Procreate for Beginners: Learn Illustration on the iPad in 4 Projects | Brooke Glaser | Skillshare
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Procreate for Beginners: Learn Illustration on the iPad in 4 Projects

teacher avatar Brooke Glaser, Illustrator

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Procreate Practice Fun: Learn Illustration on the iPad in 4 Projects

      1:45

    • 2.

      How to Download the Class Materials

      2:41

    • 3.

      Procreate Basics | Abstract Art

      8:51

    • 4.

      Share Your Art | Abstract Art

      2:19

    • 5.

      Recap: The Basics

      0:53

    • 6.

      Win a Year of Skillshare

      0:34

    • 7.

      Layer Basics | Mushrooms

      8:09

    • 8.

      The Quick Shape Tool | Mushrooms

      2:53

    • 9.

      Layers Part 2 | Mushrooms

      4:41

    • 10.

      The Color Drop Tool | Mushrooms

      3:43

    • 11.

      Recap: Layers, Quickshape, and ColorDrop

      0:35

    • 12.

      Alpha Lock vs Clipping Masks vs Layer Masks

      9:20

    • 13.

      Recap: Masks

      0:49

    • 14.

      The Symmetry Tool | Strawberries

      3:58

    • 15.

      The Selection Tool | Strawberries

      7:55

    • 16.

      Recap: Selections

      0:51

    • 17.

      The Transform Tool | Strawberries

      6:33

    • 18.

      Recap: Transform

      0:25

    • 19.

      Different Ways to Resize

      2:54

    • 20.

      Reference Images | Tiger

      4:44

    • 21.

      Recap: Reference Images

      0:18

    • 22.

      Brush Customization Part 1 | Tiger

      6:37

    • 23.

      Using Blend Modes | Tiger

      3:47

    • 24.

      Brush Customization Part 2 | Tiger

      2:55

    • 25.

      Brush Customization Part 3 | Tiger

      2:58

    • 26.

      Organizing Brushes | Tiger

      0:41

    • 27.

      Recap: Custom Brushes

      0:30

    • 28.

      Creating Custom Color Palettes

      5:58

    • 29.

      Recap: Custom Palettes

      0:30

    • 30.

      The Color Fill Tool | Mushrooms

      5:44

    • 31.

      ColorDrop for Changing Colors | Mushrooms

      2:29

    • 32.

      The Recolor Tool | Mushrooms

      3:05

    • 33.

      The Hue Saturation Brightness Tool | Tiger

      2:41

    • 34.

      Recap: Recoloring Techniques

      0:58

    • 35.

      Organizing Your Canvases

      1:14

    • 36.

      Final Notes and Resources

      1:16

    • 37.

      Wanna Learn More?

      1:10

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About This Class

In this fun, comprehensive class, we’ll cover everything you need to know to create stunning illustrations in Procreate on your iPad. You'll learn by doing; we’ll drawing 4 art pieces, and all the while, you’ll be secretly learning the tools and techniques for using Procreate. This class is for all levels: whether you’ve never opened Procreate or you’re an experienced artist looking to learn digital illustration.

Procreate is the ultimate collection of art tools: you get ALL the colors, you can experiment with brushes galore, and you don’t have to worry about making mistakes! Between the undo, redound eraser tools, you can leave your perfectionism behind and just try things out without the fear of ruining your piece with an extra brush stroke or wasting expensive art materials.

Hi, I’m Brooke Glaser, I’m a professional illustrator and a Top Teacher on Skillshare, where I’ve helped hundreds of thousands of students learn illustration in Procreate and level up their art careers. The work I've done in Procreate has been used for greeting cards, children's apparel, fabric, and gift wrap.

Maybe you’ve seen a bunch of tutorials and are blown away by everything you can DO in Procreate, but it’s overwhelming, there’s no way you just can’t possibly remember it all! That’s where this class comes in. We’re just gonna have some fun drawing tigers and mushrooms and strawberries, and all the while, you’re going to be learning and practicing all those amazing tools in Procreate! You’ll learn coloring and recoloring techniques, how to customize your brushes, and tools to make drawing easier. If you don’t know how to draw, no stress, I got you! The exercises in the class are designed for artists of ANY level.

Plus, I’ve included some fun resources in this class: some custom brushes, color palettes, and drawing guides. Whether you’ve never opened Procreate or you’re an experienced artist who just hasn’t been able to wrap your brain around what the app is capable of, by the time this class is done, you’ll be up and running and know all the essential tools to create stunning art on the iPad.

Meet Your Teacher

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Brooke Glaser

Illustrator

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Level: Beginner

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Transcripts

1. Procreate Practice Fun: Learn Illustration on the iPad in 4 Projects: [MUSIC] Procreate was a complete game-changer for me in my art. With Procreate on the iPad, you can draw anywhere, there's no messy setup, there's no time-consuming cleanup, and it let me leave my perfectionism behind. Between the Undo, Redo and Eraser tool, I didn't have to worry about making mistakes. In this class, we're going to cover everything that you need to know so that you can create your own stunning art, and you'll learn by doing. We'll create four art projects, and all the while you will secretly be learning all the tools and techniques for using Procreate. Hi, by the way, my name is Brooke Glaser. I'm a professional illustrator and a top teacher on Skillshare, where I've helped a hundreds of thousands of students learn illustration and kickstart their art careers. The art that I've made in Procreate has been used in greeting cards, children's apparel, gift wrap, and more. Maybe you've seen a bunch of Procreate tutorials and you're blown away by everything that you can do here, but it's overwhelming. There's no way that you can remember all of it, that's where this class comes in. We're just going to have some fun, draw a tiger, and strawberries and mushrooms and all the while you'll be learning and practicing all of those amazing tools in Procreate. You'll learn coloring and re-coloring techniques, you'll learn how to customize your brushes and tools to make drawing easier. If you don't know how to draw, no stress, I got you. The exercises in this class have been designed for artists at any level, plus I've included some fun free resources in this class, some custom brushes, color palettes, and drawing guides. Whether you've never opened Procreate or you're an experienced artists who just hasn't wrap their brain around, what you can do with this powerful little app by the time this class is over, my goal is for you to have an intuitive understanding of all these central tools in Procreate so that you can create your own stunning art. [MUSIC] 2. How to Download the Class Materials: Welcome to class. In this class, you will be creating four different illustrations in Procreate. I've created the lessons for you to follow along, and practice the tools that we're learning. Each lesson is going to build upon the tools that we learned in the last one. We'll also do periodic recaps so that you can review what you've just learned. There's a few materials that you'll need for this class. First, you'll need an iPad that's compatible with Procreate, and you can find the current list at procreate.art/faq. Of course, you'll also need Procreate and you will also want an Apple Pencil. Although, you may be able to get away with a stylus that at least has pressure and tilt sensitivity. You'll also want to download the class materials. I've created some brushes we'll be using, along with some color palettes, and image guides. As a student in this class, you can download the resources for free by going to brookeglaser.com/beginners, and entering your email. There's a link in the projects and resources tab to that page as well. Once you've downloaded the files to your iPad, you can find them on your iPad's files app. That's the app that looks like a folder icon right here. Navigate to the downloads, and here is where you'll find the resources that you downloaded. Now, we need to install these into Procreate, and that's really easy for these four. You've got your Mushroom_Arches.procreate file, a brush set, and two color swatches. All you have to do is you just tap on this, it will automatically load up Procreate and install the file. Now if I go into any canvas here, you can find your brushes inside of here. For your color palettes, if you're like me and you have a bajillion color palettes. You may need to scroll to the bottom to find your color palettes, and that might also be true of your brushes. They might have been loaded to the very bottom of the brush list. Back in our files over here, the last one that we have right here is this tiger reference image. This will not automatically load into Procreate, because it's actually just an image. What I want you to do is tap on the image of the tiger. Look for this little "Share" icon right up here and tap on that, and they'll be an option that says "Save Image". If you tap "Save Image" it's going to save it to your photos app, and we'll be able to grab it here and use it later. A couple of other useful tools for you in the video player where you can pause and play the video. There's a little button that will allow you to rewind 15 seconds if you need me to repeat what I've just said. You can also adjust how fast or slow the video plays. Maybe if English isn't your first language, you can slow me down a little bit. I might sound a little bit drunk, but at least you'll be able to slow me down. You can also turn on captions in a bunch of different languages as well. Enough preamble. Let's get to creating. 3. Procreate Basics | Abstract Art: In this lesson, we're going to create a fun, easy little piece of wall art like this while learning the basics of Procreate. You're going to learn some fun shortcuts for moving around the canvas, and I'm going to show you how to share the art that you've made. The first thing that we need to do is create a canvas. There's a little plus icon in the top, upper right-hand corner. From here you can choose a preset canvas size, so you can just tap on one of these options and it will create a canvas that has these settings. But I want to show you how to make a custom canvas size. Tap on the plus icon right there. Now there's a whole bunch of settings in here and you can tap through here to customize your settings. But for now, let's just focus on the dimensions. I'm going to choose inches, and I'm going to choose 10 inches by 10 inches. I'm gonna make sure that it's at 300 DPI. Then I'll tap Create. The first thing that we want to do is choose a brush. If I tap on this icon right here, the little brush icon, there's all kinds of brushes that you can choose from here. I'm going to be using the procreate practice brushes that I provided in the lesson on how to download the resources for this class, and I'm going to choose the big block texture. Then the next thing I want to do is I want to choose a color. There's a little circle right here. If you tap on that, it's going to open up your color palette options. On the bottom here are a bunch of different options. If you tap through these, these are just different ways to display your color choices. In this one, you can spin around the circle and then you choose your color by going inside the big inner circle, and that chooses how dark or light your color is. My favorite is this classic one. There's a little slider right here that controls the hue, the different colors that you can pick. Then you can just move your little circle in the center here and choose the version of color that you like in there. Harmony suggests colors that will look good together. Value is really useful if you need specific brand colors because you can choose your HSB, RGB, or your hexadecimal codes in here. Palettes, this is going to be a collection of your custom palettes. We'll learn how to make custom palettes later. But for now, just know that's what that option is. I'm going to go back to my classic one and I'm just going to choose a dusty orange-red. What I'm going to do is I'm going to draw like an upside-down half circle. This does not have to be perfect at all. The rough this is, the cooler that it looks. You really don't need to be perfect with this. I'm going to start filling this in. What I want you to notice is that if you push really lightly, your color is going to come out really transparent, really see-through. If you push really hard with this brush, it's going to come out really thickly, so you'll get a lot of color. Different brushes have different settings. One of those settings is the amount of pressure that you use with your pencil. In this particular brush, when you press lightly, you get very small amounts of color. When you press hard, you get a lot of color. I'm going to finish filling that in. Cool. Now what I want to do is I want to draw a line that goes around the outside of this half-circle, but my brush is really big and I don't want a huge line, I want a smaller line. Well, if I go to these two sliders over here, these sliders control my size and my opacity. This top one, if I drag this down, now, I'm going to have a much smaller brush size. I'll just draw a line around my half circle and it's much smaller than that initial size. If you had a lot of trouble because your brush was really small, you can always increase the size so you could fill in your circle really, really fast. Now what I want to do is I want to draw some circles, little dots around the edge of this half-circle. Now, let's say, I'm not super happy with the spacing on these circles and I want to undo it. If I take two fingers and I tap on the screen, it's going to undo the last thing that I did. If I tap multiple times, I can undo multiple dots that I just drew. If I tap and hold two fingers down, boom, it kicks into rapid undo. Rapid undo just keeps on going until you lift your fingers up. But I actually changed my mind. I kind of want everything back. Well, if I tap three fingers, boom, I'm going to redo what I did. If I tap and hold my three fingers, that also kicks into that rapid redo. I want to start working on the bottom part of this art. I'm going to choose a darker, rusty, reddish-orange color, just a darker version. I'm also going to switch brushes. I'm going to go to the small block texture. I'm going to start by making rainbow-shaped arches on the bottom here. What I want you to do is, again, push hard and lightly onto your brush. Notice how this is totally different than the brush we were just using. In this brush, the amount of pressure that you use controls the size of your brush. With this brush, it's how hard you press that affects how big or small your brushes. I don't like how uneven the lines are at the bottom of my arches here. Let's use the eraser tool. This little symbol, that is the eraser. I want to even them out. Now if you tap on the eraser tool, you can actually choose which eraser that you want to erase with. Just like you can choose a brush, you can choose your own eraser. That's really handy because sometimes you want a textured eraser and sometimes you want a smooth one. I'm going to go back to the big block texture. I'm just going to even that out so they're a little bit more even across the end. Cool. Now, remember there are two sliders over here, and the top one is the size, but the bottom one is the opacity. I want to lower the opacity of this eraser to about halfway. What I'm going to do is I'm going to erase this top half of this circle right here. Now it's not erasing everything. Like when I erase down here, it erased all signs of it. What's happening is that this opacity. Opacity is just a fancy word for see-throughness, how transparent something is. Now, if I come back in here, and I pick up my eraser. Notice that this is a lot more see-through than these sections. That's because every time that I pick up my brush, I'm going to erase halfway through those colors. Every time I'm picking up my brush, I'm erasing a little bit more and a little bit more and a little bit more. I'm going to undo that. Another thing to keep in mind is that if you press lightly with your eraser or hard with your eraser, you're getting different amounts of pressure with this brush. In the same way that, that was true of our brush when we are painting, it's also true of the eraser when we're erasing the amount of pressure that you use can affect your brush. I'm just going to erase this top half of this half-circle in one move without picking up my brush so that it looks the same. There we go. Now, in addition to the amount of pressure that you use with your brush, the tilt of your pencil can also affect the size and opacity. I want to try this out with a different pencil. If you open up your brushes, look for the one that says HB Pencil. Now, this is super cool. If I draw a straight up and down, I get a fine line like I'm drawing with a pencil. But if I take the pencil on its side and I try and draw it on its side as if I was going to be shading something, like if you had a real pencil and you were tilted on its side, that completely changes the effects of this brush has. It's not just pressure, it's also tilt that can adjust these things. Will go over more how to customize these settings for yourself in later lessons. Let's go ahead and undo those. Let's talk more about moving around the canvas. Let's say that you want to get closer in so that you can see these details a little bit better. If you take two fingers and you pinch them, you can zoom in and out of the canvas. If you twist those fingers, you can rotate the canvas. Now you could just rotate the iPad itself. But a lot of times, you're in a position where it's just easier to just pinch and zoom and get that canvas exactly where you'd like it to be. You can also use two fingers to slide the canvas from side to side. Two fingers, pinch and zoom, twist, move across the screen. For your first project, I want you to share the abstract art that you made in the project section. You can share what you've made here. You can experiment with different brushes or different colors. But once you've made this fun little art experiment, how do you share it? 4. Share Your Art | Abstract Art: You're going to tap on the Wrench icon in the left-hand corner. There are several tabs inside of here. We want to use the Share tab. From here, you can choose your file type. For now, we're going to choose a JPEG, and it's going to pop up this dialog box where you can choose different places to save your image. Maybe you've got a computer that you can AirDrop it to or a phone that you can AirDrop it to. You can also text message it to different people. If you slip all the way to the right on the second row, there's a button that says more and you can choose all different applications that you could share your picture too. The one that I want you to pay attention to here is save image. Save image is going to save the photo of this to your photos app on your iPad. We're going to tap Save Image there. Now, if I go to my photos app inside of there, I have the image that I just saved. You can also use this Wrench icon to share a really cool time-lapse of your videos. If you go to the video tab, there's an option that says time-lapse replay, and it's just a quick video showing you all the steps that you did while you are drawing your art. You can also share that by hitting the Wrench icon, Video tab, and hitting Export time-lapse video. Now, there is a tab in here. If there's at some point that you want to stop recording your video, if you turn that off, it's going to stop recording what you draw on Canvas. It'll bring up these options right here. Basically, if you purge it, it's going to erase all of the time-lapse that it's already recorded. If you don't purge it, just going to stop recording where you are and then you can turn it back on and off again. I'm going to hit Don't Purge. Now anything that I drew inside of here, that's not going to show up and when I turn it back on, now, those things will just appear on the Canvas as if it hadn't recorded at all. What the time-lapse is recording is every time that you pick up and put down your brush, all of those brushstrokes will appear individually. Whereas if I just drew like this, that would just appear as one move on the time-lapse. Save an image of your art and you'll need to use the Skillshare website, not the Skillshare app to upload a project, go to the Projects and Resources tab, tap the Create Project button, and upload your image. 5. Recap: The Basics: Let's recap what you've learned in this lesson. You learned how to create a custom canvas size. You learned about brush and eraser basics. You learned that pressure, which is how hard you press on the pencil, can affect your brushstrokes. It can either affect the size, how big or small your brushstrokes are, or the opacity, how transparent your brushstrokes are. You also learned that the tilt of your stylus can also affect your brushstrokes. That tilt can affect the size, how big and small, and the opacity, the transparency. These settings are unique for every brush. You learned how to undo, which is tapping with two fingers, and you learn to redo which is tapping on three fingers. You learned to zoom, rotate, and move around the canvas, and you learned how to save and share images of your art. 6. Win a Year of Skillshare: Want to win a year of Skillshare? To celebrate the launch of this class, I am giving away a full yearlong membership to Skillshare. All you have to do to enter to win is post a project in this class. You can do one of the exercises from the class or you can do all of them. You just need to post a project by the deadline. The deadline to enter is April 26th, 2022 at 5:00 PM, Pacific Standard Time. The winner will be chosen at random and I'll announce the winner in the discussion tab of this class. Best of luck. I am so excited to see your art. 7. Layer Basics | Mushrooms: In this lesson, we're going to learn about layers and introduce some fun drawing aids while drawing these mushrooms. The fun part of drawing mushrooms is that they're hard to mess up, because they're all weird, funky shapes. But if you like getting perfect shapes, I've got some really fun tools to help you. What I want you to do first is open the mushroom arches Procreate file. If you're unsure how to do that, go back to the lesson on downloading the materials where I walk you through all of the steps. If you're unable to, for some reason, you can also create your own custom canvas. This canvas is an 8 inch by 10 inch at 300 DPI and you can just draw your own arches. Cool. We've got our file set up. We're going to start drawing our mushrooms on separate layers. Layers is one of the best parts of making digital art. If you've never used digital art before you might be wondering what the heck are layers? Layers are like transparent tracing sheets, where you can draw on top of your art without affecting the painting that you've done underneath. It's like paper dolls. If the bottom layer is the paper doll, it can stay exactly the same. You can swap out different clothes or different hairstyles on top. Why would you want to use layers? Well, I could just draw some mushrooms on this layer right here. Then if I decide, you know what, I've made a mistake here. I'd like to erase that. Well, when I go to erase it, I'm also erasing the background. I'll undo that. But if I create a new layer and draw my mushroom and then decide, I need to come in here and erase it, now I'm not affecting the background. Brilliant. Well, let's try it out. I want you to open the Layers panel, which is this little icon right here, and you'll see a thumbnail of what's on each layer. Let's add a new layer for our mushroom caps by tapping the plus icon right here and then I'm going to rename this. If I tap on the layer, it's going to open up a bunch of different options. Right now, we're just going to focus on the rename one. Right up here at the top, and I'm going to name this, caps. Just for your information, you really don't need to be OCD about naming your layers. But since we're working together on this, I want to avoid any confusion and I'm going to name my layers. It's really clear which layer I'm talking about during this exercise. When I'm just drawing for me, I don't bother with naming the layers. Let's also name this layer arches as well, and then I'm going to tap and go back to my caps layer. Now, the fun can begin. I'm going to choose a nice medium blue color. You can choose whatever color you like, but a nice medium color. I'm going to grab my small block texture brush. I'm going to draw three rough triangles for my mushroom caps and I'll fill them in. Feel free to pause the video while you're drawing. Now, I'm going to create a new layer for my stems and I'll rename it stems and I'm going to choose a lighter blue or just a lighter version of whatever color you're using. I will draw my stems, just some fun wiggly lines. Now, the problem here is my stems are in front of my mushroom caps and I don't want that. Now, I could try to be really precise and only draw right up to the mushrooms, or I could come in here and I could erase these, but I actually don't have to worry about that because I'm using layers. See the order that you have your layers in here is the order that they're going to show up in the canvas. Layers are top are in the front and layers on the bottom are in the back. I'm going to move these stems underneath of the caps. I can do that by tapping and holding until it pops up. Then I can drag it underneath the stems. Now, I don't even have to worry about if I drew over that area. Cool. Now, let's add a layer for details and I'm going to draw some lines on the stems and I'll just swap to my taper details brush. Remember, if I try and draw right here, it's not going to show up because it's underneath the caps. You want to drag this and pop it above. There you go. Now, I don't really like this. I don't really like the way it looks. I'm going to just erase that really fast by using a three-finger scrub. If I go, [NOISE] that's going to erase everything that was on that layer. Now, I can come in here and add my details. I'm just going to draw some straight lines coming down these mushroom caps. Now, I'm going to add a layer for the underside of the mushrooms, and I'm going to drag this underneath of the stems and I'm going to choose a darker blue color. Now, you can go ahead and add a layer for some leaves. I'll choose some green color and draw some leaves and feel free to pause the video while you're drawing. I'll add a layer for some stars. I'm going to drag this to the top. Choose a white color. We'll come back later and add some more fun details to these mushrooms. But for now, we're going to start on the rest of the mushrooms. I want to draw a mushroom cap in the middle here, and I'm going to go back to my caps layers. Now, you might be wondering why don't you just create a new layer for this mushroom? Well, one of the limitations of drawing in Procreate is that you do not have unlimited layers. Depending on the version of the iPad that you have and the size of your canvas, there is a limit to the amount of layers that you get. Whenever you can, you want to conserve your layers. Now, there's a couple of places where you can check how many layers you have left in a particular canvas. Now, if you remember, when we are creating our custom canvas, there was a maximum layers displayed there. We can also check how many layers in your current canvas you have by going to the wrench icon, the Canvas tab, and choosing canvas information. Then if you go to the Layers tab, you can see, this is the amount of maximum layers that I have left. Now, I have one of the highest-end iPads available. I have a massive amount of layers for this size of canvas. But if you have an older iPad, you may have significantly less layers, but that does not mean that you cannot create amazing art. For years, I worked with canvases that had only 14 to even six layers, and I was able to make professional quality work for clients. As the years have gone on, Procreate has been able to get more and more layers, but you absolutely do not have to have the fanciest equipment to make really good art. After all, if you're working with real paint, you only get one layer. Back to our mushroom art. Here is a fun trick. If you tap and hold on the mushroom right here, it's going to grab a new color. In fact, if I drag anywhere on the canvas, you'll see that color on the top there is changing. This is called the Eyedropper tool and whatever color you are touching, Procreate is going to sample. Now, I've got that same blue color. I'm going to add a rough oval-ish shape up here for the top of my mushroom. I'm going to draw an underside of this mushroom. I'll go to the Underside layer and I'm going to make a slightly lighter color here. I will draw lines coming towards the center here. Now, I'm going to go to the stems. I will eyedrop the stem color here because I want my stems to be the same. I'll draw a wider spot on the top of this stem. Let's go to the details layer and I'm going to grab the underside of these mushrooms here. I'm going to grab my taper details line and I'll add just like a wiggly line to separate the two parts of the stem. I'm going to grab the white from the stars. I'm going to draw some little circles on the top of my mushroom. 8. The Quick Shape Tool | Mushrooms: Let's learn a new tool. I want to make some straight lines on the underside of this mushroom. But if you are not confident about your ability to draw straight lines, Procreate has an amazing feature called QuickShape. I'm going to undo these. Start drawing a straight line as you can from the base of this stem here, and do not lift up your pencil. Just hold it in the same spot without moving. After a moment, Procreate will snap that shape into a straight line and you'll see this little bar at the top that says line created. Now if you drag your pencil around the canvas, it's going to have created a perfectly straight line. For now, I'll just have you go ahead and draw straight lines using QuickShape on the underside of your mushroom. You can pause the video and draw your own lines. You can also use QuickShape to draw squares, rectangles, triangles, and polygonal shapes. You can also use them to draw circles. I want to draw a crescent moon up here, and we'll use QuickShape for this. I'm going to switch to my stars layer now. I'm going to draw the best circle that I can manage and just hold my shape until boom. Procreate engages in QuickShape, and it's smoothing out my circle. If I drag my pencil around without lifting up, it's rotating and scaling the ellipse that I've drawn. When I let go of my pencil, there is a button up here that says Edit Shape, and if I tap on that, I can choose between an ellipse and a circle. I can also grab these blue nodes and move my shape around to customize it exactly as I like. If I drag somewhere else on the canvas, it'll move my drawing around. If I tap on the canvas, it'll exit the tool. I'm going to undo that by tapping two fingers. I want to show you how to draw a perfect circle. I'll draw a QuickShape the best I can, wait for it to pop into QuickShape. Then I would take one finger and I'm going to tap and hold it on the screen. Now I'm in perfect shape mode. When I move my circle, it's just moving from the center. Now I want a crescent moon, not a full moon. Let's draw the arch where we want the outer edge of our moon to be. Draw until QuickShape pops in, and if I want to, I can edit the arch so that I can make my moon as full or as thin as I want. Then I'm just going to come in here, and erase the outer edge, and fill in the inside of my moon. At this point, I'm just going to let you go ahead and fill in whatever stars and leaves that you want. Don't forget to check the layer that you're drawing on so that you make sure that you're drawing your leaf shapes on your leaf layer and your star shapes on your star layers. Feel free to pause the video while you're drawing. 9. Layers Part 2 | Mushrooms: You can also duplicate your layers, which can save you a bunch of time. I'm going to create a new layers and I'm going to name it decorative lines. I'm going to grab the white, and I'm going to draw a decorative arch at the top of this arch. Use quick shape to get it exactly how I like it. Now instead of redrawing this arch three times for each of these layers, I'm going to open up the Layers panel, swipe to the left on this layer and tap "Duplicate". Now I've got two layers of this decorative lines. If I grab the arrow tool over here, I can move this over to my other arch. Cool. Let's do it again. I'll swipe to the right, duplicate this, and move it to my final arch. Cool. Remember how much I was talking about conserving our layers? If you ever run out of layers, you only have two options; you can delete a layer or you can merge some of your layers so that they're combined into one. In order to conserve layers on this canvas, what I'm going to do is I'm going to merge these decorative lines into a single layer by taking two fingers and pinching these together. Now, undo that real fast. In case you missed it, I use two fingers and pinch these together. But if you forget how to do that, you can tap on the layer and there's an option here that says Merge Down. Now, when you are using those two-finger gestures, you can't just grab any layer and pinch them together, like if I tried to do this, it merged all the layers in-between them. I'll undo that. The layers need to be stacked on top of each other. But sometimes, it's really hard to tell by the name or the thumbnail what you've actually drawn on which layer. Maybe you've accidentally drawn something on the wrong layer during this exercise. Welcome to the club. What a frustrating feeling. Well, there's a couple of useful tricks for double-checking what's on a layer. See this checkbox right here? That turns on and off the visibility of a layer. When I tap these details, it's hiding all of these details. Let's say maybe I want to try a different leaf shape. Well, I'll turn this layer off, I'll tap a new one and try drawing a couple of different leaf shapes, and then I can swap between the two of these and say, "Do I like this one or this one?" Definitely don't like this new one that I drew. To delete that, all I have to do is swipe to the right and delete it. Sometimes you don't want to hide one layer, but instead, you want to see what is on a single layer. If you tap and hold on a checkmark, on this caps, it's going to hide all the other layers. It's showing the caps and it's also showing the background color. If I tap and hold again, now it's going to bring back all of the other layers that I had visible. You might have noticed that when I had solo on, the very bottom layer, the background layer stayed on. That's because the background layer is a special layer. You can't draw on it, you can't rename it, you can't do anything. The only thing you could do is change its color. If I tap on here, brings up the color box and I can create a custom color for my background. You can think of that as the paper that you're drawing on top of, and while you can't draw on the paper itself, you can actually turn its visibility off. It does have a checkbox, and if you turn that off, now your background is going to be transparent. This is really useful for things like PNGs or if you're creating stickers, anything where you don't want a background. Another thing that can make organizing and finding your layers easier is creating groups of your layers. For example, I can create a group of all of the layers that make up my mushrooms. To do that, I'm going to tap on the details layer, and then if I want to grab a second layer, I need to use one finger and swipe to the right. Notice how both of these layers are blue now, I'm also going to swipe and select the stems and the undersides. I'm not going to grab the leaves. Now instead of a plus icon up here, it says Group. If I toggle the little arrow right here, it will collapse or open all of those layers. If I tap the checkbox, it'll turn all the layers off in that group on and off with just a single tap. Let's draw our final mushroom. I want to go back to my caps layer, and I'm going to draw some half-circles for this mushroom. Feel free to pause the video while you're drawing. I'll add stems on my stem layer. 10. The Color Drop Tool | Mushrooms: I'm going to add some circles onto my mushroom caps. I want to show you a really useful tool for filling in your color really quickly. To do that, I want you to go to a new brush, and I want you to choose the small smooth brush. We'll hop on over to our details layer. I'm going to make these circles white. I'm going to eyedrop some white. First, I want you to go ahead and draw in your circles, but do not fill them in. Once you have all your circles on the big mushroom drawn, we're going to use Procreate's color drop feature. I'm going to grab the color circle right here and I'm going to drag it and drop it in that circle and boom, it fills it in. I'm going to quickly go ahead and drag and drop these colors into my circles until I want you to notice what happens when I get to this circle right here. I just ruined my artwork. What happened? Well, first, I'm going to undo that. Then I want you to notice right here, this circle is not enclosed, this outline is not filled all the way in. Where there are gaps in your shape, the color drop is going to spill out everywhere until it finds a border. Now if I just draw a line right here to close the shape up, boom. Now it stays inside, filling in these circles. For the small mushroom, I want you to switch out your brush to something that has a little bit of texture. I'm going to use this tapered detail brush. I'm going to draw my outlines here for these circles. Watch what happens when I try and fill this circle in. [inaudible] I have my circle, and it's fully enclosed. Well, sometimes with highly textured brushes or brushes that have really low opacity, the color can leak through those shapes sometimes. That barrier, that outline to hold those colors in just isn't strong enough. There's a couple of things that you can do. First, you could draw a stronger line to make your outline more bold. Or second, you can adjust the color drop threshold. I'm going to drag and drop my color in here, but this time I'm not going to pick up my pencil, I'm going to hold it down. You'll notice that there's a blue bar up here that says color drop threshold and a percentage. If I slide my pencil to the right or left, it's going to adjust how much color is dropping onto the canvas. Now it's fitting inside of my circle. Now if I were to color drop and pull this all the way up to 100 percent, it's going to fill the whole canvas no matter how strong and solid my outline circle is. Another common problem that people will have with color drop is that they'll have this beautifully textured outline. They'll come and drop the color in. You'll notice that there's this weird ugly outline between the circle of the shape and the color filled drop. That also can be helped with the color threshold. If I just tap and hold this and fill it in more, it's going to create a more natural effect. Now, notice I'm running out of space on the canvas to adjust the percentage of my color drop. I can just let go off my pencil, undo this, and come back in. Color drop always remembers the last amount of threshold that you had. Now I can have more space to drag this up. If I still don't have enough room, undo, keep dragging and dropping until it's all the way up. You can go ahead and finish filling in your circles. I'll also let you go ahead and add any stars and leaves that you would like on these layers. If you want to add some lines to create some separation between the stem, now is the time to do that. We'll do a quick recap. 11. Recap: Layers, Quickshape, and ColorDrop: In this lesson, you learned a bunch about layers. You learned how to create a name, a layer. You learned about grouping and reordering your layers. You learned about hiding and soloing layers. You learned how to delete, duplicate, and merge your layers, and you also learned about background layers. Another fun thing, you learned about that Eyedropper where you can sample a color from your Canvas. You learned how to use Quickshape to create perfect lines, arcs, and shapes. You learned about Color Drop to quickly fill in the shapes with color and adjusting the color drop threshold. 12. Alpha Lock vs Clipping Masks vs Layer Masks: In this lesson, we're going to learn some advanced layer techniques that I use all the time when making digital art. We're going to learn about Alpha Lock, clipping masks, and layer masks. First, I want to add some shadows under these mushrooms stems, and I'm going to grab my big block texture brush for this and I'll go to my stems layer. Now it'd be really hard to stay drawing inside of the lines because these are really skinny mushroom stems. What we're going to do is we're going to use Alpha Lock. I'm going to go to that stem layer and I'm going to take two fingers and I'm going to swipe to the right, and you'll know that Alpha Lock is turned on because the thumbnail will have a checkerboard. Another option for turning on Alpha Lock is if you tap on the layer, you can look for the option that's labeled Alpha Lock and you can tap it on or off. Once Alpha Lock is turned on, whatever I try and draw inside of this layer is going to stay inside of the lines of what you've already drawn on that layer. Pretty cool. Now I don't want my shadows to be white, so I'm going to show you another cool trick for choosing a slightly darker color for the stems. I'm going to eyedrop the color and now I'm going to open up my color palette. This circle has the color of the stem selected, and if I tap and hold on that circle and drag it around, you're going to notice that there's actually two halves to this circle. The color on the left is the color that you most recently used and the color on the right is where you are about to select a new color. What I want to do is just create a color that is just noticeably darker than the stem color. Now I'm going to come in here and I'm going to draw some light shadows underneath of these mushroom caps, create the illusion that there is a shadow. Cool. Let's also try this with your arches. I'll come to the arches, use two fingers to swipe it on, make sure that I'm selected on the arches layer and I'm going to choose a really dark blue color, not black but a really dark blue and I'm going to switch my brush to this artist crayon brush. If I come in here, now I can create a really cool textured glow around my mushrooms. Alpha Lock is great, but it does have its downsides. For example, if I change my mind about the stems or if I change my mind about the texture in the background, the color of that, I would have to redraw them completely. Whereas if I wanted to change the stars or the textures in the mushroom or the mushroom caps itself, those are all on their own layers, so it's really easy to change my mind, change the shape, change the color, or whatever. Well, introducing clipping masks. They can help you keep inside of the lines just like Alpha Lock, but they're on their own layer so you can change them without affecting the other layers. Let's try it out on our caps. I'm going to go to my caps. I'm going to add a new layer above the caps and I'm going to rename it textures. Now I want to create a lighter shade. I'm going to create like a highlight on this mushroom. I'm going to create a lighter color, maybe I'll even pull it over into the purple zone a little bit. I'm going to come on here and you're going to say, wow Brooke, that just looks like a giant mess. Well, if I open up my layers panel, I'm going to tap on the textures layer and I'm going to choose clipping mask. Watch the magic baby. All of that is now contained to the caps. I'm going to solo the caps layer and we're going to turn on the texture so this is a little bit easier to see. Drawing on my textures layer, I can come in here and add these highlights to the mushrooms, and if I change my mind and I want to come in here and erase it, it's not going to affect the caps. It's just going to erase that texture. Super cool. I'm going to turn on the visibility of all the other layers again and let's create a second clipping mask, so I'll name it textures 2. I'm going to clip it on there, and this time I want to make like a shadow layer. I'm going to come in here and just create some darker shadows, some darker textures in here. You can even do this to your other caps if you like. I'll go back to my highlights layer and add a little bit of highlights on there. It's on the lighter texture. A couple more things about clipping masks. You can visually see that the clipping masks are attached to the caps. The cap is apparent layer and you can tell by this little downward arrow. You can have multiple clipping masks if you like and you can also rearrange them just like other layers, but clipping masks must be stacked directly above their parent layer. If I drag this clipping mask underneath of the caps, now it's been converted to a normal layer. It's no longer a clipping mask. If I tap it and drag it back up under the textures again, now it's converted it back into a clipping masks. You can also tap on a layer and choose clipping mask to convert it back to a regular layer. If you accidentally turned something on a clipping mask, you can always turn it off. Now that you understand clipping masks, you may be asking, well, why would I ever want to use Alpha Lock over clipping masks? Clipping masks just give you so much more freedom. Here's an example. Maybe you want to change the color of something really fast. I'm going to go to my stars layer and use two fingers to turn on Alpha Lock. I'm going to choose a yellow color, make sure that I'm on my stars. I'm going to choose my big smooth brush, and now I can come in here and just really quickly change the color of these stars. I could also do it to the moon, whatever I like on here. I'm going to undo that for now. That's one reason why you might want to use Alpha Lock. Another reason is, again, to conserve your layers. Remember, Procreate limits the amount of layers that you can have on your canvas. For me, how I decide between using a clipping mask versus using Alpha Lock is, is this something that I can really easily change? For example, honestly, drawing the shadows on these stems, it would be really easy for me to redraw those shadows. However, it'd be a lot more steps to try and redraw these colors and textures inside of this mushroom. We've learned about clipping masks and we've learned about Alpha Lock, but there's one more that we haven't learned about, and that's called mask. I'm going to call it a layer mask to help us distinguish between clipping mask and just the regular mask. Layer masks can be a little tricky to wrap your brain around. Essentially, layer masks are like windows and they use colors, which are like curtains to either let you look through the window or hide what's behind that window. Let's do this digitally. To avoid confusion, I first want you to turn off the decorative lines. We're just going to turn the checkmark off on that and then I also want you to choose a background color. Otherwise, this is going to get real confusing real fast. It can be any color, it just cannot be black or white. I'm just going to use the blue from my mushrooms. It really doesn't matter. Now I'm going to go to my arches layer. I'm going to tap it and I'm going to choose mask, and now you'll see nothing has happened on my canvas. But in the layers, there's a new tab that says layer mask and it's filled with white. This, if you remember my analogy about curtains, these are like white sheer curtains. We can see everything beneath this layer. But if I go and I choose a pure black color and I'm going to use my small black texture here, so I can actually come in here and redraw the shape of my arch. You might be thinking I'm erasing this, but I'm actually just drawing on my mask layer. If I go to the mask layer and I turn the visibility off, there's the rest of my arch. I haven't erased it. I've just used black like a blackout curtain. Now wherever I've drawn black on this layer, you can't see underneath of it. Now it's super important that you are drawing on your mask layer and not on the arches layer. I can see that both of these layers are selected, but the layer mask is dark blue and that's your primary layer. That's how I knew I was drawing on the layer mask. If I had tried to draw on the arches layer right here and I'd use some white paint in here, I'm just painting white on my arches and I'm not hiding or showing anything. But if I go on my layer mask and I choose a pure white, now when I come on here, I am revealing the arches again. Cool, so I'm going to turn that off. I'm going to turn my background layer back to white and I'm going to turn back on the visibility of those decorative lines. Now it's your turn. I want you to add some extra colors and textures and some details to your leaves and you can choose whether you're going to use Alpha Lock, clipping mask, or a layer mask. Remember, there's no right or wrong answer. It's what works best for you. Once you've finished your art, I want you to share it with us in the project gallery. 13. Recap: Masks: For a quick recap. In this lesson, we learned the difference between Alpha Lock, Clipping masks, and Masks. Alpha lock lets you draw inside the lines of that layer. It also makes a permanent change to your layer. It also conserves layers. Clipping masks let you draw inside the lines of a separate parent layer. You can move and edit the clipping mask without affecting the parent layer. Clipping mask count against your layer limit. A mask creates a window for your art. Black conceals, aka, they're like blackout curtains and white reveals, aka, it's like a white sheer curtain. Masks also count against your layer limit. You also learned with color picking how to measure subtle adjustments in color. 14. The Symmetry Tool | Strawberries: In the next lessons, we're going to learn how to use the selection and transform tools in Procreate plus another really fun drawing tool called symmetry. We're going to illustrate this cute little strawberry plant. If you want to use my color palette for this, you can find the instructions to download in the lesson on downloading the exercise materials for this class. But you're also welcome to pick and choose your own colors. First thing, we're going to create a new Custom Canvas, and it's going to be 10" by 10" at 300 DPI. I'm going to go to the Wrench Icon, the Canvas tab. I'm going to toggle on the Drawing Guide and then I'm going to hit "Edit Drawing Guide". Now, this is going to bring up four options. You can either use the 2D Grid, the isometric, perspective, or symmetry. We're going to use the symmetry. This is going to put a line down the center of your Canvas. If I crank up the opacity and the thickness, that makes the line itself more visible and if I drag along here, it's going to change the color of the line. But Options is where things get interesting. If I tap that, let's see what the Vertical setting does. I'm going to come out of here, I'm going to hit Done. When I come out here and start drawing, it's going to mimic, whatever I draw on one side of the Canvas, it's also going to draw on the other. This can save you so much time. I'm going to Undo that. Let's go back into Edit our Drawing Guide and if I tap Options, I've got a Horizontal Guide which will just flop it. When I draw on this side of the line, it'll replicate what I draw on the other side. Quadrant and Radial are going to add even more. This is a little bit easier to see than explain. Basically, it's drawing this in all directions. I'm going to use a three fingers scrub to erase that whole layer. Then I go back to my Wrench Icon and I'm going to turn this back to Vertical. The last thing that I want to point out, there's this green node here. This rotates your guide and the blue node moves it across the screen so you don't have to have it in this another screen, you can have it wherever you want. I'll tap two fingers to undo that because I want to have it perfectly straight up and down. The first thing I want to draw is a pot for my strawberries. I'm going to grab my blue color and I'm going to use my small block texture brush and I'm going to draw a line going out like this. Just going to draw a little rectangle for my pot and then I will draw a tapered line inwards and towards the center. Look at that. Look how fast it is for me to color both sides of the pot. I can also use color drop and fill it in really fast. But symmetry is great, saves so much time. I'm going to create a new layer for my strawberries and I'm going to choose a red color. I'm going to draw a rough triangular shape. But you might notice this only drew one strawberry, it didn't draw a strawberry on the other side. Why not? If I go to my Layers panel, I can see on Layer 1, it says assisted and that means that Drawing Assist is turned on there. If I tap on this layer and I tap Drawing Assist, this is what's going to turn the symmetry on for this layer. You can come in here and now when I draw this, now I can draw two strawberries. I'm going to clear the layer again with three fingers and I'll draw one nice big fat strawberry down here. It's a just rough, rounded triangular shape. It does not need to be perfect. I'm going to add a new layer, turn on Drawing Assist. I'll choose green and I'll add some stems for my strawberry. I'll add another new layer, tap Drawing Assist, choose yellow and I'll add some pits for my strawberry. 15. The Selection Tool | Strawberries: It's really convenient that I was able to draw both of these strawberries really fast, but I don't actually want my plant to be perfectly symmetrical. Now, if I go to my strawberry layer and I go to my transform tool, which is this arrow over here, I can move both my strawberries, but I don't want to move both of them. I just want to move this one. This is where our selection tool is going to come in really handy. You can imagine that this is an S for selection, and if I tap on this, it's going to bring up a toolbar down here. You've got automatic, freehand selection, rectangle selection, or ellipse. We're going to start with the freehand selection, and I want to make a selection of this strawberry. Now there are two ways that you can make a selection. You can just come in here and you can just draw your selection, and if I tap on that circle there, it's going to close the selection off and I'm going to undo that. Or you can tap on the canvas, tap to a new section, tap, tap, tap, tap. Everywhere you tap, it's going to create a straight line from wherever you tapped last, and sometimes this is a faster way to make your selections. Again, to close your selection, you tap on the circle where you started and boom, now you can see what is inside of your selection by these wavy lines. You can see that this strawberry is in the selection and everything that is in these wavy lines is not in the selection. Now if you want to add something to this selection, you can just create more selections, and that's because we are in the add mode. If you tap on remove, now if I make a selection, it's going to remove something from my current selection so I could come in here and boom, remove a little bit of that. This invert button is also very useful if I tap that, it's going to swap what's selected and what's not selected. Now, this strawberry is not selected. This can be really handy sometimes if you have a really complex layer and it's just easier to select one item and then swap on or off. Now I have a selection. Now what? Now I'm going to move to my transform tool and I can move my strawberry. But it only moved the base layer of my strawberry, it didn't move the stem and the seeds. Now what? Well, I'm going to undo that, and if I go to my Layers panel, I can see that I only have the base layer selected. If I swipe to the right and select both my strawberries, the stem, and the yellow pits, now I'm going to be able to move everything together. Of course, I've lost my selection because I exited the tool. Well, here's a really useful shortcut. If you tap and hold on the selection tool, it will automatically reload the last selection that you made. Now, I can move all of those layers at the same time. I'm just going to put this a little bit further up. I'm going to create one more layer, and I'm going to add some stems from these strawberries down to the pot because it's driving me nuts. These strawberries are just floating around. Another reason why selections can be useful is if you accidentally draw something on the wrong layer, selections can really help with that. Let's go to our blue pot here, and let's accidentally draw something on the wrong layer here. I'm going to come up here and I'm going to draw leaves for the strawberry here and I'm just going to create in three teardrop shapes, and then I'll just fill these in. I'm going to solo this layer so that we can see it a little bit more easily. I'd say, oh no, I didn't mean to draw my leaves on the pot layer, I want to draw them separately. Let's make a selection of these leaves, and I want to take three fingers and swipe down. This is going to open up this copy and paste menu. There's a lot of great options in here and I want to explain cut to you. If you cut something from a layer, it's going to remove it from the layer and it's going to copy it. If you hit paste, it's going to paste something onto its own new layer. If I hit cut and paste, now I have my leaves on their own layer separate from the pot. Super-useful. I'm going to turn all the layers back on. Now I can come in here and I can make a selection of this leaf right here, and I can move it down here so it's out of the way. I want to show you another useful feature of that menu. Let's say, I want you to create a selection of this strawberry right here. Swipe three fingers down and there is an option that's called copy all. If I tap Copy all, swipe three fingers down again, and then tap Paste, what I've just done is I've created a copy of that strawberry. It has copied all of the layers that were visible. It copied the strawberry base, the stems, and the pits, and it also copied the background. That's actually annoying I don't actually want the background on the strawberry. I'm going to delete that layer, I'm going to reload my selection by tapping and holding on the selection icon, and I'm going to turn off the visibility of the background layer. Now if I swipe three fingers, hit Copy all, swipe three fingers, tap Paste, now I have a strawberry that has all of the layers but no background, which can be super useful. I'm going to turn the background layer on and check that out, that strawberry is all on its own. This paste option also works in other canvases. If I take three fingers down in my mushroom canvas, boom, I can paste the strawberry in here as well. I'm going to delete that because I don't actually want the strawberry in here. Let's go back to our selection tool. We covered freehand. Rectangle, as you might be able to guess, we'll make rectangular selections, and the ellipse tool, we'll make ellipse selections. I'm going to exit my tool and enter it again so that I just get rid of that selection that I made. Automatic is a little bit different. Let's go over that really quick. I'm going to use this strawberry over here as an example. This strawberry that we pasted, this is all on one layer. The yellow dashes, the stem, and the base of the strawberry, they're all on one layer. It would be tricky for me to come in here and try and change the color of the dashes. But I can use the selection tool for this. In automatic, if I tap on the yellow, it turn it blue. That's actually the automatic selection way of telling you that something is selected instead of using those wavy lines, the way that you get in freehand, rectangle, and ellipse, it changes the color of what you're selecting in the automatic tool. If I tap on another section, boom, now I've selected another of the yellow dashes. Automatic selection works the way that color drop threshold does. If I tap on an area and don't lift my pen up, I can slide it to the left or the right and it's going to adjust the selection threshold. You might be able to see, let's zoom in here even closer, that with a low threshold, I'm only grabbing small amounts of the yellow, and the higher up I go, the more that I'm going to grab. If I keep going, the strawberry base itself is going to turn green. It's going to change color and then I'm going to know that part of that strawberry is selected. I'm going to undo that. I'm just going to grab the rest of my dashes. Now, when I exit the tool, let's say I go to the brush icon, now those wavy lines are going to appear and I can grab a dark blue color here and I can draw inside of that selection. Now I have redrawn those strawberry pits black, I'm going to undo that because well, I like the yellow dashes. 16. Recap: Selections: Let's do a quick recap of what we've just learned. You learned how to use the symmetry tool, how to turn different types of symmetry on, and you learned how to turn them on and off for each layer, how to turn the drawing assist on. You learned how to make selections, how to make hand-drawn selections versus automatic selections. You learned how to add, remove, and invert your selections. You learned how to create a selection across multiple layers. You learned how to reload a selection. You learned about the secret cut copy and paste menu and how you can remove a selection from one layer and paste it into a new layer or a different Canvas. You also learned how to copy a selection from multiple layers. You also learned copy all, which copies a selection from multiple layers. 17. The Transform Tool | Strawberries: Now that we've talked about what you can do with this selection tools, let's dive deeper into the transform tool. Let's go back to these leaves. With my leaves layer selected, I'm going to activate the transform tool. That's going to open up a menu bar down here and it's also going to create a bounding box around the leaves. The bounding box are these marching ants and they are going to create a box around everything that is on this layer. If you take a finger and you move it outside of the bounding box or inside of the bounding box, you can move your selection. If you tap a finger, it will move your selection in one pixel increments towards your finger, and that's really useful if you need to make really tiny, tiny adjustments. If you use two fingers inside of the bounding box, you can rotate and scale your selection. Whereas if you use two fingers outside the bounding box, well then you're just moving the canvas. Now I could use two fingers to tap to undo those moves, but I could also hit the reset button right here. The reset button will move everything back to exactly how you had it when you opened the transform tool. You might notice that there are several colorful nodes around the bounding box as well. The first one is this green node. If you grab and turn, this will rotate your selection. If you tap on the green node, it's going to bring up a dialog box where you can actually put an exact increments that you would like this to be rotated. If you tap the negative, it'll rotate it in the opposite direction. These blue nodes, if you grab them, will resize your selection. Whichever node you grab, the opposite node will be its anchor, so it's going to move from that side. If you grab this node, this one will be the anchor and it's going to scale from that side. If you tap on a blue node, it's going to bring a dialog box where you can resize it, and if I hit 200, boom, it's going to resize it to really, really tiny. I'll reset that. Now, you might have noticed there's a little link icon right here. That keeps your numbers in proportions. If the link is activated, whatever number I type in here, it's going to automatically change these numbers to make sure that it stays in proportion. But if I just unselect that and I put 200 in here, now it just squashed it on one side. We'll go over this yellow node a little bit later. But for now, I want you to make a selection of your leaf over here and then you can rotate and resize it to fit what you think looks best. Now I do want to say one big warning about moving your layers around. Do not take something off of the canvas and then exit the selection tool. If you try to bring this back, you won't be able to because that part that you take an off canvas has been erased. It's totally fine to move things on and off the canvas while you're still in the tool sit. That's fine. No problem. I can bring it back. It's when you exit the tool that it's going to erase anything that you've taken off the canvas, so always pay attention to that. It can be really useful sometimes when I have things that I want to delete, I make a selection and then I just drag them off the canvas, but I don't want you to accidentally destroy your artwork. Once you've placed your leaves, how you like them, then you can go back to that stem layer and connect them to the plants. It doesn't look like your stems are floating from nowhere. Let's switch things up. I don't want to go to my single strawberry layer right here. Let's learn a couple more of these transform settings. When you open up this toolbar, there are four options here. But these first two, freeform and uniform, are the most important to know. When you are in freeform, you can go crazy squishing and squashing your strawberry. But if you're in uniform, it's going to keep everything in proportion. You can also use some of these buttons down here to make really quick changes. You can use horizontal, you can flip vertical, and you can rotate. You can even fit to canvas, but I wouldn't recommend it. I'm going to reset that. Going back to the freeform mode, you might be wondering why would you want to use this. If you go to your pot layer, this is a great way to make your pot taller or shorter. If I was using uniform, it would scale the entire pot. But freeform allows me to make an adjustment where it's just taller. Let's go back to our strawberry. If I wanted to make this guy wider. When I make it wider, it looks bad. It really skews it. Well, this is where this yellow node is going to come in super handy. What I want to do is I'm going to make a duplicate of these two layers and I'm going to move one to the side because it's a lot easier for you to see the difference that this makes. For the first one, I'm just going to squash it to the side and just try and make it wider. Now I'll go back to the other strawberry, and this time I'm going to use this yellow node. This yellow node allows you to adjust your bounding box. If I make my bounding box so the sides are parallel to my strawberry and then I grab the blue node, well, look at that. That's a much more natural looking widening of the strawberry than this one. Cool. I'm going to delete that ugly skewed one and I am going to go ahead and move my strawberry around. I want you to move your strawberry wherever you like. If you want to add another one, you can move it and resize it and now you're on your own. You're welcome to customize your strawberry however you like. Perhaps you want to add some more stems. A nice detail to add is maybe some veins in the leaves. You can also add some details to your pot. If you want, you can even practice your quick shape by creating a base layer with the pink and then using quick shape to fill it in. Once you're finished with your customizations, export a JPEG and share your strawberry plant with us in the project gallery. 18. Recap: Transform: It's recap time. In this lesson, you learned all about the transform tool. You learned how to move, rotate, and resize. You learned the difference between uniform, and free form transformations. You learned how to get precise control for rotating, and resizing. You learned how to adjust your bounding box, and then you learned that artwork, that's moved off the Canvas will be erased. 19. Different Ways to Resize: What is important to know is that resizing your finished artwork can make it blurry, so if you can avoid making lots of really big resizing changes, do avoid it. Work out what size you want things to be in the sketch period when you're drawing. If you do need to do resizing work though, this section might be helpful for you. Procreate creates raster art which means that the art is made up of pixels, so the more I zoom in here you can see each of these is a little dark, it's a little pixel that this art is made of. When you decide that you need to make the art much bigger, Procreate has to make the decision for you. How many pixels, what kind of pixels am I going to add to this art to make it bigger? The same thing when it resizes it down small, so if you make it small, Procreate has to decide what pixels am I going to remove from this artwork. When you make really extreme resizing changes, you might not like how Procreate makes the art look, but luckily, Procreate actually gives us some options on how it's going to try to decide to resize your art and you can actually choose between them here in this little button right here, which is the interpolation button, and you've got three options in here, so let's go over some examples of what each of these do. I'm going to duplicate this banana, and I'm going to be in the nearest neighbor setting here, and I'm going to drag this banana so it is much larger and I'll drag it to the side here, and I'm just going to do the same thing only now I'm going to put it in bilinear, and this last one I will put in bicubic. Let's zoom in here and you can see that this option which was nearest neighbor is really crisp and this one is a little bit more soft and subtle and this one is even more subtle still. Nearest neighbor will make your art very crisp, but it also to me looks pixelated, I'm not wild about how this looks, it's not very smooth like it looks in my original banana. Really depending on the effect that you're going for, if you want it to be really crisp but potentially jaggard, you will want to choose nearest neighbor. Bilinear is going to give you a more smooth and bicubic is going to give you the smoothest transition yet. If I zoom in here, you can see it's really being delicate about the changes in color here, whereas this is also smooth but a little bit less so, and this one is very extreme in those traces. 20. Reference Images | Tiger: In this next series, we are going to draw a tiger. So I've provided a color palette and a reference sketch if you'd like to follow along with me. Again, the instructions to download those are in the lesson on downloading the materials for the class. So the first thing we're going to do is create a new canvas, again, we'll go with a 10-inch by 10-inch at 300 DPI. What I want to cover in this lesson is how to pull up reference images because when we're drawing, we often need to use reference images and there's lots of ways to do this. So the first way is to use Split Screen. If you pull up at the bottom of your iPad, it may take a couple of tries, you'll find that it'll pull up this doc. From this doc, you can grab an application like say Pinterest, and you can drag and drop it over to the side. And then you can use Google for reference images or Pinterest or whatever. There's a bar in the center and you can drag this to resize these two. If you want to close Pinterest, all you got to do is drag this bar all the way off of the screen. Now, this can be a little bit finicky, it can be kind of hard to get that in the exact right spot. So let's go over a second way to activate split screen mode. There are three dots at the top of your canvas, this is really hard to see in light mode, so I'm going to turn it onto dark mode. So there's three little dots right there, and if you tap on here, you tap that center icon, now I can come in here and I can grab an app that I'd like to activate. So I've got my photos up here and I'll tap that, and boom, it's going to open my photos app. In my photos app, I've got my reference image. So I'm going to close that for now. Let's swap back to light interface. Now if you have trouble finding those three dots, or activating split screen that way, a third way is you can scroll all the way up until all of your active apps appear on your screen. Then you can grab one of these apps and combine them together, and boom, now I've got my photos app and procreate open at the same time. Let's say you have a really small iPad screen and you don't want to reduce your procreate canvas by pulling up an extra window. Well, let's go ahead and close this by sliding it off screen, you can actually open a pop-up reference window inside of your canvas. So if you go to the wrench icon, you go to the Canvas tab and you toggle on reference right here, it's going to open up this reference window. If you tap image, you can go into import image. It'll open up your photos app and you can choose a reference image. Now I can resize this and I can move it around. If I tap on the screen, it'll hide all the menu items. Now I've got a little reference inside of my canvas. If I want to close that, just tap on the screen and tap on the x. Our final reference image option is to add an image to the Canvas. So if you go to the wrench icon and you go to the add tab, you'll see that you could insert a file, a photo, or you can even take a photo. Now that's super handy, but this is where it gets exciting. If you swipe to the left, you'll have the option to insert a private photo. I'm going to tap on here, I'm going to tap my tiger reference image, and if I open up my layers panel, I'll see that this image is private. What does that mean? It means that this image will not show up in your time lapses or your gallery view. If I go back out to the gallery, that image is invisible. So I want you to choose your preference for reference image. I like using split screen. So I'm going to delete this and I am going to pull up my image on the side and make it small. Next, I want to match the grid that I've got here. I'm going to go to my wrench icon, the canvas tab, and I'm going to toggle on the drawing guide. If you tap on Edit Drawing Guide, it's going to pull up all of your options. I'm going to crank up the opacity and the thickness just so that you can see my grid size better. You can leave these small if you prefer. I also want to adjust my grid size. While I can't use this slider right here, what's even more handy is if you tap on the pixels here, you can put in an exact number. So for this Canvas, I'll use inches. I'm going to put 1.67 and I'll hit "Done". Now I've got a grid that is going to match the reference image that I provided for this exercise. So I'll hit "Done". Now it's going to make it really easy for me to replicate what I've drawn here. 21. Recap: Reference Images: Quick recap. In this lesson, you learned three different ways to activate split screen mode. You learned how to pull up a reference image inside of Procreate, and you learned how to add a private photo. You also learned how to create and customize a grid. 22. Brush Customization Part 1 | Tiger: In this lesson, we're going to finish drawing our tiger and you are going to learn how to customize your own brush settings. I want you to come into your brush set and I want you to find the customizable liner. I'm going to use orange to draw my sketch line here because it's a little bit easier to see against this grid. What I want to do is plot out some points where the tiger's face is going to be. I can see that the top part of his head is two lines over. I'm going to put a dash right here. The top line of his head over here is two lines and so I'll go 1, 2. I can see that his chin is in the center and one line up and the widest part of his face is 1, 2 lines up and two lines over, so I'll go 1, 2, 1, 2. Now, I want you to try and connect these two lines here. If you're like me you might have a little bit of wobble in your hand here and it might not be as smooth of a line as you'd like. Well, we are going to play with some awesome settings in the brush studio. For now, I'm going to close this so it's a little bit easier for us to see. I'm going to tap on my brushes, I'm going to tap on my brush, and this is going to open up the brush studio. The brush studio is what has all of the settings for our brushes. You can come into each one of these and you can scroll in here to see all the settings for each one of these sets. Then you can practice drawing your lines in this little drawing pad right here, so you can just test out your moves. We're going to focus on a stabilization setting right here. The first group of options in here is streamline. If I crank this setting up, you'll notice that it's affecting the lines that I've drawn in here. Streamline is super cool. You really have to try this. I want you to come in here and I want you to try drawing. Streamline forces your curves to be smoother. I'm going to use three fingers and swipe this to erase it. Really fun. Whereas if I turn this all the way down, my lines are definitely not as smooth. I'm going to erase this. Stabilization is similar, but it's a little bit different. Stabilization helps you force your lines into curves, but it also helps you draw straight lines as well. Now if you crank this really high up, it's probably going to try and force your lines a little bit more than you want it to. Motion filtering is also very similar to stabilization. It's built to help with hand tremors. If you tend to have a shake in your hand, this motion filtering may really help a lot with that. The higher you crank it up, the more it's going to affect that. Expression right here, expression is just going to bring a little bit more personality back into your lines. Finding the perfect settings for you is going to be highly personal. For me, stabilization is my favorite. If you draw really slowly, cranking these settings up very high is probably going to have the best effect. But if you draw a little bit faster, that's not going to help. You can definitely have these a little bit lower. My sweet spot is in the 50s and the 60s with the stabilization brush. I want you to play around and find the setting that feels right to you. Then once you do, we're going to tap Done. I'll bring my tiger back up on the side. Now, I can work on connecting these lines a lot more smoothly and a lot more easily. Now I want to show you there's one more place that you can actually control these settings. If you go to the wrench icon and you go to the preference tab, and you go to the pressure and smoothing, you can actually create these stabilization settings across all of your brushes. Let's say that you wanted to use the small block texture brush. I could come in here and turn on the stabilization, really crank it up for that one. Then when I was done, I can come back in here and I can lower it back down. Now that we've created the outline of our tiger face, let's draw the mouth. Using quick shape, draw two overlapping circles. You can use the reference image grid to decide exactly where to place your circles and how big to make them. Mine are roughly one and a quarter squares large, but it's totally fine if yours don't match. This is just a guide, a starting point. Then I will erase where they crossover, and I'll create a chin. Then I'm going to create the nose. My nose can just be a little curve at the top between these two or I can make it dip down, and curve around like little heart shape. You can create whatever nose shape that you like. I'm just going to erase the inside of there. I'm also going to create an upside-down U-shape for the bridge of the nose. You notice that the eyes are right about here. I'll create some circles for the eyes and I'll create a perfect circle by putting one finger down while I'm drawing quick shape, and I want to give him some eyebrows. Here's a trick with the eyebrows. If you draw eyebrows that are curved into the outside, it'll look friendly. If you create eyebrows that are down like this, you can make an angry tiger. You decide however you'd like to draw your eyebrows. You can do the same thing with the ears. You can make them really pointy, you can make them round. But I'd recommend starting them where the side of this and the top of the head meet. Draw a little curve line to create the edges. Now what really makes the tiger a tiger is the stripes. We're going to draw a center jagged stripe down the middle, and then I'm going to draw two curved lines coming off of the center here. This does not need to be perfect. We're going to experiment with this a little bit later, so don't worry about making these shapes exactly perfect. The other thing that we really need on our tiger's face is this fringe on the sides. This is actually going to be where the white of the fringes, and we'll create two curved stripes on the side of his face as well. 23. Using Blend Modes | Tiger: Yeah. Look at our cute little tiger here. This is awesome. Well, I'm done with my reference layer, so I'm going to swipe this off-screen, and I'm also done with my grid. I'm going to go to the wrench icon, the canvas tab, and I'm going to toggle off the drawing guide. Now I'm going to switch to my small block texture brush and a good practice is to always choose your background color first. I'm going to come into the background here, and I'm going to choose this blue color. Now it is really hard to see my sketch. Well, let's go to our sketch layer. There are some things that we can do to help this. If you tap on the letter N, it's going to open up a whole bunch of new options for you. The first one is the opacity, and that's going to lower the opacity of the sketch layer. But if you twirl through these different options, this is also going to have a dramatic impact. If you scroll down to the top, the one that we're really going to focus on is multiply. All of these were blend modes and multiply essentially darkens it, it multiplies whatever you have drawn on that layer onto the layers underneath of it. Let's create a new layer and drag it underneath of our sketch layer here. I'm going to fill in the tiger's face here. I'm going to create an outline of where the orange part of his faces, which is the base, and then I'm going to use color drop to fill it in. If I come back to my sketch layer and I tap on the N and I go back to normal, I can't see anything from this sketch layer even though it's on top because it's the same color of orange. But with multiply turned on, it's multiplying both of those color orange and this makes it really easy to see. Now, I'm going to leave the opacity of my sketch layer at 100 percent so that you can see it really clearly on camera. But for you, I would suggest lowering your opacity so that your sketch layer is just comfortably visible, just so that you can just see it. It's a really thin pencil sketch. I'll leave mine all the way up. I'm going to create a new layer and I'll use the white brush this time. I'm going to fill in all of the areas that would be white on this tiger. So that'll be his ears, that'll be his mouth, and that's also going to be the fringe around the side of his face. I'm also going to create some eye shadow for him because tigers often have some white around their eyes as well. Now I'm going to create a new layer. I'm going to choose the darkest orange on here and I'm going to add the bridge of his nose. Now, I'm not worrying too much about like how close I'm getting to the nose because the nose is going to be a layer on top, so it's totally fine if you go around the nose. I'm going to add one more layer here and I'm going to choose the black color on my canvas and now I'm going to do all of the areas that are black except for the stripes. We're going to save those for last. Okay. I'm going to fill in his eyes, do his nose. As promised, that's covering up any mistakes I made on the bridge of the nose. I'm also going to do the corners of his ears here, and I'll also do his eyebrows. You can also follow the curve of his mouth to create a little smile for him. That's what it looks like without the sketch. 24. Brush Customization Part 2 | Tiger: All right, we're going to create a new customized brush and my goal is for these stripes. What I want to do is, I want to create a brush that when I push hard it's going to get bigger and when I push lightly it's going to get smaller and that's going to help us create some really nice effects with these stripes. I want you to open up your brush panel. I want you to go to your customizable liner. We're going to swipe to the left and we're going to tap Duplicate. I'm going to tap on the brush. That's going to open up the brush studio. The settings we're going to focus on are in the Apple pencil and property settings. In the Apple pencil, if I want my brush to get bigger, when I press harder, I'm going to focus on the pressure settings in here. I'm also going to focus on the size settings. Right now. If you try it out, there's a small effect that this has when you press harder versus press light more lightly. But I want this to be more intense. I'm going to crank this up to, I don't know, like 65-ish, something like that. You can see this is already having a much more dramatic impact. Again, if I push lightly and hard, you can practice this, that's getting bigger. But the overall size of my brush is really small. What can I do about that? Well, if I go to the Properties tab and I look at Brush behavior, you'll see that my maximum size is really small. This is making sure that my brush at the biggest size it can get, it's still pretty small. So I'm going to crank this up to oh, I don't know. You can say 80-something. Totally up to you and if you press lightly and hard on this, now I'm starting to see something that I'd like to see on my tiger. I'm going to tap on this little brush icon right here and I can clear the drawing pad and I can just practice this by drawing a center stripe, then two stripes on either side. You can go ahead and play with your maximum and minimum sizes and the amount of pressure that you think is good in your Apple pencil to create a nice brush for making your stripes and when you're happy with your settings, you can tap Done. Double-check that you're on the correct layer and draw your stripes. My brush is cranked to the max size on this slide, so I'm going to make it a little smaller. Don't forget, that's another place to adjust the size of your brush. As you're drawing your stripes, you might find it easier to turn off the visibility of your sketch layer so you can see the outlines of your shapes better. Now you can make your stripes thicker or thinner as you see fit. Once you're happy with the size of your stripes, you can add a new layer and I always like to add a little bit of white to my eyes. If you want, you can add some outlines to your face. Maybe some rougher texture. You can add some whisker dots, can even add some fur inside of the ears. 25. Brush Customization Part 3 | Tiger: Now we want to add some texture to our tiger so it doesn't look quite so flat, and of course, we're going to learn how to customize some more brushes. I want to go to my base orange layer. I'm going to tap to create a new layer and I'm going to add a clipping mask. Then I'm going to come in and I'm going to choose the dark orange that I have here. I'm going to go to my brushes and I'm going to come down to my customizable texture brush. Now I could come in here and I could add some texture in here, but it's really dark and I'd like to be a little bit more subtle here. I'm going to go into my brush settings and we are again going to focus on the Apple pencil and property settings. What I want from this brush is for it to draw really lightly when I press lightly and I want it to draw darker when I press darker. What I want to control is the opacity in this brush. With my pressure, I can pull the opacity setting further up. Let's try it ourselves. I'll draw lightly and I'll draw hard. There is some effect. I mean, this is lighter than this area, but it's still pretty dark. Well, if I go to my properties, I also have a maximum and minimum for opacity, and the minimum for opacity is cranked all the way up. If I come in here and I lower that, this is making a huge difference. Let's go back in here. Now if I push hard or push lightly, it's making a much more dramatic impact. I'll tap Done and I'm going to come in here, and I'm going to start drawing on here and this is a much more subtle effect. That can add some nice texture to my tiger without going crazy. I'm going to do the same thing on the bridge of the nose. I'll tap to add a new layer, tap and make it a clipping mask, and this time I will choose a slightly lighter color of orange, and add a little bit of texture to the nose so it's not totally flat. Then I can also go to my stripes up here, tap to create a new layer, make it a clipping mask, and I will choose a lighter blue color. I come in here and add a little bit of a glow into these stripes, and in the eyes, and the nose. Cool. Now one thing I want to show you is that I think that this is a little bit dramatic in the eyes, I'd like it to be a little bit darker. But if I come to my eraser tool and I just try to erase it, this sharp smooth line not too wild about it. It looks very noticeable. I'd like this to be a little bit more subtle. Here's a shortcut. I'm drawing with my customizable texture. If I tap and hold on the brush eraser, now when I come in, it's going to be using the same eraser as what I was just drawing with. If I come in here, that is a lot more subtle of an eraser mark. 26. Organizing Brushes | Tiger: The last thing I want to show you about customizing your brushes is how to create your own brush set. Because if you're anything like me, you're going to accumulate a whole bunch of brushes. I like to have a folder of my favorite brushes. What you're going to do is you're going to swipe down until this little plus icon appears and tap on that. Name your brush set. Now if you go into the brush set that we've been using, you can come in here and you can grab the liners that you've been creating. Hold on to them until they pop up. Take another finger, tap on your brush set, and drop your brushes in there. Then you can create a folder while you have all of your favorite brushes and they're really easy to reach. 27. Recap: Custom Brushes: To recap, in this lesson, you learned all about customizing your brushes. You learned settings for smoothing and stabilizing your brushstrokes. You learned how to control size with pressure settings, and you learned how to control opacity with pressure settings. You learned how to create your own brush set. You learned how to use layer opacity and blend modes. You also learned to gesture for your eraser, where you can quickly grab the same eraser that you've been drawing with. 28. Creating Custom Color Palettes: In the next lesson, we're going to recolor our mushroom arts. In this lesson, I want you to create your own custom palette so you can choose from colors that you like. Now there are several ways to create color palettes. Hey, those of you who are colorblind, Procreate has some tools that may be very helpful for you. If you go to the wrench icon, we'll go to the Help tab, and we'll choose the advanced settings right here. If you scroll down, there's an option here called color description notifications that I'm going to toggle on and then I'll head back to Procreate. Now, Procreate will display the name of the color that you have selected, and they'll do that with the eyedropper tool. If you come into here with the disk, it'll show you when you're going around here, and if it's dark or light, it'll show you there. If you just come and tap on the colors inside of a palette, it'll tell you what color it is. Also, it's worth noting. You can display your palettes in compact or in cards. In cards, Procreate is going to label all the colors all at once. This display is going to be on whether or not you have the color description notifications turned on or off. Let's make a color palette. For our first method, you need to have a photo of your color inspiration. You could maybe be grabbing color inspiration from something like Pinterest. I love looking at photography and home decor for color palette inspirations. Maybe you find inspiration in the fashion world or by taking your own photos in nature. Another great resource is Pantone. Pantone always has a color of the year, and they also create suggested color palettes to go with it. I'm just going to take a screenshot from this website. Once you have your photo of your color inspiration, let's go back to Procreate and we're going to go to the Palette tab. Up here is a plus icon. If you tap plus, Procreate will actually automatically create a palette for you. If I tap new from photos and I tap the screenshot that I just took here, if I scroll that at the top, here is the palette that Procreate just created from that image. Yes, you can create one automatically. I really prefer to use the eyedrop tool and manually create my color palettes because there was a lot of colors in that image and Procreate really didn't know which ones I wanted it to grab. There are two different ways that we can do this manually. I can go to the wrench icon and the Canvas tab and toggle to the reference window here. I can go to the image here and I can import my reference image from the photos app. Now, I can expand this reference window and I can eyedrop my colors here. I'm going to create a new palette by tapping on the plus icon and just tap to create a new pallet. Once I have eyedrop a color, I can just tap to add the swatch into my palette. We're going to close this reference window. Another way that you can do this is you can add a photo to your canvas itself. I'll go to the wrench icon, the add tab, and I can tap to insert a photo. Or if I swipe to the left, I can insert a private photo. Let me drag this to the top so it's not distracting. A private photo is one that's not going to show up in your time lapses. Again, from here, I can just eyedrop and add to my color palette. That's not the only way that you can create a color palette. The harmony tool is another great way to create your own custom palette. Let's add a new empty pallet here and I'll hop over to my harmony tool. The harmony tool uses color harmonies to suggest colors that might work well together. If you tap on the name underneath the color, you can choose from different color harmonies. By the way, if you want to dig deeper into color harmonies, color theory, or just how to choose better colors, I've got a whole class on color theory that you might want to check out. Once you've got a color harmony chosen, you can grab one of these circles and move it around. It'll move the other circles around, suggests colors that will work well together. All you have to do is you tap on one of these circles, add a swatch, tap on another one, add a swatch, tap on another one, add a swatch. If you want more saturated colors, you want to go out towards the edge of the circle. If you want more desaturated colors, go more towards the center. There's also this slider right here, which will adjust how bright or dark your colors are. If you accidentally add a swatch that you didn't mean to, all you have to do is do a long tap on it and it'll pop up an option that you can delete it. If you want to rearrange your swatches, tap and hold until it pops up, and then you can drag and drop it wherever you'd like it to go. Now, if you're anything like me, you're going to accumulate a ton of color palettes and you're probably need to organize them. First, you can tap on the name here and you can name your color palette. You can also rearrange your palettes by tapping until they pop upwards and then dragging them around. If you tap on these three dots right here, you can duplicate a palette or you can delete it. If you want your palette pulled up in one of these other tabs here, all you have to do is tap on a swatch in there and then it will become the active palette. Just a couple of final quick shortcuts. If you want to keep your palettes open while you're drawing in the canvas, all you have to do is drag this bar down and you can move it anywhere on the canvas and you can swap between these different modes. You can tap X to close that window. Also if you want to switch quickly between the colors that you're using, tap and hold on the colors icon and it'll switch between the colors that you've last used. Go forth and create a palette that you like or a couple of palettes. 29. Recap: Custom Palettes: Recap time. In the last lesson, you learned how to turn on color notifications. You learned how to create custom color palettes by automatically having Procreate create them, manually creating them with the eyedropper tool, or via color harmonies. You learned how to organize your palettes by rearranging and deleting swatches and rearranging and deleting pallets. You also learned how to swap between colors quickly with a quick tap. 30. The Color Fill Tool | Mushrooms: The reality is that I rarely get my colors right the first time I make a piece of art. I do a lot of color experimentation through the drawing process. In this lesson, I want to show you shortcuts for coloring your art quickly and tools for you to change your mind and re-color something. To make this easy, we're going to rework a piece of art that we've already created, our mushrooms. I want you to navigate to your mushroom Canvas. I want you to swipe to the left and I want you to choose this duplicate option. This can create a duplicate Canvas, and that way if you hate your new colors that you choose, you always have your original as a backup. Let's open this up. Let's say that I want to make these stars yellow instead of white. First, I'm going to choose a yellow color in here, and then I'm going to navigate to my stars layer. Tap on this and there's an option here called Fill layer. Now if I choose that right now it's going to fill the entire layer with yellow, which basically erases all of my stars. We don't want to do that. I'm going to tap to undo. Here's the magic. We're going to turn on alpha lock on this layer by swiping two fingers to the right. Now, when you fill your layer, because alpha lock is on, it only allows you to fill the areas of the layer that you've already drawn on. Great. That's awesome. I'm going to undo that really quick because what if I only want my moon to be yellow and I want the stars to stay white. If I come to my selection tool and I make a selection of my moon, then I come back to my layers, tap Fill Layer. Now it's only going to fill in the moon and the stars will stay white because whatever selection you have active, the fill tool will only fill in that area. But what if actually don't want the moon yellow, but all of the stars and not the moon? Well, let's undo that. I'll hop back into my selection tool. This is where this invert tool comes in really handy. Because if I tap Invert, now all of the stars are selected instead of the moon, and that's a great use of the invert tool because it's a lot easier to just grab that moon once, then try and grab all of those stars. I will undo that. Finally, let's say I only want to change the color of some of these stars. I'm going to come in and make a selection of every other star. 31. ColorDrop for Changing Colors | Mushrooms: While we were drawing our strawberries. We went over how to use Alpha Lock to quickly allow you to repaint over an area, so if I go to my leaves, I turn on Alpha Lock and I choose a new color for this, a different kind of green. I can come in here and I can repaint these really fast, super easy, super quick. But where these coloring techniques that we've gone over so far don't work so well, is where you have an area where there's multiple colors, like the stems of these mushrooms. I'm going to go ahead and solo this. The stems of our mushrooms, they've got a shadow in here and they've got the color of the stem. Trying to just recolor over this would end up in one color instead of a range of hues. Let's go over our next coloring tool, color drop. Let's bring the rest of the layers back on here. We learned about color drop in the first lesson, and if you had enclosed space, you can drop a color in and it'll fill it up. You can also use color drop to change colors. I'm going to choose a pink hue here. I'm going to zoom in. Now, if I take this pink color and I drop it onto the shading in the stem, it changes the shadow to the exact shade of pink that I selected, but it also affects the other side of the stem as well. It didn't change it to the exact same shade of pink, but it changed it to a more slightly pink hue than it was before. Let's undo this. This time I'll try dropping it onto the stem itself, and this time the stem is the exact same shade of pink that I chose, but the shadow is just slightly more on a pink hue than it was before. Now, all of this is affected because of the color drop threshold. If you remember, I can drag and drop a color and not pick up my pencil, and it's going to activate this color drop threshold here at the top. If I slide my pencil to the left or the right, it's going to change the amount of color released onto the layer. If I only want part of the stem to be affected, all I've got to do is make sure that the color threshold is really low, and if I want it to be really high, it's going to affect. I had to crank it all the way up, and it actually changed the color of all of the stems, everything on that layer. Before you move on to the next lesson, be sure to try out the color drop on your stems and change them to a color that you like. 32. The Recolor Tool | Mushrooms: Next let's go over tool that's really similar to color drop. And I want to color in the dots that are in the mushroom over here. So let's go to our layers and I want you to find the one that's labeled details. So in order to use the recolor tool, we need to do a little bit of fancy setup first. So what I want you to do is go to the wrench icon. And then we're gonna go to the Preference tab. From there, you're gonna go to gesture controls. Now, gesture controls, anytime that you want to change the settings like the shortcuts that you use with your fingers to do things in Procreate. You can customize those settings in here. We're not gonna go over all of those. Just so you know, I use the default settings and if you're ever tried to figure out what were the diesel default settings, you can go down to the tab that says general and reset to default. But we're not talking about the other settings right now. Right now, we're talking about the re-color tool. So in order to use the re-color tool, we need to go to the quick menu tab right here. And we need to set one of these options to activate the quick menu. I'm going to choose tap and square. And then I'm going to tap, Done. And you may be wondering, what was that? What is the square? So between the two sliders right here, there is a square button. If I tap on that with my finger, it's going to pull up the quick menu. Now the quick menu, if I tap and hold on one of these buttons around the edges, it'll open up a new dialogue box that is in alphabetical order. I can set all kinds of shortcuts in here. And so I'm looking for the letter R. So I'm going to scroll down to the one that says re-color. Now I've got the button that is assigned to the re-color tool. So if I tap on re-color the no, no, It's fill the entire layer with color. Why? Well, don't worry, I'm here for you. It's all okay. There is a cross hatch at the center of the canvas and all we need to do is move it around to the area that we want to re-color. Now it's affecting the circle rather than the entire layer. What's really neat about the re-color tool is that you can come into your color palette and you can change the color live. So you can experiment and say, is this light enough, is this dark enough? You can even zoom out and see how much of an effect the color is having on here. Once you're happy with your color, all you have to do is you can come in here and you can tap these other circles to add new color to them. Now if I come down to these circles down here, if I tap in here, it isn't doing a good job of grabbing the entire circle. So we need to adjust our color threshold, right? Well, in the re-color tool, we don't have color threshold. It's called flood, and the control is just sitting here open at the bottom the whole time. So all you have to do is come in here and adjust your flood as needed. Now that you've learned how to re-color using the fill tool, the color drop tool, and the re-color tool, I want you to re-color the caps of your mushrooms and any of the detail layers that you've added. You can make your mushrooms that rainbow color. You can make them rusty vintage '70s colors, or you can make them a neon psychedelic colors. 33. The Hue Saturation Brightness Tool | Tiger: There's one last coloring tool I want to go over with you and we are going to use our tiger painting that we made. Again, I want you to create a duplicated document so that you can compare your before and after. I want you to merge your clipping masks with their parent layers, so if I open up my layers here on my orange face base layer, I'm going to use two fingers and pinch those two together. I'm going to do the same thing with the bridge of the nose. I'm also going to do the same thing with the stripes and the eyes layer. I'm going to merge the clipping masks with them. Then I'm going to go back to my orange base face layer, and we are going to tap on the little Magic Wand icon right over here and these are our adjustment tools. There's a lot of fun tools to play with here and we're not going to go over all of them. But the most important one for you to know is this hue, saturation, and brightness tool. Once we open that, there's going to be a toolbar down here at the bottom where you can change the color of your tiger's face, so you can adjust the hue. You can also affect this saturation and the brightness. I want something that's a little bit more orangey red rather than yellowy for my tiger. Cool. Let's go to the layer where our eyes and our stripes are, and I will open up my hue saturation tool again, and there's a couple of hidden tools in here. If you tap on the arrow up here, you can be in layer mode or pencil mode. Layer mode is going to affect everything on that layer. I'm going to undo that with it two fingertip. But pencil mode, this will allow me to draw where I want to have the effects, so in this case, I'm only affecting my eyes, so I could turn these to a really neat green color. If you tap on the screen, it's going to pull up a secret menu. Now if you tap and hold on this Preview button, it's going to show you what your art looked like before you open the hue saturation tool and what it looks like with your current changes. If you don't like them, just tap Reset. Now is your chance to practice this tool. Maybe you want to come in here and you want to change the color of these stripes. You can paint a little bit, adjust your colors. Come in here, paint some more, play around with it. Don't forget, you can also change your background color in here. You can maybe make it purple. Once you've adjusted the colors on your tiger to your liking, share an image with us in your project. 34. Recap: Recoloring Techniques: It's recap time. In the last lessons, you learned how to duplicate a canvas and you learned a bunch of coloring methods. You learned how to use Fill Layer and Alpha Lock to quickly recolor a layer. You learned all about the selection tool, how to auto-fill selections with color. You learned how to create a feathered glow. You learned how to save complex selections, and you learned a gesture for selecting everything on a layer. You also learned about color drop. You can color in enclosed shapes and you can use the tool to re-color existing colors. You also learned how to use the color drop threshold to adjust how much color is released. You also learned how to use the recolor tool and to try out different colors on the fly. You learned about the hue saturation brightness sliders. You learned how they can adjust the brightness of an entire layer, or how to draw with just a pencil on parts of that layer. You also learned how to preview your changes without exiting the tool. 35. Organizing Your Canvases: Eventually, you're going to have a whole bunch of canvases in your gallery and you're probably going to want a way to keep things organized. If you tap and hold on a canvas, it'll pop up, and then you can rearrange it by dragging and dropping around. If you swipe to the left on a canvas, you can duplicate or delete it and you can also tap the share button. Share will give you a variety of formats for you to share your artwork without even opening the canvas. You can also group your campuses together in a stack. If you hit select up here, grab the canvases that you want to group and then tap stack, it'll pop them all into a single group. If you accidentally drop something in the stack that you didn't want to, tap and hold onto the canvas, tap the little backwards arrow, and then drop it out here. If you don't drag it all the way out, it will just snap back into the stack. You can also grab a single canvas and drop it on top of another one to automatically create a stack. You cannot, unfortunately, create stacks inside of stacks. If you use this select option up here, you can select a bunch of canvases. You can also share, duplicate, or delete multiple canvases at the same time. 36. Final Notes and Resources: I want to say a quick thank you for joining me in this class. If you enjoyed this class, please leave me a positive review, a comment, or a project. Your interaction with the class helps it rise in the skillshare rankings so that other people can find it. If I'm completely honest, it's your words of support and encouragement that make doing all of these classes and working on all of these classes worthwhile. Thank you so much for your support. If you want to be notified when I release a new class on Skillshare, you can follow me on Skillshare by going to my Profile page and then clicking the Follow button under my profile picture. I also often make a lot of free resources like Procreate gesture cheat sheets, guides for the best iPads, for art, Procreate coloring pages, stuff like that. I said that all out in my newsletter. If you'd like to get a copy of my Procreate gestures cheat sheet, you can sign up for my newsletter in the Projects and Resources tab below. If you're on social media, I would love to see what you're doing. You can tag me on Instagram. I'm @paperplaygrounds. I'm also on TikTok @paperplaygrounds, and on YouTube, I am Brooke Glaser. Thank you again for watching, I hope it's been fun and helpful. You are what makes doing all of this worthwhile. Thank you so much for your support. 37. Wanna Learn More?: By now we've gone over all of the essentials in Procreate, but there's actually a lot more that this powerful little app can do. In order to keep this class from being eight hours long, I've had to cut out a few things. But if you want to learn more about Procreate, I highly recommend checking out my Intro to Procreate class. That class is a deep dive into all of the features, and all of the things that you can do with Procreate. Whereas this class was a really hands-on project-based practice session, Intro to Procreate is a quick, thorough, and digestible walk-through of all of the tools in Procreate. It'll show you everything that the app can do with explanations and examples, but it's not practiced focused like this class. I've also got classes on how to animate in Procreate and a class on how to integrate your real watercolor paintings into the app. If you're looking to level up your drawing skills, I've got classes on how to draw, I've got color theory classes. You can check out all of my classes on my website or my Skillshare profile. Don't forget if you're interested in getting that Procreate gestures cheat sheet, you can snag that by signing up for my newsletter below. Happy creating art friend.