How to make a dance film on your iPhone. | Wayne Sables | Skillshare
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How to make a dance film on your iPhone.

teacher avatar Wayne Sables, Filmmaker | Projection Mapper | Teacher

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Course Introduction

      0:47

    • 2.

      Setting up your smartphone

      11:36

    • 3.

      Shot construction, lighting.

      8:12

    • 4.

      Creating audio and a shot list

      11:18

    • 5.

      Colour grade in the photos app

      2:53

    • 6.

      IMovie overview

      6:41

    • 7.

      IMovie - How to create a trailer

      5:46

    • 8.

      Editing a dance film in iMovie

      13:33

    • 9.

      Adding creative effects to enhance your image

      3:39

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About This Class

In this course you will learn how to create a dance film from planning to filming to editing all on your iPhone. It is an active participation course and you will be encouraged to shoot footage as you progress through. You’re learning on this course although aimed at creating a dance film give you the skills and confidence to create any film on your smart phone.

In this course you will learn how to:

Create storyboards and shot lists,

Basic to advanced cinematic shots

What additional kit is required (if any)

Choreographing the camera

Source royalty free audio

Editing your footage (on an iPhone)

Submit your work to film festivals. 

Meet Your Teacher

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Wayne Sables

Filmmaker | Projection Mapper | Teacher

Teacher
Level: All Levels

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Transcripts

1. Course Introduction: Hello, My name is Wayne stables and I'm a filmmaker specializing in creating dance film and artists documentary. Over the next four sessions, we will be working together to guide you through creating your own dance film. We're going to go through everything. So we'll start with how you set up your camera to get the best possible filming quality will explore different types of shots that you can use to build up your choreography digitally. We'll look at how you create camera movement to add extra dynamics into your choreography, we will look at how you choreograph for the camera and how you choreograph the camera to best enhance your choreography. And once we've done all of that, we're going to look at how you edit all of your footage together to create an amazing dance film. And we're going to do it all on a smart phone. Let's dive in. 2. Setting up your smartphone: Hello and welcome to this. Create your own dance film on a smart phone series of sessions in total, there'll be four sessions where we will look at everything you need to know to create and edit your own dance film in this session. So session 1, we're going to look at setting up your smartphone so you have the perfect conditions. Film, your dance film. We're going to look at some composition. So we're going to look at the native camera app. We're going to look at frame sizes. So what does for K-mean? What is 1080 p mean? You're going to find all that out in a moment. We're also going to look at something called the rule of thirds. Now the rule of thirds is a photography technique and I promised is going to absolutely make your dance films stunning in the way you compose them. Don't worry if that doesn't make any sense. Again, that part of the sessions coming up in a moment. Okay, Let's crack on Let's get into the details of how we set up our smartphone. And let's get ready to make some wonderful dance films. Let's have a look at setting up our smart phone for the optimal record settings for filming video. So I'm in my settings and I'm just going to click camera. There we go. There's my cameras. If I click that, I get a list of options. So the first I'm going to look at format. So let me click Format and I'm gonna make sure I'm on most compatible. That means that when I start editing this, it'll be compatible with different editing formats. Next I'm going to go to record video. I always record it for k 24 frames per second because that's film style. If I go down, I get a little bit more of an explanation as to what that actually means. So for example, if I shoot my film at 24 frames per second per minute will be about 270 megabytes worth of data. So you choose depending on what storage you have the best settings for yourself. So let's go back. Let's go too slow motion. I always do my slow motion, a 120 frames, especially when I'm filming movement, because I find it much smoother. I find 240 a little bit too, too slow when I'm creating movement and filming that. Always put record stereo sound. With that, I'll give you a left and a right channel. In preserve settings. Let's have a look in here. Most of mine are turned off by now because they just preserve your last settings. So if you're gonna do some filming, you might want to double-check those and make sure the set so that you don't have to keep setting that every time. Scrolling down, make sure your grids are turned on. Maria from camera is turned on. I have view outside the frame. That just means I can see what's around my frame 1, I'm firm and you don't really need that turned on. Ok, so now you have only setup for recording video. Let's move on and go into the next bit. Let's learn about the native camera app. We're going to start by looking at the native camera app on the iPhone. Let's have a look at timelapse. Time-lapse takes a series of images over a set amount of time. So if I just focus on this apple here and I click the time-lapse button. You'll see it has a countdown timer, and now he's taking one image every time that circle is completed. So let's just move over to slow motion. Slow motion does exactly what it says when I click that. It filled in some motions. If I go round here like this. And here's the video. And as you can see, it's in super slow motion. So the camera is moving around. Slow motion is great for capturing action and making sure the cameras smooth. And let's just click over to video. So video again does exactly what it says. It just record videos, so I've just clicked the button as you can see, just record and here's a clip from video. We're going to have a look at these three lines that we've got. Excellent photo just takes a photon. You'll notice the viewer changes. And I've taken a photo, that portrait. So what poetry does is it adds a blur in the background, so it's separate your subject from the background. Again, there's a photo and pan out means panoramas. If I turn that round and I press the button, you'll see I move my camera and starts to create a panoramic image. Just go back to the way we were. Back to video. Fabulous. Okay, so let's have a look at some of the features here. Here we have a grid on the screen. This directly relates to something called the Rule of Thirds. If I record now, I'm have the apple in the left side between the grids that just stopped frame with the subject in the center. Which makes it much more interesting when I'm looking at it as a viewer. So again, I can use these frame guides to frame my suggestion. I film it on my smartphone. At the top, you'll notice a timer. So now it's at 3031. That is telling me how long I've been recorded for. Really, really useful when I'm making films, I can say exactly how much I've recorded and how much storage I've taken up. In the top-left corner of your phone. What you will see is you will see a number. So it might say for k 24, when it says for K24, that means is for 1000 pixels and 24 frames per second. 24 frames per second is a cinema equivalent. So that's when you watch a film at the cinema or you watch it on TV. Okay, we've set up your camera ready for the optimal filmmaking settings. You've gone through the native camera app and you've tested all the features. Do you know what all they do? You've also probably got some ideas of how you're going to use them. Hold off a minute. Before we do that, we're going to jump into the next part of this session where we're going to look at portray versus landscape, and we're going to look at frame sizes. And then finally we're going to look at that thing that I said earlier, rule of thirds. In this section, we're going to portray versus landscape. So if you're going to shoot portraits, so you might want to shoot something for Instagram. You would have your phone. Facing upwards so you get an image like we have on the screen here. So that's filming portrait mode. If you want to create a film, I would advise that you will film in landscape mode. And this is landscape mode, because we're making dance film, landscape mode gives you much more scope to put your film in different places, but it also gives you a much wider field of view. So you can see within this shot of me filming a dancer for a dance from which we are going to watch later. You've got all of that space. Here's a little quick recap of what those terms mean. For k or not for k. So do I shoot it 720 P 10 ATP to k or four. Okay, and what is the difference? In brief, for K usually refers to the amount of pixels, IE for 1000 pixels with the width and the height, 1080 p resolution is 1920 by 1080. If you have a pixel count which isn't on our image of 3,840 by 2160. That's called UHD or alter UHD through some cameras shoot just show for K, but they do call for k, which is a little bit confusion. In this graphic. It gives you a really clear example of the size in differences. So for k obviously is four times bigger than 10 ATP and it's twice as big as 2k for example. So that begs the question, do I issue for k or don't tie shoes for k? There are a couple of advantages and disadvantages to shooting for k and not shooting. The main advantage of shooting for K, for me is if I'm delivering my film at 1080 P, I've got all that space in my image where I can reframe everything. And I can zoom in four times without losing quality. So I essentially a myriad of shot types from one shot Monash you for K. The disadvantage of shooting for K is storage size. So because I'm shooting for 1000 pixels, that means my storage size is four times higher than 1080 P. That's not a problem if you're using external hard drives, but if you're making are longer film, the bills can quickly rack up. So that decision really is yours to make. But remember your phone shoes for k. And in my next session, when I look at rule of thirds, see a really handy guide is the actually as to the actual storage sizes of shooting for K on your phone, graduate definitely on your way to making amazing cinematic quality films. I'll see you in the next session. Okay, In this part of the session, we're going to look at the rule of thirds. This is going to be incredibly important when you're making your audience. Mom, notice in this picture that the camera has got grids on. We put those grids on our camera earlier. This is just to give you a frame guide so you can see how Rule of Thirds work. So let's move over to this shot here. This athlete here is that the side of my screen? So if you imagine is through the grades were looking at the rule of thirds and that draws your audience's eye when you are creating film. So we instantly look at the actor not in the center of the screen. So one of the things that I find really interesting is if you are making something for the state, the best place to be is the center of the stage. If you're making something for film, the best place to be is not in the center. That's too obvious. So play around with the rule of thirds, framing or dancer in different parts of the screen. And experiment with how you can create that really interesting visual look. Here are some examples of rule of third inaction when making dance film. Have a look and see what you notice. Okay, So we're at that part of the session where I've got a creative task for you. What I'd like you to do between now and our next session is I'd like you to simply explore the rule of thirds. So get your camera, take some pictures, take some fatigue. It can be a very thin, it could be a plan, it can be a tree. It can be your choreography or different body parts in Cleveland be your environment. The key thing is to really take those images other footage using the rule of thirds. So experiment timeframe, something in the middle frame to the side frame in the top corner. This will really help you when you start editing and filming your dance film, because it will give you a sense of where you want to place the body on the screen. Okay, Then guys, have a wonderful time exploring rural third, and I will see you in the next session. 3. Shot construction, lighting. : Hello everybody, Welcome to session 2 of this dance filmmaking course through refresh. So today we're going to look at a couple of different things. We are going to occur. Shock construction. So that is how you put your shots together. So whether you use an establishing shot or along shore or a closed loop or a tracking shot. Don't worry if you don't know what they mean. You will do after this session. I promised we're also going to look at lighting. And you'll notice I've purposely got an interesting lighting setup to do this video with you. So we're going to talk about how lighting, clean hands, the mood and the feeling of your film. And then we're also going to talk about storyboarding. And storyboarding very simply is how you put everything together to create a visual picture of the film you're going to make. Let's dive in and let's start preparing to make our dance film. Yeah. In this session, we're going to look at basic shock construction. The first one is an extreme long shot. And extreme long shot is used as a set to a show. So it sets you're seeing, it tells your audience where the action is about to happen. So if we take the trace, our subject, you'll see setting a beautiful Parkland, a long shot, very similar to extreme long shot. We get the whole picture, so we get a whole tree in shock and some of the Parkland. And again, that's used as an establishing shot. A mid shot is a little bit closer, so it's the same tree. But I add a little bit more mystery. So we know is a TRE, but we're not quite sure of any other factors. So that's really good to start to bring your audience into a scene. So this is a close-up again, it's the same tree from a different angle, so I'm looking up. So closeups are really good for the developing emotional attachments with your audience or coenzyme really close to you. You cannot add mystery. Here's an extreme close-up. So in ECU of the tree, again, I framed in such a way that is in two parts, but an extreme close-up. Really is about focusing on the subject really close, really creating that tight bond with your audience. And then you can click between the shots. So that's basic shop construction guys. So you've looked at basic shop, so you will stand all about long shots, close-ups, et cetera. Now we're going to move on a little bit and we're going to look at more intermediate shots. Now this shots are perfect for when you are making dance films. I've got an example to show you the different types of shots in a minute. But first I want to have a quick chat with you about them. So one of the shots we're going to look at today is called a following shot. And that basically means you have your camera and you follow the action. So wherever the actions doing, you follow it with your camera. A second shot we're going to look at is a tracking shot. And that usually goes in two directions AND goes from high to low. So camera goes here as the density goes to the floor, the camera tracks down to the floor. The other shop in terms of tracking is side-to-side. So if somebody's walking, for example, your camera goes from side to side to go either side who is following the action. The other shot we're going for is a push in. And that's very simply the camera moves towards the subject, in our case, the dancer. Equally. You've got a pullback, so the camera is pulling back from the dancer. Those shots are really great. If you want to start closer and you want to go to a mid or a long shot. The final shot we're going to look at is an establishing shot. Establishing shot is usually a wide shot. And what that does it I just establishes the space in where we're in. So because our theme is place and we're exploring different places around where we live. And establishing shot might be, for example, the park, if you're a dancer, is going to take place in the park, or it might be your living room, or it might be your garden. So really is to establish the scene where we're going to film. All right, everybody, let's have a look at the level of shots I've put together so you can see those type of shots in action. Slow motion can really enhance your gangster. It's a great way to show action or choreography as it's moving past the camera. It's really good if you want to follow your subject or you want to follow your dance as they move through space. And it adds a really visceral quality to your dance film. So try experimenting with some motion with your choreography and see how you can change and impact the way you move and the way you capture your dance using slow motion. Light can be used to create a scene or a feeling to give the audience an insight into your character. Or it can simply be used to light your subject. You can use a range of lighting types, such as natural light, as we can see here. So as we all know, natural light is light that is present all around us all the time. And depending on the time of day in which you film, will depend on the kind of light that you get. So obviously, filming in the middle of the day in summer, it will be much brighter. Film it in an evening, it'll be much darker and we'll give you a very different field. Anything that gives off light can be used as a light source to enhance your choreography. So if you have a light from the front, it will like your subject from the front. If you have a light from the side, it will like them from the side equally. If you have a light from beneath them, from the Neith, have an experiment with different types of life from natural light to a maybe had a lump in your living room. The results might actually surprise you and create a really interesting effect for your dance film. 4. Creating audio and a shot list: Hello everybody. Welcome to session three of the creative dance film on your smartphone for refresh. In this session, we're going to look at a couple of different things. So first of all, we're going to look at audio and how audio can impact your dance film. And we're going to look at different types of audio. Then we're gonna move on to look at something called a shot list. A shortlist, really simply put is a list of shots that are gonna make your dance film. Moving on from that, we're going to look at color grading. We're going to look at color grading because I think it's really important that you understand how color works within your dance film. Also, it's a really great opportunity to change the way you dance looks or the way the movement looks on screen. And then moving on from that, we're going to look at some creative transitions. Now I've created a little video of me at the beach during a creative transitioned. Obviously, you can then apply this creative transition to work within your dance piece. What's interesting about that is the technique, not the subject. It'll be much more interesting when you are the subject. I promise. That's enough for me. Let's dive in and let's get into Session 3. Ideally, you want to work in a space where you can control the environment. The aim is to get the cleanest possible sound and make sure though, that you are not taking baths where your order is too loud, we can fix this in Popes. The other aspect of sand is to enhance the narrative, not just to capture the voice. Although this is the main focus when filming interviews. If you're making a short narrative film or a primal, you may want to think about layering up your audio in post-production to save on fuel. Scrooge, climb the wooden stick to his bed chamber. Background. Audio is good at creating ambience. It draws the audience in, keeps us in the moment right there with the subject. The other relationship to your film and Sam is the score. This adds a dynamic and can be tracked from any audio issues. So if you haven't quite captured perfect audio, add in a score and the need can take that away a little bit. If you're making a promotional film, such as a trailer or an adverb. Music is key as it adds to the overall feel of the film. In this part of the session, we're not going to use our cameras or smartphones. But I'd like you to do is grab a pen and paper. We're going to create a shortlist. A shot list is simply the shots we're going to use in our film. So imagine that you are preplanning in your head and you're writing it down. So for example, you might go establishing shot, closer, mid shot, tracking shot. That might be the star of your shortlist. You might go closer, closer, closer, tracking shot, one shot. So there's no rule as to which one goes first or which one. In what order they go. For example, it's really up to you. You don't have to make one shortlist and stop. You can make several and find the one that works for you. Well, I'm going to do is I'm going to pour a shot list on the screen in a moment and I'll explain everything that's on there. So you've got a little bit more idea of the kinds of things that I'm asking you to do. Alright guys, have fun, and I'll see you in a bit. Let's have a quick look at the shortlist template. So at the top you have production, that is the name of your dance film. To the right of that you have director. So that is yourself. And the date you put the date in which you created the shortlist lumen across, we have number times the number of shots, so that would be 1234 and so on. Moving across to the right, we have the type of shot. So that would be whether it's a follow show or a tracking shot or a long shot. Moving across to the right we have description. So that is a little bit of a description about what the type of shot is. So for example, if it's a long shot in the garden, you would put long shot in the garden. Next to a long shot, we have location. So this refers to whether it's an internal or an external location. So for example, if I use the garden, that would be external. So I will write external in there. And finally the last column, cast. So in cast, that would be yourself in this instance. This is the part of the session where we're going to look at that cinematic creative effect I mentioned in the introduction here is onscreen. And I think you'll agree. It makes even close in my laptop really interesting. So on screen right now you have the techniques. So what I'm going to do is I'm filming in slow motion and I'm moving the camera across the action. So the action is me closing the screen at this point. So all I'm doing is I'm just focusing in on my subject. So this is my headphones because I can't film and down to the same time. So I'm just going to move that around. So imagine that my headphones. Are you as a dancer or my laptop? Is you as a dancer? Here is the technique. I think you'll agree. It looks really interesting. So what I've done, because I found that slow motion, It's going to give me Fast and Slow parts of it. So I'm just trimming in the photos app with the Edit and this trimming, that yellow rectangle in and out just to make sure I get the perfect length of my clip. So you will do this with your choreography and your dance movement. So I'm just going to watch it through and make sure I've got the right because what I don't want is I don't want the FASB that comes at the beginning or the end of the clip. So I'm just watching it through. Yeah, that looks great. This is clips a little bit dark, so you will color grade that clip. Don't worry about gradient. That's the next section to this video. Okay, so say that as a video. Therefore, it's saved in your photos folder and you can use that ready for editing. If you want a little bit more control when your color grading your footage, you can do this in the photos app. So let me select a piece of footage here. So this is from the jumps from that we've been working on. And for this workshop, it doesn't really matter which keopi select, so I'll just select this one if I go to the Edit tab. So here in the top right corner and I get all of these functions at the right-hand side. So if I just click the little countdown timer, I can just My exposure there I could put it on auto. There we go. I can look at my highlights and I'll do this super-quick, my shadows. But you can already see how powerful this is in changing the look and the contrast and the feel of your clips. So again, I'm not painless any particular attention. I'm just going through it just to highlight what these do so you can see them. So that's if I make it really code, that is if I make it really warm. So we'll go for about 30, will go for the tint. There we go. Sharpness will make it a little bit sharper there as you can see. Let's go to about 26. And a lot of this is by ISO. You'll do this by ISO, get a look, get a different color palette. And it's really about creating a stylized look for yourself that you really like. So I've done that then. I can also go to the three circles which we recognize from iMovie and I can give it an overall look. So that is a combination of all of those individual parameters I've just set. I can also go to my crop here. And this is where I can change size or the shape of my clip. So if I just click the little crop in the top right corner, you see 16 by 9, which is the standard HD screens. If you go to the cinema, it's in 16 by 9, four by 35 by three. So if I wanted to create something that was quite stylized, it was maybe square. I could do that here. If you look over to the left, I can go either portrayed like if I was posted on social media or I can go landscape. I would recommend you would go landscape for these films that you're making right now. So my clip is already 16 by nine, so I'm not going to change that, so I just come out of that. So now my video is preparing, so I just speed this up now to speed that process up. So that video is now prepared and that look is in there. But what happens if I've done the color grade and I don't like it after I've edited it, that's not a problem. If I go back into edit, I can click revert in the top right corner and it will revert back to my original clip. So the clip when I originally brought it in to my photos app. So you want to do this before you go into iMovie. So give it a color grade before you go into iMovie for your edit. Okay, Let's have a really quick recap of everything we've done. So over the course of the last three sessions, we've looked at how you set your phone up to get the best possible settings for filmmaking. On a, we have looked at different types of shots. So we looked at the basic shots, intermediate shots, and all of those things that are in there. We've looked at the rule of thirds so you can experiment with the way you frame yourself on screen. We've looked at light, how you can use to enhance the look and the feel of your dance film. We've talked about audio in this session and how that can be used to enhance your dance film. We've talked about how do you storyboard, how do you shortlist, and how they can help you when you're planning your dance phone. We've looked at how you can calibrate your footage, so how you can give it different fields. We've also looked at how you can do creative effects. So remember the one I've just shown you with my laptop and imagine my laptop is you and your career, it will be even better. The only thing to do now is to go film your footage using all of this stuff you've learned. So your task is to film your choreography. So think about film many different angles, different shots, different speeds. So use standard speed. You slow motion. Use time-lapse if you want to, really, really quick. For example, you might want to think about shooting indoors. Shooting outdoors, for example, all mixing the two together. All of that stuff is completely up to you and that's your creativity there. In the next session, we're going to look at editing. Now, don't worry, we're going to use both iPhone and Android phones look at editing. So I've got two different options for you to edit your films on. So you can use your iPhone if you have one or your Android if you don't. We've got that covered. Okay, guys, have a great time firming your footage. I can't wait to see what you produce. And I'll see you in session 4 where we're going to edit it. 5. Colour grade in the photos app: If you want a little bit more control when you're calibrating your footage, you can do this in the photos app. So let me select a piece of footage here. So this is from the dance film that we've been working on. And for this workshop, it doesn't really matter which could by Selects, I just select this one if I go to the Edit tab. So here in the top right corner and I get all of these functions at the right-hand side. So if I just click the little countdown timer, I can just my exposure there. I could put it on auto. There we go. I can look at my highlights and I'll do this super quick poll my shadows. But you can already see how powerful this is in changing the look and the contrast and the feel of your clips. So again, I'm not paying this any particular attention. I'm just going through it just to highlight what these do so you can see them. So that's if I make it really code, that's if I make it really warm. So we'll go for about 30, will go for the tint. There we go. Chakras will make it a little bit sharper there as you can see. Let's go to about 20. And a lot of this is by ISO. You'll do this by ISIL, get a look at different color palette. And it's really about creating a stylized look for yourself that you really like. So I've done that then. I can also go to the three circles which we recognize from iMovie and I can give it an overall looks or that is a combination of all of those individual parameters I've just set. I can also go to my crop here. And this is where I can change the size or the shape of my clip. So if I just click the little crop in the top right corner, you see 16 by nine, which is the standard HD screens. If you go to the cinema arts in 16 by 94 by 35 by three. So if I wanted to create something that was quite stylized, that was maybe square, I could do that here. If you look over to the left, I can go either portrayed like if I was post on social media or I can go landscape. I would recommend you would go landscape for these films that you're making right now. So my clip is already 16 by nine, so I'm not going to change that, so I just come out of that. So now my video is preparing, so I just speed this up now to speed that process up. That video is now prepared and that look is in there. But what happens if I've done the colour grade and I don't like it after I've edited it, that's not a problem. If I go back into edit, I can click revert in the top right corner and it will revert back to my original clip. So the clip when I originally brought it in to my photos app. So you want to do this before you go into iMovie. So give it a color grade before you go into iMovie for your edit. 6. IMovie overview: Here's a quick overview of iMovie. So when we start editing our dense foam, we know where everything is and we can quickly access it. So soon as you open iMovie, you'll be faced with this interface. So you'll notice on the left you have a plus sign with a Create Project. Above that you have three dots and over to the right you have a question mark. Let's just tap the question mark. So this is an information panels which tells us where everything in our interface to solve this question mark is present on all of iMovie. So if you're in a different interface, which we will be in a moment, you can use them to pull up any information you want. So over on the far left, you'll say Import Projects. So if I had done a project in a different iMovie, I can import that into this interface. I'm working on an iPad, but is exactly the same if you're working on an iPhone, for example. Okay, let's get rid of that. Let's start projects. So I click the plus sign and you'll notice I have another interface pop-up, so I have movie or trailer. I'm gonna do a separate one on trailer, but I'll quickly click it so you can see what it is. So if you click trailer, you get all of these pre-made templates. So let me just count to like because we're going to do that later. So click Plus Project and click, move it. When I open my movie tab, you'll notice I'll get some different options, so I'll get moments. And that's everything in my iMovie, sorry, everything in my photos selection, but I want videos. I'm going to click video and I get another. Hey, so I kinda have recently added favorites. I move a slow motion Vimeo crane Instagram, if you have those accounts, but let's keep it on all for now. On the other side of the panel, you'll notice that I've got these weird timelines here. And you'll see at the side it'll say 3.5 hours to 24 hours. So that's seconds. That tells me how long we've. I click the Expand button just to make this a little bit bigger so you can see everything. If I click one of these, Let's click this one here. You'll notice it surrounded by a yellow bar. So I can select that again. If I click the tick icon that is now selected and that will be in iMovie if I take lots of them, just a word of caution. If I take lots of them, all of those ones I've ticked will be in iMovie in the order that I've ticked him. So I move it will automatically start editing them for you. I personally like to work that way, so I'm just going to take one. But before we do that, if I click Play button, you'll see I get a preview icon and he's got audio. It will play audio slides. Just stop that from there. Down at the very bottom, I got create movies. I'm going to click Create, moving on what that has done as, as open the iMovie editing interface with that clip. So here's a clip at the top and a viewer underneath playbook. As you can see, it will play there. Underneath that. I've got my clip on a time. I'm so if I select the clip, you'll notice it's got video and audio at the bottom. And the reason we know it's the bottom is a, we can see a waveform. But if I jump over to the right, you'll notice a little blue waveform. If I take that, you'll notice that disappears. If I select it again, you'll notice it reappears. If I select my clip again, I get all of these options underneath. But don't worry that about that for this session, we're going to look at that in a separate session. This is just an overview of the interface. Let's go over to the top right. You see a question mark again. So as we spoke about previously, that will give you information on what everything in iMovie dose if you ever get stuck, just look at this panel. I just get rid of that. We have a gear icon. So this is your project settings and again, are going to more detail in this in a separate tutorial. But this is where you can affect everything in your project. So if you have 30 clips in your project and you change the project filter, it will change on every one of the clips. If you change the theme, it will change the theme of the whole project. Again, we'll go into this later. If I click the plus icon, I can then bring more videos in again. So you'll notice I get this parallel side with all of my videos in there, so I can just select that. And I can add in a couple of different ways, but I just click add for now and I will just instantly bringing in really quick notice where it's brought in is brought in at the beginning because this white line, my play head was there. So if I want to move, I just hold it and drag it across. And it's giving me this transition was I went to go over in a separate tutorial. Let's go back to the interface. So over on the left of my timeline you'll notice a little microphone. If I click that means I can record directly in to iMovie. So this is really useful. For example, if I'm doing a concert or I'm filming a performance, or I want to bring in voice over into my iMovie directly in to me, just cancel that. And next to that you'll notice the little camera so I can record directly in to iMovie and I were all of these options next to the ricotta and four I want to record and I can also bring photos in to iMovie as well. So that's another functionality. Should you want to use it? Okay, Let's just click Done. So imagine I've done my edit for now, let's click Done. What I get here is I get the final interface in iMovie. So I've got my movie name, which is called my movies. If I click that, I can change the name of what that is. Let's just get rid of I have the date it was made and how many seconds I can edit it again. So even though it's on the final page, I can read it up. I can play it. So I can play it as a full screen. And that will play because this is just a rough edit. And I can export it to wherever I want to export it, or I can delete it and I can start again. Okay, so it's a really quick overview into iMovie on iOS. Next session we'll jump in and we'll start editing our dance footage. So between now and the next session, if you've got some dance for teach to work with, that would be wonderful. If not, get out, get some footage and editing in the next session. 7. IMovie - How to create a trailer: Okay, everybody, let's look at the trailer function in iMovie. So I've got my iMovie iOS interface open here, so I click the plus and we know that I get this high confirm move in trailer. I'm going to click trailer today. So what I get in trailer is I get lots of pre-made parts for me to look at. So as you can see, there's lots of them and they owe theme. So Genoa can have something that's retro, romance, scary. And the reason that theme is because it's the look that bad given you. So for example, let me just slide across less have fairy tale. Fairy tale, There we go. So if I just click that so you can hear the already, it's given me music is giving me a look, is giving me feel, is giving me transitions, for example. So I'm just going to pose because that one isn't quite right. I'm going to go for India's have loci. And again, as you can see, it's a one-minute trailer and it gives me lots of options. Let's use this one for now. So I'm going to click Create. What I get here is I get another interface at this really is my outline. So if I just click here movie name, and I'm just going to click this as tutorial. And then I'm going to cast member a girl, so on and so forth. So you can go through all this as much as you want. Studio name, logo style. So you can have dandelions instead of trees. You can have galaxies. You've got all of these functionality in a, you can have Who's directed it. And what this will do is this will give you a credit list out the end bomb are going to follow this in. You guys can fill this in as and when you feel it go just storyboards. So this here is now where we stopped building our movie up. So what we've got here is we've got our storyboard. So you can see it's just different images. So first one is 1.2 seconds and it's, it goes, if I just select that, make sure that's selected. And all I do now is I go in here and let me have a look at all. And I just selected clip for now and it's going to give me a section of clip. You can see that by the yellow highlights. If I move across here, you can see that that's the bit. So I'm not going to be too specific, I'm just literally going to click Close. So that will bring buying that. Then it moves on to the next beat. So this is an indie. So what it's doing is it's same Joe Gil boy to show actually shot. I can show you, but again, I'm not going to be specific. I'm just literally going to click the just so you can see how this works. And I'm going to go super quick. Just click any of them for now. There we go. Bear with me while I click all of these. And again, when you make this UBI little bit more specific than I will, I'm literally just clicking them just to fill the shots in. And this is a great way to build really professional-looking trailers with customizable options for you. It may be that you've already got a film and you want to showcase up film, or you want to start creating content really quick to go online, for example, ripe. So I filled all of that in. There we go. It's old done is called tutorial gemellus of credit. So I can go back and do all those things. Then all I do is I click Play. You can see that it's given me a random name. Gill. Again, this is all this which I could change. So I could change this to a dance, though, for example. And that will change in real-time. Let's change this to true TO real. Oop, I can't spell. Tutorial films, for example. Directed by me, editor by me. You can change all of those. And I'll just click Play and it's playing. Remember I've got the tree, so let me just change the trees to dandelions. There we go. So we have our dandelion film, a dance film, a boy which we need to change. Change this here to still a dance film, for example, don't. And I'll change that and I'll keep playing and so on. I can add storyboard items on the needs so I can add more into that. If I just click Play, you'll see I've got my full preview there. And this is just undermining me, just slide the across we can see. So what this has done is it's created a really professional looking film trailer. Obviously. I, again, I just chopped faulty gene. Now I haven't done this in a considered way. You'll be much more considered that I will. But that's I can create really great looking trailers using the trailer feature in. I move it, it stopped buff. Let's click Done there. And again, I get my end screen where I can do all of my adjustments. I can share the rack and save it. If I go back to the project, you'll notice is instantly saved in My Projects. That's a really quick overview into the tutorial function in iMovie. 8. Editing a dance film in iMovie: Hello everybody. In this session we're going to look at how you actually Eddie your dance for teach in annual visits, open up and movie project. And we'll go to our video footage. I'm going to select some footage to push straighten hand. So let me have, and I'm gonna do this really randomly. So I'm not looking at making something really cohesive. This is showing you how to use iMovie strap. Just selected one clip and I've imported that clip right now. Okay, brilliant. So as we can see, I've got my viewer, I got my timeline, my clips in. This clip has got audios. If I just select that and I go right down to the bottom here, you'll notice I've got some options now I'm going to split. I'm going to detach my audio there by clicking the Actions button there. So now my audio is on a separate track and deleted. Get rid of it. We don't need it for this. It's just me shouting move anyway. Okay, So by two fingers I'm going to select the clip and just drag my fingers apart and that will extend that clips, right, got a better view because I'm working on an iPad. So I want as much real estate as possible. So I'm just looking at that clip and I'm just looking for base where I can trim it, so I select it. There we go. So I've got my Java handles either side, touch the side I want to trim and I just move my finger towards the opposite side. So that's about right. Again, I'm doing this really rough, but that's about right, 8.1 seconds x. Okay, Let's move on to the next bit. What we're gonna do is we're going to import some more video footage. I go to my plus icon at the top and I'm going to select video and I'm going to bring that back into our timeline. Okay, so let's just scroll down. We've got all of our media here. Excellent. Actually, I'm going to go back and I'm going to input a Backgrounds. Let me slide down. And we have solid gradients and patterns. And I'll show you why I'm going to do this. I'm just going to put this gradient in finance. So we've just got this gradient background between the first steps are the first step will act almost like an introduction, and we're going to use this to overlay a title on. So it's a really good technique to bring now, if I want to bring other media in from other places, if you look at the bottom, I've got files and I've got all my iCloud stuff there. And between Dropbox and recently deleted, I've got an SD card plugged into my iPad, which is great on the USB-C iPad. So you can bring things in directly from external sources, which is an absolute game changer when we're editing on our iPad or our newest smartphone, for example. Okay, let's go back to our video section. So I'm just going to bring another piece in. And again, I'm doing this non-discriminatory. I'm just going to bring this in. Great job. There we go. I'm just going to, let me show you different ways. If I click the three dots, I can bring a cutaway in. So what's a cutaway? You say, let's have a look now, if I select put away, that will bring that clip into our timeline at the bottom. What we'll do, sorry, I didn't select it so I could say, there we go. It will add it to the top of the other clips. I will cook away directly to that clip. And again, this is just a random clip I've selected. So I'm just gonna get rid of that because I will show you what this does. So let me just get rid of that. Let's look at some of the other ones that we're going to bring. In. Fact, big picture in picture. So picture-in-picture is a smaller video and your main video, I don't know when you would use this book. Is there for a reason? So let's have a look at the next one. Split-screen. Pretty obvious what that is. Split-screen is you split the screen so you have your video on one side of your other video, in my case, a gradient on the other side. Let's have the greens, green and blue screen option because he won't work very well on this one because we don't have a green or blue screen. But what it will do is it'll start to play with the different colors within that I've got over gradients. You can't really see it, but it does not take away the blues and the greens in the image. I can also bring my options against. I can change it once it's in iMovie. Let's just get rid of that and let's just go back and bring some more footage in here. I'm going to bring my playhead to the end. So I've got this here and again, I don't know what, I'm not gonna go through the previews. I want to get through this as quickly as possible so you guys can start editing your own damps films. Okay, so I'm going to trim this clip in the timeline, so I select it with my left hand. I'm just going to drag that clip across. And again, I'm doing a super quick and we've got that. You'll notice what we have here are the iMovie default transitions. I heard them not a fan of cross fading cost is also, I'm going to change this. You'll also notice that that clip has audio attached to it. That's not an issue because again, we know how to get rid of the audio, so let me deal with the transition. So I select the transition and you'll notice I've got different ones on me. Sorry, show you a couple of them. So that's the fate flu black. Let's select the again. I personally preferred no transition. So I like harsh close and myself. So I'm going to select a hashCode there. And one there we go. So that's cutting straight across from one to the other. Clip. Over again, all you need to select the area. So if it's a clip, you just tap with your finger. If it's a transition is a transition. Let's bring some more midi in. I can also edit this media in my view, same as I would do it in the time I select it with the yellow handles. And I move them across to where I want backlit and I get a preview. As I'm doing it, I'm really super quick. Let me just put this in. Our chairman, there we go. And again, you'll see it gives me that default transition. Let me just extend that a little bit. So if I play again, it's always good to keep playing back your footage so you know exactly where the narrative is going and you'll know if the Eclipse makes sense or if they properly, etc. And again, you can adjust all of this change. That transition is go to this gradient. Let's add some texts. As soon as I click, I get the text titles options underneath. So I'm just gonna pick one. Here we go. Let's have a look. And there we go, we'll just pick focus in. If I click the little a in the bottom corner, I can change the font type. I click the little color wheel. I can change the color of my text, so I'm just going to move it around. Let's have a look. Black tech, little tags, red. Let's go for black classic. Okay, fabulous. Well I can also do is I click the three dots. I can play with espouse or can have this as a lower third, which is great for if you're doing interviews and you can introduce your interviewees, but I'm going to keep it as default, which is a title. I can drop my shadow. I can add any sorts of I like it, uppercase it. I can add sound effects and I can make it the full duration of the clip. That basically means if my clips 10 seconds, myTitle will be 10 seconds long. If I select the text, I can edit it, deleted, reset its output title here. So if we know what it is, obviously, you wouldn't call your film dance title here. Great, So we're playing up initial opening clip. So he's opening this dance from we get a sense of what's going on off. And then all of a sudden, boom, title dance film here, wherever it's going to be cold. And that will go straight into the dance piece to dance film. Okay, so notice I've got audio, so let's get these detached, detached audio and let's get these deleted. There we go. So they are both there and we don't want audio for this. We're going to put our own audio in which I'm going to show you in a moment. Okay, so let's move on to the next bit of this tutorial, which is the project settings. So click the gear icon at the top and I get my project filter. Now, when I select this, it changes all of my footage. But what these two specific as it changed the whole project. So as I go through, you'll notice every clip has been changed. I still got all of my options underneath. I can go through these projects setting. I'll just do a couple so you can see them. I really liked this one because it makes it look like an animation. And I really liked the fact the footage can look like an animation really quickly without learning advanced programs. Okay, Berlin, so that's working for me. I'm just going to show you a couple of other ways you can use project settings and different effects. So you've got black and white and you've got dreamy and, and lots of other ones. But let's go back to ink finance. So again, as I said earlier, as affected everything, I can also change my theme. And that's the theme of the whole project. So if I start bringing in titles and elements, I'll give that a look. Let's fade in from blackness, fade out from black. Nobody wants a really harsh beginning. We want to ease our audience into our work. Again, I'm just going to figure this out. So I'm going to select that. And you'll notice because it's a gradient, I could change the gradient on that. And I've got all these calls, but let's just do it really quick finance. And what I might do is let me just have a look at transition. You'll notice I can change the speed. So again, if I select that and I go to speed at the bottom, I can change the speed of that clip. I'm not gonna do that for now. Filters. So this first appearance of looks like the project filters. Now the difference is all the same, but the difference is a only effects the one clip. So whereas project photos affects everything, this affects the one clip. So if I select this one, what you'll notice is only that one clip has changed. And that's really nice if you want to create one of those moments that really stand out effect on several clips. And you can start to change your narrative through these filters. But for now, for me, I just want to keep it o as an animation style. So it fades in. It's playing. Jiang, I've jumped across by the way, just so I can see that transition. Let me have a look here. What I can do now is what do I want to bring in next? So Oreo, I'm going to bring some audio ends. If I go to soundtrack, what you'll notice is I move in the Gaza apple of put loads of sounds in their free for you to use and they're categorized them in different ways. So you might have Chill music or retro music. So all you do is you select it, it downloads, you can listen to it. Inside of iMovie click the plus icon when you bring it in. What's really cool here is by the magic of I'm moving algorithms. It instantly post your audio to the length of your video. So it does this for you and you'll notice it's saving in real time. So as I play, the audio is there now this audio isn't quite right, but I'm doing this really quick. Obviously you'll do this much more considered when you're doing yours. I'm just going to change these now let's go down. Slide down because there's quite a lot of them. And retro, retro, where are you? There we go. Let's have aes function. I've downloaded that. Let's pop that in. And we'll see how it fits into our dance footage. Here we go. Again, you can bring your own in, so you've got your own music that's on your iPad or on your SD card, America, for example, you can bring that into the same system by using the file. There we go, files at the bottom so you can bring it all in there. Or you can go from Dropbox or you can go from wherever an online storage you have. Okay, so we have our music in, we have our visuals in. Again, although being mined very rough, what we going to do next, we can add sound effects. I'm not going to add sound effects to this because I don't want a dinosaur gravel or a doorbell in my film for now, but you may want some of those sound effects. So we have our project, we're happy with it. We've got the beginning, we've got the child's, we've got the middle, we've got the end. So all that is left to do now is to export it. So I click the Done button and I get this output here. So I'm just going to click dance. There we go, editing a dance film. So that's my title. Obviously, you would call it something different. I get all of my information. I can go back and edit this. I can play this. I think that music fits actually quite well to say we've done this really quick. Obviously it wouldn't be called title here. Go to my next clip. And obviously it's a duplication clip. You see where we're going with that? And then they all come to an answer. I can go back in and I can edit that. So I'm just going to edit my title a little bit and just pull that tight. So in, so it says title here all the way through. Let's rename that. So we'll just collect dance film for now. Very original. I know. Click Done, it's there. It tells me how long they tell me the day. If I click the middle icon, I can export that in a number of ways. I can send it to Vimeo, I can save it to Dropbox. I can send it through a website. I can save it to Files. I can just save it on my iPad or I can sell it to somebody through Messenger, or I can scroll across and go to Twitter or wherever I want to send it. That is how you create a dense film is always going to be in that opening screen when you come back to it. So if you, if you make it and you have a couple of days off and you want to re-edit, it will always be there. Thank you so much for being here with me on the tutorial guys, and I'll see you in the next one. 9. Adding creative effects to enhance your image: In this session, we're just going to take a deeper look at different effects you can use. So I'm in, I'm moving now. I'm just going to import a little bit of footage here. So let me just bring something in that we've not seen before. So I'm just going to bring this clip in and you'll notice it's already got music attached to it, but that's fine for our purposes because we're not using the music. This is about Effects. If I select the clip and I click one of the effects, again, if I go to the project settings, that does all of my videos. But I'm going to go down here. So you'll see here if I deselect one of these down here. So let's have a look at the different options we have. So if I select this, it gives me an effect, but look, it gives me a little slider from a 100 down to 0. So if I slide this across, that changes the opacity on my clips. If I slide that down, I can get a really interesting effect where it's better on some of the effects than on other. So for example, if I get my comic mono and that's full, and I slide that down, what I get is a really interested animated effect that affects the light. Now this clip is shot in Ross. I used the moment app to shoot this in rural and I'm going to do a tutorial on how you edit raw video in the photos app in a moment. So we have our clip, we have our effect. We can change the speed and the pace of it Should we need to, as we set all of that for now. As you can see, by using these effects, dropping the opacity, it really creates interesting dynamics and interesting depth to your work. So let's continue. Let's add a photo in here. So I'm just going to add this photo of this mermaid in here. So let's, we have all the options that we have in terms of different imposed. I'm just going to drag it in. So this is still what you'll notice here. Now these don't relate to each other. This You just show you the effect. But what you'll notice here in these clips is when I import a still in, I get my standard transition, which we're going to change when I am still a, gives me this Ken Burns effect if I select that. And I'm just going to put a title here. So steels are great for title slides. So I'm just gonna put my title in here. Dance film title. There we go. And I'm not going to do too much work and as you've already seen this, okay, But what I wanted to show you is how these effects can add real depth to when you're working with images. So I've set my image, I'm just going to turn Campbell's off so it doesn't start to move my image across. That's great. So what we're gonna do now is we're going to move across and we're going to go to our filters. So filters down at the bottom on the right, as you can see there. So we've selected our filters and effects in the same way. But if I just slide this slider down, what you'll notice is I get this really interesting popping effect. So when you're using these types of filters, you can use it on video and you can use it on stills. And again, I think you'll agree It really makes this image pop. Okay guys, we can do this in the project settings as well. And we can change things. Like I showed you in a previous tutorial, right? That's it for working with different effects in your video. Have fun experiment, and I'll see you very soon.