Learn Fabric Smocking! | Dominika Syczynska | Skillshare
Drawer
Search

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Fabric Smocking Trailer

      1:30

    • 2.

      Tools and Materials

      2:29

    • 3.

      Cutting Fabrics

      6:48

    • 4.

      Ironing Fabrics

      2:39

    • 5.

      Arrow Pattern

      14:23

    • 6.

      Basket Pattern

      17:20

    • 7.

      Flower Pattern

      18:44

    • 8.

      Diamond Pattern

      25:23

    • 9.

      Honeycomb Pattern

      27:52

    • 10.

      Lozenge Pattern

      18:25

    • 11.

      Inspirations

      7:24

    • 12.

      Summary

      2:23

  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

674

Students

--

Projects

About This Class

Welcome to the fascinating world of manipulating fabrics!

A place, where you will learn how to create three-dimensional, structured and unique textiles.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN IN THIS MASTERCLASS

In this course, you will learn how to create step by step 3-dimensional, structured and simply beautiful smocked fabrics. As your teacher, I will show you all the tools and materials, that you need in order to master this class. You will learn how to hand-stitch a whole range of smocking patterns. Together we will start with the Arrow pattern, then the Basket, Flower, Diamond, Honeycomb and Lozenge. 

The goal of this masterclass is to teach you the whole process of fabric smocking, including drawing grids and patterns. During this course you will create your own smocking sample book, you will see beautiful inspirations and learn how to apply these techniques to fashion and accessories design projects.

WHAT YOU WILL GET

 

•      Instant and unlimited access to this Fabric Smocking Masterclass

•      Downloadable templates 

•      PDF coursebooks for every chapter

•      13 exclusive step by step informational videos (over 3h)

•      Exclusive access to our designer community

•      An insider view on troubleshooting mistakes when they come up

•      Additional support from Dominika inside the online community

•      Videos in English audio (with optional polish subtitles)

•      The ability to learn online anytime and at your own pace

WHAT YOU NEED 

No previous skills are necessary to master this course. You don’t need any fabric design, machine sewing and patternmaking skills. During this course, we will only hand-stitch. The only thing you really need is the eagerness to learn something new and exciting!

In terms of materials and tools, you will need fabric (around 2m of fabric without any prints), needles for hand-sewing, thread, scissors, tailor's chalk, a ruler and a meter.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Dominika Syczynska

Fashion and Fabric Designer

Teacher

Dominika Syczynska is a fabric and fashion designer and a masterclass teacher. Over the past years she has been teaching fabric design and manipulation courses to thousands of students in many design schools. She launched the online platform FABRIC CLASS in 2020 in order to share her passion and knowledge with design lovers from all over the world. She specializes in teaching: Fabric Pleating, Smocking, Fabric Manipulation Techniques, Creative Sewing, Marbling, Shibori and Batik Fabric Dye, Leather Braiding and Haute Couture embroidery. 

Dominika has launched her own fashion label in 2016, DOMINIKA SYCZYNSKA, which is a contemporary,

womenswear brand. She plays in her designs with clashing aesthetics, mixes innovative and traditional textile design technologies. All g... See full profile

Level: All Levels

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
    Exceeded!
  • 0%
  • Yes
  • 0%
  • Somewhat
  • 0%
  • Not really
  • 0%

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Fabric Smocking Trailer: Hi, I'm Dominika Syczynska and I welcome you to my fabric smoking masterclass. In this course, I'll teach you step by step how to create three-dimensional structure and simply beautiful smoked fabrics. I will show you all the tools and materials that you need in order to master this course, and I will teach you a whole range of smoking patterns. Firstly, we'll start with the arrow pattern, which is my all-time favorite pattern, and then you will learn how to create a basket pattern, a flower, a diamond, a honeycomb, and a lozenge. Together we'll cut fabric, we'll draw grids, we'll draw patterns, and we will manipulate beautiful fabrics. The goal of this masterclass is to teach you the whole process of fabric smoking and to share with you my love for craftsmanship, for [inaudible] design, and for manipulating structured fabric. I hope you're excited as much as I am and you're ready to design. So let's get started. 2. Tools and Materials: Hi everyone, and welcome to our fabric smoking masterclass. In this video, I would like to show you all the tools and materials that you need in order to create three-dimensional structured and smoked fabrics. Good news is that we don't need a lot of specific equipment because we're going to mainly hand stitch, but we need quite a lot of patients because smoking is super time-consuming, but it's going to be so well of Indian where we're going to do all these amazing patterns. What we need is, fabric. Our fabric should be plain without any prints on it. It should be quite heavy, not too soft, and you can work on natural or synthetic fabrics, it's completely up to you. Then we need a quilting ruler because we're going to draw all the lines and mark our grids using our quilting ruler. Then we need to print out all of our patterns with the smoking patterns which going to stitch today. Then we need to take our fabric scissors, they should be quite sharp and you can use a swell and electric knife if you want to cut quickly all of your fabrics at one time. Well, obviously, we need needles because we're going to mainly hand stitch today. We need pens. We need a meter. We need titles chalk, the white one for dark colors, and the red one for light colors. We need thread. Our thread should be in a matching color as our fabrics are. Blue one for the blue one, red, yellow. Then we need some pens or pencils. We need as well beads because we are going to embellish and embroid some of our products. In the very end, we need as well sewing machine [inaudible]. This is pretty everything that we need in order to master our course. So let's get started. 3. Cutting Fabrics: [MUSIC] Hi guys, and welcome back. In this video, we're going to focus on preparing all fabrics, and we need to cut our fabrics into the right size and we need to cut the right amount of fabrics. Today in general, we're going to do six different smocking samples, and I'm going to work in different colors of fabric, but you can as well work in just one color, that's totally fine. We're going to have to cut five of these fabrics into square sizes of 36 to 46 centimeters. Then we need as well one rectangle, which is going to be off the size of 54 centimeters to 46 centimeters. We are cutting five squares and one rectangle. In order to cut our fabric, we can use fabric scissors. I recommend you to take some sharp ones, or you can use simply an electric knife. If you want to cut all of your layers at one time and you want to go very quickly around, and you want to have your fabrics totally smooth and you don't want them to fray. Firstly we have to draw our grids. I'm going to take my quilting ruler, because I'm going to probably cut all of my fabrics at one time, I'm going to lay over all of my fabrics, beside the white one because I want my white one to be a rectangle. These ones are going to be my squares. We are taking all of the layers. We need to move, quilt mat and we need to have our quilting ruler because we're going to draw our square in a second, so one layer. [MUSIC] Number 2, I'm going to take my red one because I think I'm going to do a basket pattern and the red one is phosphate, so it's amazing in reds, [MUSIC] and number 3, and the blues. Once I have prepared all of my layers, we have to take some pins and quickly pin our fabrics so they don't move while we going to draw all the grids on it. I've taken some pens, quickly pinning my fabric. I know pinning fabrics is time consuming, but it saves you so much trouble later on because you don't want to cut your fabric uneven, so I'm quickly pinning them. Great. Now I'm taking my quilting ruler, and I'm quite lucky because my quilting ruler is the size of square and is actually 36 to 46 centimeters. I'm just going to quickly take my tailor's chalk, and I'm going to mark my lines, like that. I'm drawing one line, the second line, number 3, and forth one. [MUSIC] Voila, I have a perfect square of the size of 36 to 46 centimeters. I think because I'm a big fan of smart sewing and cutting machines, I'm going to go for my electric knife which is coatless, and I'm just going to quickly go around. I'm turning it on. I'm going inside. [NOISE] Voila, I have just quickly cut all of my squares. That one very quick. See you can see that all the edges are totally smooth and they're one thread. You're going to manipulate your fabrics. I'm just going to quickly put them aside, because we still have to cut one rectangle of the size of 54 to 36 centimeters. Let's get rid of the colorful fabrics for a second. Just put them aside to with my audit samples. Let's clean up a little bit. We're going to do the same thing with our white fabric. Lay it flat, take your quilting ruler. Again, mark every rectangle of the size of 54 to 36, and this time I'm going to take my red tailors chalk, because I was see it better on the white fabric. [MUSIC] I'm going to quickly take my clever cutting knife, [NOISE] and just quickly go around. [MUSIC] [NOISE] That's a super clever machine. Amazing. Our rectangle of the size of 54 to 36 centimeters is done, and I have as well my squares of the size of 46 to 46 centimeters. That means that we can start ironing on our fabrics because we want our fabrics to be completely flat without any rings on it, so let's go. [MUSIC] 4. Ironing Fabrics: Hi guys and welcome to another fabric class video. Before we start manipulating our fabrics and creating three-dimensional structures, we have to iron all of our samples because we want them to be completely flat without any wrinkles on them. In order to do it, we need to use a steam iron. I'm going to quickly iron all of my samples on both sides and my temperature is set up to 180 degrees. Then on the other side. Now the pink one and the pink one is going to be a lasagna pattern. Thanks to the high pressure on my steam iron, it goes very, very quickly and I won't be left with any wrinkles on the fabric later on. My second one is done. The red one for a basket smoking pattern. In case you are ironing a super soft fabrics like for example, siphon or silk, I recommend you to use a very smart button, which I have over here, and one more. This is my rectangle and this is going to be a honeycomb smoking pattern. All of my favorites are completely smooth without any wrinkles on them, which means now we can finally start the magic and we can start creating our beautiful smack fabrics. 5. Arrow Pattern: Hi, and welcome back. In this video, I would like to teach you another fabric manipulation technique called smocking. Smocking is an art couture technique, which means what exactly? We going to hand stitch and there are no sewing machines and no other machines which are going to do the job for you because smocking is all about craftsmanship and hand sewing. I know what you're probably thinking right now, something like, oh my God, it is going to take ages to do it. You're right because smocking is super time-consuming, but believe me, in the very end it's worth the time and work put into creating a sample because smocking is simply beautiful. Then it's also a technique which is beloved by art couture designers, so you can find beautifully smocked fabrics and runway shows of, for example, Alexander McQueen, of Josh, and now Amumu. I'll also have to admit that I'm obsessed with smocking and I have done a whole collection only made of smocked fabrics. I think it was super time-consuming, yes, but in the very end, it looks spectacular and unique. Because I love smocking so much I want to share with you today my favorite pattern, which is the arrow pattern, and it is a triangle-shaped three-dimensional pattern, which we're going to do today. Right now, I would like to show you all the tools and materials which we're going to need in order to create our beautiful smocked fabric sample. The very first thing that we need is fabric. Our fabric should be plain without any prints on it and it should not be too soft because it won't hold your structure. It would be great if you would have, for example, cotton or fixed satin or even wool or leather works amazing for smocking as well. We need a ruler in order to draw our lines and our grid. It's very important that you print out your template with an arrow pattern, which is attached to this video. You will need pins, needles, we need fabric scissors; the bigger ones and the smaller ones as well, we need a tailor's chalk, we need a meter, then we need matching threads. Your threads should be quite strong. Everything that we need so we can start designing right now. Now we have to cut our fabric into a square size of 36 centimeters and 36 centimeters. I'm going to work on this blue heavy cotton because I think it's going to look great and it's going to work amazing for smocking. I'm going to take my meter and I'm going to double-check if I have 36 centimeters, I'm going to mark it, once and two. We can cut our fabric right now. What is very important to remember about smocking is that smocking is reducing a fabric up to 50 percent, which means that if you take, for example, one meter of fabric, in the very end after you smock your fabric, you're just going to have 50 percent of it, which means 50 centimeters. Okay, great. I have my square size of 36 centimeters to 36 centimeters. The next thing that we have to do is to draw a grid on it. If you have a closer look at our pattern, you can see that we're going to work on squares or small squares of the size three centimeters to three centimeters, and later on, we're going to draw in our arrow pattern. Now we're going to take our ruler and we're simply going to mark dots every three centimeters. Then we're going to connect our lines and create the whole grid. We have to cover the whole piece of fabric with our grids. My fabric is marked and now I'm going to connect my points and simply draw my pattern, one line after another one. Once we have covered our whole fabric sample with a beautiful grid of the size of three centimeters to three centimeters each square, we're going to have to draw in our arrow pattern. I have a closer look right now at your pattern, and you can see those triangles which we have to draw on our fabric sample. I'm going to take a ruler and a tailor's chalk and I'm just going to copy this pattern on my fabric, one line after another one. Always double-check that you are not making any mistakes when copying the patterns, because it happens quite a lot of times and, unfortunately, then you have to stitch the sample once again from the beginning, which we don't want to, so always be very precise and double-check your pattern. My whole fabric sample is covered with beautiful triangles. Your sample should look like this right now. Now you are ready to make the magic happen. We're going to start hand stitching, of course, and after about two or three lines of hand stitching, you're going to see your beautiful pattern coming out and becoming three-dimensional on the other sides. Of course, always remember, that when you're drawing your arrow pattern, you have to draw on the left side of the fabric because you're going to see your 3D pattern on the right side. Always just double-check if you would like to have a matte or shiny pattern. Now we're going to have to thread our needle. What we should actually do is take a thread, which is having the matching color as your fabric, but I will just use the contrasting thread, like the white ones so you can better see how I'm going to stitch. Now I'm taking my thread; it's a pretty thick one, and now I'm going to thread my needle like that. I'm going to take it twice, and the length should not be too long, to be honest. I think that length is going to be okay, so around 10-15 centimeters, not more, I'm cutting it off. Then we have to try to make free knots on the very end. One knot should sit on another one, because we have to create a very thick and bigger knot so it doesn't go through the fabric when we pull our thread. I have one, I have number 2, and one more, I have one more. I'm just going to cut off it a little bit so it looks a little bit more neat and tidy. Now we can start stitching. Whenever we start stitching our smocking sample, we have to start on the right side or on the left side, which means that we cannot stitch, for example, diagonally or we cannot start on one side and then continue staying on the other side, because this will get too messy. I'm going to start on the right side, and I'm going to stitch my very first triangle. In this corner, I'm picking up just a little bit of fabric around two millimeters of fabric. I'm going through the fabric like this. I'm pulling my thread. I'm doing it once again. I'm trying to go into the same hole and come out in the same place. Now we're going to move our thread diagonally. I'll move over here and I'll pick up just two millimeters in this place. I'm just picking it up, I'm not making any knots. I'm going to stitch the second line, and I'm picking up again just the two millimeters. It should look like that. We just stitched one and the other one. Now we're going to pull our thread tight. We have to pull it really tight. That would be a mistake that's completely wrong, so we have to pull it very tight. We have to catch our two pleats together, and then we're going to stitch. We're going to go around two millimeters inside and we're going to come out at the other side. We go just once and another time. We're going to go to narrow point. Remember that there is a blank square here so you can not stitch over here. We have to go over here. Again, pick up just two millimeters, like that. Remember that you have to left some loose pleat. It has to be loose. I'm going to stitch again in the same place. I'm just making double sure that this thread is not pulling. I'm not going to go to another line and I'm going to stitch this one, and the other one. You set the stitch one and the second line. Now I'm going to pull it very tight. I'm going to go through fabric 1, 2, and 3 times. Our second triangle is done. I will have a look at the other side and I can already see that something's going to happen here. It's already becoming three-dimensional. Whenever you do smocking fabrics, you have to remember that you have to do at least around three rows of our pattern in order to see something already on the other side. Be patient and just continue sewing the same way as we just did. In about three rows, you're going to see the magic happen. I'll continue stitching. We have to stitch the whole sample right now. Hand stitching. Voila, I just finished stitching my arrow pattern. I'm still on the left side and I'm super excited to see what's on the other side. Three, 2, 1, go. Oh my God, this looks amazing. I hope your sample also looks that incredible as mine and you have just stitched so many beautiful triangles which are three-dimensional and make your garments look amazing. I really really love this pattern and I also prepared for you another example, where I've been working in wool. This is how the arrow pattern wool looks like. I think it's also very, very nice and unique. I hope you enjoyed this smocking course and you're going to create beautiful samples and beautiful garments. I also would like to show you some ready-made clothes and I hope I'm going to inspire you. Thank you for joining me on this course. 6. Basket Pattern: Hi guys, and welcome back. In this video, I would like to show you one of my favorite patterns, which is the basket pattern. It's as well very three-dimensional and structured and it's looking amazing. Probably you've already seen somewhere this pattern because it's very commonly used in accessories design and a lot of leather, for example, handbags are made of this pattern. In terms of sewing, it's very similar to the arrow pattern which we have just done previously because we are also going to stitch one corner, the other one, I'm just going to stitch it all together. Before we start, we have to have a closer look at our fabric and we'd have to decide whether we want to have our pattern on the mat side or the shiny one, because we're going to draw our pattern on the reverse side, which means that if I want to have a shiny pattern, I'm going to draw on the mat side because in the very end, the pattern is going to turn out on that shiny side. Then you have to also remember that this smocking pattern is unfortunately shrinking your fabric up to 50 percent. So if you are having a square of the size of 46 centimeters, in the very end, you're just going to have a tiny around 80 centimeters small size. I know it's going to be small, but it's still going to be beautiful and just with sewing it by hand. What tools do we need? First of all, we need to have our fabric samples. So the square of the size of 46 centimeters to 46 centimeters. Then we need masking tape because we're just going to take our beautiful square to the table. Because we don't want our pattern to move because we have to draw a beautiful grid on it, so it has to be totally even. I'm just going to quickly tape it on a table. We have to have our template. This template is attached to this video, so you just have to print it out and just keep it on your table because we're just going to transfer to this template on our fabric. Then we need a quilting ruler. Because right now we have two draw widths of the size of three centimeters to three centimeters. Later on, once we have drawn our grid, we have to transfer this pattern on our fabric. We need as well a pencil, we need some fabric scissors, you better take the smaller ones, and we need some course some sewing needles because we're just going to stitch everything by hand, and we need matching threads. So the best would be to take red thread. But I'm going to work today on black thread because I want you to see the pattern very well when I'm going to stitch it. Now I'm taking my grid and I'm going to mark every three centimeters lines. Amazing. My grid is almost ready. You can take scissors and cut a little bit of the thread which you don't need on every single corner. My grid of the size of three centimeters to three centimeters is ready. Now let's have a closer look again at our pattern and see those lines. We have to transfer every single of these lines onto our fabric and always make sure that you're transferring correct the size. If you have some blank spaces in between, we have to have them also another fabric. So don't make a mistake because otherwise you're going to stitch your sample in the wrong way. Again, my quilting ruler, and I'm just drawing these lines. One one line to go and we're done. Amazing. We have just prepared our basket pattern. This is how it looks like. Now the fun part starts. So we're going to hand stitch the whole pattern and we're going to see the magic happening on the reverse side. Now we have to take our thread. I'm going go to put a black one and you have to take your needle. You can take any needle which is fine for you for sewing. Then taking our thread, we need a thread through the needle, like this. Don't take too long thread to be honest because we need to anyways cut it off from time to time, so it doesn't make sense to take a super long one. Now we have to try to make three knots on the very end and one knot should sit on another one. I'm making number one. I'm going to try to make the second one in the exactly same place like this and one more. In smocking, you should always do at least three knots. The best thing is to do five knots, because if you do just one, probably your thread will go through the fabric and we don't want this to happen. If we want to stitch our pattern, then we have to go from the first row, to the second, to the fourth, and so on. We can start either on the left side or on the right side. There is no difference. What can't do for sure is to start for example, at the right side, do a little bit on the right side and a little bit on the left side and in the middle because in the very end, you will just have a big mess. We are always going one row after another one. I'm going to start in my left corner, and I'm just going to pick up a little bit of thread like this. I'll try to go one more time in exactly the same place to make sure that my thread sits in the place like that. Now I'm going to this corner. I'm again, picking up just a little bit of fabric. It's around probably one millimeter, like that. You can basically see my thread on this diagonal line. You're coloring your thread to stay on the line. Now you have to pull your thread, pull it tight, like that. If you pull it and you have a space in-between, then it's incorrect. So you have to really pull it tight, and you have to go through around three times and just go in. I'm going to try to go always with the needle in exactly the same place, and number 2 and I'm going inside this hole and a third time. The reason why we are going three times is because smocking, with time, our smock fabric is going to get quite heavy. So if we're just going to do one knot, it may open up later on which we don't want to happen. I have done my very first diagonal line. In this place, you can see there's a blank place which we cannot sew. We're just going to go quickly over to this place and we will let our thread loose. I'm not pulling it right now tight. I'll just leave it like that, so it's loose. I will, again, make a knot over here. Actually, I'll make two of them. So one. Now, I will have to pull it and I have to check whether it's not moving. Perfect. It's not moving. Again, I'm doing the same thing. I'm taking my thread from the right corner to the left corner. I'm picking up a little bit of thread around one millimeter. I'm covering with my thread the diagonal line, and I'm just going to pull it, again, with no space in-between. I'm going to go through three times, one. I don't know how you feel about smocking, but for me it's such a reset. It's so de-stressing me. Even though I know it's time-consuming, but I just feel so relaxed right now. We have done two of them and we have to do and continue with the same process. The whole first line, then the second line, the third line. With smoking, it is so that you have to do at least three, maybe four rows to see the magic happening on the other side. You have to be a little bit patient because we have to do right now three or four more rows and then we're going to have a quick break and check our fabric on the other side. Continue doing the same. Pick up a little bit of thread, leaving it loose. Don't forget that your thread should be right now red not black. So you won't to see it for sure. One more time. Once you stop re-smocking, it will go faster, I promise you. It's just on the very beginning that you're quite slow because you just have to focus on the pattern, and on this hand sewing, and with time it just goes 10 times faster, maybe five times not 10, but still faster. My very first row is almost finished, and I actually just run out of thread, so I'm cutting it off. I made a knot. This is how your fabrics should look like. Now we have to do the second row, which is a little bit more tricky to be honest because you can see that your fabric is already a little bit trape and manipulated. So you have to really focus to find the right lines and stitch the right lines. But basically, we just going to do, right now, that second row. Again, I'm taking my needle. I need to thread it once again. Again, we're going to try to make three knots sitting on each other. We'll basically just continue doing the same fun. One, two, and one more. One more. It's done. Third one is ready. Now I have to find the right diagonal lines. It's going to be this one which is a little bit hidden inside. Again, I'm picking up just a little bit thread in the corner. I'm going twice, and I'm going inside. Half of my fabric sample is done. I have done around 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 rows, which means I can finally go on the other side and check if my pattern is done well, so 3, 2, 1 and go. Amazing. This is exactly how your pattern should look like. We can already see the basket pattern coming out. You're safe to stitch another six rows and finish your sample, so it's going to look so beautiful in the very end. I'm working on satin, which is shiny on this side, and actually satin is really cool for smocking, it's looking in most cases amazing. Let's go and let's stitch six more rows. Okey-dokey. I have just finished my whole basket pattern and now it's the time where we can go on the reverse side and check out how our basket looks like and satin or any other fabric, you were just stitching. Let's go, 3, 2, 1. Amazing. This is how a basket pattern looks like. If you were, for example, doing it in leather, then I am pretty sure it's looking super cool because leather is amazing for smocking, and it's solely three-dimensional. It's looking like a basket. I'm excited. I love this pattern. I have done a whole collection using just smock the fabrics, and especially the basket pattern. I'm going to show you later on some great inspirations. I hope that you're as excited as I am right now and that you loved the basket pattern. If yes, then let's go and let's do another pattern, which is going to be the flower pattern. 7. Flower Pattern: Hi guys and welcome back to our fabric smocking masterclass. In this video I would like to teach you another pattern which is called the flower pattern. It's another three-dimensional structured smocking pattern. I have to be honest with you, I've never been a big fan of this pattern because I felt like I'm not that flower girl. You know what I mean? It's like a little bit too sweet for me because I've seen pink flower patterns and I've never been a big fan of them, but then at some point I've seen an amazing collection of [inaudible]. They've created a whole collection made of flowers, but they've been done in black letter; black shiny letter, and they've been totally over scale, and they were looking so amazing. Ever since I've seen this collection, I've totally fell in love with the flower pattern. From a little bit of paint to the flower pattern, I moved to love and I even created a whole collection made of flowers. I really like them right now, so I hope you also going to like them. Do you know what's also amazing about the flower pattern? Is that it's reversed, and on the other side you also have another pattern. On the right side you have flowers, and on the other side you have another pattern. It's something like buy one, get one free. We're going to stitch just one pattern; the flower pattern, and then you get also the second pattern. In the very end, you can decide whether you want to use this side or the other side of the fabric. Now we have to take again our fabric, so it's another square of the size of 36 to 36 centimeters. You have to print out your templates which is attached to the video, and this is our flower pattern. You can see this goes inside, and we just have to transfer this pattern onto our fabric. We are taking again our ruler, a tailor's chalk this time in white because I'm having a quiet dark fabric. Again, we are drawing a grid of the size of three centimeters to three centimeters. Later on we'll transfer this pattern onto our fabric, so let's go. Again, be very precise while drawing your pattern. One line after another line. What is important is that we are right now on the right side of the fabric. We are not drawing our pattern on the left side because we're going to stitch on the right side and we are drawing our pattern on the right side. I know that in the basket pattern and in the other pattern we've done it in the opposite way, but in the flowers we are drawing on the right side. If I want my pattern to be shiny then I'm drawing on the shiny side of the fabric. Let me get rid of a little bit of my chalk. Cool. I'm having here my grid of the size of three centimeters to three centimeters. Now we have to transfer this pattern onto our fabric and just have a closer look at this pattern so you can see all empty spaces and all the empty squares here. Watch order to correctly transfer this pattern onto your fabric. Again, I'm taking my ruler and I'm going to draw my crosses. [inaudible]. I have just finished doing my pattern so you can see it's exactly the same as my template which we just printed out. Once we have sketched our template we're going to have to take our needle and some thread. I will go put a gray one so you can better see what I'm stitching. Don't take a too long thread because we have to cut off your thread every single time we finish one flower, so adjust that length and it's going to be totally fine and enough. Now, I'm cutting it off. If you have seen the previous videos for the basket of our pattern you know that we have to do three knots on the very end and one should sit on another one, so I'm just going to quickly make them. Pull that up. We need to take our scissors and cut off threads, so we just have the knot on the very end and now the fun part starts. So we're going to start stitching. In this time we will not stitch across the diagonal lines, we're just going stitch around our square. You know what? I'm going to start with this cross because you will see better the pattern, but normally you would just stitch one row after another one. So the first one, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, and so on. I'm going into the right corner, and I'm picking up a little bit of thread like that. I'm going another one, it's inside. Now I will not go around, so I'm going to this corner here. I'm going through the fabric so you can see the thread over here. Now we are going from the right corner to the left corner. Again, I'm picking up just around one millimeter of fabric and I'm moving to the next corner, like that. We have to have three lines of thread and we don't want to close our square, so this is the correct pattern and now we're going to pull our thread like that. See, we can already see that there's a small flower over here. We have to have a closer look right now because we have on the left side two puddles and then on the right side two more. Pull your thread tight like that. We have two on the right side and two on the left side. Now we have to stitch them together so they don't fall apart, so we'll just go inside around one millimeter underneath and we'll stitch it together. Once again we have two on the left side, two on the right side, and we are switching them together like that. You should right now stitch in a very neat way because this is the middle of your fabric and you're going to see it. It's not on the reverse side, you cannot hide it. So are stitched in a nice way. I went through the fabric three times, now I'm making a small knot. I'm cutting off my thread very close to the knot. My very first flower is done. Now let's moved to the next one and we'll stitch to this one. Then we'll do this one and this one so you can see how the flower pattern works on the fabric. Again, I'm making free knots on the very end. You can already see that something is happening also on the other side and that's our second pattern. I'm not sure whether I like more the flower pattern or the reverse side because I've done denim jackets with this pattern and it looks so good. I'm going to show it to you later but now we have to stitch and stitch. I'm cutting off my knot and I'm going to stitch the second flower. Again, I'm picking up a little bit of thread on the right corner going through one more time. Now I'm going to this corner. I'm just going through the fabric like this so I'm not making any knots. I'm going to the third corner. Again, I'm just picking up one millimeter of fabric and one more. Now, again, we have to pull our thread very tight two to the left side and two to the right side. They can be in different sizes like these ones are a little bit bigger and these ones are a little bit smaller, which is totally fine because with time, when you stitch your whole pattern, all the flowers are going to be exactly in the same size. It's just on the very beginning that they look a little bit messy, but that's fine and that's correct. Again, I'm stitching together them and I'm making free knots. It's also cool to use some other color of thread, like for example, silver thread or for example, red threads or the main spots of your flowers are going to be in different colors and they're going to look a little bit more interesting. I'm cutting off. What you can also do is to take, for example, some beads and embroider your pattern. I'm going to the third one and we're just going to do the same simple, isn't it? Let's do, for example, this one. Normally, I would stitch right now the third and fourth and fifth in the same line but I want to show you that sometimes these ones are hiding inside. You just have to take your finger and just push them a little bit and then you're going to see them again. So don't be scared if you don't see them for some time because they're going to come back and they are done in the right and correct way. We're going to stitch one more flower and I'm going to show you this tiny little problem because most of my students always say, "Oh my God, I think I've done something wrong," and it's totally correct. They are just vanishing for some time and then they'd come back. One more time. I've done free lines. Now I'm pulling it tight like this so two to the left side, come on and two to the right side like this and again, I'm stitching them together. I'm cutting off What I just said is that they sometimes vanish, which means they hide a little bit and your fabric looks like this. You can just see some parts of the flower, but you can't see the whole flower. You just have to take a finger and push it back so you can see the whole flower and everything is fine and correct again. Now, we can move to the next ones and we can stitch the next rose. Great. I have just finished a half of my fabric so it looks like this. I think I'm going to embroid it later on some metal embellishments. I think it's going to be looking a little bit more edgy and cool and then on the other side we have another pattern. I'm right now not sure whether I want to use the flower pattern or this one because I like this one as well pretty much. I'm excited to see how it's going to look when we've finished a whole pattern. So let's go. I have just finished my flower pattern and then I just use some metal embellishments to add some spiciness to my fabric sample. I think my flowers look very cool right now and I've been doing it in a navy blue cotton. On the reverse side, I have something also very amazing and cool. As I have mentioned, I don't know which one I'm going to use right now. I like both. I'm interested which pattern you like most, this one or the other one? I think both look very cool and you can experiment in different fabrics because all the fabrics look different. Wool is going to look different, satin or leather and so on. I hope you really liked this example and let's go to the next one, which is going to be the diamond pattern. 8. Diamond Pattern: Hi guys, and welcome to another fabric-smocking video. In this lesson, I would like to teach you how to create an amazing diamond pattern. It's also a pattern where you have, on the other side, another pattern, so you can choose which one you like most, the diamonds or the other one. Probably, you've already seen somewhere this pattern because it's very, very commonly used by haute couture designers which simply love this pattern, so you can find a lot of diamond patterns at Chanel shows, Miu Miu, Dior, and some other amazing haute couture designers. Today, we're going to learn how to create such a pattern. What do you need in order to sew a diamond pattern? First of all, we need our fabric of the size of 36 to 36 centimeters. Then you have to print out your template with diamond pattern, which we're going to lay around, transfer onto our fabric. We also need a piece of paper because we need to draw a tiny, tiny square, and then we're going to cut it out. Obviously, we need our quilting ruler, and yeah, our needles because we're going to, again, hand stitch, and some fret. Let's start our fun part, and let's do the diamond pattern. I'm taking, again, my fabric, and I'm going to take my quilting ruler. Again, we have to draw small grids of the size of three centimeters to three centimeters. We are basically doing the same as we have done in previous patterns. Let's go. You have to be, again, very, very precise. Now let's start drawing our lines every three centimeters. Another one. Third one. If you're asking yourself right now whether you are drawing the pattern on the reverse or right side, then we're going to draw, this time, the pattern on the left side because we're going to see our diamonds on the right side. Again, if you have a matte fabric and you want your template to be, in the end, very shiny, then you have to draw it on the matte side, and your pattern is going to be shiny. What is important is that you only draw the grid of squares of the size of three centimeters to three centimeters, but do not draw the details inside because there's a little trick that we have to do in order to draw them. My grid is finished which means that, right now, I can take my pattern, and I can transfer it onto my fabric. Can you see these squares? In order to make them, you have to take a piece of paper, and you have to draw a tiny square of the size of one and a half centimeters to one and a half centimeters. The reason why we are taking one and a half to one and a half is because we need to take the half of the length of our main grid. Our main square in our grid is three centimeters to three centimeters and when we halve it, we're just going to have one and a half centimeter to one and a half centimeter. I'm putting away my fabric, and I am going to take one this one, and I'm just going to draw quickly a small square. One and a half centimeter on this side, one and a half on this side. One line and second line, and I'm just double checking. One and a half. One and a half. We have to take as well, our pattern, and we have to draw diagonal lines, which are going to cross in the middle. One line and a second line. Great. Now we are taking our scissors. I'm going to have to cut it out. Please have a look at your pattern because now we have to draw these tiny squares exactly in the same places where our main pattern is showing us it. We are taking again our fabric pattern, and we're going to place our square in the same places as our main pattern is showing us. We have our first square, and then we have our first square over here like that, and I'm going to draw around the lines, so the first one, second line, and the last one. This is exactly how you create a diamond pattern. We have to do, right now, the same process. We're just going to draw small squares of the size of one and a half to one and a half in the places that our main pattern is showing us. My second pattern is here. My second square is in the third line. I'm placing my cardboard square, and I'm just drawing around, and then you continue doing it with your whole fabric sample. Once we have finished drawing our pattern, we're going to start sewing. I'm going to take, maybe, red thread so you can better see my pattern and now I'm going to stitch it because we going to do something different in this pattern, something totally new that we haven't done previously in other patterns. I'm cutting my thread not too long because again we are going to have to cut off our thread every single time we finish one diamond. I'm making three knots. Remember that every single knot should sit on another. We are going to try to make three knots in one place like this. Now I'm taking my scissors, I'm cutting off some of the thread. Again, we are stitching every single row. So the first one, the second, the third and the fourth. What is interesting in this pattern that the very first diamond you're going to see over here. In-between those four squares, you're going to see your very first diamond. The second is going to be here, the third and the fourth. We basically have to stitch four squares in order to see one diamond. Let's go. Let me start in the second row because I just want to demonstrate to you how to sew it as a pattern. I'm taking my needle and my thread, and I'm going one millimeter after this point inside. I can't see right now my needle and I'm coming back again one millimeter before this point. Taking my needle and I'm coming out. Basically you can't see the thread. The thread is right now on that reverse side. All the other patterns you could always see the thread because we were just sewing on diagonal lines all across this square and in this time our thread is hidden under reverse sides. I'm taking my needle and I'm going, again, inside and I'm going around one millimeter after this point. I'm going inside, again, my needle and my thread is going to be underneath over here and I'm coming out in this place like that. You can only see the thread in those points. We have the first one, the second almost is done. We have to come out millimeter before this point. I'm putting my thread, and again, I can only see the thread in those points. So we have 1, 2, 3, almost a fourth. I'm making another stitch. I'm going down with my needle and I'm coming out. This is very important. I'm coming out before this knot over here. If you go too far with your needle and you would come out after this, not over here, you would not be able to pull your thread later on and you wouldn't be able to create a diamond pattern. This is how a diamond pattern correctly made looks like. Once we have done this, I'm going to twist it, you have to pull again your thread very, very tight. I have two pleets on the left side, one and two, then I have two pleets on the right side. One and two on the right slide, and one and two on the left side, and my thread should be exactly in the middle. Once we have this, we are taking our needle and we are just going through this fabric, like that. We should come out on the other side exactly in this point. Let me go back around three times. So the second, the third and we are stitching the whole time in the same place. Now I'm making a tiny knot over here. I'm cutting off my thread, and this is how your first stitch look likes. It's a little bit twisting. It's a little bit twisted. It looks a little bit like a twisters square. Once you have done this, we have to do the second, the third, and the fourth in order to see the very first diamond. It is, I think, the very far most time-consuming pattern in smocking, but it's looking really nice. It's worth the time. Again, I'm taking my thread, making knots quickly. If it's looking a little bit messy on this side, I'm going to have some extra thread then don't worry at all because we are on the reverse side on the fabric, so no one's going to see it anyway, or you can just simply cut it off later on. Now I'm going to do my second diamond. Again, I'm taking my needle. I'm going inside. Here's my point. I'm going one millimeter to the right. I'm taking my needle underneath and I'm coming out at this place, like that. Again, my thread is on the reverse side so I can't see it. I'm going inside like that, and I'm coming out. This way, I'm going to stitch all the four corners, the first, the second, the third and the fourth. You can see the red thread in every single of the corners of the square. So the first, the second, the third and the fourth. Once we have stitched this, we're going to pull our thread very tight. Again, I'm catching two pleets on the left side, and I'm having two more pleets on the right side. One and two, one and two. My thread is again in the very middle, and I'm taking my needle and I'm going inside, and I'm coming out on the other side and it should come out in this point. One and two. I'm coming back, and I'm making a simple knot. We have our second square done. We can have a quick little look on the reverse side and check if there's something going on already. Well, yes, something is going on but not a lot so you can't even see the first diamond, so again, you have to be patient and we have to stitch two more in order to see anything. Let's go back and let's continue stitching. If you're asking right now yourself whether the designers of Chanel, New Mu, or Dior, or Alexandar Mcqueen are also hand-stitching everything and they're not using any machines, then the answer is yes. They are also doing everything by hand and it's all about craftsmanship. We are doing right now the same job as they're usually doing in their design studios. We have number 1, number 2, and we are doing number 3, and the process is exactly the same so I'm going inside, I'm coming out. Can't see the thread on this side, I'm going inside. Like that. Again, four corners are done. Now it's time to pull the thread and catch two peats in my left hand, two peats in my right hand. You can see a small triangle over here. I'm just going inside and I'm pushing my needle, like that. I'm coming out and I'm going back and forth. I'm going to make a small knot on the end. Obviously, you didn't have to work on grid sizes of the size of three centimeters to three centimeters, you can make them bigger, you can make them smaller as well. I've been recently working on grids of the size of five centimeters and the diamonds were a bit bigger, but they were also looking very nice. We have to do one more diamond. I have just finished my fourth square, which means that I should see right now, my very first diamond, let's check. On this side, we have our four squares stitched. Then on the reverse side, finally, yes, I can see finally the very first diamond. This pattern is working. If you want to see more diamonds, you have to keep on sewing, so let's go guys. I have stitched the half of my fabric sample. On this side, it looks quite funny. It looks like twisted squares, which I actually totally like, and I think they would look cool, for example, on a t-shirt, maybe as an [inaudible] or something like that. On the other side, we should have right now a couple of diamonds. Let's have a quick look if it's going into the right direction, so three, two, one go. Cool. I can see finally diamonds, lots of them. I love the structure of it because it's not too 3D, it's not too big, but you can see there's something happening. It's still structured but it's a little bit smaller, which is super cool for me. I really like the pattern, so let's continue. Let us finish our sample. We still have to do 1, 2, 3, four rows to go. Let's go. My last one is done, I'm just going to get rid of some excess threads over here, so I'm just going to quickly cut them off like that. That's one side of my pattern. You can see the funny twisted squares over here. You can actually iron them if you don't like them, that they're so three-dimensional, so you can iron them and they will become a little bit more flat. On the other side, we have our beautiful diamond pattern. Now you are like a haute couture designer, you're like Chanel, New Mu and so on, and you're designing your own haute couture fabrics. This was our beautiful diamond pattern. I hope you really like this one and I'm going to show you later on some great inspirations, which include this pattern. Now let's move on to the next one. 9. Honeycomb Pattern: Hi guys. In this video, I would like to teach you an English smocking pattern. It's the honeycomb. The honeycomb pattern is created by a series of fine gutters and later on you can embellish with different beads, for example, golden ones, or silver ones, or just any beads you would like. You can create such a beautiful pattern, which you can move to the side, and it's working on your body. In order to create this beautiful pattern, we're going to have to take our fabric sample, which is a rectangle of the size of 54 centimeters to 36 centimeters. Good news is that we don't have to draw a grid on it. It's our very first pattern without a grid. We don't have to draw these tiny squares of the size of three centimeters to three centimeters. Because the only thing that we have to do is to take our ruler. Then we have to take our pen, and we have to mark dots every three centimeters. This time we're just only marking tiny dots, and we're not joining the whole grid. Let's start. Three centimeters, like that. Three, 6, 19, 21,24. Don't move your fabric sample. That 20s. Our first line should look like this. We have dots every three centimeter. Now we're going to do our second row. Again, every three centimeters, and let's go. I have covered my whole rectangle in dots every three centimeter. This is how your fabric should look like right now. Great. Now the fun part starts, and we're going to hand stitch it. We are taking our needle. Then we need threads, I may use the black one. This time we have to take very long thread. Very long thread means that it has to be, firstly, you have to take a double and secondly, the length of your thread should be longer than your fabric is. Around three centimeters, maybe five centimeters. I need to take a little bit longer piece of thread and something like that. You can see that my thread is longer than my fabric, and now I'm going to cut it up over here. I'm going to thread my needle, like that. Now I'm going to make three knots on the very end. One, two, almost and the third one is done, okey-dokey. Now we're going to stop stitching. We have to stitch every single lines. We have the first, second, third, fourth, and so on lines. We are going to start at this point where we have our first dot, and we're going to do a running stitch in the first row, which means we are taking our needle and thread. I'm going inside into the very first dot, like that. I will have to come out. My needle is inside on the reverse side of the fabric and I have to come out where the second dot is. Like that. I went into the first dot and I came out at the second dot. Now we have to pull your thread. You can see that your knot is exactly in the place where we had our first point. Now we're just going to do a basic running stitch. You're going to go inside and out, inside and out. Pretty easy and quite fast to do to be honest. I'm going inside, and I'm coming out every three centimeters All my students always say that it's their favorite pattern because it's the fastest one to do. Actually they are right because it goes quite fast to do it. Out, and we're going inside, and we continue making our running stitch. One more. Now, we are at the place where we have our last dots. We are going inside, we are coming out on the other side. But we are not making any knots, which means we're just going to take our scissors, and we're just simply going to cut off the thread. We don't need any threads, and we just want our threads to sit on a table and wait for us for later because we are going to do some magic later on. This is basically how our first running stitch looks like. Now we have to do exactly the same process with this second line, with the third line, with the fourth line. Again, we are taking our needle, and we have to take again quite long thread. Let me twist it. Double thread. Again, a little bit longer than our fabric. Don't make it too long, three centimeters to the right or to the left is totally fine. I wouldn't make it longer than five centimeters. If you go for 10-15 centimeters, it's going to be a little bit too long because it's going to be just messy. I'm threading my needle, three knots, as per usual. One, 2 and 3. I'm twisting my fabric once again. What is super important is that you have to do exactly the same running stitch in the second row, which means that if you had your first knot at the first point, then you have to do exactly the same. We're going again inside the fabric, and we are coming out at the second dot. This is correct. What would be incorrect is that when you go inside the fabric and your knot sits inside. If we would do something like that, this would be completely incorrect, and you wouldn't be able to do your honeycomb pattern. I'm just going to quickly cut it off and do a proper running stitch. One more time, and now we're going to do it in the right way. I'm going inside, I went inside with my needle, and I'm coming out. I can see that my knot is at the same place as the first one, and we can continue stitching and stitching and stitching the whole time. We're coming to the end of the second row, which means that we're going again. Go into the last dot, we come out, the other side, and again we're just cutting off our fret. I'm just cutting it off, and I'm not making any knots. I'm just leaving my fret like that. Again, we're going to have to do the same. We're stitching the second, the third, and fourth-liner. I have finished stitching my fabric sample, your fabric should look like this right now, so it should be totally covered with running stitches. Before I mentioned, we have knots at this side and we don't have any knots at this side. Right now we have to take our fret, which is on the right side, the one without any knots, then moves fret over here and we're going to pull it tight. Let me take free frets like that, and I was just going to put it in the middle, and this way I'm creating pleats. Now I'm going to take another fret-free, and I'm just going to pull it. See we are creating beautiful pleats in our fabric. Again, I'm taking some fret, and I'm pulling it, bang. Try to pull it very, very tight. Your fabric should look like this right now. We have a couple of pleats which we're going to hand stitch right now. Let's move our fret to the side. Do not cut it off. Actually don't do anything with it, because in the very end, once we're done with our honeycomb pattern, we would just get rid of it because we just going to pull these tiny knots and we'll get rid of the fret so you won't see any inside your beautiful honeycomb pattern. Right now, we have to take again fret, our needle but this time, just cut off a tiny piece of fret, maybe around this length, that should be enough, then I'm cutting it off. Fretted, make again free knots on the very end. One, two, and the third one is almost done. It's done. Cut off your fret, because we are right now on the right side of fabric. Which means you can see everything that's going on, every single stitch, every single knot. We have to make it really neat and tidy. Right now I'm taking my very first two pleats, these ones, and I'm going to go inside with my needle into the second pleat, and I'm going to stitch around one millimeter underneath, here. I'm going inside with my needle and my fret should sit here. Now I'm taking my fret, I'm taking my second pleat, like that. I'm holding it, and I'm just going through and I'm just trying to catch two pleats together. I'm holding two pleats, and I'm going once, this is the second time and the third one. It's basically just a simple backstitch. The reason why we have started in this place is because our first black fret was exactly in this place. The frets which are inside are showing us where we have to stitch. Our second stitch going to be here, where the second fret is, we're going to stitch here, and we're going to stitch over here like that. Now we're going to have to do a knot. The best way to do a knot is to go inside with your fret, like this, and I'm going inside my fret, I'm pulling it tight. I would do it once again. I'm taking my needle like that. Inside in-between the two pleats, I'm catching my needle, and once again, I'm going into this tiny hole and I'm pulling my fret tight. Now I can cut it off. You can't see any knot, so it looks really neat and tidy. The first stitch is done. It's going to be enough. Now I'm taking my fret, I'm making a tiny knot on the very end, and I'm cutting it off, and I'm going to stitch my second line. Again, I'm catching two pleats. It's actually the second and the third pleat. Again, I'm going inside my fabric. My knot is going to be inside my way first pleat, and I'm going to do an easy backstitch in order to catch my two pleats. One more time like this, 1, 2, and the third one. Again, I don't want anyone to see my knots, I'm just going to take my needle. I will go inside in-between the two pleats, I will catch my needle, and go and slide this tiny hole and pull it tight. One more time. I'm taking my needle, I'm going in-between the two pleats, and I'm going into my pull and pulling it tight. Now I can take my scissors and I cut it off and you can't see any knots it's looking nice. Obviously, you don't have to take black frets. Usually, you take fret which is in the color of your fabric, so white or Bash should be the best one. But you can as well take some contrasting fret or metallic fret, it's going to look a little bit more interesting. Once you have done the first, the second, we're going to do our next one. I need some fret, I'm fretting my needle again, not too long. I'm back to this line, the first line actually. This time I'm going to catch these two pleats. I'm catching these two pleats, it's the pleat number 1, 2, 3, and 4. Again, the fret is showing me what exactly I have to start. Again, I'm going inside with my needle just around one millimeter underneath the pleat, and I'm doing a basic backstitch three times. I'm going inside in between the two plates, and I'm cutting the deeper. Now you have to stitch these two together. You can open up a little bit to your fabric samples so you can better see your pleats. Once we have stitched these two lines, then we stitch these two pleats, and again these two pleats and it starts to work. Then again, we are opening two pleats. That's where we have to stitch again where we can see the black thread. I'm going to stitch them together. I'm just using the pins in order to show you better where you have to stitch. We can see already our honeycomb pattern coming alive over here. Let's go and let's stitch the next lines. If you want a little bit more interesting finishing to your sample, you can use as well beads. So once you're finishing stitching your two pleats, and the very end, you can just take any beads at all you find to be honest. So you can take normal beads, glass beads, metallic beads, and you can just embellish your sample so it's going to look unique and amazing. I'm taking off my pin. I'm going inside, and I'm just going to continue doing the same the whole time. So I'm doing a quick back stitch. I'm going in between the two pleats, and I'm cutting off my thread. So whole of my pattern is done. I can already see that my pattern is coming alive. I can already see the honeycombs. I'll continue doing the same with the rest of the pattern. So I still have to go a couple of rows. I have just finished stitching my honeycomb pattern. It should look like this. Now, the only thing that we have to do is to pull our thread and get rid of all those black threads in the middle because they just look ugly and we don't want them inside. So we just going to take one knot after another one and we're just going to pull it. We got rid of the first one and then we have to deal with same with the second one. Number 2. Number 3. See, your fabric is already opening up a little bit. This honeycomb pattern used to be a lot of times used in the past times because a lot of courses were made of this pattern. So it's giving you a really nice silhouette. One more, two, three, and the last one. We are done. So this is how our honeycomb pattern looks. A white satin fabric with black finishings. I really like it because it's moving on your body. You can decide if you want your honeycombs to be a little bit bigger and spread them to the side or a little bit smaller. Of course, you can also take some beads and you can embellish them and create a honeycomb like this. You can already see the difference between the same pattern which is done in wool. It looks at one hand exactly the same because it's still the honeycomb pattern, but there's a slight difference because in wool, it's a little bit more stiff and it's holding better the structure. Then in satin, it's a little bit more soft and I think feminine. I like both versions. Have a close look at backside because there are some funny pleats which you can also use, for example, for, I don't know, maybe making a sleeve. A sleeve would be cool. Interesting. Haven't seen something like that so far so why not? We have just done our honeycomb pattern which I really like, and I hope you also enjoyed this pattern. Let's go and let's make the last pattern, which is the lozenge pattern. 10. Lozenge Pattern: Hi guys and welcome to our sixth and last video. Gosh, that went so quick. How about we celebrate this last tutorial with a beautiful lasagna pattern. This is our lasagna pattern, and looks a bit like I'm even please. This pattern is a little bit more soft and delicate, and it doesn't have such expressive structure like the error pattern or the basket pattern, which we have done previously. But that's actually very good because sometimes less is more, so in order to make it a lasagna pattern we need, our fabric which was cut to a square size of 36 centimeters to 46 centimeters. Then we have to print out our template which is attached to the video with lasagna pattern, and as well we need our fabric scissors, our needle on frets, and we need a pen. That's actually everything that we need, so let's get started. Firstly we have to draw a grid of the size of three centimeters to three centimeters, like previously we have done so three centimeters to three centimeters. I'm going to take my quilting ruler, and am going to start drawing lines every three centimeters. This pattern you are also drawing on the reverse side of the fabric a new pattern would pop out on the other side. Again, in this side whether you want to have a shiny or marked pattern, or a light color or dark color like in my case I have here. Am marking my dots every three centimeter. Now we have to connect our lines, and create a beautiful grid, and later on we will transfer our lasagna pattern on our fabric. I have just finished drawing my grid of the size three centimeters to three centimeters. Right now we have to transfer our pattern onto the fabric and have a closer look at it, as you can see that we are marking the same lines a second time. We're going to stitch this time, every single line. It's a little bit similar to the basket pattern where we just going to pick up a little bit of fabric on one corner, and then on second corner and we'll just pull it, and we'll create lasagna pattern. Again am taking my quilting ruler, am placing my patterns I can see it and let's start our pattern. Be careful with this pattern because it's a little bit tricky while you are going to draw it. All the lines a little bit mixed up so you have to always double-check so you don't make a mistake. Now I'd like to show you the direction of sewing. I will quickly write it down on our template, the direction of stitching. Firstly we're going to do this line, and the second line is right here 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and again, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. It's going to be easy, it's just looking complicated. Firstly we have to stitch our line which is marked with the number 1. We are up, then we are going down, and we're going to stitch that second line. Then we're going again up number 3 and down, so up and down, up and down. This is basically our first row which will have sifters, so we're going up, down, up and down, up and down, up and down. This is our first row, and then our second row we have to skip down, and again, scotch at this point and we're going to start low. Then we're going to go up and down, up and down so 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and we're going to do the same with the next lines. It's going to be the same process. One more time, this is our first line, 1, 2, 3, 4, and then we have to go down, and we're going to start over here, and this is going to be our first-line, and again going up and down, up and down. Let's start to create of parts, so let's take some thread, let me take you maybe the red one. Again we have to tread our needle and make three knots on the very end. Your thread can be a bit longer, as we don't have to cut it off every single time we finish a line. Also remember that we are stitching one line after another one. We're not starting on the bottom, and then we are stitching something down because otherwise it will mixed up everything. I'm picking up a little bit of fabric, at the right corner, like that. One more time, and now am going to cover with my thread the line which I just have drawn. I'm going to this corner and again am picking up just a little bit of material around 1-2 millimeters maybe. Basically in this we see the thread on line, so it's not tying on the reverse side, but we can see it the whole tie. Right now we have to pull it tight. This point meets the second one, and there's no space in-between like that. Now I'm just going to quickly do a backstitch, and I will just go over three times, like in all the previous patterns. Number 2, we have done our first line. Right now we have to go down, and we're going to stitch the second line. Can you see this line? We cannot pull it, so we're going to go to this corner, and I'll just pick up a little bit of material. Again just one millimeter, and I will leave some loose thread like that. Now I am making a tiny backstitch, to first on the threat so it doesn't move. Double-check, amazing it's still loose so we can now stitch the second line. Again we're going to this corner, we are picking up just a little bit of material and you're going to pull it tight, like that. Am basically having two tiny threads in my fingers, am going about one millimeter down. Am making a backstitch and I'm going through three times. Once we are down, we have to go again up and stitch number 3, then we go down number 4, 5 and, the fun continuous. Again I'm going up, am leaving my thread a little bit loose, and I'm making a small backstitch. Double-check, if it's fine and I can continue hand sewing. Am going to pull it. Okay, Number 3 is done so we going Number 4, 5, 6. Once we have finished our first line, this is how your first line should look like. We have tiny triangles. We going to have to skip down and you're going to have to start over here. We're not starting with this line, we are starting with the second line. I'm going to start where my Number 1 is, and then I'm going to go up and again down, so up and down, up and down. This is basically my second line which I have to stitch. Number 1, I have to fasten my thread again in the left corner, and now I'm stitching this line, I'm picking up a little bit of material and then right corner. I'm pulling my thread tight and a quick backstitch. Now I have to skip and do this line, the upper line. Don't forget to leave your thread loose, like that, and make a tiny backstitch to fasten it. Always double-check if it's not moving. It's fine. I can pull it, it's not moving and now we're going to stitch Number 2, then we are doing Number 3. We are halfway done. I've stitched 50 percent of my sample, and this is how it looks on the reverse side. You can see a mix of squares and triangles. If you have the same, then you've done your pattern in a well way. Let's go on the other side and see what's going on here. I can finally see some tiny pleats popping out from the fabric. This is how a Lozenge pattern coming to live. I like how it's looking so far so let's go and let's stitch the outer hall. I have just finished stitching my Lozenge pattern. This is how it should look on the reverse side. As I have mentioned, we have a cool mix of triangles and squares. I also like this pattern on this side and I've been using it also in my collections because I like it, it's so geometrical. Then on the right side, we have our beautiful Lozenge pattern, which consists of those uneven mixed stitched pleats. I really like that this pattern is so soft and delicate and I also hope that you like this pattern as well and let me see you in the next video. 11. Inspirations: [MUSIC] Hi, I'm Dominika Syczynska, and you're watching fabric class inspirations. In today's video, I would like to show you some great examples of smoked fabrics. Here we can find my collection which is entirely done with smoked fabrics, and you can find your three-dimensional structures, very unique fabrics, and all of these garments were made by hand stitching. It was a super time-consuming collection, but it was worth at the time because amazing patterns came out while we were creating this collection. Before I show you the whole collection, let me take you quickly on a creative journey and present my mood board. Here, we can find all the inspirations that came into my mind while I was designing this collection. It's basically my brain put up on the wall, and it's a quiet color for a little bit messy brain as you can see. Whenever we design a collection, we always start with some rough sketches, so we have a lot of sketches. The main inspiration in this collection were geometrical shapes and prints and drawings. Firstly, we were going through books, films, prints, photos, and we were collecting them and tried to get creative. Before you start designing collection, you should always do as many samples as you can, because smoking patterns look totally different in various fabrics. For example, this arrow pattern looks totally different in leather, and it looks totally different in chiffon and as well in wool. Once you have stitched all of these fabric samples, we have done more sketches. I usually sketch by hand, and then I take my sketches to the computer and I just mix them out a little bit, and I see what's going to happen, whether I like it or not. All the things which we like, in the very end, we put it up onto this wall and we brainstorm. This is a super time-consuming process to be honest, it's like making a mood board. But to be honest, it's my favorite part because it's the most creative one. Once you are done with this, we finally started doing the collection and this is the outcome. Here Here, you can find quite a lot of garments from a smoking collection. For example, you can find here pre-core jumper which has Lozenga patterns. Lozenga is a smoking pattern. I also embellished my jumper with some metal embellishments, and I'm wearing it with a long white shirt. I think it's looking pretty cool. You can wear it for daily work and go to work. Here's a dress which I really like to be honest, and it's entirely made out of cashmere. I was smoking read cashmere, and I was creating an arrow pattern which you can see here, and I was mixing it with a leaf pattern. The outcome is both three-dimensional, unique, and structured. This dress was worn a lot of times by celebrities, because it's looking amazing on a catwalk. It's a dress which you can wear on big night outs. Then I have a dress, that's my favorite one. I always wear it with heavy black boots, and it's made out of silver lame. Can you recognize this pattern? It's a honeycomb pattern. I smoked together tiny pits and the outcome is pretty cool, because it is three-dimensional but still you can wear it daily. It's mixed with a black leather and silver embellishments, so it's cool for a concept, for example, or for a date, why not? This one I like. This is a vest which was made of black leather and it's totally shiny. It's super cool. It's made of black arrow pattern. In the front, we're doing a small arrow pattern, so the grid size was 3-3 centimeters. Then on the backside, we decided to do a big arrow pattern. Small one, big one, and we added some embellishments on the leather belt and it's super cool. Because my collection was full of super cool and edgy clothes with lots of leather, I thought I needed something more feminine and soft, so I made actually more skirts which are a bit more feminine. They are soft, and the structure which is a diamond pattern gives this skirt a little bit of edginess, but it's still something you can wear normal to work, for a date. I think it's looking amazing with a t-shirt or as well with a blazer. We also made the same skirt in another color, but here we changed the pattern. This is a basket pattern, it's a little bit more 3D, so it's a little bit more popping out from the skirt. But it's still looking amazing with, for example, t-shirts or even with a sweatshirt. You can pair this miniskirts with, for example, a leather jacket. When I was doing this collection, I really wanted to do a leather jacket, but I didn't want it to be totally boring. I wanted to add some twist to it, and I wanted it to be a little bit more edgy. I decided that I will add a flower pattern over here. I know what you're thinking right now that you can't see any flowers, but there are some because this fabric is double-sided. On one side we have flowers which are inside and you can't see them right now, and on this side we have a geometrical course of a pattern. I just added it on one side, and I think it's looking super cool and edgy, and you can wear it with a t-shirt, for example, or with our miniskirts or just pair it with jeans and you're going to look amazing. I also have some small simple clothes over here. Here is a vest which you can also wear actually as a dress. We just wanted to do something totally simple and delicate, so we thought we're going to do Lozenga patterns. Lozenga is one of our smoking patterns which we have learned today, and it's a little bit more soft and it's looking amazing with a t-shirt or just with some trousers. Here, I have one more vest which you can also wear as a dress. We made a flower pocket so it's popping out from the fabric, and it's totally three-dimensional and structured, and it's made of cashmere and dark wool. I simply love it. I actually wore it the whole year. I'm wearing it during spring time on a t-shirt, and I'm wearing it when it's a little bit colder. This was my smoked collection which was entirely done by hand stitching. Yes, it was super time-consuming, but in the end it was so worth doing it because these garments look spectacular. [MUSIC] I hope you liked this video, and you're going to tune into my next videos. [MUSIC] 12. Summary: Hi, guys, and congratulations because you have just finished our fabric smoking masterclass. As a teacher, I couldn't be more proud of you and I'm super happy that you've created all these three-dimensional structure, the beautifully smoked fabrics. To summary our masterclass, firstly, you have learned everything about the tools and materials that you needed in order to create those beautiful fabrics. Later on, you've discovered our very first pattern, which was the arrow pattern. It's a triangle-shaped pattern, which is still my all time favorite pattern. Then you have learned everything about the basket pattern. Do you remember we've been drawing greats, transferring patterns and hand stitching it. Once we were done with the basket pattern, we've done a beautiful flower pattern which was two-sided. On one side we had a geometrical pattern, on the other side we had some beautiful flowers. Later on you took some cardboard and we've been drawing a diamond pattern, which is also double-sided. On one side you have those funny cleats a little bit twisted, and on the other side we have nice diamonds. Once we have finished those ones, we've moved on to our traditional English smoking pattern, which is called the honeycomb. We've been stitching this pattern by hand and we've also embellished it with some nice beads. In the very end, we have done a lasagna pattern, which was again on one side a little bit geometry, and it was a mix of triangles and squares, and on this side we had a mix of nice cleats. Once we have stitched all these beautiful patterns, I have shown you some great inspirations and my collection which was entirely done of smoked fabrics. I hope that you're inspired by this masterclass and you will continue to create three-dimensional beautiful and smoked fabrics. I'm Dominika Syczynska, and I was your fabric smoking masterclass teacher.