Mantaflow Fluid Simulation Guide in Blender 3. 1 | Stephen Pearson | Skillshare
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Mantaflow Fluid Simulation Guide in Blender 3. 1

teacher avatar Stephen Pearson

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      1:59

    • 2.

      Downloading Blender

      0:41

    • 3.

      Blender Basics Overview

      16:21

    • 4.

      Mantaflow Simulation Basics

      8:17

    • 5.

      Quick Liquid Effect v2

      1:19

    • 6.

      Domain Settings

      6:10

    • 7.

      Liquid Settings

      5:55

    • 8.

      Viscocity Slider

      5:37

    • 9.

      Diffusion

      2:56

    • 10.

      Guiding Domains

      5:59

    • 11.

      Guiding Effectors

      3:42

    • 12.

      Spray Foam & Bubble Particles

      6:25

    • 13.

      Mesh Domain

      3:58

    • 14.

      Using Vector Blur

      4:59

    • 15.

      Collections tab

      1:41

    • 16.

      Cache & Baking

      8:07

    • 17.

      Field Weights

      2:40

    • 18.

      Viewport Display

      3:07

    • 19.

      Flow Objects

      6:38

    • 20.

      Inflows and Outflows

      4:22

    • 21.

      Effectos & Collisions

      3:20

    • 22.

      Viewport Render Animation

      3:53

    • 23.

      Apply Collision to Multiple Objects

      2:21

    • 24.

      Water Materials in Eevee & Cycles

      4:38

    • 25.

      Ocean Modifier

      11:24

    • 26.

      Ocean Material

      10:03

    • 27.

      Fluid Particle Animation P1 Modeling

      6:51

    • 28.

      Fluid Particle Animation P2 Simulating

      3:51

    • 29.

      Fluid Particle Animation P3 Materials

      10:26

    • 30.

      Fluid Particle Animation P4 Seuqencing

      2:35

    • 31.

      Fluid Cube Simulation P1 Rigid Bodies

      4:21

    • 32.

      Fluid Cube Simulation P2 Simulating

      7:52

    • 33.

      Fluid Cube Simulation P3 Materials

      9:06

    • 34.

      Creating a Waterfall P1 Modeling

      6:25

    • 35.

      Creating a Waterfall P2 Simulating the Fluid

      7:22

    • 36.

      Creating a Waterfall P3 Materials

      6:17

    • 37.

      Creating a Waterfall P4 Rendering

      5:51

    • 38.

      Creating a Waterfall P5 Sequencing the Render

      1:59

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About This Class

Hello everyone and welcome to the Mantaflow Fluid Simulation Guide in Blender. In this course you will learn everything there is to know about the fluid simulation.   In first section I will be showing you the very basics of the fluid simulation and how it works. After that we will be going through the domain and how every single setting and value effects the simulation.  With the introduction of Mantaflow it completely changed how the fluid simulation operates.

That is why  In first section I will be showing you the basics and how it works.  After that we will be going through the domain and learning how every single setting and value effects the simulation.

Section 3 will be about all the different types of objects that can add to your simulation. Such as flow objects obstacles  guides and much more. We will also be covering realistic water material and how to create that in Blender.  The ocean modifier is also something that we will be taking a look at.

One of the best ways to learn something is to follow along and create something yourself. That is why there are 3 full tutorials in this course. The first one is an obstacle course for fluid particles to go through.  In this section we will learn about basic modeling, simulating particles with Mantaflow, creating a nice colorful material and rendering it out!

The 2nd tutorial we will learn about the rigid body simulation and how you can use it to interact with the fluid simulation.  The end result will be a cube falling with fluid inside it. 

And finally the last tutorial we will learn step by step on how to create a realistic waterfall using Mantaflow! In this section we will first model out the waterfall, create the simulation, add particles, create materials and render it out using Cycles!

If you are wanting to learn step by step on how the Mantaflow fluid simulation works and how to create realistic fluid this course is for you! 

So hit that enroll button and lets get started!

I look forward to seeing what you create!

Thanks

Stephen

Meet Your Teacher

Hello! My name is Stephen!  Thank you for stopping by and reviewing my Blender course.   My goal is to help you become the 3D artist you've always dreamed of becoming AND -  have a blast doing it.   Working with Blender and creating amazing 3D graphics is amazing and anyone can learn it.  

I really enjoy teaching others what I know.  I appreciate each and every one of my students.  Please let me know if I can help you perfect your Blender graphics!   

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Level: Intermediate

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello everyone and welcome to the man's flow fluid simulation guide in Blender three-point one. In this course, you will learn everything there is to know about the fluid simulation. It can be hard to figure out how this complex system works and what every setting does without spending hours of testing. That is why I have done it for you in this course. The first section, I'm gonna be showing you the very basics of the fluid simulation and how it works and the objects that you will need in order to create one. After that, we're going to be diving deep into all the settings and values and learning about what each one does. There'll be examples on screen, so it's easy to understand exactly how it affects the simulation. Section three will be about all the different types of objects that you can add to your stimulation, such as flow objects, obstacles, guides, and much more. We will also be covering realistic water material in both Aviana cycles. As a fun bonus project, we will also create an ocean using the ocean modifier and learning how to create this nice, satisfying animation in Blender. One of the best ways to learn is to follow along and create something cool yourself. That is why there are three full tutorials in this course. The first one is an obstacle course for fluid particles to go through. In this section, we will learn the basics of modeling simulating particles and creating a nice colorful material. The second tutorial, we will learn about the rigid body simulation and how to have fluid inside an object while it's moving around. The end result will look something like this. Finally, the last tutorial will be a step-by-step guide on how to create a realistic waterfall using mantle flow. We will first model the waterfall, create the simulation, add particles and materials, and then finally render it into an animation. If you are wanting to learn step-by-step on how mental it works in Blender and how to create realistic fluid. This course is for you. So go ahead, hit that Enrollment button and let's get started. 2. Downloading Blender: in this video, I'll be showing you how to download Blender 2.8. Now what you need to do is go over to blender dot org's and you should see a big down the button right in the middle of your page. Go ahead and click on that button, and it will take you to a download page. You can come over here and change which version that you need. If you need a Lennix Mac windows, all the different versions go ahead and do that. You can also link your steam account if you want it to go to your steam. Once you figure that out, go ahead and click. Download a blender 2.8 and then we'll take you to this page and there should be a download that happens right here, and we can see it download. Once that is done, just go ahead and install it and you'll be ready to go 3. Blender Basics Overview: Hello everyone. In this video we're gonna go over the basics of Blender. And so if you are completely new, this is the video for you. I'll be going through step-by-step on the different render engines, the shortcuts that we're gonna be using, all of that in this video, right? When you open up Blender, this is the default scene. You have a camera, you have a cube in the middle, and then you have a lamp on the right side. If you ever get stuck on what button I press throughout this course, just look on the bottom right corner and you will see what I press. For example, if I left-click, you can see here it says left mouse and it will also highlight the mouse button on this sign right here. Same for the right-click, same for the middle mouse button. All of that will be displayed at this point. If you ever get stuck, just look down on the bottom right. Let's first talk about the render engines that Blender has to offer. Over on the right side, there is a lot of different panels. And if we select this one right here, this is called the scene panel. We will see that our render engine is currently on EV. There are three different render engines that we can pick in Blender, EV, workbench, and cycles. Ev is a real-time render engine, and this allows you to actually view a scene in real-time. It will calculate the lighting almost instantly and display it for you in your rendered view. Workbench, on the other hand, is basically just for modelling and sculpting your object. You don't really use this render engine for rendering because it doesn't really display materials that well. The last one is Cycles. Cycles is blenders, physically-based rendering engine. And this will provide very realistic results. It will calculate the lighting all that pretty accurately. Before we get into anything else in Blender, Let's go up to our user preferences and change a couple of settings there. To do this, we can go over to the Edit menu. Down at the bottom, we can go into our preferences. Underneath the K-map tab right here. Here is a couple of things that we're going to want to check. First off, we have the selective mouse button right here. You can either select with your left-click or your right-click. In Blender version 2.79 and below, the default was set to right-click. Now at 2.8 and above it is set to left-click as the default. I recommend staying with left-click because that will help you with a lot of other applications outside of Blender. These Spacebar button down here allows you to pick what the spacebar will do. Currently it is on play and that is what I'm going to leave it on. So what happens is if I hit the space bar over here, it's going to play the timeline down at the bottom. Underneath that we have a couple of view options which I'm just gonna leave at the default. The other thing we're going to want to change is extra shading pine menu items. Make sure that is enabled. This will allow you to actually see the different views. So if I exit out of this window and press Z, we can see here we have a couple of different views. Material view is one of the ones that's added when you select the extra shading pie menu items. This will allow you to see what the material looks like without having to render it. We'll go over that in just a little bit. Next up on our list is selecting objects. To select an object you can left-click on the object that you want to select. In this case, I selected the camera and you can see it's highlighted in that yellow outline. If I select the cube, It's the same thing. And then the lamp up top, it also highlights it. You can select multiple objects by holding the Shift key on your keyboard and selecting it. You'll notice that once we do this, the other selections have an orange outline and not a yellow one. This means that it's not the active object. The active object will be highlighted in the yellow outline, as you can see here with the camera. If you want to deselect everything, you can hold Alt and then press a to deselect everything. You can also select everything back by hitting a and double tapping a will do the exact same thing. So a to select Alt a to deselect or you can press a and then double-tap a to deselect. Now let's learn about moving around the 3D view. If I hit the middle mouse button on my mouse, I can move around and rotate the view around the object that I have selected. As you can see here, our view is orientated around this cube. But let's say for example, I wanted to orientate my view to the camera. I can select it and hit the period key on my numpad, not the period key on the keyboard, the period key on the numpad. And it will zoom in on the object that we have selected. And now we are rotating our view around the camera instead of the cube. If we select the cube, hit the period key on my number pad, I can zoom in on the cube, and now our view is back to the original. You can also zoom in by using the scroll wheel. Zoom in and zoom out with the scroll wheel. You can also do like a pan or zoom. So if you hold Control and middle mouse button to pen backwards, as you can see here, holding the Shift key and middle mouse button will pay in the view to the side. If you don't have a middle mouse button, what you can do is go over to the preferences and emulate it by going over to the preferences. Underneath the input tab, you can turn on emulate three button mouse. What this will allow you to do is hold the Alt key and then left-click to pan the view. You can see here it's displaying I'm using my middle mouse, but I'm not. I'm using the Alt key and the left mouse button to actually rotate the view around. Just in case you don't have a middle mouse button, you can turn that on. Since I do have one though, I'm going to leave that off because I find it's much easier with the middle mouse button. Now let's learn about scaling, rotating and moving objects around. To scale an object up, you can press the Esc key on your keyboard to scale it up. As you can see here, it's scaling up my cube. And if you want to see how much you've scaled it up, look on the top-left over here on the top left corner, you can see I've scaled it up five times. You can also set a manual number n. So let's say I wanted to scale the cube up three times. I can hit three on my keyboard and that will scale it up by three times. And now I can't scale it up anymore even though I'm moving my mouse because we set in a manual number, it's locked to that scale. I can hit the Backspace twice and that will get rid of that selection. And now I can scale it up or down, as you can see here, to rotate an object, you can hit the R key on your keyboard and that will rotate it around as you can see here. And it's going to rotate it depending on the view that you are looking at it. So let's say I move my view over to this angle and I hit R and rotate. You can see it's rotating at that angle. If we go into the front view by pressing one on my number pad, it will put us into this view. And now if we rotate, it's gonna be rotating it along this view. If we rotate it like this, I can go look at the side. You can see it's perfectly rotated along the y-axis. I'm going to press Control Z to undo that. And now let's learn about moving an object. If I press it G, you can move your object around and you can place it anywhere that you want. You can also lock the movement to a certain axis. So let's say I hit G and then y. And you can see here it's locked to the y-axis and I can't move it outside of that if I wanted to move it up and down along the x, which is the red line. I can't do that because it's locked to the y-axis. I can also backspace that and then hit the X key and you can see it's going to move it along the x now instead of the y. Just like that. And I can also right-click to cancel the movement. What I just did there is I canceled the movement. So if I press R to rotate, I can right-click to cancel that action and it will snap back to its original position. This works with everything. So if I press S to scale, I can right-click and it will snap it back to that original position. This is very useful in case you want to look at a certain part of your scene. I can just move my object out of the way, view what I want to see, and then right-click and it will snap it back to its original position. Now let's learn about the different views we already discussed front view by pressing one on the number pad, it will bring us into the front view. And if we wanted to view the R object on the right side, which is this side over here, I can press a three on my number pad and it will move me into the side view. Now we're looking at our cube, but from the side, let's say I wanted to look at the top view. I can press seven on my number pad and it will view from the top. And we can see our camera is right there. And now we're looking at our object from the top of it. Control one on the number pad will bring us to the back view. Now we're looking at the back. Control. Three will look on the left side. You can see here, this is the right side. Now this is the left side and we were looking at it from this angle. If you don't have a number pad, what you can do is also emulate it by going over to your user preferences. Underneath the input tab, you can enable, emulate a numpad. And this will allow you to use the top row of numbers on your keyboard. Let's say I press one on the top of my keyboard. I'm now looking in the front view. Same thing for the side view, the top view and all of that. Since I have a number pad though, I'm going to disable this just like that and then exit out to save it. Now let's talk about edit mode. Edit mode is the mode that you're gonna be using to model anything in Blender. To access edit mode. You can press Tab on your keyboard or you can come up to this menu and select Edit Mode. Once we do this, you can see our object has turned into a orange color. Now we can select the different points on our cube. This point that I have selected right here is called a vertex. Every single mesh is consisted of many vertices. As you can see here. With our cube, we have eight different points, four on top and four on the bottom. You can select multiple vertices by holding the Shift key and then selecting them as you can see here. Once I've selected four of them, you can see the inside of that has turned into an orange color. And this means we have a face selected. Let's talk about the different selection types. Over in the top left corner you can see where we are on vertex select mode, which means that I can select the different points. If I switch it over to the edge select mode, I can select the edges instead of the vertices. Then finally, the face select mode will allow you to select an entire face, as you can see here. You can also extrude faces outward. If I select this top face and price e to extrude, I can extrude it upwards. Now we have basically two cubes on top of each other. Down on the bottom, you will see all of your scene details. And if you don't see this, you can right-click and then enable the scene statistics right there. We can see here we have four vertices out of 12 selected. And then if I press a to select everything, we can see here we have 12 out of 12 selected. You can also see the edges, the faces, and the objects in your scene. This is a pretty useful setting in case you want to check how many objects that you have in your scene. There are many different ways to add objects or delete objects in Blender. To add an object, you can press the shortcut Shift and a, and you can add an a mesh and you can see all of the default meshes right here. Or you can come over to the Add menu, then click on Mesh, and then add in a mesh over here. Let's say I press Shift a and I add in an icon sphere. From here I can move it over to the left side by pressing G and X and dragging it over. If I want to delete this object, I can press the X key and select Delete. Or you can hit the Delete key on your keyboard or go up to object and then down to delete right here. If I want to undo that and bring that object back, I can press Control Z to bring it back. This will undo the last action. If I want to redo the action, I can press Control Shift and z and that will redo the action. You can also do this by coming over to the Edit menu and selecting undo or redo right here. Once again, to add an object, you can press Shift a and to delete an object makes sure you have it selected the X key or the delete key or any of the other ways to delete objects. And then you can select it and there it's gone. Now let's talk about the different views. If we come up to the top right, you will see there is four different views, solid view, and that's the one that we have selected wireframe. And this will allow you to see inside of your mesh, as you can see here, it's a now a wireframe. Next to that we have in the material view. So let's say we've added in a new material, it will display exactly what it looks like. And then we also have rendered view. This will be what it looks like in the final render. When we render out an animation or an image, it calculates the lighting and does everything else. As you can see. You can also press the Z key on your keyboard and switch to the different views. Most of the time, this is how I use it because it's very fast. I can just press Z, go into wire-frame, z go into rendered view, and then material view like that. There's also toggle overlays and toggle x-ray. Toggle overlays will get rid of the grid and the outline around the object. So if I select Toggle overlays, it will just display what the model looks like without any of the extra details. If we go back into solid view, we can press Z and then toggle x-ray. And this will allow us to see inside of our mesh. You can see by looking at this view, we can see the ear right there. And then on the other side we can see the eyes. And you can also select the of vertices on the opposite side. If, if toggle overlays is turned off, we can't do that. We can only select the faces that are visible. Finally, let's press the Enter key on our keyboard and look at the properties. Here we can see a couple of other details, the location of our object. And you can also change this and you will move the object as you can see, the rotation value, the scale value, and the dimensions. The dimensions currently say two-by-two, two-by-two. And we can change it depending on what we type here. We can make it completely flat, stretch it out a little bit, and you can do all of that. Finally, the last thing that we will talk about in this video is the timeline. Down here we have a timeline and this is the amount of frames in our animation. Currently we have 250 frames. Now the default frame rate in Blender is 24. So that means if we play, our animation is going to travel 24 frames every single seconds. On the bottom right here we have a skip, a forward, and a play option. If we click this button to play it, you can see our timeline is now moving. So if we had any animation data, it would play once we play the timeline. You can also press the spacebar to play it automatically as you can see there. And that is very useful. You can also press Shift and then left arrow or right arrow to skip to the end or the beginning of the timeline. And you can see on the bottom. And then the spacebar to play it once again. You can also add in keyframes. So let's say I added in a keyframe by hitting the I key on my keyboard. And we can add in a keyframe to any of these different properties. Let's say I added it to the location value. What we can do then is drive this upward and then skip to a different part of the animation and move the cute. If I skip to frame AT, then I can press G and then X to move it along. I can move it to this location. Then I can hit the I key one more time and add an another location keyframe. Over 80 frames. It's going to travel from this position over to this position that we just added. What we have to do now is hold Shift Left Arrow to skip to the beginning. Or you can click the backspace button. And then we can hit the space bar to play. And you can see it moves over to that location over 80 frames. That is basically how animation works. You can also add keyframes, do almost anything in Blender. If you hover over a certain value and hit the I key, it will add in a keyframe to that value. There you go. That is a full basic overview of Blender. I hope this is useful if you're completely new and now that you have a basic understanding of how blender works, let's jump straight into the course. 4. Mantaflow Simulation Basics: Hello everyone and welcome to the first video. We're actually going to jump into Blender and learn about the fluid simulation. This video is meant to be a basic overview of the stimulation and the objects that you need in order to create one. To get started, there's always two objects that you need for a fluid simulation. That is a domain object and a flow object. A domain object is the bounding box of the simulation. No fluid will be able to exit outside of the domain. The domain is always going to be in the shape of a cube. Even if you set a UV sphere to be the domain, it's not going to work. The fluid will always exit outside of the mesh and act like a cube. So it's recommended to always use a cube for the domain object. The flow object will either add fluid to the simulation or it will delete fluid. And we'll talk about those in just a second. The other objects that aren't necessary for a simulation, but it can be useful are effector objects. These objects are collisions. They can also be guides, which we will talk about later in this class, but those are the three main objects for a simulation. You can also add force fields if you want to. This can also be useful in certain simulations. Let's go ahead and get started and we're going to create a simulation together. So go ahead and open up a new blender file and follow along with this tutorial. The first thing that we'll do is we'll scale up this cube. This is gonna be the domain object that we use. Another thing to note about fluid simulations is that it's important to make sure everything is pretty large. If you try to add in a domain about this size, it's not going to really work that great because the blender has a hard time simulating at a small-scale. Make sure that you always have your objects pretty large in your simulation. Next, we need a flow object. The flow object that I will add is a UV sphere. You can press Shift a, go over to mesh and then select that UV sphere. To see what we're doing. We can switch over to the wireframe mode by clicking right here. Or you can press Z and go into wire-frame. Let's drag this UV sphere up so it's above just like that. Then another thing that you should get in the habit of naming your objects. With this UV sphere selected, we can go over to the outliner, double-click on the name, and we can call this object the flow object. Then we can click on our cube, double-tap it, and then we can call this one at the domain object. Just like that. Now with the domain selected, we're going to jump over to the Physics panel which is located here. It has a circle with a dot in the middle. And then we can click on the fluid icon for the type. Since this is going to be the domain, we need to set the type over to the domain mode. Right now the domain type is set to gas, meaning this is gonna be a smoke or fire simulation. Since we are working with fluid, we need to switch the type over to the liquid mode. You can see nothing's really happened and that's because we need to add in our flow object. Next, let's select the flow object. Click on fluid. And then for this time, we're gonna choose the flow type. The flow type is currently set to smoke and we need to switch it over to the liquid mode since we're dealing with fluid. So switch it over to liquid. And then currently there are three types of flow behaviors. Inflow will constantly add fluid at to the simulation. Outflow will delete fluid. So any fluid that actually touches this object will get deleted. And a geometry, which is the default one, means that the amount of fluid that's added is just gonna be the geometry of the mesh. Let's go ahead and select the domain and we're gonna change a setting to refresh the simulation. If we change the resolution up here, you can see it refreshed and now we have fluid in our scene. What we can do now is come down to the timeline and hit play and we can see what this looks like. That looks pretty cool. You can see all of the particles are right there. The resolution controls how good the simulation we'll look and we'll talk about that in more detail in a later video. But what I want to do is I want to scroll down over to the cache, and I wanted to talk about the cash for just a second. You can see here there is this folder. This is the this is the default folder that Blender creates when you start working with the fluid simulation. If you haven't saved your blend fall yet, this is gonna be put in a temporary folder, as you can see here, it's AppData local 10th, meaning that if you close this project and open it back up later, that cash, that fluid simulation data will get deleted and you will have to rebate the simulation if you want to save your data. And so when you open the project backup, you still have the fluid simulation. You need to send a custom folder right here. You can do that by clicking on the button right there and navigating to a different folder. So what I can do is I can select this folder and then click Accept. And now it's going to place all of the information in this folder. Down here we have a couple of different types of caches. The current one is set to replay, which allows us to view the simulation in real-time. If I play my simulation, we can see it playing just like that. I can scroll up here, I can change the resolution. I'll restart the animation and then play it. And you can see we can test out the settings very quickly in real-time. The other option if we want to bake in the simulation, is that the modular or the all modular allows you to bake an individual parts of the simulation. You can see here we can bake in the initial data and we can also bacon the mesh down here. But first we have to bake in the fluid and then we can make in the mesh. But you can also notice this warning right here. Non resumable cash and bacon mesh or particles will not be possible. This means that if we don't scroll back down and enable is resumable, we won't be able to bake into the mesh or the particles. So whenever you have the modular mode active, it's always a good option to turn on is resumable. Is resumable also allows you to stop the bake and then resume it at another point. For example, if I click on bake, you can press the Escape key to stop it. And you can see you can either resume the bake or you can free the bake. I use this option a lot because it allows me to stop the bacon then see what it looks like. If I like what it looks like, I can resume it later. One thing to note though, is that if it's resumable is turned on, it's gonna take a lot longer to bake because it has to write more data in order to stop the bake and resume it. It's recommended if you have a very high resolution simulation to make sure is resumable is turned off and you use the all option. The all option allows you to bake in everything all at once. You can see the bake button has disappeared. But now if we enable mesh, we can bake in everything all at once with only one click. What I'll do is I'll scroll up to the top. I'll set the resolution to 64. And then I'll scroll down here and underneath the mesh settings, I'm going to set the uprise factor, which is basically the resolution of the mesh. I'm going to set that down to one just so it makes it a little bit faster than we can click on bake. All we can see here it's starting to bake and what it's gonna do is it's gonna bake all the way to the end frame, which is 250 frames. You can see the progress of the bake by looking at the progress bar down here. Currently it's at 22%. I'm gonna go ahead and stop the bank right there. And then we can restart. And now the domain has disappeared and now we can see the mess. So let's go into solid view. And then I'll hit the spacebar to play it. And we can see we now have a fluid simulation. There you go. That is the very basics of a fluid simulation. And in the next coming videos, we're gonna go into more depth. Learn about this settings and how to create realistic looking fluid. 5. Quick Liquid Effect v2: Hello everyone. In this video I'm gonna show you a very quick and easy way to automatically add a domain and a basic material with one-click. You can do this by having the object that you want to become the inflow object selected, then you can go over to the Object menu down to quick effects and then click on Quick liquid. As you can see here, it automatically added a domain for us. It named it over in the top right, and it went ahead and created a basic water material. This material works great in at the Cycles render engine, but with EB, there is a little bit more that you need to do in order to get the liquid to look good, which we will talk about in a later video. I just wanted to demonstrate how you can automatically add a domain. You can see here if we go over to the Physics tab, all the settings are right there. They're just the basic settings. If we select the inflow object, it has all the basic settings as well. And we can play your animation. From here. What you can do is you can select your domain, scale it up however you want. You can scale it up this way, drag the objects up. And this will save you some time from having to actually add in the domain and adding in the domain settings over here. The setting is pretty useful because it automatically does all the work for you. Then you can get into the settings and figure out exactly the simulation that you want to create. 6. Domain Settings: Now that we have a basic understanding of how the mantle flow of fluid simulation works. Let's actually jump into the settings and get a little bit technical and figure out exactly how it works. In order to do this, we're going to have our cube selected. We're gonna go over to object down to quick effects and then quick liquid. If you watched the previous video, you'll know that this automatically adds a domain for us. Let's drag everything up so it's sitting on top of the grid floor. Let's go ahead and select the domain. I'm going to jump over to the Physics panel, which is this icon right here. It has a dot in the middle and we can see all of the domain settings. What we're gonna do in this video is we're going to discuss all of these settings, the border collisions and everything above it. The first option that we have is the liquid type, which we discussed in the basics video. There is gas and liquid. The gas domain is for fire and smoke, and of course, liquid is for a fluid simulation. The resolution divisions controls how good the simulation will look. Higher resolutions will make the simulation better, but it'll take a lot longer to bake. You can play around with the resolution and test it out for yourself. And it also depends on the scene and what you're trying to achieve, how the resolution divisions works is it breaks your simulation into different cells. The size of these cells controls how good the simulation will look. You can see the size by looking in the bottom corner of your domain, you can see a small cube. This is the size of yourself. If you increase the resolution divisions, let's go up to a value of 64. You will see that the cell has become smaller. Now we have a higher resolution simulation and it will look better if you decrease this, the cell will become a lot bigger. For example, if I set this down to a value of six, this is the lowest cell that you can do. You will see that the simulation has way less particles because the simulation resolution is so low. If we then restart and try to play it, you'll notice that it's actually not really working because the simulation resolution is so low, it's not going to really simulate properly. Let's try a value of 16. If we restart the simulation and we play it, you can see it's now simulating, but there are very little particles and it's not going to really look that great. Let's try a value of 256 and enter. And you will notice the simulation cell has become a lot smaller. Now we should get a very high resolution and it'll look pretty good. The timescale controls the speed of the simulation. Higher values, of course, will speed up the simulation and lower values will make the simulation look slower and create more of a slow motion look depending on the size and what you're trying to achieve. You may want to play around with the timescale in order to achieve a realistic results. The CFL number, which is a little bit more technical, it deals with timesteps. Timesteps is the amount of times the solver will calculate per frame. This also depends on the velocity of the object. If you have a very fast-moving collision, you're going to need more time-steps in order to be accurate. The CFL number controls how many timesteps is going to be per frame. Higher values will result in less timesteps, which means it'll be a faster bake and a lower values will mean more timesteps, which will create a more accurate simulation. But it's gonna take a little bit longer to bake. Normally, a value of four works for most simulations and I haven't really ever messed around with this number. Use adapted timesteps will tell blender to automatically calculate how many timesteps it will need. And you can see the number is right here. The minimum is set to one and the maximum is set to four. Meaning if you have a very fast-moving object, it'll automatically calculate that and probably use a maximum of four timesteps. This number is useful if you have very fast moving fluid or if your fluid is kind of jittery, you can turn both the time-steps, maximum and minimum values up, and that will help smooth it out and also create more accurate simulations. You'll notice that the gravity option is currently grayed out and we can't change the settings. This is because it's using this scene gravity. You can disable this by going over to the scene panel right here and opening up the gravity option, you can see the number is right there. You can turn this off and then we'll be able to change how the gravity affects the simulation. You can see here it's no longer grayed out and we can change the settings. What we can do here is we can set the z-direction to, let's say, a value of five. And instead of falling down, it'll actually go in the positive z direction. So it's gonna hit the ceiling. We can test this out by resetting the simulation will change the resolution to refresh it. Then if we hit the spacebar to play the simulation, you can see the fluid is now floating. You can also set it in the other axes. So for example, if I wanted to float on this side of the domain, I can set the x direction to a positive value like ten. We'll restart and play. And you can see it's now on that side. Delete an obstacle, will delete the fluid that is stuck inside an obstacle. For example, if I add in a cube, I'll drag this up. We'll place it right there and we'll click on fluid, set the type or Vo2 effector, and the current type of a factor is set to collision, which is what we want. We'll select this will restart. And you can see some of the fluid is still inside the collision. But if we turn ON delete obstacle will restart. You can see all of the fluid it has now disappeared that was inside of this collision. Finally, the board of collisions allows the domain to actually collide with the fluid. If one of these values is off, the fluid will just pass through it and act like nothing is there. For example, if I turn off the bottom, which is the bottom of the domain, I reset the gravity so it's at a negative z direction. We'll restart and refresh it. Now if we play our simulation, you can see it doesn't collide, but it just passes right through it. This can be useful if you don't want fluid to build up in your scene or if you have like a river and fluid is going across, it'll just go out the other side and not build up. But there we go. That is all of the settings for the top of the domain. In the next video, we're going to be taking a look at the liquid particles. 7. Liquid Settings: All of the liquid settings down here control how the fluid simulation will behave. It controls the splashes, how it will look, and the number of particles that will be added to the simulation. Firstly, we have a checkbox. If this is turned off, it will not create the particles system as you can see. But with that turned on, you'll be able to visually see how the simulation will look. If we jump over to the particle system tab, you will see the particle system that it created. You can turn it off just in the viewport by clicking that button right there. And you also have all of the options for the render. You can render it as an object and you also have the options for the viewport. We go through these settings later when we actually create a project using this method. But for now, let's jump back over to the domain and talk about the settings. The simulation method controls how the simulation will work. And there are two options, the flip method and the APIC. The flipped method will produce a bigger splashes and the fluid will go crazy in the air. And at the APIC is a little bit more energetic. And as you can see, there has a more stable behavior. They both produce pretty similar results, but you can play around with it and choose the one that is required for your scene. The flip ratio controls the flip method. If I switch it over to APIC, that flip a ratio is now gone. So that setting only works for the flip method. This controls how many splashes are in the scene. Higher values will produce more and bigger splashes and lower values will smooth out the fluid and create not as big of splashes. The system maximum controls how many particles are in the scene with it set to 0. Blender will automatically calculate how many particles it needs for the simulation. But we can also set this manually. If I go up to a value of 100, there's only going to be a 100 particles in the scene. As you can see, this is useful if you want to save on baking and render time, because a lot of the time if you have a very high resolution division, there will be millions of particles. And this can be a little bit overwhelming for some PCs and it might slow down quite a bit. So setting the maximum value to like 100 thousand will prevent those millions of particles from being created. The particle radius controls the radius around each particle. Higher values will make the particles spread out further from each other, and lower values will bring them closer together. You may want to play around with this value when you are dealing with a very high resolution simulation. You'll notice in the animation on screen at that this single cube, it turns into this big bunch of fluid. The reason for this is because there are a lot of particles in the scene and there are spreading outwards. At the beginning of the animation, all of the particles are bunched together, but when it plays, they spread out from each other. This is why the simulation looks like it gains volume. In this case, I may want to turn the particle radius down to probably around a value of 0.95 or even lower than that. It just depends. If you're stimulation, it looks like it's gaining volume. Turn this value down. This will make the particles come closer together and it's not going to have as much volume on the other side, if your simulation tends to lose volume, turn this value up so the particles will actually spread out further and counteract that. Most of the time though, when you have a high resolution, you're going to want to turn this value down. The sampling controls how many times it's going to sample. Higher values will increase the number of particles and lower values will of course, decrease the number of particles. The randomness controls where the particles will spawn. With it's set to 0, you'll get a very grid-like pattern, but with it set to a little bit of a higher value, the particles will be a lot more random, which in turn will look more realistic. And the particle maximum and minimum values controls how many particles are gonna be in each cell. We talked about cells In the last video. And the maximum you can see here is set to 16. This is the maximum amount of particles that are going to be in each cell. If you want more particles, you can turn this value up. The narrow bandwidth is a really cool option to play around with. You can see if I play my simulation at the particles will have a thin line at the top of the simulation. This is the narrow bandwidth. With this set to three, you can see it goes down a little bit, but it doesn't fill the bottom of the simulation. If I set this value higher, let's say a value of ten, it will increase the number of particles in the simulation and fill out everything in the scene. As you can see, we have a lot more particles and it's actually filling out the rest of the simulation. Basically, this value controls the thickness of the band that goes around the flow object. Increasing this will add more particles to the scene and it will also slow down the simulation. Unless you want more particles in the scene, I don't recommend turning this value up. Fractional obstacles will allow a fluid at, to pass over obstacles very smoothly. You will see on screen one without fractional obstacles, N1 with it, you will see the one with fractional obstacles turned on. The fluid will just pass over the collision it very easily and it doesn't get stuck. The obstacle distance controls how far away the fluid will be from the obstacle. You can see with it set to 0.5, there is a small gap right there. But if I go even higher, let's say a value of two, there's going to be even a bigger gap. Setting this value higher though, does cause some problems in the simulation. As you can see, it's recommended to set this lower probably around a value of 0.5 or anything lower than that. The threshold value controls how smooth the fluid will pass over the obstacle. Lower values will make it look like eyes and it'll just go over very smoothly. Higher values will make it stick to the obstacle. You can see with a value of 0.5, the fluid is passing over the obstacle very quickly. But if we set the threshold up to a value of one, which is the highest number that you can go. The fluid will stick to the obstacle and pass a lot more slowly. There you go. That is all of these settings for the liquid. In the next video, we're gonna be taking a look at the viscosity slider right here. 8. Viscocity Slider: Hello everyone and welcome to another video. This one, we're gonna take a look at the new viscosity setting and blender to 0.9 to if you haven't downloaded the latest version, go ahead and go to Blender.org and download the latest version so you can follow along with the introduction of this new update. There is a new setting over here called viscosity. This slider allows you to easily add thickness to fluid. Beforehand. You would need to use the diffusion over here. And it was a little bit hard to figure out exactly what it does. And it required a little bit of guesswork. With this new slider, it's very easy to add in thickness. Underneath the viscosity tab, we have a strength slider. The higher you set this to, the more thick the fluid will be. You can see on screen the differences in the different settings with a value of 0.10.40 and then there are no viscosity at all. If this is turned on and then the strength is set to 0, it will still add a little bit of viscosity to your scene. So keep that in mind. What you need if you don't want any viscosity is you need to uncheck this. The cool thing about using this method is it can also be animated this and create some really interesting results. For example, if we go over to frame 100, add in a keyframe right here, I'm going to turn that on. Add in a keyframe by hovering my mouse over this, hitting I. I can go to the next frame, frame a 101. Uncheck this and then add an another keyframe. It's going to be thick fluid for a 100 frames and right when it hits 101, it's going to turn it into regular fluid. The strength setting can also be animated and this can create some really interesting results as the fluid comes down, it slowly turns into regular fluid. This simulation method also has a little bit to do with how the fluid looks with a viscosity. You can see the differences with the flip and then with the APIC. They are very minimal, but you will see a slight difference between the two. Now that we know how this works, let's create a cool animation. If you want to follow along, you can download this original scene right here with the monkey head, the domain and then the flow object. Or you can just create it yourself because there's only three objects. This monkey had just has a collision effector to it. The inflow is just the basic settings with a flow behavior set to inflow. And then for the domain, everything is exactly the same except for this viscosity down here. I'm going to keep the animation that we've added on frame 100. And I'm also going to be animating the strength value. Let's go ahead and get started by creating a really cool animation. We're going to be animating the strength value. So we're going to set it to 0.4 for the start of the animation. And then I want it to turn into 0.1 by the end. And then right at frame 100, I want it to turn into regular fluid. Since we've already animated this checkbox, we can leave that keyframe in there. I'm going to jump to the beginning of the animation and hit eye while hovering over this strength value. I'm going to go all the way to frame a 100. And I'll set the strength down to, let's go with actually 0.05. Then add in another keyframe over a 100 frames, it's going to go from a strength 0.4 all the way down to a strength of 0.05. I think that will look very cool. I'm also going to turn on Mesh. Do we actually get a mesh in our scene over in the domain settings? I'm also going to set the type over two modular so we don't get that fluid right there and everything will run a little bit smoother to give our scene a little bit more interests. Let's also rotate our info object to spin around. Now we could press I and add in a rotation keyframe and then just animate it that way. Or we can add an a driver and it will automatically do it for us. To do this, select your inflow object and press N underneath the item tab and rotation. We're going to add a driver to the rotation of the z-axis. To add in a driver, you can click in the rotation. And to do this, you can press hashtag frame. And then you can go divide by hitting slash and then type in the number that you want. If we divide it around 30 and then press Enter, we'll restart R and Player Animation. We can see it's rotating just like this. You can set the speed. You can set the speed of the rotation by going over to the frame and then dividing it by a higher or lower number. A higher number will make it go even slower. So if we go with 50 will restart and play it, you can see it's moving even slower. But if we go a little bit lower, Let's go divided by 20. You can see it is rotating a lot faster. I think a value of around 25 will actually look pretty good. I'm going to go frame. I'm gonna go hashtag frame divided by 25. And that will look pretty good. As you can see there. It's rotating and it's going at a good speed. Now that we have our animation is set up, we are ready to bake. So I'm going to select my domain, go over to the resolution divisions and I'm going to set this up to 64. Keep in mind that the viscosity will add a little bit of time to your bake. So I'm not gonna go too high in the resolution. I'm going to scroll down over to the cache setting and set the end frame to 150. I'm going to turn on is resumable and set the type over to all so we can bake everything all at once. I'm going to set the end frame down here to 150 as well. Then I'm going to save my project and bake it out. And after the baker has done, just apply a little bit of materials to your objects, add some lighting, and then you can render the sound and create a really nice satisfying animation. There you go. That is the viscosity slider in Blender 2.92. 9. Diffusion: In the last video, we talked about the viscosity in the domain settings. In this video we're gonna be talking about the diffusion. The diffusion is another way to add thickness to your fluid, but it's a little bit more complex. How the viscosity works is it's based on the base and the exponent in the diffusion tab. First, let's talk about how viscosity is actually measured in the real-world, is commonly measured by a value called p a dot S, which stands for Pascal seconds. This is basically the mass, the length, and the time, and then it does some equation and then figures out a certain value. There is also another way of measuring which is called Cp. And one Cp is equal to 0.001 p a dot S. So keep that in mind while we go through this video to figure out the values that we need to put in the base and the exponent. We need to do a little bit of math. How blender works is it calculates the viscosity a bit different. It uses what's called kinematic viscosity, which is the PA dot S divided by the density of the fluid. With this in mind, let's figure out the equation for water. Water at room temperature has a Cp of 1.002 or 0.00100 to p a dot S. And the density of water is about 1000 kilograms per cubic meter. So with that in mind, we can figure out what the value is to put in the base and the exponent. How the equation works is we need to take the PAADS value and divide that by the density of water, which is 10000. That gives us this number. We can bring this down to a scientific number of 1.002 times ten to the negative six. Now we know the values to put in the base and the exponent. We need to set the base to one and the exponent to six. Let's do another equation for lava. There are many types of different lavas out there, but the one I'm looking at has a PAADS value of 3,500 and the density is about 3,100 kilograms per cubic meter. Now all we have to do is divide it again. Let's take the PAADS value and divide it by 3,100. That gives us a value of 1.1 to nine. So let's just round it down to a value of about one. In Blender, all we have to do is set the base to a value of one and the exponent to a value of 0. You can go on Google and figure out the Cp values and the values for a lot of different fluids. And then you can figure out the density and do the equation for yourself. Blender also has a couple of presets right here that we can take a look at. Ketchup has a base of one, exponent of one. And that's gonna give us the viscosity of ketchup. The last setting is the surface tension. This will just add a little bit of tension to the surface of the fluid and you can see what that looks like onscreen. But there you go. That is the diffusion tab in the domain settings. In the next video, we're gonna take a look at the particles. 10. Guiding Domains: hello over one. And in this video we're gonna look at the guides in the domain settings. The guides allow you to use an object or another simulation to give some velocity to the fluid. For example, if I turn this on, we can see here are a couple different values. We have the velocity source which can use a domain or can use an effect. Er so for this example will be using a smoke simulation and selecting that domain in this guide parent right here to demonstrate this. Let's first take a look at our fluid simulation right here. We have a flow objects. I'm going to enable fluid and set the type over to flow. And then the flow type is going to be on liquid. Here, we can see we have that. And then this is just a basic simulation. The resolution is at 32 so it just makes in a little bit faster. And these are all just the default settings. What we need to do now is set up a smokes in relation. To do this, I'm going to select the domain press shift D and then right click over in the outline er you can see I named the fluid domain and the flow object. So I'm gonna go ahead and double click on this and call this one smoke and then domain. Just so we're a little bit more organized and what I'll do next is all press shift and added a another cube. This is going to be our flow object for the smoke domain operas s and Z and scale it down just a little bit. And then over in the outline, er, I will also name this so we know exactly what we're doing Smoke and then flow. I'm going to turn on fluid and set the type over to flow, and we're gonna leave it as smoke, and we're gonna set the behavior as inflow. So how this works is the fluid will take the velocity of the smoke, and it will kind of guide it going upwards. So the smoke is actually going to catch some fluid as it flows up and carry it with it all the way to the top of the dome. Eight. I'm going to drag the flow object below the fluid so it actually goes through. And since we did that We also need to select the smoke domain and scale it up just slightly . So the flow object is still inside the domain. Also, skillet up just slightly so we don't get that jittery effect. And there we go. So with the smoke domain selected, I'm going to select the type over here to gas, and the resolution will leave at 32. That's fine. And the time scale. I'm gonna bring up to one now. Let's bake this in. So I'm going to uncheck guys because we do not want guides for this simulation and then over in the cast settings we need to set to custom folders. One is going to be for the smoke domain, and another one is going to be for the fluid. So since we're using the smoke, I'm going to select that button on the bottom and navigate to a folder. And as you can see here, I have two different folders. I'm going to select smoke and then click accept. Then we can bake this it. This should go pretty fast cause it's at a low resolution, and now if we play our simulation, we can see it's working, but it's not showing up because of the domain saw selected and breast h to hide. And this is our simulation. So now let's set up the guides in the fluid. I'm gonna press Ault h to bring back the domain and select it. This is our fluid domain, and I'll go over to the guides panel and open up this first off, we're going to set another custom folder in the cast sitting, So I'm going to select that button on the side and navigate to it. Since we're now dealing with the fluid, I'm going to select the fluid domain on the side and click. Accept the end frame. I will leave that 50 and then here in the guides panel, we need to select the parents. I'm going to select the smoker domain. We have three different values here. The weight, the size and the velocity factor. The weight is basically how strict the fluid will be to the smoke. So if you were to set this to a higher number, the fluid will lag behind the smoke. If you said it to a lower number, this the fluid will be mawr attached to the smoking. It will follow it a lot closely, so I'm going to set that to a lower number so the fluid actually stays close. The size right here is basically the size of the guiding, and if you said this to a bigger number, they'll beam or of the guide. And if you said it to a smaller number, it will be a lot smaller. All set it to a value of four, just so it's a little bit smaller. The velocity factor controls how much velocity the smoke will give to the fluid. So if you were to set this to a higher number, basically what's gonna happen is the fluid will shoot straight up really fast and collide with the top of the domain. If you leave it at a lower number, it will go a little bit more slowly up to the top. I'm going to leave it at a value up to, and I think that would work perfectly fine. And then we can scroll up and click on bake. I've noticed when bacon in the guides. It takes a lot longer than usual, so be careful if you're going for a very high resolution because you're baked can take a lot longer. So now let's restart the simulation and press the play button, and we can see this is how it looks. It's taken the fluid and bringing it upwards just like that. And when you're looking at the domain, if you notice a lot of red, that means you're particles are moving very, very fast. As we can see here, we do have a lot of red, so what we can do to fix that is free the data and maybe set the wait up to a value of two so the fluid does lying behind the smoke just a little bit will bake that in and see how that looks. The bake is done, and now it's player simulation and we can see that does look a lot better. It's a lot slower than it was, and now what we can do is just come over here to the bottom and bacon a lot more frames, but you get the basic idea. You can take a simulation and use it as some velocity for another simulation, and you can get some very interesting results 11. Guiding Effectors: The other cool thing that you can do with guides is you can switch the velocity source over to a defector and use an object instead of a domain. So to demonstrate this, I'm gonna press shift A and added a monkey head of right here. I'll drag it below the domain. And now we're going to animate this on frame one. I'm going to hit I and go location, rotation. Then that frame 30. I'm gonna press G and Z and dragged through the domain hit I and go location rotation once again. Now, if we go over to the physics have we can enable fluid set the type over to effect er and then for the effect or type weaken Select guide. Here we have a couple different settings is plantar. We've talked about this before. If you're using a plane, you are gonna want to turn this Ellen the surface thickness. This is the amount of thickness around the object that will be considered as a guide. And for this example, I'm gonna bring this up to a value of 0.5. So instead of just being at the monkey head, the amount the service around it will also affect the guiding as well, so it will probably be around here and then the velocity factor. This also is a velocity factor that will move the fluid a lot quicker. So if you want slower moving velocities, you will turn this down the guide mode. It takes the velocity of your monkey head and the velocity that you set here and then does a little bit of math to figure out exactly what it should do. So, for example, if this is set to override its going to override the velocity of this monkey head and just to use this value here, if this is set to average, is going to average out the velocity of the monkey head and the velocity that you put here and just use an average for this example, I'm going to set it to average. And now back over in the domain settings. Aiken, scroll down to the guides. Here we have a new button called bait guides. We did not have that when when we were using the domain. But now, since we're using a defector, we do need to bake the guides before we bacon the liquid up here keep in mind before you bake in the guides. You also need to set the resolution because once you bacon the guides, this will be great out and he won't be able to change it. I'm going to leave the default settings and I'm going to select bacon guides. You can see it went very fast down there, and now we can go over to the settings up top and we can see the resolution is great out. We need to select baked data right here for this to work. Since I am using a resolution of 32 this is going pretty fast. So now it's resource dissimulation and play. We can see this is what happened. So since the monkey head is moving pretty slow and the resolution for the guide is also set to one and it's averaging it out, it's not doing a lot of motion as you can see there. So if we wanted this to be a lot faster, what we can do is scroll down here, free the guide so we can change some of the settings. I'm gonna set the velocity factor up a little bit. Let's go with a value of six and we'll see how that looks will bake the data. We'll scroll up to the settings and baked the data up here as well. With that done bacon, we will restart and play this and we can see there is a lot more velocity now since we set the velocity factor up down here. So if you want faster moving fluid, you will set the velocity factor here. And you will also set the velocity factor over here as well. We'll restart this. You can view that one more time, and that's basically what it does. It just add some velocity using an object, you can create some very interesting results using this. 12. Spray Foam & Bubble Particles: Hello everyone and welcome to another video. This one we're going to talk about the particle tab. A particle tab allows you to add in a couple of different particle systems. They can either be a spray foam or a bubble particle system. And we're gonna be talking about each one. How it works is you first need to enable one of these options. If we select spray, it'll add in the spray particles. You might be asking yourself what the difference between these particles and the particles up here when we actually add in a liquid, you can see them right here. These are the original particles when we add in the fluid simulation. And these particles are for the shape of the fluid and how the fluid will interact with collisions and the overall behavior. These particles down here are specified for each of these things, either the spray or the foam or the bubbles. The spray particles are exactly what you would think. It sprays out particles when the fluid is splashes or it creates any sort of fast movement, spray particles will be created. Foam particles are for foam. You can see they hover on top of the fluid as the fluid moves around. And bubble particles are for the particle system that's gonna be inside the fluid and they're going to act alike bubbles. Jumping back over to these settings if we enable one of these options and go over to the particle system tab, you will see that it created a new particle system called spray. We can then select it, open up the render tab and we can render it as an object or anything else. We can also change the viewport display. We'll be talking about all these settings in a later video. If we can also jump back over to the domain and if we enable foam and bubbles, this will also create three other particles systems, as you can see here, spray foam and bubbles. Each of these have the exact same settings and you can customize each one how you want. Let's say you did not want to have three individual particle systems, but you wanted to combine them. You can do that with the combined export. Currently it's set to off, but we can either combine it, the spray and foam. Now what will happen is you can see the spray and foam, our one particle system and then the bubble one. We can also go back over here and combine all of them spray foam and bubbles. And now each of those are gonna be combined into one particle system, which can be useful if you want to just change the settings on one end, it will affect all of them with that out of the waitlist and back over to the settings and actually talk about all of these different values because there's quite a lot of them. The upper is factor controls the resolution of the particles. Higher values, of course, will result in more particles in the simulation. Basically how this works is it takes the base resolution up here at the top, which is currently at 32. And if it's at a value of one, it's going to have a resolution of 32. But if we bring it up to a value of two, it'll have a resolution of 64 and so on. It just multiplies the base resolution and then applies that to the particles. Now let's go over the rest of the settings. Here we have a couple of maximum and minimum values. The wave crest potential maximum, the trapped air, and the kinetic energy. All these values control if the particles will be created in those certain areas. The wave crest, for example, controls the particles at the wave crest and the potential of particles being created there. The trapped air is basically when fluid overlaps each other and there's eight trapped air pocket, that is the amount of particles that's going to be in that spot. And the kinetic energy is for the speed of the particles. This is the threshold of if a particle will be created. If the value is set very high, it's going to have a high threshold. So there's generally going to be less particles with it set to a lower value like five in this example, there's gonna be a lot of particles that are created. Normally all of these settings, if you just changed them a little bit, there's gonna see, you're gonna see very little difference. Normally though, I will leave all of these settings at the default ones because I don't see any reason to change them, but they are there for you if you want to play around with them. The potential radius and the particle update radius basically smooths out the grid of particles. Higher values will be a little bit slower, but the movement of the particles will be better and it's gonna be more smooth. If your particles are moving around very chaotically and you have some glitches in the particle system, you can try turning this value up and that will help prevent some of those issues. Normally though, if you don't have any problems with the simulation, you should just leave this at the default value because higher values will tend to be a little bit slower when baking in the wave crests at particle sampling and the trapped air particle sampling controls the amount of particles in those grid cells. For example, you can see on screen a value of 20 and a value of 10000. So every time there's a crest and the wave, the particles sample puts in 100 particles on that exact spot. Same thing goes for the trapped air particle sampling. The particle life and maximum and minimum values controls how long the particles are going to last in the scene, It's set at a higher value. Particles will last the entire animation and when it set to a lower value, they will die out and then new particles will spawn. Finally, we get into something a little bit more interesting. The particle, the bubble buoyancy and the bubble drag. The bubble buoyancy will either push the particles to the surface of the mesh or it'll keep it inside lower values. We'll have them inside the fluid and it'll just go with it. And then higher values will push them upwards. The drag does something similar, but it'll keep the particles moving with the fluid. Higher values will keep the particles moving very closely with a fluid. And then lower values will make the particles move slightly, but it's gonna have a little bit more of a loose movement. And finally, the particle in a boundary will either delete the particles. So if there's particles that are stuck inside a collision object, they will get deleted or we can push them out. Some of the time the particles will exit out of the domain. So it'll either delete them or it'll push them back into the domain if you set it to push out. But there we go. Those are all of the settings for the particles. With the spray foam and bubble particles, they allow you to do some really cool things. For example, you can check the foam checkbox and then you can add some foam to the top of a river or an ocean and you can create some really cool simulations. In the next video, we're gonna talk about the mesh settings. 13. Mesh Domain: In this video, we're gonna be talking about the mesh panel. The panel is a way to visualize the fluid simulation using a mesh. Normally with the fluid simulation, if the mesh is unchecked, it's going to display the particles as you can see here. But if we wanted to display the mesh, we will need to turn this on and then bake it in. Remember if you're using the replay cache type down here, and you'll be able to see the mesh in real-time if you wanted to bake it in, make sure you switch over to the modular mode and then make sure is resumable is enabled. Then you'll be able to bake in the data up here. And then you can bake in the mesh. Once the first bake is done. With that out of the way, let's talk about these settings. The upper S factor is the same as the oppressed factor and the particles. It takes the base resolution and then multiplies it to give you the mesh, how your values will result in a better looking mesh, but it's gonna take longer to bake. You can see on the animations on screen the different resolutions and the oppressed factor. One thing to keep in mind, if you have a low resolution divisions like a value of 32, but a high oppressed factor. It's going to give you some strange results. The fluid is going to look a bit choppy and it's not gonna look that great. What you would need to do is set the base resolution divisions higher, probably a value of 128 or 196. And then you'll be able to set the upper S factor to a value of two. And that is going to look pretty nice. The particle radius controls the mesh size around each particle. How the mesh works is it takes every single particle in your simulation and then wraps a mess around it. And the radius controls how big that is. Higher values will give you a more blobby looking fluid, and lower values will give you a sharper fluid. Normally for a high-resolution at fluid simulation, I would set this value to around 1.5 or 1.4 because I think too is a bit too high, used to be vectors allows you to add in motion blur to the fluid. This is a bit more complicated and it takes a little bit of time to set up. So we're gonna be talking about that in the next video, the mesh generator. There are two options. Final end preview, final allows you to add in all of these settings down here, you can change the smoothing negative, positive and the concavity upper and lower. If we switch this over to preview, all of those settings disappear and it'll just be the preview of the mesh. I like to keep this on final because it gives a better, smoother looking mesh and a higher-quality looking one as well. Now let's talk about the smoothing positive and negative. These values control how smooth the mesh is going to be. The positive value will smooth it out more. And the negative value, we'll do the opposite and it'll make it look a little bit more sharp. You can see in the animations on screen the different values and how it changes, how the simulation will look. If you want a sharper fluid and bring the negative value up. If you want a smoother fluid at bringing the positive value up, the concavity. Upper and lower values control how the fluid will look in concave areas. Higher values of the upper will smooth out the top part of the concave and a lower and the lower value down here will smooth out the ones underneath. Normally you don't want to go higher with the lower value or it will distort the mess. As you can see on screen, usually the default values work perfectly fine, but you can tweak them how you want. And then of course, once you are happy with the settings, you can click on it, bake mesh. This will then start to bake the mesh down here. And if you wanted to stop the bank by hitting Escape, you can preview what it looks like. As you can see here, we now have a mesh for the fluid. We can restart and play it. And this is what it looks like. As you can see there, the fluid simulation is still going, but the mesh has stopped because I stopped the bake. At this point, we can resume the bake. Or if you don't like how the settings look, you can free it, change the settings and then bake it again. But there we go, that is the mesh panel. And in the next video we're gonna talk about the use of speed vectors. 14. Using Vector Blur: Hello everyone. In this video I'm gonna be showing you how you can use the US speed vector option over in the mesh panel. This option allows you to add in motion blur to the fluid. This is very cool because it takes a lot less time to render than actually using real motion blur and you can customize it very easily. How this works is we first need to enable use speed vectors. And if you want to follow along with this tutorial, you can download this blend file. It's just a basic scene with a couple of effectors and an inflow object that shoots water out this way. So going back over to the domain, what we need to do is make sure you speed vectors is enabled. And the other important thing is we need to come down to the format and volume and switch it from open VDB over to uni cache. Open VDB does not support this feature, so make sure you switch it over to uni cash. With that out of the way, we can scroll up to the top and then bacon at the data. Once you've set up all of your settings, just click on fake data and it should go pretty fast. Once this has finished baking, then we can make in the mesh. Now that the bank has finished, we can scroll down over to the mesh panel, make sure the US speed vectors is enabled. Then we can click on it. Bake match. As you can see here, it's starting to bake. And once it's done, we will set up the rest of the settings. There we go. The bank has finished. We can play our simulation and here is what it looks like. It looks pretty cool so far. But now what we need to do is go over to the render settings. Firstly, this feature only works in the Cycles Render Engine. So make sure to switch the Endrew. Make sure to switch to the render engine from EB over two cycles. Then what you can do is go over to the render layers panel. There are two things that we need to enable. We need to enable the vector pass. This will allow us to add in motion blur in the compositor. Since we enable speed vectors in the mesh panel, we need to make sure the vector pass actually renders out. So check that box and then also check the z box. This will also be important later. Now what we can do is pick a frame. Let's just go with this frame, for example. Then I'm gonna hit F12 to render out an image. And there we go, it has finished rendering. Now what we can do is exit out of this and then jump over to the compositing workspace up at the top here, make sure the US nose is enabled and then you should be able to see the render layers. What we can do to actually see what our image it looks like is if you hold the, if you hold Control Shift and then left-click on the render layer, that'll bring in a viewer node. Now we can see what we're doing. The next step is to add in the vector blur node, we can press Shift a, go over to Filter and then select vector blur. Let's place that right here, will take the image plugging into the composite. And now what happens is if we take the vector from the render layers, plug that into the speed, what it's gonna do is it's going to blur the fluid. Just give it a second to composite and then you should see what it looks like. As you can see there, there is a little bit of motion blur. You can control this blurb by changing the blur amount. Let's go up to a value of three. And there you can see it's even more blurred. You might notice that some parts of the fluid look a bit strange like it's bleeding into the effector objects. And to fix that, we need to take these depth value, which is the Z pass over here. And then we need to plug that into the Z pass in the vector blur. And that should fix any issues that the fluid is bleeding into the effector objects. At this point, you can play around with the blur amount. If you wanted to go crazy, you got to a value of 2020 is the max value. And you can see the entire thing is now blurred and it looks really weird. One thing that we can do is if we zoom in here, you might see some repeating patterns. As you can see there, there's some repeating patterns in the blur. This is controlled by these samples. If we go up to a value of 128, it's gonna take a lot longer to composite, but that should help some of those repeating patterns. As you can see here, it's still begging, but there you go. Now that looks a lot better. I don't recommend this though because it will take a long time to render out because it has two composite every single frame I value of 32 samples will be perfectly fine. And then a value of about, let's say three, that should look pretty good. And there we go. You can see we have nice motion blur in the fluid. The Min and max values control the maximum and minimum amount of blur that's going to be in the composite. For example, if you have a very fast-moving object and then very slow moving object, if you set the max value, the same amount of blur is going to be applied to both of the objects, even though one of them is moving a lot faster. This just clamps down on the maximum amount of blur that's gonna be in the scene. And also the exact same thing for the minimum. But there you go. Now all you have to do is just render this out into an animation and you will have some nice motion blur in the scene. 15. Collections tab: Hello everyone. In this video we're gonna take a look at the collections tab in the domain settings, the collection tab allows you to limit the amount of flow objects and effect or objects per collection. Right here I've created a basic scene where we have a flow objects that to geometry, and then we have a collision object down here in collection to what this tab allows you to do is you can set the collections that are going to actually interact with the scene. For example, this flow object is in collection one. If I limit the flow objects to be in collection to which it's not in this simulation is not going to work because there is no flow objects in collection too. Now if we refresh the simulation and restart, you can see it's not working because there's no flow object in collection to same thing goes for collision objects. I'm going to exit out of this and then refresh it. You can see exactly what happens. You can see it's colliding with that collision. But now if we limit the collection effect or objects to collection one which does not have the collision in it. It's not going to interact with that collision. Now let's refresh it. Now let's refresh it by changing a setting, will restart the timeline and play it. And you can see it does not interact with that effector. So this can be useful if you have multiple objects and multiple domains and you have a lot of stuff going on, and you don't want some collisions to affect another one. This is actually very useful. But there you have it. That is the collection tab. 16. Cache & Baking: Hello everyone. In this video we're gonna take a look at the cache tab over in the Domain Settings. Here is where we can bake in the data set, the end frame and start frame. And then you can add in some compression options over in the cache settings. We're gonna go through it one by one. And the first option here is the directory of where all of the data is going to be stored. This is set in a temporary folder when you first opened Blender and add a domain, this means that when you close the software, this cash is going to get deleted. You can see here it's AppData Local and then temp that we're attempt that means it's a temporary file. If you want to bake in your simulation and be able to close the software and open it back up later, you need to set a new directory. You can do this by clicking on the button right over there, and then you can navigate to a new folder. Let's do this real quick. I'm gonna go over to this folder here, the select this one. And then I will just create a new one called cash and then put it into this folder. If we click Accept now you can see it's located in this folder. Now all of the fluid simulation data is going to be put into this folder. Let's go ahead and test that out by switching the setting up here just to refresh it. Then we'll restart and play. And sometimes it doesn't play and that means you just need to refresh it a little bit more. We'll restart. There we go. Now you can see it's actually working. We'll set that to 132. And then player simulation. Now some data is being stored. If we open up that folder, you will see two folders right here, config and data. Let's go ahead and open this and you will see all of the fluid information right here in VDB files. That's because we set down here to be the format open VDB. Now that we understand that, let's talk about the rest of the settings, the frame, start and end. These are the options to set when the simulation starts and when the simulation ends. There's also an option for the offset and this means that it's going to offset. And when the simulation starts, you can see it's currently grayed out because this needs to be actually baked in and to bake in the simulation. We learned about this at the start of the class. We need to switch it over to the modular or the all. Again, replay allows us to view the stimulation in real-time. We can change some of the settings here. If we want to bring up the resolution, it'll update it in real-time and then we can hit the space bar to play. But if we wanted to bake this in, we will need to change the type over two modular. Now we have a bake button right here. You will also get an error that says none resumable cash, baking mesh or particles will not be possible. This means that if we try to bake in at the mesh, it's not going to work. We can check this box, but the bake mesh is going to be disabled. In order for this to happen, we need to make sure is resumable is checked and then we will be able to bake in the data, and then we'll be able to bake in the mesh and the particle tab. So keep that in mind whenever you have it set to modular and you want to bake in the mesh or particles or even the guides for that matter, you need to make sure is resumable is checked. If we switch it over to the all option, will be able to bake everything all at once with one click. You can see the bake button is now gone up here at the top. And there's only one big button down at the bottom right here. So this is useful if we want to make everything all at once without having to go through each of these panels in baking them individually. One thing I wanted to mention if you have the ISR resumable checkbox enabled, this is going to take a little longer to bake because it has to write the information to actually stop and resume the bake. So it's recommended to make sure this option is turned off when you are baking at a high resolution, or it's going to take longer and it's going to take up more space on your hard drive. Speaking of space, fluid simulations, fire simulations, all of those will take up a lot of space. So make sure when you're dealing with a very high resolution, you have the right amount of storage on your hard drive, the fluid simulation to actually bake through. I've had fluid simulations take up to like 80 gigabytes. Sometimes if it's a super high resolution or 40 gigabytes, it takes up a lot of space, so make sure you have enough storage to actually store it. Now you can see here when we switched it over to the all or the modular, we have an offset option. This allows us to actually offset when the animation starts. For example, if I set this to negative 25, then if we scroll up to the top, we'll just bake this in real quick. We'll stop it right about there and then restart. You can see on frame one it's actually playing the simulation right here rather than up here. Keep in mind, it's still has to bake in those extra frames because it doesn't know exactly when this happens in the simulation. So even if you set this to negative 25, it's still going to bake those extra frames. You can see here if I set this to a positive value like 25, for example, not a negative value, we can read the data and then bake it in again. We'll stop it right about there and restart. You can see it's not going to play until it reaches frame 25. Just like that. This is not when the simulation starts to bake, is just when the simulation starts to play. I'm going to set that back down to 0. Next up, let's talk about the file format. There are two options, open VDB and unicast. Unicast is blender's way of compressing the files. And each object is going to have its own file in the cache settings. Open VDV will combine all of the objects into one single file. For example, if we select a unique cache and we can make this in, we'll stop it right about there. Then we will open up the folder. And if we open up the data, you will see that we have a PP underscore 007. And then if we scroll down over here, we also have a val underscore 003 and then over here 007, it's taken each object and giving it its own file. If we then free this and then switch it over to Open VDB, we'll bake this in. Now every single object is going to be stored into one single file. So if we now open up the folder and then select the data, you can see every single object is now stored into one file. As you can see here, fluid underscore data zeros 046 dot VDB. I've found that open VDB does store a little bit better and the caches are a bit smaller. And unicast is pretty good as well, except it's gonna be a little bit bigger and it's going to take a little bit longer to bake in. You can see on the animations on screen that is very little difference in the actual simulation. But you can see the open VDB did take a little bit less time than the unicast format. Another thing to keep in mind is that union cash I've found works a bit better for a more stable stimulation. Sometimes whenever I work with open VDB, it doesn't really work as great. And we have some glitches in the cache. Unicast sometimes is the better option if you want a more accurate simulation underneath that. And we have the meshes and there are two options, binary and object. Binary means that it's going to have a bit of compression whenever it bakes in the mesh. And then the object is just the standard one and there's not gonna be as much compression. So it's gonna be a bigger file size. Normally I just leave it on binary and then for the format volume, I'll usually stick with open VDB. But if I have problems with the simulation, I will switch it over to union cash. There's also a Advanced tab with the open vdb format. There is compression volumes and there are three options here. Bosque is just a way of compressing it. It's multithreaded. Zip is very similar, but it's a less efficient. And then non means there's gonna be no compression and the file size is going to be pretty big. And then the precision volumes is just the how precise the open VDB file formats are going to be written as. You can write them as half, mini or full. But there we go. That is the cash panel in mantle flow. 17. Field Weights: In this video, we're going to take a look at the field of weights in the domain settings. The field weights allows us to control the gravity and all of the strength of the force fields in our simulation. If you didn't know, you can actually add enforced fields to affect the fluid. For example, if I press Shift a and I'll add in a turbulence force field, I can drag this up here. We'll set the strength of it to a value of two. And then if we select our domain and refresh it by changing a setting, will restart and then play. You can see it's actually affecting the fluid and you can see the particles are moving around. You also might notice that it's actually gaining volume. The reason that's happening is because the fluid simulation is going crazy and the particles are being added and this joist and it's going to be gaining volume. In this case, I would need to turn down the particle radius to counteract that. Since we already talked about that, we're going to scroll back down to the field weights. And this allows us to actually control the strength of each individual force field. For example, if I change the turbulence all the way down to a value of 0, we may need to refresh it. So let's scroll up to the top, will change a setting to refresh it. Then we'll player simulation and you can see the turbulence force field is no longer affecting the simulation. If we scroll down here, we'll set the strength of it to a value of 0.1. We'll scroll back up, we'll refresh it. And then restart and play it. And you can see it's affecting it just a little bit. This is very useful if you have multiple domains and you don't want the force fields interacting with every single one. You can turn the sum of the force fields down. You can also turn off all of the force fields by changing this value all the way down to 0. And you can also turn off gravity. Let's go ahead and test that out. I'm going to grab our inflow object, put it in the middle of our domain. We will refresh it and then restart and then play. And you can see there is no longer gravity and it looks actually pretty cool. There's also a effector collection and this is exactly the same as the collections up here. It allows you to select a different collections with force fields in them to affect the simulation. Let's go ahead and test this out by moving this object to a new collection collection too. We'll select the domain and set the effector collection to collection one which does not have the turbulence force field will come up here. We'll refresh it, restart and play. And you can see the force field is no longer affecting the simulation. There you go. You can play around with different force fields, find out what you like and test that out. And you can create some really interesting simulations using them. 18. Viewport Display: In this video, we're going to take a look at the viewport display. This panel down here allows you to display your fluid simulation in a different view. You can change a couple of settings. All of these settings right here are for the smoke simulation, so they're not going to affect the fluid at all. But what will affect the fluid is the grid display and the vector display. The slides also doesn't really work. You can see if I select it, it's not really working. And that's because it also deals with these smoke simulation. We're gonna go ahead and close that off. But what is really cool is the grid display. If we go ahead and check that box and open up this panel, you will see that there is a couple of settings here. We have the field. In this field, it allows us to display certain attributes such as the z velocity, y velocity, the pressure, or the fluid level set. The fluid level set allows you to see where the fluid is actually rising. So what we need to do is first refresh this. So we'll change a setting to refresh it. Then we'll then restart and play it. And we can see that the level is right here. We can see the level going all the way at this level. It allows you to actually see a couple of different attributes in your fluid. The other ones that we have here is obstacle level set. The z force or pressure. Pressure is a bit interesting. We'll go ahead and restart. This doesn't work a bit finicky. What we need to do is change something and then scroll up to the top and just refresh a setting. Then if we can play, we can see it actually works. And the pressure is just the pressure of the fluid, as you can see it's displaying right there. That also gives us a interesting effect. The scale option down here allows you to scale up the colormap. For example, this is, it's set to one right here. Then we will set this down to like point to, for example, will scroll up. We'll refresh a setting just like this, restart and play it. And this is the scale at 0.2. You can see it's a lot smaller than it was before. The vector display also is a cool effect. It allows you to display certain fields with different needles. For example, it's currently displayed as a needle. We can set it over to grid and we can see the grid values here. We can also change it to streamline, which is very similar to needles. Let's just go ahead and switch it back over to needles. And you can change the size of it by changing this scale value. So if I wanted them all to be a bit smaller, I can change them like this. And then this allows us to actually view certain attributes as well. For example, the field, the force field velocity, the forests are the guide velocity. And this magnitude option allows the needles to actually scale. So if I turn it on and we can see here some of the needles are scaling down when there's not a lot of velocity and when there is a lot that's scaling up. This is just a way to view your simulation in different attributes and you can play around with them and create some interesting Viewport Display. Again, this does not affect the render at all. It only affects how the viewport is displayed. But there we go, that is all of the settings in the domain. In the next section we're going to jump into flow objects affect our objects and learn about all of those. Go ahead and join me in the next section. 19. Flow Objects: Hello everyone. In this section we're gonna be discussing a lot of different things about the fluid simulation. The first couple of videos we will discuss inflow objects, outflows and effect effector objects and how they can interact with your scene. And then we're gonna be going over a lot of other stuff included with the man supposed simulation. Starting out with, we're gonna talk about flow objects. To actually add in a flow object, you should probably already know how to do this, but with your objects selected, we're gonna go over to fluid and set the type over to flow. Now there are a lot of different options here to change how the flow object operates in the fluid simulation. First, we need to switch the type from smoke over to liquid. You can see there is smoke, fire and smoke and fire. All of these deal with the gas simulation. Since we are working with liquid, we need to switch it over to the liquid simulation. And then for the flow behavior, there are three options. Inflow will constantly add fluid to your scene in the shape of the flow object. Outflow will delete fluid. So whenever there is fluid that touches the outflow, it'll get deleted. And then of course, geometry means that the only fluid that is added is in the shape of the geometry. In this case it's a UV sphere. Let's go ahead and refresh the simulation to see what this looks like. I'm going to change a setting over here and then restart and then play it. And we can see this is the effect. We now have fluid in our simulation. One thing to note about flow object is you need to make sure that it's not super close to the domain edge. I've had problems when the flow object is really close to that. It doesn't work at all and no fluid will get emitted. We'll talk about that a little bit more in the next video when we talk about inflows. But I wanted to mention that real quick. Underneath that we have the sample sub-steps. The sample subsets deals with very fast movie and inflow objects. If I go over to collection to, I've created a simple animation to demonstrate how this works. If we select our cube over five frames and moves across the screen. If I go into the Properties panel by pressing N, we can see the location is at negative five meters. Then if we jump over to frame five, it goes to positive five meters. How animation works is it takes your keyframes and the distance that you've applied it, and then moves the object to that location over a certain amount of frames. In this case it is five frames. How this works is if I go to frame one and then I go to frame two, you can see there is a jump from this position over to this position on frame 12. How the sample sub-steps works is it takes those two frames and then divides it up because you can see there is a big gap. The origin point jumps from here all the way over to here in one single frame. In this case, there's probably going to be some errors if there is fluid in this position because the frame jumps from here over to here, what the samples subsets does is it takes those two positions and then subdivides them into different points. So it's a little bit more accurate. Most of the time, if you don't have a very fast-moving object, you don't need to bring this up, but in case you do make sure you bring this up so your simulation is more accurate. If we press Shift a and add in a plane object will bring it up here. We'll set the type IV fluid and send it over to flow. And then we'll set it to liquid and then over to inflow. What will happen is if we select our domain, we'll refresh it by changing a setting. And then we try to play our simulation. You can see the plane object is not working. This is because it's a flat object. What we need to do is give this object some thickness, or we will need to make sure is planar is checked. If we turn on is planar for this plane, we'll select our domain, refresh it by changing a setting, restart and then play it. Now you can see the plane is actually working. This deals with non manifold objects. Another example of this would be a cubed. If we go into solid view and go into edit mode, and then we delete this face on top. This is a non manifold object, which means it's a unclosed match. For this example, we would need to make sure is planar is enabled to actually get this cube to produce fluid in our domain. The surface emission value deals with the area around the flow object. If this value is set to 0, it's just going to be the exact dimension of your flow. If this value is up higher, it's going to bring the fluid outside of the flow object and it's gonna have some thickness going around the entire thing. Initial velocity is super cool. What this will do is it will add some initial velocities here, fluid in the direction that you want. There are five different options here we have the source value, which means that if the object is moving quickly and the source value is up, it's going to add momentum to the fluid when it starts to emit. And you can see an example on screen of that. The normal option deals with the normals of your fluid. The normals if you didn't know is the direction a face is pointed in, you can see the direction if you go into edit mode. And if we open up this menu here and turn on the normals and bring the size up a little bit. You can see the direction that the faces are pointed in. They're all pointing outwards. What would happen if we bring the normal value up to a value of one? We will select our object, we'll refresh it, and then play it. And you can see they all shoot out in the direction of the normals. We can see this a bit better if we use a plain object. Here I've created a simulation where the normal is set to a value of ten. And if we go into edit mode, we can see the normals are pointed in the upward direction. This is an inflow objects. So if the normal is set to 0, it'll just shoot down. But if the normal is set to ten, it's going to shoot upwards. Let's go ahead and test this out by playing our animation. And you can see that's exactly what happens. The fluid shoots upwards rather than going straight down. And finally, we have the initial x, y, and z directions. This gives us more control over where we want the fluid to shoot out from. If we bring the x value up to a value of four, we'll select our domain and refresh it by changing a setting. Now if we play our simulation, you can see the inflow object is shooting fluid out in this direction. You can also have multiple directions. So for example, if I drag this to the middle of our domain, if I want the fluid to shoot upwards at this angle, I can set the z direction to a value of four. So the x is going in this direction and the z is going up. So it's going to shoot out at an angle somewhere around here. Then if we select our domain, we'll refresh it by changing a setting, restart and then play it. And you can see that's exactly what happens. 20. Inflows and Outflows: In this video, I wanted to look more at inflow objects and outflow objects. Here I've created a another simulation. We have an inflow object here and an outflow on this plane. Again, both of these are playing objects, so I made sure that it is planar option is checked. So how outflows work is if you set it over to outflow, it'll delete anything that the fluid touches. In this example, if I restart my simulation and play it, you can see all of the fluid is getting deleted right when it touches that outflow. Let's go ahead and select our inflow object. Here we have an option to use float. The useful option allows you to turn off and on inflow objects. And this setting can also be animated. Let's go ahead and test that out by jumping over to frame and 60 right here. What I'll do is I'll check that little button on the sign to add an eight key frame. Then I'm going to jump over to frame 61, turn this off and then add in another keyframe. Now it's going to emit fluid for 60 frames, stop at 60, and then it's going to be turned off. This is very useful if you don't want to fill your entire domain, but you still want to use an inflow. You can animate the US flow. Same thing goes for this plane here. Let's go ahead and do that. I'm going to skip to frame 40. I'm going to turn it on. Then I'm going to skip to the next frame, frame 41, turn it off, and then add an another keyframe. Now this is not going to be used anymore for the outflow and fluid will just pass right through it and hit the bottom of the domain. There is also an option for the surface emission and this is the area around the outflow. You can see here if I go into front view that there is a little bit of a gap. And one main reason for that is because the resolution of the domain is at 34, which is pretty low. So this means that it's not gonna be as accurate. If we were to turn the resolution up, it would get a lot closer to the outflow object. Now let's go ahead and test this out by changing the resolution to refresh it. I'll restart and play it. You can see it comes down and then it hits it right when it turns off and then this full object turns off as well. Another thing I wanted to mention in this video is the position of your inflows if your object is very close to the edge of the domain, as you can see, this object is, it might look a little bit strange. We can see here if I play my animation for some reason the fluid it shoots out this way. The reason that's happening is because it's really close and at the resolution of this is too low. If we take a look at the resolution right here, this displays how big of the voxels are in our stimulation. It's about the size. If we then take that cube and drag it up to the top here, you're gonna notice that it's actually intersecting into the inflow. This is causing the simulation to look really strange. What we would need to do is either take the inflow object, drag it down so it doesn't touch the top of the domain, or we would need to bring the resolution up, the box down here becomes smaller. If I select my domain, I can set the resolution to 64. And you can see it's a bit better. But now if I drag my inflow object down just slightly just to make sure that the box down here isn't the same as up here. I can then refresh my simulation. I'll restart it. You can see it's now working much better. Keep in mind if your flow object is not working in the way that it's intended, make sure your flow object is not super close to the domain, or you have to turn up your resolution. So the box becomes smaller and it doesn't intersect inside of the flow object. Finally, the last thing that we will discuss in this video is the initial velocity down here. If you want more fluid to enter your domain, you can set the initial velocity in these values and more fluid will be pushed out very quickly. For example, if I set the z-direction to a negative value, let's try negative five, for example. I'll make sure this is a little bit lower. I'll select my domain and refresh it. Then we can restart. You can see a lot more fluid is now being produced inside our simulation because it's being shot out much more quickly. In this case, if you want more fluid inside your domain, make sure to turn up the initial velocity. That'll add a lot more fluid. But there we go. That is the inflows and outflows. 21. Effectos & Collisions: Hello everyone. In this video we're going to take a look at effector objects and how to actually collide at something with the fluid. You can do this very easily by selecting the object that you want to be, the collision and jumping over to the Physics tab, selecting fluid and setting the type over to effector. Right now the effector type is set to collision. There is also a guide which we talked about earlier in this course. For now we're gonna stick with collision. Now what happens if we select our domain? We will refresh it by changing a setting, restart and play it. You can see the fluid is now colliding with the cylinder and it looks really cool. Let's go back to the settings one more time. Here we have the sample subsets, which we talked about in an earlier video. Remember if you have a very fast-moving collision, makes sure to turn these samples sub-steps up. We also have the surface thickness. If this value is higher, it's going to add an invisible border around the collision, and that is going to be the actual collision instead of the mesh itself. Use the factor if you wanted to animate when the collision turns on, you can do that by clicking the button right there, turning it off and on and animating it. And then of course it is planar is right here as well. If I drag this up, I'm going to add in a plane object. I'll scale this up, drag it up, and then add N D a factor to it. So we'll click on Fluid sets, the type or R2 vector. If we then select our domain, we will refresh it by changing a setting, will restart and play it. You can see the plane is not colliding with the fluid. The reason for that is because it is a plain object and we need to make sure is planar is checked. When it's checked, we can then select our domain. We'll refresh them one more time, restart and then play it. And now you can see it's actually colliding with the plane. So make sure if you have a plane that is colliding with the fluid, you check the is planar option. This also again works for anything that is non manifold. And non manifold means it can't exist in the real world. For example, a cube with a hole in the middle. If I go into edit mode, select that top face and then I will delete it. We can see this is a non manifold mesh. It's not closed. If there is a phase on top. If I select that ring and press F, Now this is a closed match, but with the face deleted, this is a unclosed mesh. So I would need to make sure is planar edge tagged for this to work properly. The other thing I wanted to mention in this video is the fractional obstacles. We talked about this in the last section where we talked about the liquid settings. And this will also affect how the fluid interacts with obstacles. Here is what the simulation looks like right now you can see it collides with it and goes over and slides off pretty easily. But if we were to turn on fractional obstacles will restart the simulation and play it. You can see the fluid is actually sliding off even more. So again, the fractional obstacles allows fluid to pass over obstacles very easily and nothing gets stuck. So this could be what you were looking for, but if you want it to be more of a sticky collision and the fluid to bounce around a bit more. You can turn that on and you can see the fluid is acting like that. But there you go. That is how you use collision objects in your fluid simulation. 22. Viewport Render Animation: Hello everyone. In this video I'm gonna show you how you can view your simulation at full speed without rendering it out. A lot of the times when you're working with simulations and you try to play it in the viewport, you can see my frame rate is dropping almost to five FPS and it's really slowing down. So I can't really tell what this simulation is going to look like when it's finally rendered. An easy way to actually preview the speed and to see your simulation in real time. What we can do is we can actually render out the viewport. First, what we need to do is hide the inflow object. If we play our animation, you can see the inflow is right here and I don't want that to show up in the view, so I'm going to hide it from the view and from the Render. The other thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to press Z and select Toggle overlays. If you don't see toggle overlays, that's because you probably need to enable it. You can come over here to the preferences underneath the K-map and make sure extra shading pie menu items is turned on. Or you can come over here to this button on the top. And that will also do the exact same thing. What that does is it just hides the cursor and the lamp right here and the origin points and just shows the actual models. At this point, we can render out our viewport. To do this, we need to set an output. So over in the Output tab, we can set an output over. We want our animation to go to. This is very similar to rendering, but it's not going to render, it's only going to render out the viewport. Selected this button on the side, and navigate to a folder. Once you have found your folder, you can click Accept and then also make sure you switch it over to a movie file. I'm going to choose the mpeg. And then underneath the container right here, we're going to choose MP4 and then switch it over to the high-quality. Now to actually render the viewport out, what we need to do is come over to the view menu and then we have a couple of options down here, viewport render image and viewport render animation. What the viewport render image will do is it'll just take a screenshot of your viewport and now you actually have an image that you can save. If we select that view Render Animation, what that's gonna do is that's going to actually render out the entire animation. Viewport rendered key-frames. That's a little bit different. What that'll do is if you have any key frames in your animation, it's only going to render out those keyframe changes. For example, if you have a cube that moves across the screen over a certain period of time, it's only going to render the frames that actually have the keyframes on them. As you can see in this animation, It's really jumpy. What we want to do is select the viewport render animation. What that's gonna do is it's going to render out your animation is as a viewport as you can see here. And then we'll be able to view it in real-time so we can see the speed and how our simulation is going to look. There we go. It's now finished. And what we can do is exit out of this render right here and then go over to render and then click on View Animation. Then what it's gonna do is it's going to play your animation and you'll be able to see what your simulation looks like in real time without even rendering. This can be very useful if you want to spot any errors in your simulation or to see how the speed is. It's very useful and it saves you a lot of time from having to render out the entire thing. One last thing that I'll show you real quick is you can actually change the color of some of these objects and render that out as well. If you come over here to this menu and select at that drop-down arrow, you can click on some different options here. For example, if you have any textures, you can switch it over to texture to object to random. And that's going to assign a random color to each of the objects. And then over here you can turn on cavity. You can turn on a screen space right here, depth of field, all of that. And that's also going to be rendered out in the viewport. Whatever you see in this viewport right here, that's gonna be rendered once you select the viewport render animation. But there we go. I just wanted to give a quick video to show how that works. And hopefully that helps you in your future simulations. 23. Apply Collision to Multiple Objects: Hello everyone. In this video I'm gonna show you a very quick and easy way to apply collision to a lot of different objects in your scene. Here we can see I've created a lot of different cubes and all of them do not have the effector collision applied to them. And it would be annoying to select each one, click on fluid and set the type over to effector. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to select all of them by dragging a box, selecting all of them. I'm going to de-select my domain object by hitting B and then drawing with the middle mouse button to de-select. And we can see here the one that I apply, the collision two is the active object. The active object is the one with the lighter orange outline, this yellow outline right here. Make sure that one is the one that has the collision applied to it. Then what you can do is you can press Control or Command L. And that'll bring up the link transfer data menu. Or you can go over to object down to link transfer data and then click on Copy modifiers. And that's going to apply that exact same modifier to the rest of the objects. Now we can see here they all have collision. And then that was much faster than going through one-by-one. This also works for all of the different settings. So for example, if I wanted the surface thickness to be up a little bit, I can set that to 0.5, for example. Then I will select all of them, de-selected Domain Control or Command L, and then click on it, copy modifiers. Now, all of those will have these 0.5 if you have animation in your scene. The other way to do that is if you select them all, let's create an animation real quick. We'll go through frame 30. I'll turn on use effector. I'll go to the next frame and then alternate off. If I wanted to copy that animation data to the rest of the objects, I would press Control L, and then we have an option to link animation and data if we select that, now they will all have the exact same animation data for the US effector. Now let's go ahead and test that out by selecting our object, we will refresh a setting, restart and play it. And we can see they're colliding and then it doesn't quite it anymore because the animation turns it off. But there you go. That is a quick and easy way to copy modifiers and fluid simulation settings in mantle flow. 24. Water Materials in Eevee & Cycles: Hello everyone. In this video I'm gonna show you how you can create a water material in both EB and in cycles. We're going to be going over how to create transparency and EV, and how to make it look good. Here I have a simulation where there is fluid that is shooting out to the right and it's colliding with the wall. To actually get this into a water material with transparency, there's a little bit of things that you need to set up in the EV render engine. First, we need to come over to the right side where the render panel is. Ensure an honest screen space reflections. If we open up this panel, there's also a refraction that checkbox, make sure that it's checked. This will allow the object that you have selected to have transparency whenever you enable it. Then we can also turn off half raise trace. This is gonna give us the full resolution of all of the ray traces. Next we're gonna go over to the Material tab and we're going to create a new material. For this material, we're going to come down to the transmission value. This is the transparency and this will allow it to turn into a glass material. We're going to set this all the way up to a value of one. When we do this, you can see this is the effect that happens. Next, we need to scroll down to the settings in the material and then change the blend mode from opaque over two alpha blend. Then what happens is if we turn on a screen space refraction, it'll allow transparency to happen in the material. And as you can see, that looks pretty nice. There are a couple of things that we need to change though. I'll go back into camera view. And one thing I'm going to change is the show a back face. You can see here if I zoom in a little bit, there's these weird jagged lines and that is the back face that is showing up. If I turn show back face off, those jagged lines disappear. Next up, if we scroll up to the top here we can see the roughness is set to 0.5. This is giving us a pretty rough material. Now this is, this does look pretty cool and this could be the look that you're going for. But if you want it to be nice and glossy, you can set the roughness down to a value of 0. That's going to give you a very sharp reflections. But I do think a little bit of roughness looks pretty good and EV, So I'm gonna bring that up to a value of about 0.2. Let's go with 0.25 and enter. The other thing that we need to change is the IOR value. The IOR stands for index of refraction, and this is basically how light enters the object and then refracts outwards. The IOR of water is 1.333. And there are a lot of different IOR values for other materials and substances in the real life, the IOR of water in this case is 1.333. We're going to enter that here. And that's gonna give us the correct index of refraction for this material. And that is basically all you really needed to do to create a transparent water material and EV. From here you can give it a color if you wanted to, maybe a slightly blue color, something like that, and then you can render it out. Next up, let's take a look at the material in the Cycles Render Engine. Jumping over to the render panel, we're going to switch the render engine from EV over to the Cycles Render Engine. If you have a GPU, go ahead and select that here, so it renders a bit faster than let's go over to the Material tab. We're going to create a new material once again. Then we're gonna come down here to the transmission value, turn that all the way up to one. And then for the IOR, we're also going to set this to 1.333 and enter the roughness. We're going to bring that down to 0 and then give it a base color somewhere around here, maybe a slightly blue color, something like that will look pretty nice. Then because we're using cycles. This is a real, this is a ray trace ever render engine. We don't have to do anything else and we can go ahead and render this out. And it's going to look really nice. I'm going to set the render samples right here to a value of, let's go with 50 and then make sure in denoising is turned on. Then let's go ahead and press F12 to render out an image. The render has finished. And here is our result. This is the Render in cycles, and as you can see, it does look very nice. There's a lot of reflections. The water looks good. And then if we go over to slot three, this is the Render for the EV render engine. As you can see, it doesn't look as good, but you can see this render only took about two seconds, and this render took about 17 seconds. So EV is a lot faster, but cycles is going to look a lot better. But there you go. That is how you create water materials in both EV and in cycles. 25. Ocean Modifier: Hello everyone. In this two-part series, we are going to be creating the ocean that you see on screen right now using the ocean modifier. Now the ocean modifier isn't a part of the fluid simulation, but it is a cool feature in Blender and I wanted to talk about it in these two videos. To get started, we need to add this into our object right here. You can use any object in Blender. In this case, we're just going to stick with the DePaul cube. We're going to jump over to the Modifier tab, click Add Modifier, and then select the ocean modifier on the right side. What this will do is it'll change your cube into an ocean, as you can see here. Now in this first video, we're gonna be talking about all the different settings over on the right side and how to customize it to exactly what you want. And in the next video, we're going to actually be creating a material and rendering out an animation in EV. Let's go ahead and get started by talking about the setting on the top here and working our way down. The geometry right here allows you to generate a new ocean or displace your ocean. If we click on displacement, it's going to try to displace the cube, but it's not going to really work very well because we only have eight vertices on our cube. In this case, we will need to subdivide this are adding more geometry or changed it to a plane or something like that. In most cases you're probably going to want to use the generate options. We will actually generate a new ocean. Next up we have repeat x and y. So if you wanted your ocean to repeat along those different axes, you can add more in or lesson depending on what you want. In this case, I'm just going to leave it at one. Then we also have the resolution in the viewport and in the Render. If we drive the resolution up on both of these, Let's go with a value of 16. We're gonna get a lot more detail in our ocean, as you can see right here. The two options here. This is where the viewport and this is for the render. If you're working in the viewport and you don't want the scene to lag, you can change the view port to a lower value, but keep the render at a high-value. And you're gonna get all of that detail when you render out the image and the time value allows you to change the time of the ocean. You can see if I drag this value up, it's actually going to play the ocean for us, as you can see right here. What we're gonna be doing is actually animating this time value. Let's do that real quick by adding an a driver to change it. For us to do this, we can click on this value and type in hashtag frame to create a new driver. And then we're going to go divided by using the slash key. And let's go with a value of five. Now what happens is for every five frames, the time value is going to go up to one. You can see here if I skip over to frame five, we now have one. If I skip over to frame ten, we now have a value of two, and so on going across the timeline, this is way too fast though. So if we play our animation, you can see this is way too fast. The ocean is going crazy. So let's slow this down quite a bit. If we click on this value, we can change the speed by increasing the value after the divide. Let's go with a value of 25. If we go with 25 now you can see it's moving a lot slower and that looks a lot better. The next couple of settings that we have here is the depth of the setting. And this is basically the depth of the ocean. If we set this to a lower value, it's going to create smaller waves. If we set it to a higher value, it's going to create bigger waves because the depth is much larger. We're going to leave that at a value of 200 because I do want larger waves. And then for the size this is basically scaling down the ocean. If I drag this value down, you can see it's going to scale it down, but drag it up, it's going to scale it up. These spatial size is basically the ocean size in meters. You can see here, if I drag this value down, it's going to change how the ocean looks, but it's going to try to keep those settings. We're gonna leave this spatial size at a value of 50 and the size up to one, the random state is pretty easy to understand that this basically just changes the seed of your ocean and gives you a different random pattern. For example, if you don't like this wave right here, I can drag that up to one and it's gonna give me a random variation just like that. I'm just going to leave that at 0. The generate normals option allows us to generate the normals of our ocean right here, which we can then plug into the material and change it how we want. We're going to leave that off for now. Next up, let's open up the waves option here and here we get into a lot of more interesting settings. If I drag this scale up, is going to scale up the height of our waves. As you can see there, we have much bigger waves. Now, if we play our animation here is the result that we get. The smallest wave option right here allows us to set the smallest wave that's going to be in the scene. This is gonna really get rid of a lot of detail if you drag this value of, because now the smallest wave is going to be what you set here. If I want the smallest wave in the ocean to be one meter, it's going to really smooth out everything. I like to set this down to 0 so we get the most detail in our ocean. The choppiness is also a cool setting. What this will do is it'll sharpen the edges of your ways. If I drag this value up, you can see all of the waves are a lot sharper now. We'll play it right there. And you can see right at this peak it's a lot sharper. If I drag this value down, it's going to smooth out the top there. But if it's up higher, it's going to sharpen out those peaks. I like to set this up to 1.5 for most of my animations. And I think that looks really nice. The wind velocity also controls the size of your waves. Higher values will make the waves a lot bigger but lower values like a value of three, for example, it's gonna give us a much smaller ways. Now that the waves are much smaller, the scale is incorrect. So we will need to bring the scale down to actually match the wind velocity. There we go. Now we have a much shallower ocean. I'm going to bring that back up to a value of 34, the wind velocity. And then for the scale, Let's go back up to 2.8. Next up is the alignment. The alignment controls the alignment of the waves. If this is all the way up to one, you can see all the waves are going in one direction. If this is down to 0, the waves are just going to go all over the place and there's not gonna be any alignment. I do like a little bit of alignment. So we're going to bring this up to a value of about 0.3. And I think that's going to look really nice. If you don't like the direction of the ways, you can also change that here. So if you wanted it to go at a 45-degree angle, you can go like that. And now they're going at this angle rather than going left to right. And the dampening value, what this will do if it's all the way up to one, there's gonna be no dampening and the waves are gonna go in this direction. But if the dampening is set down to 0, the waves are going to hit each other and bounce in the opposite direction. You can see here this wave is going to come up, hit there, and then go back down this way. Now the waves are bouncing off of each other and going back in the direction that they came from. But with the dampening it all the way up to one, they're not gonna do that and they're just going to go in one single direction. I like to have this value at around 0.5 and I think that looks pretty nice. Next up, let's check the foam checkbox and open up this panel. Here we have a data layer name and what we need to type in here is the word foam or any other word. And this will allow us to take that foam information and plug it into the material later, which we will cover in the next video. The coverage right here controls the amount of foam that's going to be in the scene. If you set this higher, it's going to cover a lot more area on the ocean. If it's set to lower, it's going to cover a lot less. With it set to 0. It's actually a pretty good amount of foam, even though it's set to 0, there is still going to be phone in the scene right here. So we're going to leave that at a value of 0. The spray option here is similar to the foam. It allows us to add in some spray particles. You also have another data layer name right here, which you can put in. For now though we're just going to leave that off. Next up is the spectrum. The spectrum is basically presets for the ocean right now it's on turbulence. So that means there's gonna be a lot of high waves, very chaotic looking ocean. If we switch it over to shallow water, the waves are gonna be much calmer now, in this case, we would need to bring down the wind velocity to make sure it looks good. And then also this scale, we'd have to drag down as well to actually get these shallow water to look good. There's also established ocean and then establish ocean with sharp peaks. What this is is if we select it and then we bring the wind velocity down, you can see the waves have now sharp peaks. But if we set it over to the established ocean, just like that, there are a lot more smooth. This is for more of like a lake or an ocean that there's barely any wind and all the waves are very, very small. That's probably what you're going to want to set it to. But since we are going for a high turbulent ocean and we're gonna set that back over to turbulent and then we're bringing the wind velocity up to 30. And finally, we have an option to bake in the ocean. And what this will do is it will actually export all of that information that we select here as textures. We can select the generate normals and we're gonna get a normal map. We can also generate the foam map, the spray map, and at the displacement map, we can set the end frame of how many textures we want to export and also the foam fade. So if we want the film to fade out quickly or slowly, we can set that here. And then all those textures are going to be put in this folder. If you click on bake ocean, all those textures are gonna be put into a single folder. As you can see here, we have all of the displacement textures. And I've actually already moved the textures into different folders. Here we have the foam, and then here we have this spray and inverse spray folders right here. If we open up these EXIF files into an editing program like Photoshop for example, here is what the displacement texture will look like. This is an RGB file. So if we take this texture and plug it into the material, it's going to give us that same displacement as the ocean in Blender right now, we can also take a look at the foam EXE file, and here's what the foam looks like. We can also take this texture, plug it into the material, changing up however we want. There's a lot of customization that you can do with the different textures. Baking in the ocean is not necessary for creating an ocean in Blender, it basically just exports those textures and allows for more customization, but you don't need to do that in order to create a notion. You can just check the foam checkbox, put in a name here, and already plugged that into the material. And that's actually what we're gonna do. We're not gonna need to make the scent. Bacon in the ocean is more for customization with the textures. And also if you wanted to submit your blend file to a render farm or something like that, then you would probably want to bake it in. But for most scenes you actually don't need to bake this end. We're just going to close that off for now. Now one thing that needs to be mentioned is we have a driver for the time value, and this controls the time of the animation, as you can see here, it's moving across. Now, this is not going to work when you bake in the ocean. You actually need to manually animate this value. It's not going to work. If you click on bake ocean, you're gonna get the same texture for every single frame of the animation. So drivers do not work. You need to actually manually animate this value. But since we're not vacant it in, we can use the time and that's going to work perfectly fine. There we go. We've now covered all of the different settings for our ocean modifier. In the next video, we're gonna be taking the ocean and actually adding a material to it. 26. Ocean Material: Now that we have our modifiers setup with all the different settings, Let's go ahead and create a material for this ocean. To do this, we're going to open up a new window by dragging the top and switching it over to the shader editor. We're going to press Enter to close up that panel. And now let's create the material to actually see what we're doing. Let's go into rendered view. I'm going to press Z and go into the rendered view. And we don't need the light up here. So go ahead and select the light, press X and delete it. Next up, let's add in an HDR to our scene to actually see and give us some lighting for our ocean. To do this, go over to the world settings, click on Color and switch it over to an environment texture. If you click on Open, you can now navigate to an HDR and open it into Blender. And the HDR that I'm gonna be using is off of HDR haven. Hdr haven is a great website for free HDR that are very high-quality and good for scenes just like this one. The one that we'll be using for this tutorial is **** underscore road for k. So go ahead and search that in HDR haven and download it. Once you have it downloaded, go ahead and select it and open image. And there we go. We now have opened it in our CNN. It is looking pretty good. Let's actually set the background to transparent so we can just focus on the ocean. So to do that, go over to the render settings underneath the film tab. Turn on at transparent. Now the background is now gone and now we can actually focus on creating the ocean. I'm gonna go ahead and toggle overlays by selecting that button right there. And that's gonna get rid of the grid and we can focus on creating the ocean material. The first thing that we need to do is set the roughness down to 0 so we get some nice reflections. And then the transmission, I'm going to go all the way up to one. Then for the base color, we're gonna go with a nice blue somewhere around here. Darken it quite a bit. Something like that is going to look pretty nice already. Our ocean is looking pretty cool. The next step is we need to add in the foam to our ocean. To do this is actually pretty simple. Let's add an input and then an attribute. If we go over to the Modifier Tab, once again, we can see here we have a data layer and the word that we have here is foam. What we need to do is take that exact word will control C to copy, and then we'll paste it over in this attribute node. So underneath the name we're going to press Control V or Command V on a Mac to paste in that foam data. We are now exporting the foam information from the ocean modifier and plugging it into the material. Next up we're going to press Shift a go-to shader and then add an a mix shader and place it right here. We're gonna take the factor from the attribute, plug that into the factor of the mix shader. Then we'll press Shift a and we need to plug in something in the bottom here to actually add in the foam. We're going to add in another principled shader. We'll place it right there. Then take the BSD f and plug it into the mix shader. Once we do this, you can see here it takes a minute and now we have a little bit of foam in our scene, but it's currently not very visible. To control this a bit more, we're going to add in a converter and then a math node and place it right here. If we then switch the mode over to multiply, this now controls the brightness of our phone. If we bring that up to, let's say ten, for example, we can see we have a lot more foam coming into our scene and that is looking pretty cool. You can also control the amount of bone by adding in a color ramp. So let's press Shift a, go over to colorRamp, will place it right there. Now this black handle controls the amount. If we drag this lower, it's going to clamp down on those foam values. And that's going to look a lot better because you can see here with it all the way down to 0, there's quite a bit of foam. It's like there's too much in here. If we drag this lower, it's going to clamp down on those values. Then of course, if you wanted it to be brighter or not as right, you can change the value in the multiply. You can see here if I drag that up or drag it lower, it's going to decrease the amount of foam just alike that. As for the shader, we're going to set the roughness down to 0 and the transmission value, we're gonna go up to 0.3. So there's a little bit of transmission. And also the other thing I forgot to do in the principled shader right here, the IOR, which stands for index of refraction, which we talked about earlier in the course. We're going to set that to 1.333 to match the IOR of water. There we go. That looks pretty good. You can then change the base color if you wanted to, if you wanted a bit more blue or a bit brighter or something like that will look pretty nice. The cool thing about using this method for the foam is now we can change the base color to whatever we want and that's going to affect the phone. For example, if I wanted blue foam, I can drag that up or red foam, green foam, all that. It's very customizable right here. We're just going to leave it at White though, because white is what foam looks like and I think that is looking pretty nice. There we go. We've now created the material for our ocean. We can go ahead and close this off by dragging this across and closing off that window. Now if we zoom in on the ocean and you're gonna notice we don't have a lot of detail in our ocean. And that's because the resolution in the modifier is currently too low. We're going to set both of these values, the render and the viewport up to 32. Once we do this, it might take a second, but now we have much more detail in our ocean and that is looking at much, much better. For the final render though I'm actually going to set the render amount to 40, but I'm gonna leave the viewport at 32 just so we can work in our scene a bit faster, but we have a higher resolution when we were actually render out the animation. What we're gonna do now is placed the camera. I'm going to position my viewport right about here. Then I'm gonna hit control and then Alt or Command and Option on a Mac and then numpad 0, Control Alt numpad 0. That's going to place the camera to wherever we are looking. From here, we can select it in the outliner, press G and then middle mouse button, and drag it backwards till we get the full view. But you might notice that this happens. And the reason this is happening is because the clipping is currently at 100 and the camera settings. So anything past 100 meters is going to get clipped off. Let's set this up to one thousandths. We can get the entire scene in our camera. And there we go. Now the ocean is back. From here. Just position the camera how you want. I might actually drag it down a little bit. You can double-tap are and move it upwards. Something like that is going to look pretty nice. Let's go to the Render Settings. I'm also going to turn on screen space reflections, so we get some nice reflections in the ocean. And then underneath the color management tab and the Render Settings, Let's set the look over to medium high contrast. That's going to just give us more contrast in our scene. And there we go. That looks pretty good. If you think the world settings are a bit too dark, you can go over to the world settings, maybe bring up the brightness of the world, something like that might look pretty nice. 1.2, I think is looking good. Let's go ahead and render this out into an image. I'm gonna press F12 to render out an image. And since we are using EV, it's gonna render very quickly. And there we go. It's already done in three seconds. Now this material also works in cycles. If we go over to the render settings and switch it over to cycles, it'll automatically work as you can see there, we can use the GPU and cycles and EV both work exactly the same and the ocean is going to look really nice. But since I want to render this an eBay, let's go back over to the AV render engine. Now finally, before this tutorial ends, I wanted to show you how you can add in the blue background as you saw at the beginning of this tutorial. What we're gonna do is jump over to the compositing workspace and then click on Use notes. I'm going to press N and then I'm going to drag this down. So we have a bit more room. The compositing workspace takes to render and then you can add some post-processing effects to it. In this case, we're gonna be adding in a background to actually see what we're doing. We're going to press Control Shift and then left-click on the render layers. This is going to add in a viewer node so we can actually see what we're doing. What we want to do. I'm going to press V a couple of times to actually zoom out so we can see the full thing. I'm going to press Shift a, go over to color and then add in an Alpha over node. We're going to place that right there. If we take the image and plug it into the bottom input of the Alpha over now the top input is going to control the background. In this case, I want it to be a blue color and then a very dark blue, something like that will look pretty nice. There we go. We now have a background and then we can take that image and plug it into the composite. Now when we render the animation, every single frame is going to have that blue background. To actually render out an animation in Blender. What we need to do is go over to the Output Settings. We're going to click on the Output folder right here and navigate to where we want our animation to save to the file format. We're going to switch it over to a movie file. Now normally if you render out in animation, you should probably render it as an image sequence and then sequence it out later. But in this case, since we're rendering an EV, it's gonna go very quickly. So I don't really see a need to render it as PNGs and then sequence it out later is just going to go quickly. So we're going to render it as a MP4 file. As for the container, we're going to switch it over to MPEG-4. And then the output quality, we're gonna go with high-quality. There we go. At this point, we can save our project, then go over to render and then click on Render Animation. But there we go. We've now created an ocean in Blender using the ocean modifier. Thank you for watching and if you created your own ocean, I would love to see it so you can post it in the assignment after this video or in the discussions. 27. Fluid Particle Animation P1 Modeling: Hello everyone. In this section we're gonna be creating the animation that you see on screen right now, I'll be showing you how to model this course and add in the particles, create the fluid simulation and render it out in cycles. Let's go ahead and get started. The first thing that we're gonna do in this video is create the obstacle course. This is just gonna be a couple of different planes and sum cubes laid out in a scene. So first off, let's figure out the dimensions that we want for our domain object. Let's go into front view by pressing one on the number pad, and then I'm going to press S, then x and scale this cube. It's pretty long, something like that. Then we're going to press S and Z and scale it up. So it's pretty tall as well. Somewhere around there is pretty good. At this point, we can go back into front view. I'm going to press Z and go into wire-frame. And then let's add in the rest of the objects. Let's add in some stairs on the left side going down at an angle. And a very easy way to create stairs is if we add in a new cube, we're going to go into edit mode and delete the bottom half right here. So I'm going to box select that bottom half, press X and delete it. So now we have this right angle. Then I'm going to select that top corner and press Control or Command B on your keyboard. And then we can just left-click. If we open up at this bevel panel down here, we can now set the bevel amount. If we drag this value up, you can see it's going to bring that bevel all the way down. And then if we open up the profile types down here underneath the custom, we can actually set a preset for the bevel. Then we can see right here we have an option for steps. If we check this box first, we need to add in a couple of more segments so there's more vertices in the bubble. So if we drag this up, you're gonna see that we now have stairs and very, very easily, just like that, I'm going to go with a value of 16, so we don't have that one in the middle. And there it is. We'll look at that. We now have stairs. We can go ahead and exit out of edit mode. And then I'm going to press S, then x and scale it up this way so it's a little bit longer. Then we'll go into front view once again and then place it in the top-left somewhere around here. I don't think I want this part of the mesh. I'm going to go into edit mode box selected that part on the bottom and you can press X and delete it. So we just have this flat surface right at the top there. Next up, let's add in the other objects. I want another plane to be right here. Going across this way, we'll add in a plane object, will place it there, rotate it a little bit, and then you can press S, then x. And you can scale it on the X. And if you press X one more time, it's going to scale it along this way. We're going to drag that up somewhere around there. You can press X twice again, scale it out. Something like that would look pretty nice. Then finally, the other object that we will add is a object down here That's going to be rounded out. What I'll do is I'll just press shift D on this plane. We're going to rotate it, place it right about there, then go into edit mode. And let's add in a loop cut in the middle of this plane. I'm going to press Control or Command R, add another loop cut, and then right-click. Let's go back into front view and drag this down so it's at an angle. Then we're going to bevel this edge once again. So it's a lot smoother. So press Control B, drag it outwards. Then you can left-click right about there. Right now you can see we're still using that stair preset, which is not what we want. So we're going to switch it back over to the super ellipse custom profile right there. There we go. Now we have a nice smooth transition. We could then drive the width up so it's a bit smoother. Somewhere around there is going to look nice. And finally, the last object that we will add is a cylinder and we're going to place it right over here. I'm going to scale it down, rotate it, scale it along the z, scale it down a bit and just place it right about there, I think will look pretty nice. So this is just going to be another object for the fluid to collide width. Now let's give all of these plain objects some thickness. I'm going to select the one up top here. We're going to go to the Modifier Tab and add an a solidify modifier. So click Add Modifier and then choose solidify. We're going to zoom in here and then we're going to turn on even a thickness, so everything is even throughout. And then we'll just drag this up a little bit so we get some thickness in our plane. Let's go ahead and add in a Bevel modifier as well to smooth out the corners so they're not as sharp. So click Add Modifier and choose Bevel. The other thing that you need to do whenever you apply a solidify or a bevel modifier is you need to apply the scale. If we press N and we look at the scale, you can see the X is at a weird number. So this means it's actually going to be scaling out the bevel according to this number. What we need to do is press Control or Command a and then click on Scale. And that's going to apply the solidify modifier and the bevel modifier evenly throughout the object. Now you can see the scale numbers are back down to one. For the amount in the bevel, we're going to drag this down so it's not as much. Then we're gonna turn up the segments up a little bit, something like that. It's going to look good. Let's apply these exact modifiers to the rest of the objects. I'm going to select it the plane down here and then the round plane. And then finally we'll select these stairs. Last, you can press Control L and then click on modifiers right here. Copy modifiers. Make sure you press Control a and apply the scale to all of these objects as well. There we go. We now have some thickness in the rest of our objects. Finally, before this video ends, let's add in a border around our domain object. To do this, let's add in a new cube and then I'm going to go into edit mode. I want to leave the origin point at the center right here because we're going to mirror the object on the right side. So to do this, go into edit mode and then move it along the x by pressing G and then x. And you can see the origin is still there. If you move it in object mode is actually going to move the origin point. So make sure you move it in edit mode. Next, we're gonna go over to the Add Modifier and then click on a mirror. And you can see it mirrored it along the right side, which is what we want. We're going to scale this down along the x, scale it up along the z, something like that. We'll select that bottom half at the bottom e to extrude. And then we'll box selected at the bottom right there to select that face and then extrude it out this way. Let's turn on clipping in the modifier and this will make sure that we actually clip inside the mirror, which is good just like that. And then we can press X and delete that face just like that. There we go. We now have a border for our domain object. And in the next video we're actually going to be setting up the simulation. 28. Fluid Particle Animation P2 Simulating: Now that we have our scene setup, let's create the simulation. First. We need a flow objects, so let's add in a new cube, will scale it down a little bit and place it in the top left corner. I'm going to press S and then z and scale it down so it's a little bit thinner and just like that. And then place it right about here. Make sure it's not super close to the domain or it's not going to work properly. So just probably around there is going to be good. Next up, let's select the domain object and we'll create the simulation over in the physics tab. We're going to select fluid and set the type over to domain. The domain type we're going to choose a liquid and then further resolution divisions. Let's go all the way up to 96. The other thing that we're going to want to change is the timesteps and maximum and minimum values. Currently there at 41. And with these values, some of the particles are actually going to pass through the collision object, which is not going to look the best. So to counteract this, to help prevent any particles from exiting the collisions, we're going to set the maximum up to six and the minimum all the way up to a value of three. That's going to look a lot better. Next up, let's come down here to the liquid settings. With this simulation, I've noticed that the particles tend to gain a lot of volume when simulating. So to help prevent that, Let's set the particle radius down to a value of 0.7 and Enter. Next up, we're going to set the narrow bandwidth all the way up to ten. And this is going to fill out the entire simulation full of particles. You'll notice with it set to three, there's gonna be a thin layer on top. But if you turn this value up, there's gonna be more particles and it's going to fill out the entire fluid. With that down, we're going to go ahead and select that the flow objects. We're going to choose fluid and set the type over to flow. As for the flow type, we're going to select a liquid. And then for the flow behavior, let's choose inflow. The other thing that we're going to do is animate when they use flow turns off. I want it to simulate over 50 frames. And then on frame 50, I want the use flow to turn off Frame affording nine, we're going to check little button on the side to add in a keyframe to the US flow. We're going to skip to the next frame at frame 50, turn this off and then add an another keyframe. And just like that, let's also turn on initial velocity and set the z direction so the fluid will shoot downwards a little bit faster. Let's go with a negative 0.5 and Enter. Next, let's add in collision to the rest of the objects. We're going to select the object with the stairs. We're going to select fluid, set the type over to factor, and then make sure is playing R is checked because this is a plane object. We're also going to jump over to the Modifier Tab and makes sure the fluid modifier is at the very top of the modifier stack. This way it doesn't take into account the solidify or the bevel, but just the plane. Let's do that same thing for the rest of the objects. I'm going to select the plane, go over to the Physics tab, select to fluid, and then select effector, and then make sure is planner is checked. Then over in the Modifier tab, we're going to drag it all the way up to the very top. As for the cylinder, we don't need to add the is planar, but we do need to add in the effector. As for the curve, we're going to select it, choose fluid and then of course effector and then make sure is planar. Then over in the Modifier tab, we're going to drag it all the way up to the very top. There we go. That's basically all we really need to do with the domain selected. We're just going to double-check that everything else looks good, which I think it does. So over in the cache settings, we're going to set the type over two modular. Turn on is resumable just in case we want to stop the bake. With that done, we're ready. I'm going to save our project and then I'm going to click on a vague data. 29. Fluid Particle Animation P3 Materials: The simulation has finished baking and here is our results. I'm gonna go ahead and restart the simulation and play it. And we can see here it is. As you can see, that does look pretty nice. One thing that we have an issue with is there is a very large gap between the fluid and the collision objects. Now one way to fix that is to actually invert the solidify modifier because currently it's going downwards, but we can actually make it so the solidify is moving upwards. To do that, select your object, go over to the Modifier tab, open up the solidify modifier and there is an offset which is currently at negative one. If we drive that all the way up to positive one, it's actually going in this direction now. Now if we play it, you can see it's much closer. If you want to, you can drag this up even further to get even closer to the fluid. Somewhere around there is probably going to look nice. Let's do that for the rest of the objects will select the plane, open up the solidify, set the offset all the way up to one, and then drag it up just a tiny bit so it's a bit closer to the fluid. We're going to select this object as well. We'll player stimulation right about there. Looks good. Open up these, solidify, drag it up to one, and move it up just a little bit, and there we go, That looks much better. The next step in this tutorial is we need an object to be the particle. To do this, we're going to add in an ecosphere, select the ecosphere and then open up the menu down here at the bottom, and then set these subdivisions down to one with it's at T2. There's gonna be a lot of geometry when we represent this object as each particle. So to help them memory of the scene, we're gonna set this down to one. You can drag it over to the left so it's out of the way and then select the domain objects. Jumping over to the particle system tab, we can see we have a liquid particle system. Go ahead and select that, and then open up the render and the viewport display. The Render. We're going to render it as an object. And then for the incident objects, we're going to select the ecosphere. If we play our simulation, we can see exactly what this looks like. And as you can see, that is actually looking pretty cool, but currently the particles are way too big. So let us play or stimulation until we find a nice frame somewhere around there. And then let's scale down at the particles to what we want. Probably a value of 0.02, I think would look pretty good. Something like that. You can play around with it and set the exact size. I might go a little bit smaller than that. Let's go 0.015. There we go. I'm liking how that looks. The other thing that you're going to want to turn off is the show emitter. With this turned on, you're going to render a solid cube. So make sure this is turned off. So it actually renders the particles that are inside, but not the cube itself. Same thing goes for the viewport. Let's turn it off in the viewport so we can actually see the particles in solid view, because if this is turned on, we can't see it. You can see it's the solid cube, but if we turn it off, we can now see the particles. Next up, let's add in a background I'm going to add in a plane object will rotate this 90 degrees, place it in the back of the scene just like this, and scale it up pretty big. I'm gonna move it right here, so it's right next to the fluid, just like that. Now let's create the material for the particles. We're going to go over to the render tab and switch the render engine from EV over two cycles because we're gonna be using a node that is only supported in the Cycles Render Engine. And then for the device, we're going to choose the GPU. To open up the node editor. We're gonna come up here to the top-right click and drag to split this view and then switch it over to the shader editor. I'm going to press N to close off that panel and then select it the ecosphere. Whenever you apply a material to particle systems, you need to make sure you apply it to the original particle mesh. In this case, it's the ecosphere. With it selected, we're going to click New to create a new material. Let's go into front view, zoom in a little bit, and then press Z and go into rendered view. We can see here is what it looks like. There's not that much lighting in the scene. So let's go ahead and select the light and then actually move it towards the front. Just like this. Then for the world settings, we're gonna go over to the world. Drag this up so it's a little bit brighter so we can see everything that's going on. Then let's select the ecosphere once again. For this material, we're gonna be using a node called the particle info node. If we press Shift a and go over to input, there is a particle info node right here. Go ahead and select that. With this node, we can either take the random output and this is gonna give a random value to each particle. So you could set it into a color ramp. Every particle will have a random color. You can also change the Age of it, the lifetime, all of that. But the one that we're gonna be using is the velocity. If we control shift. If we take the velocity and plug that into the base color of the principled shader. It's going to look like this. Now what this is doing is it's taking the velocity of each particle and giving it a certain value, and then that's gonna be the color of it. The red particles means that it's moving very quickly in the black particles, the blue and black particles, that means it's moving very slowly. We can actually change this by adding in a new node. We're going to add in a hue saturation node. We'll place it right here. If we take the value, Let's bring that up to 15, so it's a lot brighter. Now we get a very colorful looking particle system. If we then play it, we can see what it looks like. Let's go ahead and skip to a different frame. And you can see this is actually looking pretty cool. If we want it to use one single color and just a shade of that color, what we need to do is add in a new node, we're going to add in a color mix RGB. We'll place it right here. And it's currently lagging quite a bit. So I'm going to skip to a frame where there's not that many particles. Frame 40. There you go. You can see actually there it is. The lender has now updated. What we're gonna do is switch the mode from mix over to color down here. And then for the color, we're going to select any color that we want. In this case, if we switch it over to blue and set the factor all the way up to one. Every single particle is going to be that shade of blue. If we then skip to a different frame, we can see that is the effect that we get. You can change it to whatever color that you want. You can also add in a color ramp. If you wanted to add in multiple colors to your particle system, you can do that. For now though, I think I might stick with a nice orange color. I might drag this over to like a reddish orange somewhere around here. For the principled shader, I'm going to bring the roughness down just a little bit so the particles are a bit more glossy. Let's go with a value of 0.1. Then for the rest of the materials, we're going to select the plane. We're going to give it a new material. Let's also restart the simulation so it renders very quickly. The base color. We're gonna go with a nice dark gray somewhere around there. And then for the obstacles and the rest of the objects, we will select the border, give it a new material. This one is gonna be a blue. I'll set the roughness lower and then maybe darken it just a little bit, something like that. Now if I want to apply this exact blue to the rest of the objects, what we need to do is first select each one of them. I'm going to select the curve, the plane of the cylinder, the stairs, and then holding Shift, I'm going to select it the border once again, this is the object with the blue color. We're going to press Control L or Command L on a Mac and then click on a link materials. Now every object that we have selected is going to have that exact color that we set up here. If we press the Z, go back into rendered view, there it is. Now they all have the same color. I'm going to select the cube up here and then I'm going to turn it off in the viewport and in the render by clicking the buttons in the top right and the outliner, because I don't want it that object who show up in the render. So we're going to turn it off. Then finally, what we're gonna do is set up the camera. I'm going to go into front view once again, press Control Alt numpad 0 to snap the cameras to place. You can also go up to View, down to Align View and then click on Align active camera to view. That's gonna do the exact same thing. Then you can select the camera, move it backwards and position it how you want. As for the Render Settings, we're going to jump over to the render panel, scroll down to the color management tab and set the look too high contrast. This is gonna give us more contrast in the scene. And as you can see, that looks a lot better. Then for the render sampling, it's currently at 4,096, which is way too much. So let's bring this down to a value of 25. I'm going to press Control S to save my project and then head over to the output tab. We're going to be rendering this as an image sequence. And then I'm going to show you how to sequence it out later. And the reason we are rendering it as an image sequence rather than an MP4 file, is because we can stop the render at any point and then resume it right at that exact frame. If you render it as an MP4 file, you can't stop the render a halfway through. You have to let the entire thing finished to get the final result. But if you render it as a PNG, you can stop at N. Resume it. If overwrite is unchecked. If overwrite is unchecked, it's going to resume at the frame that it left off of. If overwrites checked, it's going to restart and overwrite every image in that folder. Make sure if you do stop the render, you uncheck overwrite so it doesn't restart over on the right side. Make sure you click on this button to set an output to where you want your frames to go to. I'm just going to put it in this folder and then click accept. With that done, we're ready to render. So make sure you save your project once again, you can change the rest of the settings. You can change the color, mess around with the lighting, do whatever you want. It's all up to you. Once you are happy with your scene, you can go over to render and then click on Render Animation. This will open up a new window and it will start to render out. In the next video, I'm gonna show you how you can sequence it out into a movie file. 30. Fluid Particle Animation P4 Seuqencing: Alright, the render has finished and here is our result. As you can see, it does look pretty good. If you want to view the entire animation, what you can do is exit out of this window, go over to render and then click on view animation. This will bring up a new window and it might be a little bit laggy right now because it's calculating all the different frames. But once it's done calculating it will play smoothly. So you can see here once it reaches the end and now it's going to play smoothly. And as you can see, the material does look pretty nice. It's changing colors as the particles are moving around. The higher, the faster moving particles have a parameter color, the slower moving particles have a darker color. And it looks really nice. Now what we're gonna do is sequence all of those frames into a MP4 file. You can see here if we open up that folder, all the images are located right here. We're going to take all of those images and sequence them out. To do this, head over to the top corner right here, click on that plus sign, click on video editing and select the video editing workspace. On frame one, we're going to click Add and go over to image sequence and then navigate to those images. Mine are right here. And then we're going to make sure a frame one is at the very top. If for some reason it's on modified date, you can see 250 is at the top, is going to play backwards. So make sure you come up here and sort by name rather than modified date. Then you can press a to select everything and go Add Image strip. There we go. We can see it in our scene. And now what we're gonna do is we're gonna come over here to the output tab. We're gonna change the file format over to mpeg. And then underneath the encoding, switch it over to mp4. And then for the output quality, let's go with a high-quality. The other thing that you might notice is there is a lot of contrasts in our scene. The reason that's happening is because the color management over here is set too high contrast. And we already applied the high contrast to the images. It's applying the high contrast again over top. If you don't want it to look like this, just set the look over to none. But I think it does look pretty nice, but I think it's a bit too much. I'm going to set it over to medium high contrast. With that done, we're ready to render it out. I'm gonna save my project once again, then go over to render, and then click on Render Animation. That's going to take all of those images and sequence them together. But there you go. That is how you create a particle fluid animation in Blender using mantle float. Thank you for making it all the way to the end of this section. And if you create something cool, makes sure to post it in the assignment or in the project and discussions. 31. Fluid Cube Simulation P1 Rigid Bodies: Hello everyone and welcome to a new section. In this section we're going to be creating the animation that you see on screen. We're gonna be covering a lot of different topics including rigid body simulations, fluid simulations, effectors, and a bunch of other things. So let's go ahead and get started. The first thing that we're gonna do in this video is create the rigid body simulation. To do this, we're going to be animating this cube, falling down on a couple of platforms and then landing on the ground. What I'll do is I'll go into front view and they'll place the cube over in the top-left, somewhere over here. Then I'm going to press shift D on this cube, drag it below, and this is going to be the first platform. I'm going to scale it along the z-axis, so it's a little bit smaller, Something like that. Then I'll press shift D, I'll drag it over here. And then one more time we'll drag it over right about there. And then I'll just drive them all up so they're a little bit above the ground. Next up we're going to select this cube and we're going to place it about halfway across here. So when it falls down, it hits the side and then rolls across the different platforms and then lands on the bottom. We also need a plain objects I'm going to add in a plane and then I'll just scale it up so it fits the different platforms. There we go. So now let's go ahead and set up the rigid body simulation. I'm going to select my cube up here and go over to the Physics tab and then click on rigid body. We're going to leave the type on active, but now we need to add the rigid body to the rest of the objects. We will select this object first. We will go with rigid body, and this time we're gonna change the type from active to passive. Passive means that it's going to stay in its exact spot, but it's still going to interact with the scene. Now an easy way to copy that exact rigid body to the rest of the objects is if we select the plane, selected the bottom platform, the middle platform, and then select it this one. Last, we're gonna go over to object down to rigid body and then click on copy from active. This means it's going to copy all of the settings with our active object. Currently it's at passive. So now every single one of these will have that passive type. There we go. So now let's go ahead and play the simulation to see what it looks like. We can see here the cube lands, it goes like that and then falls. And I think that looks pretty nice. There we go. You can play around with the position of the platforms. If you want them to be a little bit more vertical, you can move them like that. And so now what happens is it will look like this, which could look pretty cool. What I might do though is it might just go a little bit that right about here. And so it's a little bit more vertical and the cube will actually fall down a bit faster and roll a couple of more times. Let's check this out. And that looks pretty nice. With that done, we're ready to bake in our simulation. What we're gonna do is go over to the scene panel and open the Rigid Body Worlds. How this is gonna work is we're going to bake in the rigid body and then convert all of those baked files into keyframes. Because the rigid body does not work with the fluid simulation, we actually need to apply keyframes to this. So what I'll do is I'll go back over to the scene panel. We're going to bake in. Let's see, let's see how long our animation is. Then it stops right about there. Let's bake in a 100 frames over any cash panel. We're going to set the end frame to 100. Then we're just going to click on bake, and it should bake very quickly. At this point, we need to convert this over to keyframes. To do this, go over to object with the cube selected, go down to rigid body and then click on it, bake two key frames. We're going to set the end frame to 100. Then we're gonna click on OK. You can see here is all of the different keyframes. And if we play our simulation now, it looks like that. Not too bad. We can go ahead and get rid of the rigid body for the other objects. We don't need them anymore, so I'm just going to delete it off of all of these platforms. And then we'll delete it off of the plane just like that. And there we go. We've now set up the rigid body. And in the next video we're going to create the fluid simulation. 32. Fluid Cube Simulation P2 Simulating: Now that we have a rigid body simulation set up, let's work on the fluid simulation. The first thing that we need to add is the domain object. I'm going to press Shift a and add in a new cube. We're going to scale this cube up, drag it up, and then press S and Z to scale it up so it's the correct height. And we want to make sure that this cube is inside the domain object at all points in the animation. We're going to scale it along the x-axis so it's the correct width as you can see there. Then we're going to jump over to frame 115 or so. And we can see there is a big gap here. We don't need to make it this big, so I'm going to scale it down and drag it over. We'll restart the animation, drag it over this way. Then I'll press S and Z, this scale it up just a tiny bit, just like that. We're going to skip to the end and make sure it's inside, as you can see, it's currently outside of the domain. So I'm going to scale it along the y and drag it over just slightly. You can scroll through the animation and make sure it works correctly, which it does. Perfect. Now let's add in the domain. Over in the physics panel we're going to select fluid and set the type or R2 Domain. We're going to change the domain type over to a liquid simulation, and then we'll leave the rest of the settings as default for now. Next up, let's add in the flow object. To do this, select your cube. We're going to press Shift S and go cursor to select it. And then let's add in a new cube. Let's scale this cube down a little bit. Press S and Z. And then we're going to scale this to be about half the size of the collision object. So right about there is probably good. Over in the physics panel, we're going to select fluid and set the type or R2 flow where the flow type we're going to choose liquid and then the flow behavior we're going to select inflow. Now for the collision object, go ahead and select it, then go over to the Physics tab, select fluid and set the type over to effector. Now if we try to simulate this with the default settings, if we try to simulate it, I'll just refresh the setting. You can see there is no fluid that is showing up. The reason for this is because flow objects inside collision objects don't really work that great using mantle flow, there is a couple of things that we need to set up in order to get this to work properly. One of the main reasons why this is not simulating is because blender is treating this object as a completely solid cube. If we go into edit mode and it's come over here and enable the normals by clicking this button down here. And I'll just drag up the size a little bit so you can see it. You can see the normals are pointed in the outward direction. This means that blender is thinking this is completely solid. In order to get the fluid to actually simulate, we need to invert the normals. So blender thinks this is an empty object rather than a solid cube. To do this, press Shift N. And then over here in this menu, make sure you turn on the inside. And now the normals are pointing to the inside of the object rather than the outside. There we go. The other thing that we need to do is create a whole is somewhere in this cube. If we refresh the setting and play the animation, you can see the fluid is simulating, but it's not colliding with the collision. And also it looks like this is set to a inflow, which it is. So let's bring that over to geometry. We don't want to use the info setting to get this to actually stay inside the cube. What we need to do is turn on is planar. If we do this though, you're gonna notice that it doesn't simulate all the fluid has disappeared. What we need to do now is actually create a hole somewhere inside this cube. What we're gonna do is go into edit mode and we're gonna select the top face here. So go into the face select mode, select the top face. We're going to press I2 and set. Then I'm going to press X and delete that face. Then what I'll do is I'll go into the vertices select mode, select that loop right there by holding Alt and selecting it. And we'll just press G, Shift Z and you can move it across. The phase will just drag it over here so it's in the top corner. You need to make sure the hole over here is bigger than the resolution of your domain. You can see the cube here is pretty large. The resolution that we're gonna be using is actually a 160 over in the resolution divisions. Let's go up to 160. And once we do this, you can see the fluid is actually now simulating. And then the cube is that small. So we can actually bring the size of this hole down just a little bit. Somewhere around there is probably good. Let's make sure this is working properly by refreshing a setting. And you can see the fluid is still there, which is good. It's the fluid has disappeared and make sure you have a bigger hole in your collision object. Finally, the last thing that we're going to add is an outflow to catch any fluid that exits outside of this collision object. I'm going to press Shift a and an a new cube. We're going to scale this cube upwards just like this. So it's a little bit bigger than over in the physics tab. We're going to select fluid and set the type over to flow. And then for the flow type we're going to choose liquid. And then for the flow behavior, we're going to select outflow. Again, we need to invert the normals because right now this is a completely solid cube. So it's going to delete all of the fluid that's inside it, go into edit mode and press Shift N and then select inside. So the normals are actually pointed to the inside and it doesn't delete the fluid that's inside, but only anything that touches it on the outside. The other thing that you need to turn on is the planar makes sure that is enabled and then set the surface emission up to a value of 0.1. Let's bring up the sample stuff steps up to a value of three. And then also to get this outflow to actually follow the collision object, make sure it's selected. Then you can hold Shift and select the collision. We're going to press Control P and parents at to the collision object. Now you can see the outflow is actually following the rest of the cube. And there we go. We've now created the simulation. And if you've done everything correctly, it should simulate properly. Over in the time-steps maximum, we're going to bring that up to a value of five and the minimum up to a value of two. This will make sure that no fluid exits outside of the collision. And if it does, the outflow will delete it. Over in the rest of the settings. We're going to bring the flip ratio up to a value of one. This is going to create bigger splashes over any fractional obstacles. We're going to enable it and set the obstacle distance down to 0.1. This will make sure the fluid is very close to the collision object. Next up we're going to enable foam over here. So this will create some foam particles on the top. And then we're also going to enable mesh and set the particle radius down to a value of 1.3 and enter for the end frame, I'm going to set this lower to a value of 180. I think that is all the settings that we need to change. Let's go back down over to the cash at setting and switch the type over two modular and then turn on is resumable. We're gonna bake the particles first just to make sure everything is working properly and the particles don't exit outside of the collision object or anything messes up. What that done, save your project and then click on it. Fake data. I would probably stop it at about frame 50 just to make sure it is working properly, then you can resume it. My stimulation has finished baking and here is the result. If we play it, you can see all of the fluid stays inside the collision object at all times. If it exits out, it gets deleted from the outflow. I really like how that looks. So I'm gonna go ahead and bacon at the particles and the mesh. So go ahead and select your domain object, scroll down to the particle tab and then click on bake. Once this is finished bacon, we'll begin at the mesh. 33. Fluid Cube Simulation P3 Materials: The simulation has finished baking and here is our results. I'm gonna go ahead and play the simulation and you can see what it looks like. As you can see, the fluid stays inside the cube as it's simulating and it looks pretty cool. Now in this video, we are going to set up the particle system and create the lighting materials and then render it out using EV. To get started, let's do the particle system. I'm going to press Shift a and add in an IPO sphere. This is going to represent the particle. Make sure you open up this tab right here and set the subdivisions down to a value of one, just so we don't have a lot of geometry in the scene. Let's move it over to the left side, scale it down a little bit, and then we can select our domain. We're going to jump over to the particle system tab, which is right here. And then we're going to turn off the liquid one. We're not going to need that and turn off it in the render as well. Let's open up both of these tabs. And then over in the render panel, we're going to select Render as halo to render as objects. And then for the Incident Object, Let's select the ecosphere. Let's find a frame where we can actually see all of the particles. Let's skip to frame 50 or so. And then we'll zoom in here. It might be a little bit hard to see, but you can notice that the particles are very large. Let's scale them down a little bit by changing the scale value. Let's go with a value of 0.01 and we'll see what that looks like. There we go. I think that looks a lot better right now are seen as ligand quite a bit. So what I'll do is I'll just turn it off in the viewport so it doesn't show up in the view. And we can actually move around the scene a lot better over in the outliner. Let's go ahead and hide it, both the outflow and the collision object. Select it and then click on the little eye right there to hide it from the view. And let's hide it from the render as well. If we select our outflow, you'll notice that it's not showing up in the outliner over here. And that's because it's actually a parented to this cube. We need to open up this cube and then we can see it located there. So make sure you hide that from the viewport and from the render as well. So we don't see that, but we just see the fluid itself. And as for the flow object, Let's go ahead and select it and then hide that as well from the view and from the render. If we take a look at our fluid, you're going to notice that it doesn't really look that smooth. You can see there's a lot of jaggedness in our fluid. What we can do to make that look a little bit better is add in a smooth modifier. Jumping over to the Modifier tab, Let's click Add Modifier and select these smooth modifier. On the right side we have a factor and mount, and this controls the strength of it. Let's set this, let's set this up to a value of two. Then as for the repeat option here, it will just repeat that factor. Let's go up to a value of three for this. There you go. You can see that looks a lot more smooth. We can also right-click and shade it smooth as well. Now if we skip to frame like 70 or so, we can see that looks a little bit better. This is with it turned on and then this is with it turned off. You can see there's a lot of jaggedness, but if we enable it, it smooths it out. There we go. That looks pretty nice. Now let's create the material for our fluid. Jumping over to the Material tab, we're going to click on Add New to create a new material. Then we're going to scroll down here to the transmission value and turn that all the way up to a value of one. This is gonna make our fluid looked like water. If we press Z and go into rendered view, we can see what it looks like. It might be a bit hard to see. So let's add in an HDR over in the world settings. Let's click on the color and select environment texture. Let's use the same HDR that we use for the ocean tutorial, which is **** road forks. Go ahead and select it and open image. That's the one off of HDRI haven. We can set the strength of this to a value of two. There we go, we now have some lighting. Let's go ahead and select our fluid once again and go back over to the Material tab. I'm going to set the roughness of this down to 0. And then the IOR, I'm going to set that to 1.333 to match the IOR of water. As for the color, Let's bring it down a little bit and just give it a slightly blue color. And then it over here in the settings, we need to make sure we use Alpha blend. Then also make sure that the screen space refraction is turned on. Now jumping over to the render settings in EV, we're going to enable screen space reflections and then make sure refraction is turned on. And now we should be able to see through the object. There we go. That looks a lot better. As for the other materials. Let's select the cube right here and we'll go over here and then we'll just change the base color over to a blue, and then we'll darken it to be a nice grayish blue color. I'll set the roughness down to a value of 0.1 so we get some nice reflections. The other thing I'm going to add to this platform is I'm going to bevel out the edges, jumping over to the modifier tablets, add in a Bevel modifier. Make sure you press Control a and apply the scale to it as well so the bevel works correctly. And then we'll set the amount down here much lower, somewhere around 0.02. And then we'll bring up the segments up to three. Select the object down here and then select the middle platform. And then finally the one with the bevel last and let's link them together. We'll press Control L and click on Copy modifiers. And then make sure you apply the scale as well to both of these objects. And that will look pretty nice. There we go. As for the particle material, Let's go ahead and select the particle. Let's also right-click and shade it smooth. Over in the material tab. We'll give it a new material, and then we'll just leave it at the white color. I think that will look the best. I'm going to position my camera right about here. And when you find the view that you want, you can press Control Alt and numpad 0, and that'll snap the camera to view. Or you can go over to view down to a live view and then select a line camera to view. And that'll do the exact same thing. Select your camera. You can press G middle mouse button to zoom outwards. Place it somewhere around here. And then you can play your animation to see what it looks like. If you want to, you can also animate the camera. So if you wanted to place the camera right about here on frame one, you can hit I and go location rotation and then skip to frame a 180. That's when the simulation ends. You can drag the camera down and then zooming in on this object right about there and then hit I and add in another location keyframe. Then what you can do is just skip through here. You might notice that the camera doesn't follow it to that spot. So what I usually do here is I'll just move the camera down. I add an another location keyframe. And there we go. That looks a bit better. I also don't want to see the background here. So one thing that you can do to prevent the background from showing up is with this plane object, you can go into edit mode and select those two back of vertices. If you extrude them upwards, that'll hide the background. You can also select this edge again and you can bevel it so it smooths it out. This will give a nice gradual look to the background. What I'll do is I'll press Control or Command V automatic. Scroll out a little bit and then use the scroll wheel to add in more geometry. Once you're happy with it, you can left-click and then go out of that mode. And if we look in the camera view, we now have a nice transition in the background as you can see there. That is a trick that I use quite often when rendering out scenes like this. We can also right-click and shade it smooth and that will smooth it out even more. I'm gonna go ahead and pause right about there. And let's render out this frame to see what the particle system looks like. I'm going to save my project and then hit F12. And there we go. It finished rendering and about two seconds. And if we zoom in here, you can see the particles there. You can see a lot of particles inside the fluid, and that looks pretty nice. It's gonna be a little bit hard to see the particles because we're using AV and it doesn't really work that great with reflections and glass. If you render this in cycles, it'll probably look better, but it's gonna take a lot longer to render. So I'm just going to stick with, with EV. One final thing that I'll do before we render this out is I'm gonna come over to the color management and I'm gonna set the look too high contrast. This will just give the overall contrast to the scene a little bit. And then for the background plane, I think it's a bit too bright. So we're going to create a new material for that and just bring the color of it, it down just a little bit somewhere around there just to make sure it's not so blown out and the camera. As for the roughness, I will also turn that down just a tiny bit to give us some nice reflections. But there we go. From here you can go over to the output tab, set an output folder, and then render this into an animation. We covered how to render animations in the last tutorial. So we're gonna go ahead and skip that for now. But there we go. That is how you create a fluid simulation inside an object. Thank you for watching this tutorial and making it to the end. And if you created something cool, makes sure to post it in the assignment or in the discussions after this video. 34. Creating a Waterfall P1 Modeling: Hello everyone and welcome to a new section. In this section we're going to be creating a waterfall using Blender and Mansa flow. We're gonna go through step-by-step on how to model the waterfall. We're gonna be adding in a plane, extruding it, changing it up a little bit. And then we're gonna be adding in some rocks, then creating the simulation and rendering it out. And I'm gonna be showing you exactly how to do that. So with that out of the way, let's go ahead and get started. We don't need the default cube, so I'm going to press X and delete it. Then we're going to add in a mesh and a plane object. This is going to be the basic waterfall shape. What I'll do here is I'll rotate it by 90 degrees along the x-direction, so it's standing up like that. I'll go into edit mode, press G and Z and drag it upwards. So the origin point is right there. Let's scale it along the x, so it's a little bit longer, just like that. And now let's add in a lot of geometry, I'm going to press Control R to add in a loop cut, and then using the scroll wheel, let's drag it up a little bit. So we get around like eight cuts or so, something like that. Then we can left-click and then right-click, just like that. Next, Let's hold Alt and select that top row just like that. And let's extrude it along the Y. So press E to extrude, drag it out this way. Then we will press E to extrude again, we'll drag it upwards and then E to extrude one more time and we'll drag it backwards. This is the basic shape of the waterfall. There's gonna be a small drop and then a bigger drop right here. Now currently this is very boring and flat and it's not going to really look that great. So let's give it some randomness and change it up a little bit. I'm going to go into edge select mode by hitting that button right there. Or you can press to on your keyboard. And then let's press O to turn off proportional editing or you can click right here to turn it on as well. I'm going to select that face in the middle and press G and then y and drag it backwards, just like this. And you can use the scroll wheel to drag the proportional up or down. Let's give it a little bit of roundness. And then also I will select that face right, or that edge, I mean, right there, G and Y drag this back a little bit. And we're basically giving this waterfall some randomness. I'll select this face, maybe I'll drag that back a little bit. Selected this one, drag it forward, and just kind of doing something like that. Then over here in the back, we will select these, these couple of phases. I'll select all four of those, maybe that one as well. We'll move this back just like that. Something like that looks good. We'll go back into edge select mode. We'll select that edge and that edge, drag that backwards. Maybe we'll drag this forward a little bit so there's a drop. And then maybe I'll grab this edge, drag that one back. Then over here I'm going to hold Alt and selected that edge loop. And then I'm going to press Control V to bevel it. Let's drag it out, something like that. It looks a little bit better. Let's do the same thing on top. So going back into edit mode, I'm going to hold the Alt key, select that edge loop, press Control or Command B and just bevel it, something like that. And you can use the scroll wheel to add in more geometry. We'll just go something like that. Looks fine. Same thing down here. I'm going to hold Alt, select that edge Control B. And then we'll go something like that. It's probably good. We'll add in two loops. And there we go. That's not too bad. If you want to. You can also add in a little bit of geometry in the middle here. So if you press Control R, add in some geometry, maybe drag that part down a little bit. Drag this part up, something like that just to give it even more randomness. Then in the back here we'll do the exact same thing. Adding a couple more. Luke cuts, select a random bit, drag it up, or drag it down. Something like that. It's probably good. Alright, there we go. I'm liking how that looks. Now for the rocks, I'm going to press Shift a and add in an ecosphere. Then we're going to open up this menu and set the subdivisions up to a value of four. Then from here I'm going to scale this along the z-axis, so it's more of like an egg shape. Then let's add in the displacement modifier. So jumping over to the Modifier Tab, I'm going to click Add Modifier and select displacement. We're gonna give it a new texture by selecting New. Then over in the Texture tab down here, we're going to change the type from image or movie over two clouds, will drag the size up so the displacement is not so small. Something like a value of 1.3 or so, we'll probably be good. Then jumping back over to the Modifier tab, we're going to bring the strength down just slightly. Maybe scale it along the x and just kind of play around with it. The other thing we're gonna do is for the coordinates it's currently set to local. So that means it's using the local coordinates. If we switch this over to global, if we move it around, it's going to change how the displacement works. This is very useful when we duplicate the rock. It's not going to use the same coordinate texture, so it's gonna be different. Let's go ahead and set these shrink down a little bit. I think it's a little bit too strong. And then also I'm going to select the bottom half down here, select just the random edge. And I'm going to press G and Z and drag it up so it's a little bit more flat. And I think that looks a little bit better. It's more of a rock shape. It will do the same thing on top here. And yeah, there we go. That looks a little bit better. Now what we can do is scale this down and place it like in the middle right here so the water will hit it and go on either side. Maybe drag it down somewhere like this. Let's also right-click and shade it smooth. Then we will select the plane right-click Shade Smooth as well. We can select this one, Shift D it double-tap ours, we rotate it around, scale it down a little bit, drag it up, something like that. Then we can select this one will shift D it over here. And you just want to place it in random spots along the river just to add more variation and randomness that will make the simulation look pretty cool. Something like that is probably good. There we go. So the water is going to hit it and split on either side. Well, the Shift D, this one, drag it down here so the water will hit this object's, place it here, something like that. Maybe scale it up a little bit and then place it on that side, I think will look pretty cool. And there we go. I like how that looks. We have some random rock spread out. The water is going to hit them and splashed all over the place. And it's going to look pretty nice. Now in the next video, we're going to set up the simulation. 35. Creating a Waterfall P2 Simulating the Fluid: Now that we have our waterfall setup, let's create these simulation. Let's first add in an inflow. So I'm gonna hold shift and then right-click to place my cursor in the back. Then let's press Shift a and add in a plane object. We're going to rotate this plane 90 degrees along the x, so it's standing upright and then scale it down. And then we'll scale it along the x so it's longer, just the like that scale along z. So it's a little bit thinner, something like that. It's going to look good and then we'll place it in the back. I'm also going to give this some randomness. So we're gonna go into edit mode and press Control R and add in a couple of different luke cuts right about there looks good. Left-click and then right-click. Then jump over to the face select mode by hitting three or you can press the button up top, and then let's select some random faces. So let's say these faces, that face and then maybe, I think that's probably good. We'll press X and delete those faces. Then we'll go into the edge select mode. We'll drag this edge this way a little bit, something like that. Maybe we'll drag this edge up slightly, this edge this way, just kind of randomness like that. And then from here let's also add an another displacement modifier. So over in the Modifier tab, we're going to select Add Modifier and choose displacement. We're gonna give it a new texture. Then jumping over to the texture panel, Let's change the type over to clouds. Then we'll go back over to the Modifier Tab and bring the strength up, something like that. There we go. Now the other thing we're going to add is an object to move this texture around. We can do that by adding in an empty, let's just add in a plane axes. We'll drag it backwards so it's out of the way. What we're gonna do is go into the Properties tab by hitting N. And then underneath the location, we're gonna have this object move over time. To do this, let's add in a driver to the x location, on the x location. To add an a driver, we're going to type hashtag frame and then divided by 800. Now what's going to happen is this object is going to move. You can see here if I set this lower like 100, it's gonna move faster as you can see there, so that 800 sets the speed. Let's go ahead and select our object here we're going to change the coordinates from local over to object. And then for the object, we're going to select the empty. As this empty is moving, it's going to move the texture around and the inflow is going to change. And it's going to give the fluid a lot more randomness. You can see that's currently what it looks like and that's moving a bit too fast. So what we can do is select our object and I'm just going to set the strength up higher. Let's go with 500. Let's try that. There we go. I think that's actually moving a bit too slow. Let's go down to 350. This is going to give us some randomness in our inflow. The water is going to be shooting out at different points as you can see there. And that's going to look really nice. Next up, let's add in our domain, I'm going to press Shift a at an a new cube will go into top view, drag it this way. Then you can press S and then x scale it outwards. We'll go into edit mode and then go into side view. And then we'll select that face. We'll drag it all the way across. And then we'll drag this all the way down here. Just like that. There we go. Let's make sure that this is actually inside you. Make sure the of it is on both sides, which it is, That's good. Let's jump over to the Physics panel and select fluid and set the type over to domain. We're going to set the domain type over to liquid. And then let's select our object here, the envelope object, we will go fluid, set the type over to flow, and then for the flow type will choose a liquid. And then the behavior, of course we're going to choose inflow. We're going to turn on the planner option in the flow source. So open up this tab and turn on is planar because this is a flat object, then we're going to turn on initial velocity, so the fluid actually shoots out in a certain direction. We're going to set the y-direction down here to negative one. As for the other objects in the scene, let's go ahead and select it the waterfall object here we'll select fluid, set the type over to a factor, and then make sure it is planar Edge checked. We're also going to select all of the different rocks, will select all of them at once. There we go, we'll de-select the plane. And you can do that by hitting B middle mouse button to de-select an object. We'll go fluid, set the type over to effector, and then we don't need to use is planar because these objects actually have some thickness. Then you can press Control or Command L and go copy modifiers. Now, each of the rocks should have that exact modifier. Let's go back over to our a domain settings right here. And what we'll do first is we'll scroll down to the cache and change it over to modular, and then we'll turn on is resumable. The other thing that we're going to change is the format volume. We're gonna switch it over to uni cash because we are gonna be using the US speed vectors in the mesh to add in motion blur. That only works with the uni cash format. So make sure you switch it here. Let's go up to the top here and set the resolution of this to 160. That gives us a nice high resolution. And again, if you have a slower system, you can go with a value of 128. And that will still give you a pretty nice results. If you're, if you're a computer can handle it, you can set that up to 160. As for the other settings, we're gonna turn off collision in the front and the bottom of the domain. When the fluid comes out this way, It's going to splash and then exit out of the domain over here. We don't want it to fill up. We wanted to exit out the other settings here. We can just leave them as the default. We don't really need to change any of them. We can open up the particle tab and we're going to enable both spray and foam particles. We're going to leave the default settings here and then open up the mesh settings. We're going to set the upper as factor. We're going to leave it at two. And then for the particle radius, we're going to bring this down to a value of 1.35. And then turn on use speed vectors. One last setting that we're going to change is the timescale. I've noticed in this simulation that the fluid moves very quickly. So let's bring this down to a value of 0.65 and enter. And that's just going to slow down the simulation just a little bit. With that done, you can save your project and then click on baked data. I'm going to probably stop the bake around frame like an 80 or 90 or somewhere in there just to see how the simulation looks. I've stopped the breakout around frame a 100 and now B players simulation here is what it looks like. As you can see, it does look really nice. The fluid is going over and I'm liking how that looks. So I'm gonna go ahead and bake out the rest of this simulation. What I can do here is just click Resume and it's going to resume right at that point. And then it's going to finish out the simulation. Now that the main simulation has finished baking, we're going to go ahead and bacon at the particle system with it. Both of these spray and the phone particle selected, let's click on fake data. Once this is done baking, we will also bacon the mesh down here. And finally, we're gonna bake in the mesh down here. So make sure everything looks good. A value of 2.351, you speed vectors is turned on, then we can click on fake match. With that out of the way, we're going to jump into the next video and create the particle system and materials. 36. Creating a Waterfall P3 Materials: The simulation has finished baking. Now we're going to set up the particle system and the lighting and materials. First off, what we're gonna do is add in the particle. And for this, we're actually going to be using a cube this time since there are a lot more particles, I don't want there to be an ecosphere because that is more geometry. We're going to drag this over to the left side and scale it down. And then also make sure you press Control or Command a and apply the scale to the cube so the particles actually work correctly. Then we're going to select the domain object, head over to the particle system tab. And we can see we have three particles systems. We don't need the liquid ones. So go ahead and turn that off in both the render and the viewport. And then let's select the spray particles of stomach. We're going to set the render as to render as object. And then for the incident object, we're going to select the cube right here. So click the Eyedropper tool and then select the cube over on the left. Let's skip to a different frame and we can see how big the cubes are, and you can see they are currently very large. So let's bring the scale of them down by quite a bit. Let's go with a value of 0.007. We'll see what that looks like. There we go. I like how that looks. Those are pretty small. And then for the scale randomness, this will give some random variation. Let's go with a value of 0.3. As for the amount of particles, we're actually going to bring this down. We're gonna go with 50% of the particles because there are a lot of spray particles, especially in these later frames, we're gonna set that lower. Then let's do the same thing for the foam. We're going to select the foam, we're going to select Render as object, and then for the Incident Object, select the cube 001. Then of course for the amount down here are for the scale, we're going to drag this lower. Let's go with a value of 0.007, just like before. Then we're gonna leave the amount at 100 either want there to be a lot more foam particles then spray particles, then also to make our scene and not like so much. Let's turn it off in the viewport by clicking into those two buttons right there. There we go. Let's select our water. We'll right-click and shade it smooth, so everything is nice and smooth. And that's it. We have created the particle system and now let's work on the lighting and materials. As for the lighting, we're going to jump over to the world settings and then open up the color. We're going to switch it over to an environment texture, click on open, and then navigate to the HDR. Hdr that we'll be using a seed or bridged for k. So go ahead and select it and then go open image. And this is linked in the resources or in the article to this section. Let's go into render view by hitting Z and going into rendered view. Currently we're using the EV render engine. So let's go over to the render tab and switch it over to cycles. Since we're gonna be using the vector blur that only works in the Cycles Render Engine. So make sure to switch it over and then use your GPU for the device. We're going to come down here to the color management tab and set the look over too high contrast so we get more contrast in the scene. And then also I don't want to see the background. Let's turn it off by going over to the film tab and turning on transparency. Now let's create the material for the water with it selected, we're going to jump over to the Material tab and click on new. We're going to scroll down here to the transmission value, turn that all the way up to one. And then for the IOR, we're going to bring this to 1.333. As for the roughness, we're gonna set that down to 0. And then for the base color, we're gonna drag this lower and then give it a slightly green color, something like that. Let's get to a different frame just to make sure that looks good. And there we go, That does look pretty nice. If you think it's too dark, just drag it up just slightly. And there we go, Not too bad. The texture that we're gonna be using in this tutorial is this one right here. It's rock, boulder dry, and it's on poly haven. The link is in the Projects and Resources or in the article to this section. Make sure you click on that and then make sure you have the blend file right here set to blend. And then you can use the 2k. Once you have that downloaded, we can jump back into Blender. And a quick way to import that material automatically is if we go over to File down to append. And then what we can do is navigate to where that blend file is, where that folder is right here, the rock boulder dry, select it, select the blend file, and then underneath the material, go ahead and select it that material right there, and then append it into your scene. Now if we select one of the boulders, actually let's select all the objects. There we go, all of the rocks, and then we're gonna come over here to the material tab, select the drop-down menu and then choose the rock boulder dry material. If we then link all of those to share that exact material, will press Control L and click on that link materials. Now if we press Z and go into material preview, we should be able to see all of those objects. Now this object here is very stretched because we extruded it outwards. So go ahead and select your waterfall, go into edit mode, press a to select everything. And then we're going to unwrap this again. To do that, press U and choose unwrapped. Now, it should unwrap correctly and the material should look good. There we go. The other thing that we're gonna do is change the color of this. I'm gonna come over here and split the view and switch it over to the shader editor. Here we can see the material and also in the normal map, make sure you select it, the UV map and that shouldn't make sure it applies it correctly. What we're gonna do is change the color of this. I'm going to press Shift a and go over to color and then add in a hue saturation node. And we're gonna place it between the base color and the principled shader. Underneath the value, we're gonna go lower to a value of 0.2. And then we're going to bring the saturation down a little bit so it's more of a gray color. Let's go into a rendered view to see what that looks like. And there you go, you can actually see it looks pretty nice now. You might be able to go a little bit brighter. Let's go with a value of 0.4. And that looks pretty nice. Then finally, the last material that we will do in this video is the particle. So go ahead and select it, create a new material. Then we're just going to leave the default white settings with the roughness at 0.5. But there we go. We've now created the material and in the next video we're going to set up the render settings. 37. Creating a Waterfall P4 Rendering: To actually render this out, we're going to position the camera right about this angle so we get the full thing in the view. Then we're going to press Control Alt and numpad 0 to snap the camera to view. Or you can go over to view down to Align View and then align active camera to the View. Select it and then you can double-tap are and if you hold Shift, you can position this how you want. We'll zoom out a little bit and then place it right about. There. Looks pretty good. So we get the full waterfall in the view. From here, we're gonna go over to the render tab and then set the render samples. We're gonna go with a value of 50, so it renders pretty quickly. Also, I don't want to see that particles, so I'm just going to drag it upwards. And then over in the render layers panel, make sure we turn on the Z pass and the vector paths we can enable motion blur later saved your project and then we're going to render out a single frame. Let's go with this frame, frame 140 to save your project before you do this and then hit F12, the render has finished. And here is the result. As you can see, we have a lot of particles and it looks pretty good to actually add in the motion blur. We're going to exit out of this window and jump over to the compositing workspace, turn on and use nodes and then we can press N, and then we're going to drag this down so we have more space. Over on the right side when your cursor turns into a plus sign, click and drag to drop that view to actually see what we're doing. We're going to press Control Shift and then left-click on the render layers. This is going to add in a viewer node. And the other thing I like to do when I'm working like this is if I hold shift, I can right-click and drag over this. And that's going to create another little node right here. It's closer over here. And now we can easily add a nodes between these two points. And it's going to automatically add them into these Viewer and composite. Over on this side we're going to add the vector blur. We're going to go over to Filter and then choose vector blur. Let's place that right here. We're gonna take the vector and plug that into the speed. And once we do this, it might take a minute to load, but we should have some blur in the scene. As you can see right there. It's quite a lot. We're going to turn the blur amount down to 0.3. Then we're also going to take the depth value and plug it into the Z. And that should help give us better blur amounts right here. Now there is a lot of blur in these areas, but there's not a lot of blur over here. So what I'm going to do is actually set a maximum amount of blur because it's currently down here. There's too much. But over here it's like just the right amount. At the maximum, we're gonna go up to a value of 120. And that should really clamp down on some of those values down here. And as you can see, that looks much better. There might actually be even too much. So I might go with a blur amount of 0.2 and we'll see what that looks like. And actually I like it better before. So we'll go back up to 0.3. As for the background, I'm going to add in an Alpha over node. So press Shift a, go over to color and then add in an Alpha over node. We're gonna take the image and plug it into the bottom input. And then now this top infant controls the background. We're going to set this over to a nice gray color, something like that. Then the last thing that we will add to the scene as a vignette, so we're going to darken the corners so the focus is in the middle here. I'm going to press Shift a and go over to Filter and then add in a blur node. Then we will also add in a Distort and a lens distortion. We're going to take the image, plug it into the image down here. We're going to set the distort up to a value of one. This is going to distort the edges over here. And then we're going to blur that. And then we're going to add it over top to darken it. So we're gonna go over to color and then add an a mixed node, replace it right here. If we then take the image, plug it into the image right here, we should have blackness on all of the corners. We can then blur those corners by changing over to the fast Gaussian select relative. And then underneath the why aspect ratio, Let's go with a value of 15% for both of these. And then we should get some nice. There you go. And as you can see, that looks much better. To get rid of the white values, we're going to switch it over to multiply. And now this factor value controls how dark those edges are. If we bring this lower like a value of 0.7, it's not gonna be as strong. And there we go. That looks much better. If you want to, you can add in a color and then a color balance node and you can place it here. Then we can change how the color balance works. If we want darker shadows, we can drag that down just slightly. Or if we want to brighten the highlights, we can drag it up, drag up the gain, and that will brighten up the highlights. Then if we wanted to give everything a slightly blue color, we can drag the gamma, which is the mid tones, over to the blue. And that's gonna give us a nice look. But there we go. That is basically all the compositing that we need to do. From here, we're going to go back over to the layout. And we're also going to hide the object right here. We don't want to show the info object in the render, so let's turn it off in both the viewport and the render. At this point, we're ready to render out our final animation. Jumping over to the scene panel right here, we can set an output of where we want our frames to go to. I'm just going to put them in this folder and then I'm going to click Accept. Once you've done that, we're ready to render out our entire animation. Now again, we're going to be rendering it as an image sequence. And then I'll see, then we're going to sequence it out later and make sure if you want to solve the render halfway through that you uncheck overwrite. Because at that point it's going to resume at the frame that you left off. If overwrite as checked, is going to resume at frame one and overwrite all the images that are already in that folder. So with that done, we're gonna save and then go over to render and then click on Render Animation. Once this is done rendering, we're going to jump into the video sequence editor and I'll show you how to sequence it into a movie file. 38. Creating a Waterfall P5 Sequencing the Render: The render has finished, and if we want to view our results, we can go ahead and exit out of this window and then go over to render and select that view animation. This will bring up a new window and it will start to grab all of those images. And it is a little bit laggy at the start, but once it cycles through all the images, it'll be nice and smooth as you can see here. But there we go. As you can see, there is a lot of particles. It looks really nice. There's lots of foam, and overall it looks like a nice river. So now in this video I'm gonna show you how to sue cans all of those images together. To do this, you can click on this plus sign, go down to video editing and select the video editing workspace. We're going to select Add Image Sequence. And then we're going to select the folder with all of the images. Make sure frame one is at the very top. And you can do that by checking your sorting by the name and not the modified date. Then you can press a to select everything and go Add Image Strip. This will add in the image strip right here and we can play through it. Then all we have to do now is come over here and set the output to be a movie file. In this case, I'm going to choose FFmpeg. Then in the container I'm going to choose MP4. And then for the output quality, Let's go with high. If you notice that there's a lot of contrast in the scene, That's because over in the render tab right here underneath the color management, it's using that the high contrast that we used in the other when we render it out the images. So it's applying it over top of the already contrast image. To fix that, all we have to do is set this over to none. Or if you like how it looks, you can actually keep it. I'm going to go with medium, high contrast. With that done, you can save your project then go over to render and select Render Animation. That's going to grab all of those images and put them into a movie file. But there you go. That is how you create a waterfall fluid simulation and blender. Thank you for watching and thank you for making it all the way to the end of this course. And if you create something cool, I would love to see it so you can post it in the discussions or tag me on Instagram at blender made easy, but that's gonna do it and I will see you guys in the next one.