graphics. Because we are playing with two different capacities, with two different layers. So what we actually want to do is combine them into one layer and then decrease the capacity of that. And that's possible. What I'm going to do here for my mountains is first set the capacity back to 100. And I'm going to do the same thing for my background. And you will see now that now these two layers do match together. If I dislect my layers here, it seems as though this is just one background shape to bring the capacity equally down for those two layers, we're going to have to group them together. And that is very easily done. I can just create a new folder here in this layer menu, click on that. Or create a new group. And I'm going to call this Background layers. And just take your two background layers and put them in that folder like so. And of course, we want to make sure that an entire group now sits on the bottom. And what I should be able to do now is select that entire group and then decrease the opacity. But there is a problem. I mean, I can change the position of that entire group, all right? I can change the rotation. I mean, I can even scale that entire group. But I don't have an opacity control. Well, don't worry, I can add an opacity control in there by just adding a specific effects. Let's head over to the effects library right now, and I'm going to look for an effect called transform. The transform effect is a very interesting one because it's basically exactly the same as the motion property that we have with any other clip in the timeline. And what I'm going to do is just take that transform effect and drag that into the folder above my two layers here in the essential graphics. There we go. It is very important that you put the effect above, because everything below will be affected by that transform effect. And the reason why we have put that into a folder or a group is so that we can still put something below that group which will not be affected by that effect because it sits within that group. I'll show it to you in a moment. But first, let's select that transform effect. Unfortunately, we don't see any options down here within the essential graphics because it doesn't really recognize that effect. But we can access its properties always through the effects controls. So here now we can find the transform effect. And down here we get an opacity control. Let's set that to something around 30% And there we go. We can now decrease the capacity of that entire group. All right, I want to show a case. You guys, one last thing. I'm going to create a graphic outside of that group. Let me just collapse it for a moment and let me create a circle this time. So let's go to the ellip tool and let's just do something random, which makes absolutely no sense. This is going to be very ugly graphic design, but you get the point. All right, so I'm going to call this one here, circle. There we go. And I'm going to put that here. Down below everything on the bottom, so as you can see now it sits currently outside of that group. Let me just change the color of that to get a better view of what's going on. To red perhaps. So it sits here in the background, but it's not being affected by the transform effect because that transform effect sits within that group. If we were to place that transform effect outside of that group on top of everything, that red circle will be affected by the opacity. So that is why we create groups because if we add an effect in here, every layer below will be affected. All right, I'm going to delete that circle because that looks very ugly. Not saying that my mountains look anything better, but you get the idea. This is how you can create graphics and text within Adobe Premiere. 13. Text Transcription: So far we've just been doing some basic video editing, we've been creating some graphics and we've been just putting stuff in the timeline and all that is really cool. But now let's add some extra power to the machine because we're going to take a look at some AI features. That's right, everything is AI these days. Even this pen right here. All right, so this is what we created in the previous lesson. This nice little graphic here with the mountains on top. We're going to go over to the menu on top, Select Window. And from there we'll find a text panel. So just click on that, which will open up this. On top we can find tree tapped, we've got transcript captions and graphics. So the text panel is very broad. It basically displays every kind of text and there are just many possibilities that we can do with it. One of which is the graphics tap, which is basically just going to showcase all of the different graphics and text letters that you have used in your edit. Very useful for if you have a long edit of an hour long and you have hundreds of different text letters in there, you can more easily find them back right in here, you can select them which is going to select your layer in a timeline and open up the properties of that with in essential graphics. So that is just something I quickly want to show you guys. But we're going to go over to the transcript tap because here it starts to become very interesting. So transcribing basically means that Premier is going to find spoken words in your edit and just create text from that. And there is a ton that we can do with that generated text. So right here it recognizes a song that we have in the edit, so even a song that has lyrics can be transcribed. There probably are some use cases for that. But I'm going to showcase this on something better. So for that, I'm actually going to delete everything in my timeline. There we go. I'm going to close the essential graphics panel for now because we don't need it. And let me go over to my footage folder. Go over to video and her interview. I'm going to double click on Timon interview and make sure that we have the entire interview. So what I'm going to do here is right click in this area and choose clear in and out. That way I am removing my in and out selection. So if you have made a selection like that and you don't need it anymore, just right click and choose clear in and out. It's that simple. So now I can drag this entire interview into the timeline. There we go. And let's just say keep existing settings. All right, so Timon here is talking about his Iceland adventure, so there's a lot of spoken words. So if you go now to the text panel, we can find it back here in a transcript tap. So let's transcribe that. Hit that button here. So it's going to take a few moments for Premier to recognize the spoken words. But once it's finished, you can see now here that we have that entire text written out. Now this goes really far. There are a ton of things that we can do with a transcribed text, but I'm going to keep it basic for now and just showcase a few of the most used techniques now. First of all, lots of a listen adds to what Timon here is saying. Hey, I'm Timon. I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland landscapes there are very beautiful, beautiful. The landscapes there are very beautiful. And I was able to capture a lot of waterfalls and so on. So as you can see, team line is not talking fluently, He is saying some things wrong. There are long pauses in there, so I'm going to cut those things out. Which we can do here of course with the rings or blade tool. I can take that by pressing on a keyboard. And for instance here, this entire gap, we can just make a cut there and there. Then take a selection tool again, delete that part like this and close the gap. So that's one way of getting rid of all those mistakes in an interview, But we could also do that, and here in the text panel, so let me just undo my action control Z, control z, control Z, control z. Let's go to here. First of all, we have his first sentence, and here we see these three dots and it says 1.1 second. That is the pause, so I just select that right click and say deletes, or I can also use the backspace button. There we go. That pause is now edited out. All right, Next up, he says, the landscapes here are beautiful, beautiful. And then he starts again by saying, the landscapes here are beautiful. So this part here is a mistake. So I'm just going to select all of that and hit the backspace button this time. There we go. It's gone. All right. Next up, I was able to capture all the waterfalls with my throat. I think Premiere Transcribe something wrong there. I must have plugged in the cable wrong. Anyway, let's just continue and I was able to capture all of water falls with my drone. Okay, so this here's parole sentence that he said wrong. So I'm going to just select that as well. There we go. Delete that part. This is also something that we don't need. The ants ''s gonna delete that too. There's a pause here. I don't need that. Pause deleted as well. He's able to capture waterfalls with my drone. Delete this pause here There. Rl of animals there. Rl of animals. So he says that double as well. So I'm going to delete the first sentence here. Like that's gone. There's a pause here as well. Be gone. There are a lot of animals as well, especially horses and sheep. And we have a last. Uh, seconds here that we don't need as well, So delete that too. There you go. I just entirely edited this interview on the text. This is a lot faster guys. Let me just play this back and see how that edit looks like. Hey, I'm Timon. I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland. The landscapes there are very beautiful. I was able to capture a lot of waterfalls with my drone. There are a lot of animals as well, especially horses and sheep. This is a pretty cool guys, one of the brand new features within premiere. All right. So I always just able to entirely cut up my interview based on the visual text that I'm reading. Now, what else can we do with text? Of course, subtitles. Now, if I want to use this text for subtitles, I do have to make sure that everything is correct. So right in here I see that it says, hey, I'm Demon. Well, his name is actually Timon and it's Demon. So I'm just going to double click on that to change the text. So I'm going to type in here, I'm Timon. All right, Click away. Is there anything else in here? Landscapes, I think he says the landscapes. Yeah, the landscape there. So while it's double click on that as well and typing the landscapes, I was able to capture all of water files with my drone. That is good. Or all of animals as well, Especially horses and cheaps. I think it's just cheap, but Okay, there we go. Now, in order to create subtitles from this, we can just go up to the top menu here and click on CC, which says Create Captions. And it's going to ask you like, which kind of subtitles that you want to create. There are a whole bunch of things to choose from, don't worry about those. Those are mostly just broadcast settings, so just leave it at subtitle default, which is good. It's create captions and it's going to create those captions for you inside our timeline. We've got a new track, very specific for subtitles, and if we played it back, we can see that we have beautiful subtitles there which are in sync with what man is talking about. Even though that these are caption layers and now the graphic layers, we can still change the styles of them through the essential graphics panel. All we got to do is head over to the menu on top, select Window, Go over to the Essential Graphics. And now we just got to make sure to select one of these captions. Let me just make a bit more room for that, Like this, click on the first caption for instance, and here we can see all of the options. So from here we can make that larger. If you want to, we can change the color. Oftentimes, yellow is also used for subtitles It, okay? And the nice thing is that we can stylize each caption individually. So maybe if you have multiple speakers, like one speaker has like the color yellow, the other one has blue, or we can also just select all of the captions. And one way of doing that is just by making a selection like this, or as we've learned in the past. Let me just zoom it a bit more. We can also just take the track selection tool here from the tool bar. Make sure that we hit Shift on our keyboard to only select everything in one track. And now we have all the subtitles here, all the captions selected. And now we can change the styling. So for example, the fill color, we're going to make that, let's say blue. And then the size as well. Let's change that something like this. And since we've got everything selected in the timeline, you will see now that all of these captions have the same styling. And those are one of the couple things that we can do with transcribing a spoken text. And I want you to practice this right now. It is very important to get the hang of this, to get more familiar with this. So take that interview from the course assets, put it in your timeline, transcribe it, and try to edit it on the text itself. Then create captions from that and just give it a different style. And then I'll see you back in the next lesson when we're going to explore how to use and create templates. 14. Templates: Welcome back. I hope you had some good practice by transcribing your videos and editing on the text and even creating captions. Right now we're going to do something different and that is exploring templates. So basically templates are, you know, Premd motion graphic animations or still graphics that you can reuse in different projects. And to locate those templates, we want to go back to the menu on top, select the window, and from there, essential graphics. We've seen it before. We have on top a browse tab and an edit tap. And in the browse tap, we can find a whole bunch of templates. Now, templates come in two different ways. We've got Premier Pro templates, which we can create ourselves, and we're going to see how to do that in a moment. Or we can also work with Adobe After Effects templates, which is used for more advanced visual effects and motion graphics. But people can create templates with those and share on the web for other people to use. And you don't need to know anything about after effects. They work very user friendly inside Premiere. So let's explore. I already have a whole bunch of templates in here, as you can see. And these are probably going to be different from your templates. If you install Adobe Premiere Pro, you're going to have a couple of default templates. I think this one right here, the strong titles template and such, are the ones that are default. But I have a few more in here, like this one right here, Simple treaty logo intro, which I created myself inside after effects. But we can also find templates on Adobe stock. Right here on top we have that button, a tap for Adobe stock. It's basically Adobe's stock website. And they also sell a whole bunch of motion graphic animations. But we also get a whole bunch for free if we enable that filter right here on top free. This one here, we can just import directly into our project and start using them. And there are some really cools in there. Let me just take the cinematic titles for instance. All we got to do is just take that template and drag it into the timeline. There we go. Let's say keep existing settings now, it could take some time for that motion graphic to load because it has to download that in the background, you know, the load, all of those different graphics. And depending on how heavy that motion graphic template is, it could take some time. And looking at it here, I think it's going to take some time. So I shouldn't have picked that template. I should have gone for something simpler, but we got the power of magic. Instead of waiting for 2 minutes, I can just cut. Oh, there we go. The template is ready. All right, let's have a look here. It's small because it's probably four HD. And we are working in a four resolution sequence. I'm just going to select that layer, head over to my effects controls. And from here change the scaling to 200% to just scale it up and fits in my sequence resolution. All right, so we got the template downloaded guy. So now in the essential graphics panel, we're going to go to edit. And you'll see a whole bunch of controls in here. I can open up the global controls and change the position. Apparently, I can change the text. Here we get two text fields. So let me just expand that. The first one says cinematically, let me just change that to Iceland's. And then we cut to the second text here. Let's change that to Iceland travel. I don't know. We get some more options to change the font and the size, it and everything of that text. That is up to you. We also have some background control. So apparently we can change the look of the smoke and everything. You know, perhaps. Let's go for a more like greenish spark color here. And the smoke perhaps. Let's change that too, I don't know, like red smoke. I don't know what I'm doing here. Okay, there we go. We can change the template the way we want. Now, as we can see here on the top, we've got the red line which indicates that we cannot play this back in real time. So what we have to do is just hit the return key on the keyboard. It is rendered. Let's play it back. That looks pretty cool, right, right inside from your guys, we can create awesome things like these utilizing templates. Now, every template is going to have their own controls in here. That is up to the creator who made them. They can choose which controls they give to the end user. Let me show you one of the templates that I created. I'm going to delete this template here for now. I'm going to go over to browse and I'm going to go back to the my template. Tap here on top and I'm going to install a new template that doesn't come from Adobe stock. To do that, you want to go here all the way on the bottom, find that button that says install motion graphics template. So just click on that. And you want to browse to the template that you've downloaded. I'm going to go to my desktop on which I can find the video creator template pack. So this is a pack that we have created and you can buy that off from our website. If you go to Syncom.net and go over to video packs, you can find that back right here. Here is the video critter template pack for Premier Pro. And if you've purchased the entire syncom complete bundle, you know if this is part of that, you can find it back in your dashboard and just download it from there. And let's just take any of these. For instance, the Simple Treat logo intro, which I think is pretty cool, it open. And I already had that installed. That's right. I already have my own pack installed, obviously. So let's locate that one. It is right here. Simple treat logo. Just drag that here into the timeline. There we go. So what I can do now is just again select that layer, go to the edit tap, and these are the options that we give to the end user. So that starts with the logo. I can replace that logo right here. All I got to do here is click on the top menu. Say replace from Explorer. And I'm going to locate that here on my desktop. I got my Iceland Travel video. Go to the Assets folder images, and I have an Arctic logo right here. So just select that and hit open. So there we go. It's now replaced and it's a little bit small, so I can increase the scale of that. There we go, and we get a whole bunch of more options to fill in this template. It is super user friendly to use and you get a very nice animation. As you can see right here. It doesn't play back super smooth because again, I should render this, okay. We get the idea of using someone else, their template. But how can we create our own template? Well, let me just delete this one here and let's create a nice graphic. We've seen this in the previous lesson, how to do that, so I'm going to do that very quickly right now. Let's create a shape here. I'm going to create an ellipse. Let's just draw a circle. By the way, if you hold down shift as you're drawing a circle, it'll create a perfect circle instead of an ellipse. So let me just create a perfect circle by holding down Shift. And from the options here and the essential graphics, I'm going to align that to the center, both vertically and horizontally. And let's change the color of that to, I don't know, something like like Ts perhaps. And now let's add a text in there. I'm going to take my type tool and a text called a Iceland. And I want to make sure that the text here is aligned to the center. Let's change the font real quick to something else. I'm going to take El again, It's not the most fancy font, but it is something that everyone has installed. So if you are going to download these project files, it will work for you as well. And I don't think it changed my text because I had to select it all. So let's do that again. L L black. All right. Let me just increase the size of that. I can do that as well here with my selection tool and display that in the middle. Or again, use my alignment tools here on top to align it horizontally. And align it vertically so that it sits perfectly in the middle. All right, cool. We got ourselves a graphic. Let me just put that in the beginning of my time line. Now I want to save this as a template so that I can use that in a different project as well. To do that simply right click on it and we're going to go over to export motion graphics templates here. You can give that a name on top, so let's call that Iceland graphic, for instance. And then choose the destination. So we can either directly save that into our templates folder or we can save it to our computer. That way we have an actual template file as I've showed you before and you can share that with your friend or to a colleague for them to use. But if you don't want to do that, you just want to use the template for yourself. You can keep the destination here, local templates folder and then hits, okay, there we go. What I can do now is actually just delete where I just created because I have it saved in my library. Let's go here to the brow stab on top of the essential graphics. And let me locate the template that I just created. Where is it? Al right here on top, Iceland graphic. Drag that into your timeline. So select it. Go to the Edit tab, and here we have everything that we designed before. And the great thing is that this is not down to this project. If you create a new Adobe from your project, all of your templates will be shown in there. And that is how you can use someone else's templates or create your own. Thanks for watching and I'll see you back in the next lesson. 15. Masking: Hi there, Welcome back. In this lesson we're going to do some masking, which is a technique used very often while video editing. So in my timeline right here, I have a couple of examples, one of which are two video clips on top of each other and an interview of Timon. We're going to start here with this first example. So we've seen previously in this course why having two clips on top of each other. We can cut out a part from the top clip with the crop effect and then show the bottom clip kind of making a split screen. That's cool. No, but we can only cut out the piece from the sites. What if we want to create a custom shape? Well, that is where masking comes in. So I'm going to select here the top clip in my timeline and head over to the effects controls. Let's go over to the Epacity property, because right in here, we can find a few masking options. Now these do look very similar and are similar to the ones in your toolbar. However, the tools here are used to create graphic shapes, so they are very different to each other because we cannot create graphics with these here only masks. So we can use the presets here to create an ellipse mask or a rectangle mask, or we can create a custom shape. Let's first explore the ellipse mask. Just click on it and it will create a mask for you. You can see here mask one has been applied to the opacity property and we get a whole bunch of options. And here in the program monitor, you can see here that our video has been cut out. And we can see the video laying underneath it in track number one. So I can just take that mask and move it to a different spot. I can make that ellipse bigger by taking one of the points here, the mask points and really define how I want to cut out my video from the mask properties. We also get a bunch of options. We can increase the fetter of the mask or perhaps set that to 100 pixels. That way it's kind of like more fettered and they kind of like blend in more together. We also get a mask opacity option, so if we decrease that, we are removing the mask. We can also set that to somewhere in the middle to 50% and kind of still see boats clips. Or we also have a mask expansion property it as the name says. Just expand the mask, Just make that bigger, bigger from the shape that you have drawn. All right, let me just delete that mask here with the mask once selected in the capacity property. Just hit the delete key on your keyboard to remove it. I'm going to take the pen tool now and I'm going to create a custom mask. Pat, let's say that I want to go around this rock right here. I can just click to create a point just the same way as we did with shapes. Click again, but hold down your mouse to create an arc, to create a curve. You know what? I'm just going to zoom in a bit more on this so I can see better what I'm doing. And I can do that with the option here on the bottom in my program monitor. It's currently set to fit, which means that it will always zoom in to the size of your program monitor, to the panel itself. But we can also set that, for example, to 100% to really zoom in on that clip. Or perhaps even a bit more to 150% All right, let me just scroll to where I was creating my mask. Let's create a new point. There we go. So really go around that rock and create the shape of that rock. There we go. So now I have cut out that rock. It is really good to just go ahead and practice with that pen tool if you aren't used to it yet. Those of you who have already worked in something like Photoshop or Illustrator might be more familiar with that Pentol right here, because it is exactly the same as in all the other Adobe programs. Al right, we get it. We can create custom masks. But this isn't really useful, is it? We're cutting out a rock. It makes absolutely no sense. Let me just set my scale and here back to fit. This makes no sense. So that's why I've got a second example right here with Timon. You know, here's the thing. I filmed Timon for this interview, but actually he didn't consent. I filmed him without asking for his permission. So what I have to do now is, is blur out his face. Now, here's a problem. I can select that clip. I can go over to the effects controls, find opacity, and then draw a mask around his face. Because that is what we want to do, right? We want to target his face. So I can do this, but you know, this is just going to cut out his face. I mean, this is not really helping to make him unrecognizable. Right? Well, that is because we are creating a mask on opacity. We're going to have to create a mask on something different. So let me just delete that mask. We're going to need something that will blur out his face or make it like these small, tiny blocks that you oftentimes see on television. Oh, they can do that by going to the effects library and actually look for Mosaic. Mosaic. There it is, under Stylized Mosaic. Let me just drag that onto the clip, and right now, the entire shot is blocky. If we go to the effects controls, we get some more options for that Mosaic Effect, in which we can change how many blocks that we want. For instance, we can set that to 50, had those blocks be a little bit smaller. Al right, this is good. But the problem is again that this effect has been applied to the entire clip. We want it to be only applied to man's face. Well, let's just cut out a part from that effect. Let's ask out a piece from that effect. And just like with the capacity controls here, we also get some masking options for the Mosaic effect. So, let's take that pencil, shall we? And I'm going to draw around his face and look at that. Only his face has the mosaic effect right now. That is the power of masking. Al right, this works in all. But there is a problem. Because if I'm going to play back this clip, you will see that my mask will just stay here in the middle. But Tim on, he's actually moving now. It's still okay. We cannot see his face. So it's not a big problem, but it doesn't come off professionally. If we are going to mask out someone's face or blur someone's face, we want to make sure that that's blurriness, kind of like follows their face. And that is where animations comes in. Now for masks, we can actually automate those animations so we don't have to worry about manually animating that mask frame by frame and stuff. So let's see where we can do that, which is right here within the mask options. Make sure that you are at the beginning of your clip. So without playhead here, I'm going to hold down shift on my keyboard. That way I snap with my playhead here on the end of my clip or on the beginning of my clip. So I know that I'm right here now. And I want to make sure to align my mask so that it fits nicely around his face. I might want to move a couple of points here. Around, there we go. And then let's see here in the mask properties, what we have here, one of which is the mask pad. And that's the property that we want to animate. And next to the mask pad, we get a whole bunch of options. I want to start here by clicking on the wrench, which is the animation properties you could say. We can choose what we want to automatically animate. Do we only want the position of that mask to animate? So that means if we have a round ellipse like right now around his face, it's only going to follow in its position. We also want the rotation to follow. That means whenever I'm going to rotate my head, that the mask has to follow as well. If I don't have that enabled, I will rotate my head and only the position will follow, but not the rotation of that mask. And finally, is the position scale and rotation. That means if I'm going to come closer to the camera, you also want to make sure that the mask becomes bigger because my head will be bigger. So in nine out of ten cases, you want to make sure that position scale and rotation is enabled. And finally is preview, which I'm going to enable as well. By enabling that we will actually see the animation or the automatic animation going in progress. All right, and now we just got to press the play button rire. That is it. I'm going to press it and you will now see that automatically here, the mask is following Timan's movements. Now, depending on how long your clip is or how complex it is, it could take some time. But there we go, we are done. And if we play back this clip now you can see here that the mask is nicely following his face. So the tracking went perfect. Now this is an animation. It's something that has been created. So I'm wondering, is that animation safe somewhere? I can, I see that animation? Well yes we can. Right here in the effects controls next to the mask path here we can see a whole bunch of key friends. If you cannot see this, it means that this panel has been collapsed. You can expand it here with this little arrow on top. So if I click it now I will collapse it. But if I click it again, I will expand it and actually see all of the animations of my properties. And basically what this is, I can zoom in on it by using this little lever here on the bottom. What this is are just small, tiny little key frames. You know, these little things right here in key frames like these store specific data. In this case, it is the shape of the mask. Every single key frame has a different position or shape of that mask stored within. Back in the old days, we had to do that manually. Go one frame forward, adjust a mask, save that in a keyframe again, Go one frame forward, adjust a mask again, and so on. But these days, all of that goes automatic. Now, unfortunately, we cannot automate everything. Animation is still a creative process, so that is good. We have to do some manual animations, and that is for the next lesson. 16. Creating Animations: So we already had a glimpse of what animations look like in Adobe Premiere, when we automatically made a mask track forwards. It's created keyframes for us and key frames is the essence of animations. So we're going to focus a couple of different lessons on animations itself. Let's of look here what I have in my timeline. We've got a background image of these mountains, and then on top we've got a single graphics layer with a simple text in there, Iceland. And so what I want to do now is just kind of animate that text upwards so that it comes in into the frame. We are going to animate it. To do that, we're going to have to find the property that allows us to make that movement possible, which is going to be the position property. So with her clip selected, we're going to head over to the effects controls. Now with a graphics lagger, it could become a little bit confusing because we have two options. Here we get graphics on top, and here on the bottom we get video. Underneath video, we get the standard properties that we are used to by now. But on top we get the same motion properties. Let me just expand the text property here. The reason that we also have position, scale, rotation, and everything just like underneath here, is because this is a graphics layer. And we've seen before that a graphics layer can hold multiple different graphics. We can have multiple texts in there, we can have pictures in there, we can have shapes in there. And premia has given us the option to animate every single element separately. So that is why we can choose to animate the layer itself. Or we can choose to just animate the entire graphics layer which sits here under the video premier. Made it a little bit confusing by also adding a vector motion property here on top, which also has the same motion properties. This is not because I might have a second graphic within my graphic layer now that is just there because Premier sees it as a global property. But we already have that underneath the video category right here, so it wasn't really necessary. All it does is create confusion, but easy for you guys. You can choose where you want to animate it. You can do that under the vector motion property, or you can do that here under the video motion property. It's exactly the same for now. Let's keep it here under the motion property, so we know that we can change the position by changing the value right here. I can move the text up and down. There we go. But now I want to make that value change over time. And that's something that we can do by placing key frames. So we're going to start here at the beginning of the timeline or from this layer, and you want to make sure that your layer time line view here is enabled. Let me just make it a little bit bigger. This site, there we go. If you can't see this, click this little arrow here on top which shows or hides the timeline view. Now this timeline right here is something that we can't really work in like we have down here. Now. This timeline right here only represents the clip that you have selected. So if I move my play here on the end of that graphics layer, it's also on the end of that layer itself. Here in a timeline, you can see both playheads move to the left and to the right. Let me just quickly add another clip next to that to give you a better idea. With my graphic layer or my text layer selected here, I'm going to move my playhead in my small or my layer timeline view. And you can see here when I'm at the end of my mini time line, I'm at the end of my layer here in the actual timeline. But I still have room to go forward as you can see here. But that won't be shown in the mini timeline. Right, so I hope that that was clear. Let me just delete that clip again. I'm going to let my text layer go to the very beginning of that text layer. And let's take a look here at the position property. What I'm going to do is move my text down all the way to the bottom so that it is off screen. This is where I want my animation to start. My text is going to come from below the canvas. So I want to save the current value right now. And that's something that we can do by clicking here on the stopwatch icon. Click on that, which will create a new key frame, which is this little thing right here. That keyframe currently holds the current value of that position. Now what I'm going to do is move forward in time. So I'm going to move my playhead forward like that. And now I will change the position value and move that text up like so. As you can see, automatically a new key frame has been created. That second key frame holds the new value, the second value. So let's play this back now. I'm going to go to the beginning and just hit my play bar and look at that. We have just created our first animation inside premiere. See this as a car having to drive from point A to point B. This is your point A, and this is your point B. So we are giving that car 2 seconds to go from point A to point B. Now, what if we gave that car 4 seconds? So that means the car has to travel the same distance, but it gets 4 seconds to do that. I'm just going to take that keyframe and move it up till the four second mark, which I can see here on the top. That means it can do that more relaxed. It has more time to do so, so the car will drive slower. In other words, the animation will go slower as well. That means if I move these two keyframes closer to each other, that animation will go faster. Placing a key frame is never set in stone. You can always change the speed of it by just moving the key frames around. Now what if my final position wasn't the right position that I wanted to? Well, super easy. We just got to stand on the key frame itself. And to make sure that you're actually standing on that key frame, what you can do is hold down shift on your keyboard as you move around the play hat which will snap the play had to a keyframe. So once we are sitting on a key frame, we can just rechange the position. You know, let me just select my motion property right here so that I can just grab my Iceland text and move it to a different spot. And you can see here visually the path of that animation in the program monitor. All right, let's play that back and see how that looks. Pretty awesome. There is a problem about this animation. It starts like very quick and then it stops like instantly as well as you're driving a car. You can't stop instantly too unless you're drive into a wall, but you always got to hit the brake and smoothly come to a stop. That is just more natural and also something that we can do with key framing. You see currently we are working with a linear key frame which looks like this. This simply says that we're not going to do any kind of smoothing. Now see what happens here. I can actually right click on this keyframe, on the last keyframe, and then go over to temporal interpolation. Within there, we get a whole bunch of options to choose how that smoothness has to be. And most of the time we're going to work with ease in or ease out. Since it's the last keyframe we want to choose ease in. I know that that might sound a little bit counterintuitive, but you got to see it this way. I'm going to select cheer in. You can see the keyframe change to an icon like this, which tells us that the animation will stop smoothly. Now the animation here is coming from the left to the right, so it's going into that final keyframe. That is how you got to think about it. If you want your animation to start smooth, we got to choose out for the first key frame because the animation is going out of that key frame. But here is the thing. Since the text starts off screen, we don't really need to add an ease to it because we don't see that smooth acceleration start, But we do see it stop. Let's play that back and see how the animation looks. Wow. Much better guys. This is so much better. We get a smooth animation and that is one of those small things which sets an amateur versus a professional video editor apart, making sure that your key frames are smooth in doubts. Now, as you can see here, every single one of these properties has a stopwatch next to them. And whenever we see a stopwatch like this, it means that we can animate that property. So in the next lesson, we're going to start to animate some effects and create our very own custom transition. 17. Custom Transitions: All right guys, we are getting familiar with these keyframes right here. So let's take this to the next level and try to do something more advance. In other words, we're going to create our own custom transition. So what I've got right here in my timeline are just two clips. One of a mountain and the other one as well from a mountain. And we've seen previously that if we transition from one clip to another, kind of have to overlap using one of the build in transitions. It's going to take care of that. If we're going to create a custom transition, we're going to have to create that overlap ourselves. So let's do that. I'm going to take this clip here, move it up one track and move that a little bit over the other. Right now we are creating an overlap and we can make a transition from this part to this part right here. All right, let's start off basic. I'm going to select here, the clip on top. And I'm going to go over to my effect controls, the motion property. Let's start by just animating the position. So we're looking here at the mini time line. This only represents this clip right here in the timeline. So let's start from the beginning. And I'm going to move this clip all the way to the right so that it is off screen. Now let's enable animation for this position property by clicking on the stopwatch, which is automatically going to create a first key frame. Let's go forward in time, but not too much because we want to make sure that we stay here within the overlap, so we can go further than this. All right, so now we could drag that clip back in as you can see like that, but actually we just need to be at the default position. So what I can do as well is very simply reset that entire value, and now that new value, or the reset it value is stored within that second keyframe. Let's play this back. So now we have this clip here coming in from the right. All right, looking good. I might want this to be a little bit faster. So what I'm going to do is just move these two key frames a little bit closer to each other. Let's play it back again. All right, looking better. All right, so this is a good start. The clip comes in, it moves in fast. And what I wanted to do is kind of like spin around a couple of times because it comes in so fast. And for that we're going to have to work with in effect. I'm going to go over to my effects library here and search for the offset effect. See what I really recommend is just to go through your entire effects library and drag one by one to a clip, and see what the effects does, go through the different parameters and just get familiar and get a better idea of what there is in the effects library. But give that time. The more you practice, the more you go through these effects, the easier you know which one you need. All right, let's take the offset effect and drag that to the top clip. You see the offset effect just basically allows us to offset that clip. So if I change the shift center here, you can see here that I can kind of like rotate on the horizontal axis. And that is exactly what I want to do. Let's reset here, this value. And I want this rotation to start on the very end of my position keyframe. So you want to hold down shift on your keyboard so that it snaps to that last keyframe here. And now I will start animation for the offset, enable shift center two. Now let's go a little bit forward in time. Let's shift it to the left side, the same side as where the clip came in. All right, let me just move it up a couple of times. There we go. And now let's see what happens. So this clip comes in from the position property. We've got the two key frames right here on top. And then when it's at its end position, the offset is going to continue by starting as animation right here and offset that clip. So now it seems as though this clip comes in and it rotates a couple of times. So this is how you can be creative by mixing different animations together. Let's play this back and see how it actually looks. All right, so here it's very important that we get the speed right. And it seems as though the motion here in the beginning, the position is not fast enough for that rotation to happen. So what I'm going to do here is actually select all of these key frames and move them up this way. I'm making my position animation go faster, but my offset animation stays intact. Let's play that back again. All right, this is looking good by the way. We can also zoom in in this timeline. Here, get a better idea of our key frames as we've seen in the previous lesson. Guys, we want to ease certain key frames Now, since the momentum here has to just continue to go, we are not going to ease any of these key frames right here. They have to stay linear because nothing comes to a stop. The animation keeps on going there. So only the last keyframe here. For the offset, I will right click, choose temporal interpolation. And then ease in, because as we've seen before, the animation comes into that key frame. So now let's play this back, and there we go, it stops. Super smooth, Fine guys, this is a pretty cool transition, right? We got that clip coming in, rolling a couple of times, looking really good. However, it is not looking great just yet. You see when an object moves fast, we should see some kind of motion blur. You see when I move my hands really fast. My hand isn't sharp. You can't really tell how many fingers I have, and that is because of motion blur. My hand becomes very blurry because it's moving so fast. And that's something that we have to recreate, insights, premiere as well. Unfortunately, there is no option to just enable that, so we're going to have to create that ourselves quickly. There's a great effect for that. Let me go back to my effects library and this time look for blur. And there are a whole bunch of different blur effects to choose from. One of which is the directional blur right here. So let me just drag that onto my clip as well. Now the directional blur is very simple. We can just increase the blur length. Let's do that. Which is going to add blurriness to the clip as you can see. But we can also change the direction it's currently moving to the site. So I will change this 90 degree like that. Yeah, that's pretty cool. Maybe it's a bit too much. Let's change the blurred length to I'm like 20 oftentimes keeping it subtle is the best. Alright, so looking good. We've got the motion blur going on, but once it stops, the motion blur has to be gone too. So I'm just going to create two simple key frames. One right before it stops, somewhere right here, red a keyframe for the blurred length because we've got a stop wit cheer on the left side. Two, move a little bit forward on the end. So hold down shift to make it snack till the very last keyframe. And then let's change that value to zero. So everything before this keyframe here has a blurred length of 20, and here it stops to zero. So now if you played it back, it should look pretty cool. Awesome. There's one last problem that occurs. Let's have a look here. And that is this border. Because we are blurring the clip, we are kind of like biting away apart from the edges. And that's easily fixed. We can just zoom in that clip a little bit so that we don't see the edges right here up here. So from the motion property, I'm just going to scale this clip up by, let's say 105. That is enough. There we go. The border is going all right, let's play this bad guys, Let's have a look. The clip comes in, we'll get motion blur, and it comes to a stop. Really cool transitions like these cannot be found within the effects library because you have just created an entire custom transition and we are utilizing multiple key frames. Here, as you can see, we are mixing different effects together to get a desired outcome. Now, it's very natural that this lesson might have been a bit overwhelming because this is a lot to take in. Definitely, if you've never worked with key framing before. So if that's the case, it is super important that you practice this lesson a couple of times. Try to recreate what I've just done and maybe rewatch this lesson a couple of times over. So that you get a good idea of what's going on, what the key frames do, and what the purpose are of these keyframes. And if you were able to recreate this well and try to create something yourself, create a transition with a new effects, try to mix a couple together, see what they do, and place a keyframe to create something of yourself. You can get really creative with that, which is the fun part of video editing. And once you get the hang of that, guys, I love to see you back in the next lesson. 18. Audio Enhancing and Effects: Time to put on your headphones because we're going to tackle some audio in my timeline. We've got that interview of mine and actually this was shot using the internal microphone of the camera. So if we have a listen to it, it doesn't sound so great. Hey, I'm Timon. I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland. The landscapes there are very beautiful and I was able to capture a lot of waterfalls with my drone. So his voice is missing. A warmed depth answers a lot of background noise as well. So let's see where we can enhance his voice. Just like the essential graphics, Adobe has also created an essential sound panel. Just go up to the menu on top Select Window, and from there choose Essential Sound. So this panel here takes care of all of the audio things. Let me just make a bit more space for that here in my workspace. There we go. And just like with graphics, you want to select a layer that you're going to work on. You can select one, or you can select multiple layers to work on all of them at the same time. And Premier is going to ask you to choose what kind of audio that is. Is it a dialogue, a music track, is it sound effects, or is it ambience? Depending on what you choose, you're going to get different options. Now, you can choose that manually through the options down here or you can let Premier figure it out for you. Let's try and do that. So just say auto tak is going to take some time and there we go. It has tagged it as dialogue, so that is good. You can see that's here on top, it says dialogue. And if you missed clicked or premiere, made an ups, you can clear the audio type from right here on the top right. So just click on that. And then you can re select your tag, dialogue. All right, So we get a whole bunch of options as you can see right here. First of all, we get enhanced speech, which as the name says, enhanced the speech. We can automatically set the volume right. We have a couple of repair options such as reducing the noise, the rumble, and what nuts Down here we get a clarity option to make your voice sounds more clear. We get Q, which is something more creative. We can make it seem like it's coming from an old radio or as if Min is on a telephone. And then at the bottom down here, we get an option under Creative, We get an option to add some reverb to it. So we get a little bit of everything. We can just enhance the speech, we can fix issues, but we can also be creative by adding certain effects to it. And let's start from the top because we've got a clearer goal on line. This was recorded using the internal microphone of the camera, so the audio is pretty bad, therefore we want to fix that. And so I'm just going to click here on enhanced speech, this is an AI. There's a lot of AI stuff now inside premiere. So it's, it has to process that and it's already done. Ic, So let's play this back in, Evo listen to it. Hey, I'm, I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland. All right. Let's hear the before by just disabling that option here on top. Hey, I'm, I'm an Arctic explorer and that is a big improvement guys, as you can see, let's enable that back and if you want so you can mix that with the original. So if I turn that up all the way to the right here, we are slowly listening to the enhanced speech. I'm, I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland. Of course, this is too much, it's too obvious that we've altered the audios. So we want to mix this down and round seven was actually pretty good. The landscapes there are very beautiful and I was able to capture a lot of waterfalls with my drone. Perfect. We still hear something from the background. I mean, we are outside so it's not natural to take away all the background sounds. It's the same thing. If you were to shoot indoor, you kind of need to hear some kind of echo. Because you are indoor, it makes it more natural. And usually this enhanced speech option is going to take care of all of the fixes that need to happen. So most often you could just skip the repair section down here because it is going to remove the noise, it is going to equalize the voice. It's going to do a whole bunch of things to the voice to make it sounds professional. This is, by the way, one of the brand new features here in premiere, and it works super well. If you ever still have a problem with noise, you could enable that down here and say, reduce noise. The more you increase that, the more it will do its best to reduce the noise. Let's play that back. Hey, I'm Timon. I'm an Arctic explorer and I read. As you can hear, it's a bit too much. What you can do as well is just play that back and shuffle the slider up and down to find the right spot. We went to Iceland. The landscapes there are very beautiful and I was able to capture a lot of waterfalls with my drone. Just ask which, creating graphics or once we're going to talk about color correction and color grading, you want to look at your image and see how it looks as you're making changes. With audio, it's the exact same thing. You want to play it back, listen to it as you're making changes, but okay, the enhanced speech did everything for us so we don't have to reduce the noise anymore, you know? We just know that the options are there. If you need to use them, you know where to find them. All right, Let's scroll a little bit more down and see or have a look at the other options. Clarity, it's just going to make your voice or your audio more clear. Like right now, there might be too much basin there coming from the enhanced speech here on top which we did. So let's add a little bit of clarity to it, enable dynamics and let's play it back. Hey, I'm Timon. I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland. The landscapes there are very beautiful and I was able to capture a lot of waterfalls with my drone. Something that you can do is just play back your timeline and then just enable and disable the option just to see like the before and the after. Hey, I'm Timon. I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland. The landscapes there are very beautiful, so maybe like a little bit like two or 2.5 of clarity is something that we can add to the voice, but don't overdo it like with everything while editing. You never want to overdo something. All right, so that is it for enhancing the audio. Let's have a look at a couple of effects right now. Down here we get a whole bunch of styling options. So for the equalizer, let's enable that. And let's have a look at the presets. So we can make it seem like Timon is locked in a trunk and so that the ideo is coming from there. Again, you can play it back and increase the amount or decrease it as much as you want. Able to capture a lot of waterfalls with my drone. So all the higher frequencies are being left out. And now he's doing this interview back in my trunk. All right, let's see what else we have in here. For instance, on the telephone. So now we're conducting this interview through the telephone. Hey, I'm Timon. I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland. Cool, so that is what you can do with the equalizer. For now, let's just disable that as we don't need to style it, we just want to keep it natural. But let's check out the last option here on the bottom, which is to add reverb. And we have a whole bunch of options to choose from, again, all different kinds of reverbs. Let's just go for the extreme ones like church, and let's increase the amount. Let's have listen to it. Let's, and there we have it. If you need to add some reverb now you know where to find it. And that's exactly what we're going to do in the next lesson. I'm going to create a small edit with some sound effects, a music track to interview as well. And we're going to create an entire audio mix, which the essential sound panel is going to help us with. 19. Editing and Sound Design: Audio mixing is the balance in volume and tone between different audio tracks. So when you have an interview of somebody talking and you've got some music underneath that as well. You want to make sure that we still hear the person talking and that the music is not going to be too loud. That is audio mixing. So before we can start doing audio mixing, we first need a small edit. I currently have an empty timeline as you can see, because I want to show you guys that process of putting together a small edit So you won't learn anything new in this lesson. But I think it's good to kind of see how I'm creating an edit. All right, I'm going to go over to my Footage folder and the first thing that I'll do, locate that interview right here. Let's just double click on that. I've got a selection here. I'm going to right click right here and choose Clear In and Out To clear my in and out point so that I can drag the entire interview into my timeline. All right. I'm going to go over to the Window menu on top and make sure that my text panel is active. There we go. Select that clip. I'm going to go over to Transcript. And it's already done. That was probably from one of the previous lessons. So I'm just going to edit here on the text. So this pause can just go, Human explorer went to Iceland. This can go, Erie says something doubled, so that has to go. We have some pauses here. And just going to delete those pauses as well. All right. I've edited my interview based on the text that was transcribed, so this is a good basis to start from Nel. Let's look for some nice shots to fill that in. So here he says, hi, I'm Timon. I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland. So I'm going to create like a small gap right here to show a little bit of Iceland here in the middle. So let's go back here in my project window. Go over to video and let's look for drone perhaps like, like an overview shot of Iceland's. So perhaps like these mountains are pretty cool. I think that they show Iceland, right? We've got some ice in here in the back, so I think that does show like this is Iceland, right? So let's drag this into the timeline. And I want to start already a bit where he says, I've been to Iceland. So let's play this back and see where we have to start that clip. All right, so perhaps right here and we show Iceland. There we go. We've got some nice music playing right here. And perhaps like one more shot where we start to talk about the next thing which is the landscapes there are beautiful. Let's, so let's show landscapes, right? I've got like, there's this river here, right here. Let's drag it into the timeline here on top. And so it's right here where I want to start to music. So let's also already place the music in there and I'm going to go back and look for audio. And we've got music folder right there and I'm going to take an instrumental song this time because I don't want a singer to interfere with Tmn's interview. All right, let's have a listen here and see which part we can select. But I think at the beginning is pretty good. All right, let's get an out point right here and drag the audio track into the timeline. So I might want to start the music where we start seeing the landscape. All right, let's play this back. As you're editing, you always want to play back any changes you make. I'm Timon, I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Il looking good. And I might want to cut like on the beat of that song. Let's look for that beat, which is right here. You can see it as well in the wave form of that song. Here is like a little peak. And these peaks always show volume, so the higher the peak, the louder. So usually a sudden peak is a beat. So I might want to cut here on this point. Let's trim that clip and drag here the next one next to it. Let's have a look. So here we have another beat. So I might want to trim this clip as well and add a new clip in there. Let's go back. Let's look for the video folder again. Drone perhaps. Let's look for another landscape. This one is pretty cool as well. Lots of ice. Here is a nice glacier by the way. Points out points, Drag it into the time line. Let's play it back. All right. Looking good. I want to hear what Timon is saying. Currently, the music is too loud. So for a quick moment, I'm just going to mute that entire track. And you can see here on the left hand side, within the track options, every track has an M button, which can mute that entire track. So everything within this track now is muted so that way I can only hear. And if you have multiple tracks and you only want to listen to one in specific, you can also solo that track. So instead of muting audio track number two, I can also solo audio track number one. So now only this one is being played back and none of the other ones. All right, so here he says, I was able to capture all of water falls with my drone. All right, so we're going to have to find a waterfall, but I see like I already used it right here. This might be that waterfall. You know what? Let's place this one right here where he says where I captured a lot of waterfalls with my drone and perhaps put something else in here. Let's go back here and look at the normal camera folder. See what we have in there. I really like this shot as well on this Ok, let's drag that into the timeline and which I'm going to drag for a moment here on top on track number three. That way I can trim it in. That it fits here between these two E clips. All right, let's play this back. Arctic Explorer. And I recently went to Iceland. The landscapes there are very beautiful and I was able to capture a lot of waterfalls with my drone. All right, I was able to capture, I want to show Timon just for a small moment there. Let's see how this looks beautiful and I was able to capture a lot of waterfalls with my drone. Alright, really good. I might want to extend this clip here a little bit because I also want here to have a little break. Going to add a little gap here in between. And again, just show some nature shots, but I know that man is going to start talking about animals here, so I kind of want to have like a bridge in between these two. Let's have a look here at what I have. We've got the sheep, we've got the horses, but they're going to be for later. You know, it perhaps show where Timon or someone is walking. You know, it could be traveling towards those animals. So let's take this shot here. Drag that into the timeline. So here we have the water falls. And now he is going to walk towards those horses and sheep. And the thing is always about telling a story. You are showing something visual. What is that visual telling us? Let's put the horses and the sheep now in there. Got the sheep right here. Let me just drag that already into my timeline. And we've got a horse over here. I'm going to drag that as well into my timeline. I'm just placing it very random for now on the side so that I can use that later on because I need like one more shot here in between. And I know that in my drone folder I actually have some horses here as well, where we fly with the drone over the horses. So maybe I want to take an endpoint here. Go a little bit forward in time, outpoint there, this selection. Drag that into my time line right there. And then perhaps show the horse and close up next to that clip like this, and then show the sheep. All right, let's have a look. We might want to shuffle around. A few things of water falls with my drone. There are a lot of animals as well, especially horses and sheep. All right, He's pretty fast there, so I might want to trim this walking shot a little bit and move all of these clips here to the site like that and maybe move Tim Want's clip a little bit more to the right side. I think the horse can also be a little bit shorter. Let's play that back. There are a lot of animals as well, especially horses and sheep. Alright, looking good. Timon can go a little bit more back and you know, this is a good reason why we want to disable the snap in the timeline for a moment. Because I want this clip now to snap here against that clip. So let's just disable that. A little magnet up here. And now I can drag this clip more precise to the left. Let's play that back again. There are a lot of animals as well, especially horses and sheeps. Alright, perfect, that is good. In sync. Let's enable snap again. And I might want to like end this video on a final nice note, a good shot of something. What else do we have? I really like this shot here actually, where we see the mountains there in the back. Let's drag that into the timeline as well. There we go. So now we have a nice edit, and I might want to extend the music a bit more until the end. All right, let's play this back in its entirety and take a look if everything sits at the right place. Hey, I'm Demon. I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to the landscapes. There are very beautiful and I was able to capture a lot of waterfalls between road, there are a lot of animals as well, especially orgs. This final clip can be cut off a bit sooner because we have that beat again here, like right here, we see a little peak here in the audio that is a beat. So let's trim this clip here of the sheep and then move these mountains here, close that gap. All right guys, we got ourselves a small edit. This is how you would present an interview. Had the speaker talk leave some gaps in there and show what that speaker is talking about. You can let the music start a little bit later. It kind of like introduces the music introduces Iceland as we show the first mountain shots. Now there's one last thing missing and that is a sound design. So I'm going to make some more room down here so that I can see my audio tracks a little bit better, perhaps make my video tracks a little bit smaller. Hold Alt as you scroll to do that. There we go. Move that up a bit. All right, let's see in my project window where we can find the sound effects is right here within audio. And now we've got sound effects. Now I don't have that many sound effects. If you have a subscription to a music library like audio, you can download thousands of different sound effects. So it's really useful to have something like that. And again, link in a course subscription to grab yourself that 70% discount on your first year at audio. Alright, let's have a look. There are a few things in here which I really like. So as this horse here comes closer, I kind of want to emphasize that. Let me just mute to the other two tracks here. Let's only listen to the sound design for now. So the horse is coming closer. This is a good point. Or we can let the horse here, so we've got breeding horse right here, so just double click on that. And let's have listen, okay. I like the second one a lot. Let's put an point and outpoint around that and drag that sound effect into the timeline, into one of the audio tracks here. Let's listen maybe a little bit more to the site. All right, that is great. What else do we have in there? We have heavy winds which is definitely going to be useful as well. Like maybe like one of those bigger mountains like right here or here. Yeah, let's add the wind in there. This is bad habit. I should be listening to what I'm editing with. I'm sound designing visually here. All right, what do we have here? Let's have a listen. Okay, let's put that perhaps only under this shot right here. Is there anything else that could use? The winds, perhaps this shot as well. We can see some snow coming through it. So let's take a different parts from that same sound effect. Perhaps like this part right here. Drag that underneath the snowy shot. Trim it so that it's the same size, looking good. And I also have some snow footsteps right there, which I can insert under these footsteps. All right, Let me just take one to start with, drag that into my time line. And I might want to zoom in more because I want to synchronize these. Here's a footstep. We've got another footstep right there. Let's take a second one. All right, there we go. All right, perfect. Well, do we have in there a river? I see that is a river. We also have a waterfall that is way more powerful. Let's look at the waterfall that we were working with. Oh yeah, I think we can use the more heavier water fall. Let's endpoint outpoint. And just put that underneath. Play it back. All right. Looking good guys. And maybe the last part here as well. We might want to add some heavy wind to that too. Endpoint, outpoint, drag it underneath, like so. And you know what, even though we don't see a crow, I'm going to put it in there anyways because I have the saddened effect. I always think that a crow sounds, makes things feel like bigger, like enormous the mountains. So let's drag that underneath there as well. We could make it subtle, of course. Perfect. Love that sound effect. So the whole idea behind sound design is that you are going to emphasize the visuals, like what is the visual telling us? And is there a way that I can amplify that? As I was talking about these mountains right here, I want this to seem big, like we humans are very small against those very big mountains, that big, open place. So that's why I'm adding that wind and also that crow. Let's play this back and only listen to the sound design because I've got these two tracks muted for now. We could add some wind in here as well. All right. This is good guys. I know it sounds very rough and it's absolutely not done yet. So that's something that we're going to work on in the next lesson when we're going to do some audio mixing. 20. Audio Mixing: We've just made a funnel edit insight, Adobe Premier Pro, and now it's time to work on the details such as the audio mixing. Audio mixing is basically balancing the volume and tone of your different audio tracks. Let's have listened at what we have right here. Hey, I'm Tim. I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to All right, I'm going to stop at right theater because we can already tell what the mistake is. We cannot hear Timon talking anymore because the volume is just way too quiet compared to the music. So let's see what we can do about that. First of all, I'm going to go up to the menu on top Select Window, and from there choose the Essential sound panel. I'm going to just change my interface so that we can see better what we are doing. And I'm going to take my track selection tool right here so that I can select everything in audio track number one. So make sure that you hold down shift to do that, to only select one track. All right. We got the entire Timon speech selected. So now here in the essential sound panel, let's also tag it and say that it is dialogue. And as we've seen before, we're going to hit here, and hence on top, to enhance the speech. That's the first thing that we'll do. And I'm going to sold that audio track for a moment so that we can only listen to Timon talking. Let's have listen and perhaps we need to change the mixture a bit of the enhanced speech. Hey, I'm Timon. I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland. All right, this is good. Now, let's play that back again. And let's look here at the audio meters, which we can see right here. The audio meters are going to tell us if the Deo is too quiet or maybe if it's too loud, we want to have the right balance. That is what audio mixing is all about. So as we're playing this back, we can see that it sits around the -12 minus nine DC bells. You know, that could be fine. You can keep it at -12 DC bells if you like. So, but remember that you want to hear Timon speaking, so that means we're going to need everything else to be underneath the -12 DC bells at least. But we can also boost the volume a bit so that it touches more around the minus three DC bells. You don't want to touch it too much on the zero DC bells, because if it goes over the zero DC bells, we're talking about audio peaking. Basically your audio will sound very distorted. And there are three ways of changing the volume of an audio clip, and unfortunately it's not like one is better than the other. So it just makes things more complicated. So we can either change the volume of a clip by changing its game, or we can change the volume by changing the volume. And there are two different ways of doing that. So let's first take a look at how to change the gain of a clip. To change the game, all you got to do is right click on your clip. You can add multiple selected, by the way, and then choose audio gain. And you pop up appears. And from here we actually get a very nice indicator down here that we get a peak amplitude of -8.7 DC bells. That means from the entire speech, the highest audio peak lays at -8.7 DC bells. So that means that I can boost up the volume of these clips or boost up the gain by 8.7 DC bells without having to worry that they are going to peak. And we can either do that by setting the gain to a certain level, so I can type in here 8.7 I can set the gain to that value, or I can also adjust the gain by something. So that means take three DC bells off or add nine DC bells. And that setting it to a specific DC bell value, I'm just adding something to it or taking away something from it, you know what. But for new, let's set the game to, let's take eight DC belts and hit, Okay. But before I do that, have a look here at the wave forms of that clip. You will actually see the amplitude of those become bigger. And that's why I personally like to use the audio game first, so I can visually see that those clips have a difference in volume. And then afterwards I might decrease it a bit by using the volume control, which is different. It's really up to your workflow and what you prefer the best. Let's play this back in Evolsten, but also have a look here at the audio meters. Hey, I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to isolate. All right, so it's a little bit louder. Now we are more sitting around the minus six DC bells, so we essentially could boost that first clip up a little bit more. Let's do that with the volume control, and there are two ways to do that. First of all, we get a volume, or a clip volume here on the bottom of the essential sound panel. Now, increasing this right here will actually add a specific effect to your clip when we select one of the clips, let's select the first one in here, you'll actually see an effect now applied to its cold heart limiter. This has been applied to that clip because I changed the clip volume. You see If I were to delete that, we can just delete that effect. You'll also see here at the clip volume level has been disabled. If I enable that, again, that effect will be applied to it again. So why heart limiter? Well, the heart limiter is just a volume control as well. You can see here on the top that we also get volume that is the other way of doing it. Like I was telling you, a heart limitter is actually going to make sure that if you were to boost the volume of a clip by too much and it's going to Sound distort it, it's going to limit that a little bit. So see it as a new proof effect. You're less likely to make mistakes using the heart limitter than with the actual volume control. But then again, you can also just play back your timeline, have listen, and take a look at your audio meters. If those things are right, then your audio is fine as well. All right, then I'm going to delete that heart limiter effect. And you know what, I'm actually going to delete that for all of my clips here. Just like everything. And just disable here clip volume which is going to do the same thing, just delete that effect from all of those clips. Let's have a look at the third way of changing the volume, and that is if you select a clip, if you scroll down here, you have a volume control right here, we can change the level. So that is just a parameter that we can change over here. Now here's something interesting. Let's have a look at the timeline. And I'm going to expand here my audio track a bit more and zoom in into that clip. You see there's kind of like this line here that appears on top of the audio waveforms. And I can take that and I can move that up and I can move that down. And on the bottom of that clip you can see a DC Bell value changing as I move that line up and down. Well, that is because this line right here represents the level volume. So if I were to decrease that line like this, it currently says the -10.6 DC bells. You can see that back here as well in the volume parameter, the level right here. So that means I don't have to select each individual clip. Go to my effect controls and change the volume from there. I can just visually do that on the clip itself by moving that line up and down for instance. I can take that line, move it a bit up, and boost that a bit more to around like three DC belts extra. So that means I've gained it by eight DC bells, plus I added an extra three DC belts of volume. So we're now currently at around 11 DC belts. Let's play it back. Let's have a listen. I'm Tim, I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland. That is perfect. I wanted it to be around the minus three DC bells. And is there, so that is good. The volume sits in place. Now let me just disable here the solo for an entire track. And let's mix the music in there now as well. So the music is very loud. Of course, it's better. We can hear your Timon a bit better, but the music is still too loud. So we can either do that by selecting that music track right click, choosing audio gain, and decrease the gain from there. That's one way of doing it. Or we can also, with that selected, go to the essential sound panel, choose music from there, and on the bottom, change the clip volume. Or we can change the volume directly on the clip itself by using this line right here. And that has a great advantage because you see, if I were to decrease the volume of that, let's do that for let's say -30 BC bells. And let's play this back. Let's have a listen thick explorer. And I recently went to isolate. All right, this is kind of okay for the beginning parts where Timon is talking. Because we can hear him. We can hear a gentle music in the background. But then when he stops talking, that music is actually too silent. We want the music to go up in volume as Timon stops talking. And that is something that we can animate on that line itself, right here. If you hold down the control key on your keyboard, you can see your pointer change. A plus is being added right there. And what I want to do here is actually create a keyframe on that line by just clicking on it in the effects controls. You can also see here now that automatically, a key frame has been applied for the level and we've been working with key framing or animating before, so we know exactly what's going on in here. So let's add another key frame, which I'm going to do a little bit forward in time, another key frame, by just clicking on that line. And what I can do now is actually take one of these keyframes and just move them up, increasing the volume. Let's put that around like minus ten DC bells. So I am ramping up the music. Right here, Es Timon stops talking. Let's have listen to that. Recently went to isolate. How cool is that? Al right, that sounds great. I might want to increase the volume a bit more in the beginning Here, let's say that to -23 perhaps. And I recently went to isolate. That's great guys. Now estimont starts to talk again, we want to decrease the volume. So again, we're going to create a keyframe right here, right before he starts talking and add a new one as he's talking a little bit forward in time, drag the second one down. And you can see here that we are creating this little arc. Let me just make it a little bit bigger, an arc that represents the volume of that slip. So that is why I love to work with the volume control rather than with the heart limiter coming off from the essential sounds. The gain control is good to see how your wave forms look, but again, we can't animate the gain. We can only do that with the volume or the level. And this right here is exactly the same than if you were to animate the level parameter in the effects controls. You can also do that right here if you prefer, but I'd like to do that more visually. It also gives you an overview, if you're going to take a look at your edit where your audio mix is taking place. And this is audio mixing guys, let me just solo the music for now as well as the speech. And let's continue doing this so that we don't get bothered with the sound effects just yet. All right, so time is talking right here. Let's have a listen, the landscapes there are very beautiful and I was able to capture a lot of waterfalls with my drone. Okay, good. Let's add a key frame forward in time, another key frame, and move the audio up around minus ten DC bells. Alright, let's scroll a bit further for the last part. Key frame, another key frame, and bring the last one down. Every time that Timon stops talking, I'm going to create an arc so that the music comes in and fades back out as he starts talking again. And you can do the same thing on the speech as well, guys, sometimes people talk very loud and then they start to talk very loud quiet. That was the work, and I think that is something that is happening right here. Because I can see these peaks in the wave forms, and then the wave forms start to like fade out a bit. So let's have listen, there are a lot of animals as well, especially horses and sheep. Yeah. So I might want to alter the volume there a bit too. So I'm going to create a key frame, like right after that peak in volume, create a new one. And then move up the second key frame a bit at like I like four DC. Bell starts. Let's listen, there are a lot of animals as well, especially horses and sheep. Okay? That's maybe a bit too much because we can hear that the volume is changing. And we don't want that, you never want to notice that your volume is going up and down. So to decrease that a bits or perhaps extend the time that the animation takes here, that ramping, let's play that back again. There are a lot of animals as well, especially horses and sheep. Alright, Perfect. I cannot hear that the volume was altered during that shot, but it does make the entire clip a bit more louder. This is what audio mixing is all about. All right. There's one last part here. On the end, I see where Timon stops talking. So let's create a keyframe there as well. Another one right here. And push the volume up again, Right? Let's play this entire video back. I'm Timon, I'm an artist that is floor. And isolate the volume is sounding really good. A very audio levels, I was able to capture a lot of audio with my drone. Nothing is speaking. There are a lot of animals as well, especially horses and sheep. Perfect. Now, how do you know when your audio is speaking? Well, let me just show that to you guys. I'm going to increase the volume of my audio track by too much. And let's play this back. You can hear that the audio is distorted or peaking, but we can also see that in the audio meters because right here we get two red indicators on top. As I play back my music, those two indicators will light up, that means my audio is peaking. So let me just undo my action control Z, play it back again much better, and we don't see these red indicators on top. Good. All right, the final thing, the sound design. Let's make sure that we can hear everything now in the audio track. So make sure nothing is soloaed or nothing is muted. And let's have listen. The landscapes there are very beautiful and I was able to, all right, this is a bit too loud and we just decrease that a bit. Let's say my five DC bells perhaps. Play it back again. The landscapes there are very beautiful and I was all right sounding goods. And you know what I'm gonna do here because we have these white shots of this big glacier in these big mountains. I'm going to make the sound of that wind a bit deeper. So what do we do here with that club Selected, head into my essential sound panel and click on sound effect because that is exactly what it is. And I want to change the reverb a bit of that. So enable reverb, stick outside reverb for instance. And let's play that back and change the amount as we do So. Landscapes there are very beautiful, maybe a bit more. The landscapes there are very beautiful. Yes. Sounding really good. No one problem though. You can tell that the audio is suddenly appearing or popping in. I'm just playing it back again. The landscapes there, there. It just instantly starts. So what I'm going to do is select the endpoint of that audio clip and hit Shift D on the keyboard to add the default transition to that, which in this case is a fade in for the sounds. It's going to make that a bit smaller and that way, like the audio is more gently coming in rather than instantly being there. And we do the same thing here on the end as well. Make sure that it fades out a tiny bit. Yes, really nice in it, blends in more naturally. All right, let's continue this here as well with this clip. I'm going to just do the exact same thing with all of my audio effects here. And they can also start a bit sooner because they are fading in as well. So we can let them start before we can see that clip. Okay, way too loud. Let's decrease that. There are a lot of waterfalls within my drove. Still too loud. Decrease that again. There are a lot of waterfalls with my rod. All right. Really good. And I'm also going to add a transition between these two sound effects in here as well. Shift D, there we go. And make sure that we also had that here on the end. All right, really good. The footsteps are at the right volume so I don't have to touch them. And then right here we get the horse, especially horses and All right, sounding good as well. Perhaps decrease the volume is a tiny bit of that horse, especially horses. And Yes, perfect. And then finally we have the last part also here. Make sure to fade that music or that sound effect a bit in. Let that start a little bit sooner than the actual clip is starting. Also on the end, we can do the same thing with the music. By the way, just let that fade out nicely. We can decrease the length of that fade out. Let's play that back, all right. Really good. Maybe the crowd was a bit too much. Decrease that a little bit too. All right, perfect. Let's play back that entire video now. Let's have a listen. Hey, I'm Timon. I'm an Arctic explorer and I recently went to Iceland. The landscapes there are very beautiful and I was able to capture a lot of waterfalls with my drone. There are a lot of animals as well, especially horses and sheep. I love it, I hope you too. So we've just done the entire audio mixing, which is balancing the volume between the different audio clips, but also sometimes changing the tone. Definitely with sound effects like we've seen with the wind. Just adding a little bit more reverb to that to make it more like bigger with the mountains and the glacier and everything. Alright guys, these last lessons could definitely be a bit overwhelming as we are tackling some of the more advanced things right now. But they are very important, so I really want you to try this out yourself now. Once you've added music and sound effects to your edit, try to mix the audio and also change the tone a bit. Perhaps add some equalizing, add some reverb to the sound effects practice that a bit. And perhaps rewatch this lesson again. And then I'll see you back for the next lessons in which we're going to tackle colors. 21. Color Correction: Boy, boy, boy guys, are you even aware that we're almost through the entire course? I mean, that's something huge. You've just learned the entire fundamental basics of Adobe Premier Pro. Think about it. This is a professional video editing program, so that makes you almost a professional video editor. Because there's still one last thing that you've got to learn, and that is colors. Video needs fine tuning. We've seen that in the previous lessons with audio mixing and enhancing. Let's have a look at the colors now. Right here in my time line, we've got that small little edit that we've created with Tim on talking about his Arctic Adventures. You start color correcting these clips. We could go to the effects library and look for color correcting effects like the contrast and brightness and whatnot. But Adobe has a building tool for that. Just like with the essential graphics, essential Sound, We got lumitry or lumetry. Nobody actually knows how to pronounce it. And we can find that panel again, like always, by going to the menu on top, select the window, and from there choose lumetry color. Click on that. So I'm just going to change my workspace a bit so we can better see what we are working with. All right, so we get a whole bunch of options. I'm just going to collapse the basic correction here on top because as you can see, we get basic correction, we get creative curves, color wheels, and match HSL, secondary and vignette. Now for this course, I'm just going to keep it to the two on top. So basic correction, it's creative because color correction or grading is a whole course on its own. I also have a separate course just about that. It can be very complex and I don't want to overwhelm you with all of that stuff. So I'm going to keep it very basic right now so that you immediately know what to do with your Eclipse. Just make them look a little bit better. And in this lesson, we're going to stay working in the basic correction tap. So let's explore what we can find in here. Starting off, we get a whole bunch of color controls, and then at the bottom here, we get some lighting controls. So with the color controls, we can make the shot a bit warmer, as they also say, by just adding a little bit more orange into that shot. So now it seems as though that the sun is a little bit lower. You know, just making the shot a little bit warmer. Or perhaps we're on the Arctic like Tim was talking about. We want to make that a little bit colder. That's something that we can do here with the temperature slider. The tin slider is something that you usually don't touch unless you really get a color shift. For some reason, perhaps you're filming through a window, and that way your shot looks pretty green or something. Or you can fix that here with the Tin slider control, which is going to add green or magenta into your shot. Finally, we get saturation, decreasing that we'll just make our shots black and white, which could be an artistic choice or you can increase that to add more saturation. Just more colors in general. You can see here how it looks. All right, If you want to reset any of these values, just double click on the slider. And then here on the bottom, we get some lighting controls to change the exposure. Just make the shot brighter or darker, we can add some more contrast to make the shot pop a little bit more. And then on the bottom here, we get four more controls, which are also going to alter the contrast. But I'm going to skip those for this course because if I have to explain them, we are a couple of hours further down the road and really for your first edit. Trust me, you don't need those controls. So let's have a look here at this shot. Let me just make a little bit more room so we can see it better. There we go, team on, so it is looking pretty flat. We want to make it pop more to stand out a bit more. Let's increase the contrast. To do that, you can instantly see here how that makes the shots look a lot better. And by the way guys, if you have your clip selected here and head over to the effects controls, you will now see that a Lumetrc color effect has been applied to that. Actually, we could go ahead and expand here the basic correction. And scroll down and find the exact same controls in there that we can see lumetry panel. Of course, the Lumetri color panel is more user friendly, so there's no real reason to start fumbling around in here. But just so you know it is there all right, looking goods. Now if you want to see the before and after guys all the way in top here, we can find an button. And if you click on that, you will actually disable the entire lumetry effects. If you click on that again, you'll enable it again, so that way we can look at before and after real quick. Alright, I might want to add a little bit more warmth to that shot. There we go, tiny bit and you know what? Let's also increase the saturation, just making that shot pop a bit more. Let's have a look at the before and after. This looks a whole lot better as you can see. Now, this interview here was shot with the same camera and the same exact moment. So we could just go ahead and copy and paste that effect over to the other clips as well. And that's something that we can do from the effects controls. We're just going to take that lumetric color effect, right, click on it and choose copy. You could also just press control or command C for the Mac users to copy that effect. Then select all of your other clips here in a time line, and it control V or command V for the Mac users to paste that effect. And you can see now here, if I stand on this clip, that it also has that exact same color correction. Great, we've just done our first color correction. We've made a shot, just look a bit better by making it pop more, adding some more contrast to it, making it a bit more warmer, and just adding a bit more saturation to it. What else can we do? I'm going to select here another clip in my timeline. This one right here of these mountains in Iceland. So let's go back to that lumetric color panel here. And instead of this time, like playing around with all of these controls, what I could also do is just let Premier do its thing by pressing on the auto button, and Premier will automatically do a color correction for us. There's even a slider down here to increase the intensity of what Premier is suggesting, or to decrease that. And you know what, oftentimes is actually a good suggestion, definitely with that intensity slider, you still have control over what premier is going to suggest to you. Looking at the before and after, it definitely came out a whole lot better. This shot is popping so much more. This allows you to quickly make color changes to all of your eclipse. So you select the next one, hit auto and perhaps increase that intensity a bit more. And the next one, hit auto and increase the intensity or decrease it depending on your flavor and the next one. Do you make sure that you always select your clip, by the way, in a timeline guise? As you do that, we are correcting them clip by clip because every clip looks different. So we cannot just copy and paste the same color correction over all of the clips. We can only do that with the same clips such as the interview. All the rest are shot at different times of the day with different camera settings, at different locations. All right, next one, auto. This could have a bit more intensity as well. The next one with the horses here, pretty flat as well. Auto looks so much better. And next one. All right, here we are running into some special shots. We've got the horse right here, but also the cheap. Let's focus on this shot here for a moment. So this here is actually shot in a color profile, cold lock. And usually I wouldn't want to bother you with the whole lock color profile. But it is something so common, something so popular, that you might come across it sooner than later. So most professional and prosumer cameras, even your phone these days, have an option to shoot in a lock color profile. You can choose that setting in the camera itself. But basically this is what comes out of it. And it's a very flat picture. There is very little contrast, very little saturation in there. And the whole idea behind that is that you get more detail from your image. Eventually, if you will get more into video making, you will also explore shooting in a log format. But as an editor, it's already good to know what it is and that it's out there. Matt, you might encounter it. What do we have to do with this? Is this something special? Well, kind of we could go ahead and just increase the contrast and increase the saturation, but this does not really make your shot look better. For some reason, there's still too little contrast even though I'm at the end of my slider. And increasing the saturation just makes the shot green for some reason. That is because a lock color profile needs to be transformed into the right color profile, such as the other shots here that we've previously seen in the timeline. And that can be done using a lot file. So let me just reset here the values. Just double click on these. Let's have a look here on top where it says Input Lot. Open up that drop down menu and we get some presets to choose from. But I'm going to click on Custom or um, browse is basically the same thing. And within your download you should see a folder called lot. And within there we get one cue file and the name is V, Lock to Re seven oh nine. So this here was shot using a Panasonic camera. And Panasonic uses lock for their lock flavor. Sony cameras have lock, Canon cameras have lock. And every brand basically just have their own flavor of lock. So look a line for your type of camera or type of lock. And then to Re 709, because Rex 709 is the default color space that we work with in premiere. So this is just a file that I downloaded off from the Internet from the official Panasonic website. We're going to transform the V lock into Re 709, the default color space. It's open, and immediately you can see how that transformed the entire shots. The colors look a whole lot better now, and we can still add contrast from this point on if you want to, perhaps increase the staturation. And you know what, the shot looks a little bit too yellow. So let's change the temperature as well. However, I'm going to do that a little bit different. You see there's this color picker here on top and it says white balance. And with that color picker, what we're going to do is select a white part in the shot, and in this case here, the sheep, well they are white or supposed to be white. So let's click here with that color picker on a white part of the sheep. And automatically, premier will change the temperature and tint according to the shot. We're basically making sure that white is white. All right, this looks good guys. I might want to increase the exposure a bit more, maybe at a bit more contrast. And there we go, looking at before and after we've come a long way. So if you encounter a very flat shot, think about it. Maybe it was shot in a lock color profile. If you shot that with your own camera and you know which kind of brand you're working with. If you got the shot from a friend or so, ask which camera they were shooting with so that you can look up the right lot for that. All right, so we got those sheep color corrected. Let's do the exact same thing now for the horse right here, the input lot. Go to browse, make sure to slide V lock to Rex 79 cube. There we go, looking a whole lot better and perhaps increase the contrast a bit more of that shot as well as the saturation or if you like. So you can also just press the auto key as well, even after you've applied the lot. I mean, this button here has nothing to do with your lot. It's only going to change all the settings down here. All right, And then finally we have one last shot here which is not in lock but just in a normal Rex 79. And hit auto for that one as well. And perhaps play around with the intensity slider if needed. And there we go, we have just color corrected our entire edit. That is how fast it goes. Color correction is all about making your shots look better and fixing certain issues. Like with the sheep, they were just way too orange. We had to push more blue into that shot to neutralize it a bit more, to make it look better. And all in all, we're just changing contrast exposure and saturation. That's all we got to do. Now, all these shots here, they look better, That is right. But they don't have a specific look to them. And adding a certain look to your shot is a very creative process. That is why the next setting is called Creative Here and Elmetry Panel, but that is for the next lesson. 22. Color Grading: Color correction and color grading, what is the difference between the two? Well, technically, inside Premier, not that much. We still just work with limetric color. But it's a difference in goal that we have in line. You see with color correction, we just want to make our video pretty. We want to fix certain things like if it's too warm or too cold. We can do that with the temperature slider. If it's too flat, we can add more contrast in there just to make it pretty. But with color grading, we're going to give it a specific look, we're going to add a mood and feeling to the shots. We can give it an old vintage look, or we can give it a scifi look, or perhaps a horror look. That is where we can really start to play around with the colors and get creative. So in the previous lesson, we have color corrected all of the shots here in a timeline. Mostly using the auto button here on top and the basic correction within Lumetri. So first of all we're going to do the color correction, and then on top of that we can do the color grading. And since all of these shots here now are color corrected, we can actually apply a specific grade to all of them at once. Now we could go ahead and do that for each individual clip itself, and then copy and paste that lumetri effect over to the other clips. But that's just tedious, so there is a better way of doing that. I'm actually going to go here into my project panel. Right click. Go over to New item, and from there choose Adjustment Layer. Click on that, a pop up box appears. Just hit okay. And you'll see that a new file now has been added into the project window and adjustment layer. And what I can do with that is simply drag that, drop it into my timeline on top of everything else. And I want to make sure to trim that adjustment layer out so that it covers the entire edit. Basically, that adjustment layer is a nothing layer. It doesn't do anything. Nothing has visually changed. However, we can use that adjustment layer to apply effects to that. And every effect that is applied to an adjustment layer will have an effect on all of the clips below that adjustment layer. So not above, but everything below. So that means I can select the adjustment layer and head over to the lumetric color panel and just make any change which will be applied to everything below. Let me just quickly demonstrate that. For instance, I'm going to increase the temperature, make it orange. You know, this could be a color grade. Usually films about Mexico are a bit more warm. And you can see here that now has been applied to my bottom clip as well. And if I scrub through my time line, it is also applied to every other clip in there. So that way I can work fast and apply a color grade over everything at once. All right, let me just reset that temperature value so we can use the basic corrections as well to color grade our shot. Because maybe it's our intention to decrease the contrast, make everything flat, or perhaps you want to add more contrast. You see, that is completely up to you. However, we also have a creative tap down here. And the creative tap is going to give us a more option, specifically for color grading. One of each. Here is the look. And the look is really just that. If you open up that drop down menu, a whole bunch of lots, they are pre installed within your premiere, but these lots are not going to transform your footage from lock to Re 7.9 as we've seen before. These are really just going to give a specific look, so I could choose one of these Fuji or Kodak, lots from Adobe, which is basically going to transform your digital video into the look of film. You know that actual film strip that we had in the old days right here is going to try and emulate the look of that, which could be really cool for some kind of a vintage or older film. Let's take one of these. I'm going to take this one for instance, and there you go. You can instantly see what that does to my image. If it's too hard, you can decrease the intensity that applied look. Or you can increase it if you want to. But it's now also applied to the entire edit. Now down below that dropdown menu, we can see a preview of the different looks that are applied. So that allows us to quickly, like shuffle through the different looks that we have within that dropdown menu. And if we see something that we like, for instance this one, you can just click on it to be applied to your selected clip or the adjustment layer in this case. So this one here is more flat as you can see. It gives a whole different look, but there are a bunch in there and I would just suggest to go through them and see if there's something in there that you like. It's always a good start. Definitely, if you're just starting out with video editing to make use of one of these looks, even in a professional environment, looks are still being used. Don't see this as a quick and dirty way. There are actually some really good looks out there, which you can also purchase or download from the Internet and install into premiere. But the looks that you get with premiere right here are a great way to start with. Let me just take something else here. For example, gold heat, making everything warmer, which is really cool as well as you can see. All right, and then down here we get some more options like faded film to make sure video more flatter, like it's going to lift up those darker areas. And you could always do that in combination with applying a look, like there's never a right or wrong way of doing something if you want to achieve a certain look. And you can get that by playing around with a whole bunch of sliders and settings. And that is good, all right. We can add some sharpness to it and we can alter the vibrant and the saturation. And down here we get two interesting color wheels. Basically, this allows us to push a certain color into the darker areas or into the brighter areas. So what I could do, for instance, is add some red color into the darker areas. So that's going to be here, this patch of grass or third here, or these mountains in the back, or I can push, for instance. Green into the highlights, which is going to be your sky and the snow right here. And that really allows you to create some very creative looks. Just be careful to not overdo it. Definitely with shots with people in them. Because looking here at Tim on his skin is starting to look pretty weird. He looks a little bit sick. Now I do want to show you guys a very popular custom grate that is being used almost everywhere. And that is the teal and orange look. Let me show that to you. I'm going to reset the look in here. So you scroll up. Set that to non. I'm also going to double click here on faded film to reset that too. And also shadow tint and highlight tint, you can just double click on it to reset these two color wheels. Here are actually not that user friendly. If you're going to stroll down here to color wheels in match, you will find three color wheels. And the shadows and the highlights right here are exactly the same. Only here you get an extra one, the midtones, plus you get an extra slider to change the exposure of those levels. Let me show it to you guys. We're going to start off with the shadows, which are the darker areas in the shot. And what I'm going to do is push a little bit of teal or blue into those areas. Furthermore, I'm going to decrease the exposure for those darker areas as well. There we go. We have very deep shadows right now. And that is because we have not only lowered the exposure, but also add a little bit of blue or teal in there. Now let's work on the opposite, but instead of working on the high lights, I'm actually going to work on the mid tones, which are more the skin tones here of mine. And I'm going to push the opposite in there. So instead of blue, I'm going to add the opposite, which is yellow, orange in there, making the whole shot a bit warmer. But at the same time, retain that colder look, that bluish tint in the shadows. And so, not only do we have contrast by having darker and brighter areas in the shot, but we also have contrast by color. The darker areas have a blue tint. As for the brighter areas, the mid tones have an orange tint, the opposite of blue. And let me just enable and disable that here real quick. You see the before and after of the color wheels and match, which you can do also as well here on the right side. Disable that and enable that. You can see here how big of a difference that is. So this really is a quick and dirty color grade, but it works all the time. And definitely if you're starting out, this is great to get started with. And so as we are working on that adjustment layer, this color grade has been applied to my entire edit, making it give a more like cinematic look because of that teal and orange grade that I just created. All right, and now it's up to you. Go ahead and play around with the creative settings right here. See if there's a look that you really like within a drop down menu. And play around with the intensity to see whether or not you need to add more of that look or take away a little bit. And if you feel comfortable, play around with the color wheels. I wouldn't suggest to work with these, but instead go to the color wheels and match so that you can work on the shadows and the midtones instead of the shadows and the highlights. These controls also gives you an exposure control for these two settings. Try to really finalize your video right now, because in the next and last lesson of this course, we're going to export our video so you can share it with your friends and with the white world, Wep. 23. Export Your Video: Oh yeah, and your video is done. It is time to share your masterpiece with the world or your mom. That's up to you. In many ways, that means that we're going to have to export the video out front premieter, so that we actually have a file that we could upload to Youtube or to Facebook or to wherever you want. So it all started here with the import tap as we've seen in the first lessons of this course. And we didn't really use the import feature that much, we mostly just used it to create a project. Then we went over to the edit tap on which all of the work happened and depending on our needs, we used the different windows here to color correct or create graphics or to work on Yadio and whatnot. And now it's time to explore the last tab here on top which is the Export tab. So let's click on that and see what we get. So we mainly get three columns, the first one here being the destinations. Then we get to the settings, and then finally the preview. Let's start with the destination. Usually you just want to export it over to a media file which is an actually MP four on your computer. But you could also choose to immediately publish that to some kind of social media platform like Twitter, or Vimeo, or Facebook or Youtube. If you're going to enable one of these, let me just quickly do that. For instance, it's going to ask you to sign in into your Youtube account and immediately you can place it into a playlist, you can set a title, a description, everything for that video. Now, honestly I'm not sure if this is being used that often or at least I never used that. I just upload it to an actual video file and then I upload it to Youtube. That still gives you the most control. And also you'll see more options in Youtube itself than through premiere, so I'm going to disable that. And finally, here on the bottom, we have a couple of options to upload it to the cloud, but I think these are more advanced features and also more specific, definitely if you're working in a team or at an agency or something of that. So for now we're just going to focus on the media file. And here on top, you'll see what you're going to export, which is going to be my Iceland and video. It's possible that you have multiple sequences, so make sure that the right one is selected. If it's the wrong one, go back to your Editap and make sure to double click, open up the sequence that you actually want to export, and then go to exports. Alright, let's have a look here at the settings, which is actually pretty easy because these dates you don't need to fumble around with all of these different settings and formats, and codecs, and whatnot. We can just go ahead and choose one of the presets. So down here you'll see preset and let's explore the options. There are not that many options and that is good. Mainly two big differences. We get match source and then some of the other high quality exports here. Match source is just going to take a look at the settings of your sequence, so the resolution, the frame rate, and whatnot. And it's just going to take those settings over and then you can choose the quality setting. You want it to be high quality or bitrate, medium or low quality. Now you might think, let's just always go for the high quality, right? Well, the higher the quality of your video, also the bigger the file size will be. So that is up to you how big the file can be for you. But to give you guys an idea, let me, for instance, set it to low bitrate. We can now see here in the preview all the way on the bottom right, estimated file size. So that gives you upfront an idea of how big that file is going to be. So now it sits around 47 megabytes. And if I change my preset here to high quality, you'll see now that it's going to estimate the file size to 158 megabytes, which is still relatively small. So this is good. We can go for that high quality setting. Now if you want to have different settings, which is mostly going to be resolution, we can choose one of the different presets here, the high quality presets. So maybe I have edited my video in a four K resolution, but my client or my friend wants to see it in ten ADP because maybe his device can't run four K or for some reason. Well then you can choose ten ADP from here. Which is just going to change the resolution of your video. So you don't always need to change the actual sequence settings. You can also just choose a different export setting. And we can see that down here, what is the source? What is the resolution of my sequence? What is the frame rate? And then here on the right side, we can see the output. What is going to be the resolution, what's going to be the frame rate, and so on. And that's really it. These presets right here make use of the H 264 format or codec. This is the most used codec out there, so you are pretty sure that this works on every device. You can use that to upload it to social media or to put it on your phone on a tablet, watch it on a television, even you can put that on a USB thumbstick and give that to a friend or something. That format will always work. The other formats are there for more advanced and very specific purposes. All right. Now if you feel like a daredevil, you could slide into the video settings and make changes there, but again, that's not going to be necessary. The same thing for the audio as well. We can choose a different audio format and everything, but they are all set correctly by the presets. However, there is one last thing that I do want to show you guys, and that is the captions. So I actually have created captions now as we've learned about in one of the previous lessons. And now we can choose what needs to happen with those captions. I can either burn them into the video as it's currently set, so that means I just have one video file and the subtitles are burned in. I cannot disable them. Or I can also export it as a side car file, which is basically a separate SRT file. You might be familiar with that, a subtitle file, which means that I can choose to disable or enable the subtitles. For instance, Youtube allows you upload the SRT file separately. You can also make different languages so you can translate your SRT files and that way the end user can just choose which kind of subtitles that they want to see or if you don't want to export the captions, you can also just disable that entirely right here. And that's pretty much it, guys. All there's left to do is give it a name. Let's call this one here my awesome Iceland video. And choose the location where we want to save it. So just click on this link here. And I'm going to go into my Iceland Travel video, into my main folder. And I'll just put it in there. Hit Safe, and now hit Export on the bottom right. And now you just got to wait it out until Adobe Premiere is done with rendering or exporting your video. And there we have it. Let me just check out my folder here. There is my video file, which I can double click on now and watch into my media player. Awesome. All right guys, we've gone through the entire course. Now we've got ourselves the exported video and we can share that with the world. Now there's one last very important thing that I want to talk about, but that is for the next lesson, the conclusion lesson. 24. Conclusion: Oh yeah, this is so cool. How awesome is that? You've just completed the entire Adobe Premier Pro for beginners course. You could be proud about yourself, even if it's still a little bit overwhelming. It is very good that you set through the entire course. Maybe you need to rewatch certain lessons to get the hang of those technical or creative skills. That first step is the hardest and you just went through it as smooth as butter. Now it is very important that you start practicing the things you've learned. You can download all of the projects and media files that were used in this course to start using to create edits. And I want you to utilize multiple techniques even though you might not be interested in all of them. Like not everybody is interested in audio or color correction. Make sure that you practice all different techniques so that you have a very solid foundation of knowledge. Start with editing that interview from man. Make sure to add some sound design to your edit and use that free track from audio to enhance your edit. Fill it up with some B roll. Try to experiment with animating graphics or text. And finally, give it some color correction. And do some audio fine tuning. Go again over every lesson within this course. Maybe you don't need to re, watch them, but just look at the title so that you know which techniques you need to implement in your first edits. And once you're done, make sure to show it off to the world. Guys, upload your video to Youtube. Show it to the world and just ask for feedback. Feedback is going to be very important in your journey to becoming a better video editor. Even from your friends and family, every kind of feedback is important. So go out now and start your first video edit. And I wish you a lot of luck with that, but also a ton of fun because that is what video editing is all about. Ni. Thank you so much for following this course and if you enjoyed it, or maybe if you didn't, I would still appreciate if you could leave a review, which you can do down below on this page. Any input helps me to create better courses in the future. Thank you so much again, and as we always say, stay creative.