Fusion and Blender VFX Masterclass | Ruan Lotter | Skillshare
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Fusion and Blender VFX Masterclass

teacher avatar Ruan Lotter, VFX & 3D Artist

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Fusion and Blender VFX Masterclass - Introduction Video

      1:23

    • 2.

      Lesson 01: Create a PNG Image Sequence from Fusion

      6:03

    • 3.

      Lesson 02: 3D Camera Tracking in Fusion

      22:08

    • 4.

      Lesson 03: Import FBX to Blender and Align World

      6:10

    • 5.

      Lesson 04: Mixamo Character and Basic Scene Setup in Blender

      8:20

    • 6.

      Lesson 05: Match Lighting and Shadows in Blender

      8:30

    • 7.

      Lesson 06: Render Layers and Render Passes

      5:37

    • 8.

      Lesson 07: Render Multilayer EXR Sequence from Blender

      2:16

    • 9.

      Lesson 08: Fusion Compositing Part 1 (Merging Render Passes)

      19:01

    • 10.

      Lesson 09: Fusion Compositing Part 2 (Vector Motion Blur)

      4:31

    • 11.

      Lesson 10: Fusion Compositing Part 3 (Color Correction)

      5:08

    • 12.

      Lesson 11: Fusion Compositing Part 4 (Rotoscoping)

      10:29

    • 13.

      Lesson 12: Fusion Compositing Part 5 (Lightwrap)

      8:48

    • 14.

      Lesson 13: Fusion Compositing Part 6 (Final Compositing Effects)

      6:19

    • 15.

      Lesson 14: Export Your Final Render from Fusion

      2:02

    • 16.

      Course Conclusion - Thanks for watching

      0:37

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About This Class

Welcome to this Fusion and Blender VFX Masterclass

What you will learn?

  • 3D camera tracking in Fusion
  • How to setup reference geometry in Fusion
  • Export tracked scene as FBX from Fusion to Blender
  • Import animated character from Mixamo into your Blender scene
  • Matching lighting and shadows in Blender
  • Creating shadow catchers in Blender
  • How to setup render layers and render passes in Blender
  • Rendering a multi-layer EXR image sequence
  • Fusion Compositing - Merging render passes
  • Fusion Compositing - Vector motion blur and color correction
  • Fusion Compositing - Rotoscoping and using masks
  • Fusion Compositing - How to create a lightwrap
  • Fusion Compositing - Final grading and compositing effects

During this course I will take you step-by-step through my own personal VFX pipeline, from 3D Camera Tracking in Fusion, to building your 3D scene in Blender, importing an animated character from Mixamo, rendering different render passes and render layers - all the way to compositing our final shot, using Fusion's amazing node based compositing system.

You will learn various compositing techniques in Fusion, including how to merge render passes, adding vector motion blur, color correction and grading, rotoscoping and using masks, how to create a lightwrap, as well as final compositing effects to spice up your renders. 

I've specifically designed this course in such a way that anyone interested in learning VFX can follow along and create their own amazing shots.

The software used in this course is Davinci Resolve Studio 18.6 (Which is the paid version) and Blender 4.0.2.

Some nodes are not available in the Free version of Davinci Resolve (such as the Camera Tracking Node) but most of the nodes I discuss in this course, are available in the Free version.

By the end of this course, you'll have the skills and knowledge to create your own stunning visual effects shots.

Here is a list of all the lessons in this course:

  1. Create a PNG Image Sequence
  2. 3D Camera Tracking in Fusion
  3. Import FBX to Blender and Align World
  4. Mixamo Character and Basic Scene Setup
  5. Match Lighting and Shadows
  6. Render Layers and Render Passes
  7. Render Multilayer EXR Sequence
  8. Fusion Compositing Part 1 (Merging Render Passes)
  9. Fusion Compositing Part 2 (Vector Motion Blur)
  10. Fusion Compositing Part 3 (Color Correction)
  11. Fusion Compositing Part 4 (Rotoscoping)
  12. Fusion Compositing Part 5 (Lightwrap)
  13. Fusion Compositing Part 6 (Final Compositing Effects)
  14. Export Final Render from Fusion

Download Assets:
I'm including the footage I use during the course so you can follow along - but feel free to use your own footage if you wish. - Download footage here: Footage

I really hope that you will learn a lot during this course, and feel free to reach out if you have any questions.

Are you ready to get started? Let's dive in!

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Ruan Lotter

VFX & 3D Artist

Teacher

Ruan Lotter is a VFX & 3D Artist, Online Teacher, Music Producer and Author from Cape Town, South Africa. He has worked on many short films and TV commercials for brands such as Hasbro, Lipton, RB, Ryobi and HP doing mostly camera tracking, general 3D work and compositing.

It all started in 1994 when he discovered 3dsmax for DOS! Back then it was called "3D Studio" and that changed everything... A few years later, 3dsmax for Windows was released and the world of online tutorials was born. Ruan instantly started binge watching online tutorials on a website called "3D Buzz" and dove deep into the world of 3D. Over the years he used many different VFX related software such as Adobe After Effects, Maya, Cinema4d, Modo, PFTrack, Boujou and Nuke to name a few and he fell in love with t... See full profile

Level: All Levels

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Transcripts

1. Fusion and Blender VFX Masterclass - Introduction Video: Hey, and welcome to this Fusion and Blender V effect course. During this course, I will take you step by step through my own personal V E Fx pipeline from three D camera tracking in Fusion to building our three D scene in Blender. Importing an animated character from Meximo, rendering different render passes and render layers, all the way to compositing our final shot using Fusion. During this course, you will learn various compositing techniques in Fusion, including merging render passes, adding vector motion, blur color correction, grading rotoscoping, and using masks. How to create a light wrap, as well as final compositing effects. I've specifically designed this course in such a way that anyone interested in learning V effects can follow along and create their own amazing shots. The software used in this course is the Vinci Resolve Studio 18.6 which is the paved version. And then Blender 4.0 0.2 Some of the nodes are not available in the free version of Da Vinci resolve, such as the camera tracking node. But most of the other nodes I discussed in this course are available in the free version. By the end of this course, you'll have the skills and knowledge to create your own stunning visual effect shots. Are you ready to get started? Let's dive in. 2. Lesson 01: Create a PNG Image Sequence from Fusion: Hey and welcome to the first lesson in this course. As you can see, I'm in Da Vinci Resolve. In this first lesson, I'm going to show you how to create a PNG image sequence from the clip that we're going to use throughout this course. So the reason that we're going to create a PNG image sequence is just to ensure that we know the exact number of frames in our shot and that we don't miss any frames when jumping between fusion and blender and then back to fusion. It's always good practice to use an image sequence rather than your video just when jumping between these software. Right at the end when we do the compositing, then we will use the original video again. But it's always just good practice to use an image sequence before we import any media into Da Vinci. Let's set up some project settings, which is really important. Let's go right to the top and click on File. And then we're going to go down to Project Settings. And the only thing really you need to worry about here is your frame rate. Now the video that I'm going to use throughout this course was recorded at 25 frames a second. Let's set our timeline frame rate to 25. Now if you are going to use a different clip with a different frame rate, you can obviously set this here. But I'm just setting it to 25 because that's the frame rate of the clip that we're going to use. You can set that up there and then just click Save. And that will close that project settings for you. Next we can bring in our clip. Now there are a couple of ways that you can do it. We're going to bring it into the edit page, so make sure you're on the page right here at the bottom. And then you're on the left hand side. You can see the media pull. If you don't see the media pool, you can click right here at the top on Media Pool, and that will just display it right here. Now you can either drag and drop some video files in here, or you can simply right click and select Import Media. So browse to the video file that you've downloaded. The link is in the course description, and then you simply click on Open to import that clip into our media pool. You can always double check the frame rate of this clip by just right clicking on it. And then go to Clip Attributes. And that will show you all the information about this clip, like the video audio, time code, et cetera. Under video, you'll see that the frame rate is 25, so we are good to go. We're simply going to drag this into our timeline here at the bottom. And what we can do is we can also delete the audio from here. So I'm going to right click on this clip and then click on Link Clips just to disable the link between these two layers, the audio and the video. Now you can simply just delete the audio as we don't need that. What I want to do before exporting the PNG image sequence is trim this clip to exactly 10 seconds. Let's do that now. Just use this play head and go to around 10 seconds. And then you can use the arrow keys on the keyboard just to ensure that we are exactly on 10 seconds. Then we're just going to drag the end of this clip to snap to our played. Now we know that we're actually using the first 10 seconds of this clip. Let's save our project before moving on, Get a file, and then save project As, and let's give it a name. And then click Save. Next, we're going to click on the Deliver tab, right here at the bottom. And this is going to take us into this render workspace. Let's browse to the location where we're going to export our image sequence. Simply click on Browse at the top. And then let's create a folder somewhere. I'm just going to call this image EQ for image sequence. And then you simply on save now we can give it a name right here at the top. I'm going to call this image EQ. And then I'm going to place an underscore because it's going to have the frame number. After that, I usually like to just add a underscore after the name. Next, we're going to change the format from Quick Time to PNG because we want to export a PNG image sequence. Next, click on File, and here you want to bring down this eight to about. Let's set this to four. This will be the number of digits after the file name. For the frame number, it will basically start at 00010002, et cetera. Another thing that you can do here, you can tick this box that says each clip starts at frame one, and that will just ensure that the first frame will be 0001 and not zero. That just makes things a little bit easier for me. So once we are happy with the location and the file name and you've set this up, you can click on Add to Render Q, and then you can simply click on Render. All that's going to run through this ten second clip, and we'll export all those frames to a PNG sequence. Once the render is complete, you can browse to the folder that you export your sequence to. As you can see, our image sequence has got 250 frames starting at frame one ending at 250. That's perfect. And now we can jump back into Davinci resolve. So let's go back to the edit page quickly and just create some folders here in our media pool to keep everything nice and neat. Let's right click and create a new bin. A bin is basically like a folder, so I'm just going to call this one footage and I'm going to drag the MOV file into that one. Maybe let's create a bin for timelines and this timeline is the one that we created here at the bottom. So I'm somebody going to rename this one to image sequence because that's the timeline that we used to create the image sequence. And we can drop that in there. That will just keep your media pool nice and neat. Go ahead and save your project and then I will see you in the next lesson. 3. Lesson 02: 3D Camera Tracking in Fusion: And welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to look at camera tracking. Now that we exported our scene as an image sequence, we can import that image sequence again into our media pool. Make sure you have your media pool shown on the side. Let's first create a folder or a bin. Rightly create new bin. Let's call this one image sequence. Then let's create one more bin and call this one comps. And this is where we will save all our Fusion comps. Let's import our image sequence. Right click, Import Media, then browse to the folder where you export it, your image sequence, and select the first one. Hold in Shift. And then select the last one. And make sure you select all 250 frames. Once you select them, just make sure that you have all 250 frames selected like this. Then let's click open to import that. Now you can see we have our image sequence right here. Let's drag and drop this into our image sequence bin. Now let's just right click on this image sequence and click Clip Attributes. And then just double check that the frame rate is correct, as you can see, minus set to 25, which is perfect. And then just click on Okay to confirm that. All right, so now we can create our tracking comp. Let's go into the comps bin that we created. Right click, and then select New Fusion Composition. Let's call this one Tracking, because this will be the composition where we're going to do our camera tracking in. Let's also set the duration to 10 seconds because our clip is 10 seconds long. Just update that to ten, and then click on Create. Now you'll see we've got this tracking comp, and you can see it's got this little lightning bolt next to it, and that means it's a Fusion comp. Let's double click on it. And that's going to open it up in the Fusion page right here at the bottom. Let's bring our media pull back by clicking this media pull button right here at the top. And then let's go to our image sequence. And drag and drop that into our node tree here at the bottom. Then you can connect your media into your media out node, and that will show our image sequence here in the viewer. Let's go ahead and close the media pool for now, so we have some extra space here at the top. If you don't see anything in the viewer here, just click on the media out node and press two on the keyboard. If you're zoom in here, you'll see we've got these two dots underneath the media out. This is just a way to see which viewer this node is being displayed through. Basically, we have two viewers here at the top. If you click this little button right here, you'll see we've got a viewer on the left hand side and a viewer on the right hand side. The left hand side is viewer number one and the right hand side is viewer number two. If I select my media out and press one on the keyboard, it's going to show through viewer number one. If I press two, it's going to show through viewer number two. And you can see these little dots at the bottom. Both of them are white. This is just a way to quickly see that we're displaying this node through viewer one and through viewer two. But for now we can just use one viewer and just make sure this one is just set to viewer number two. Let's create our camera tracker node. So let's search for a new node by pressing shift and space and then just type camera. And that's going to show you all the nodes with the word camera. And we want to create a camera tracker. You can simply use your arrow keys and then just press Enter to create that new node like this. Next we want to connect this node to this line. Simply just drag it, then hold shift on the keyboard and then just point to this line and you'll see it. We'll turn a blue, yellow color and just release and that's going to connect it to that line. Next, let's select our camera tracker node here in the inspector you can see all the different settings for this camera tracker. Let's tick this preview, auto track locations and that's going to give you a preview where the tracks will be placed in the viewer. Sometimes the footage is a little bit bright and you can't really see the tracking markers. Let's go to options here on the side and then tick this darken image and that's just going to darken our footage so we can see the tracking markers a bit easier. Now if you go back to track, you can see that we can actually adjust these settings here to maybe create more trackers, et cetera. But for this track, I'm going to leave it on default To reset these values back to default, simply double click on their names and it will reset back to default. If we look at the trees in the background, you can see they are moving quite a bit because of the wind. It's always good practice not to track anything in the shot that's moving, like moving trees or people walking around, et cetera. We want to exclude them from the track. Basically, we're going to draw a mask around the area that we want to track and everything outside of that mask will be ignored. So let's do that now. Let's put the play somewhere in the middle of our shot and let's create a new mask. So we've got four options here. So we're going to go with a polygon mask. This one Simply click that to create a new node. Let's not connect this mask to any node yet. Let's first draw our mask, and then we can connect it to our camera tracker with this polygon mask selected. Let's click here in the viewer on the side, click here. And then let's just draw a mask like this. And then just close the mask by clicking on that first point. Again, now we have this mask that we can basically mask out the area that we want to track. I'm going to align it so it's aligned with this, with the train tracks going here, just below the trees. And then that will automatically create a keyframe for us on this mask. Let's scrub forward a bit and let's just re position this mask. Maybe let's go right to the end. And just bring this mask up like that. Now let's scrub backwards and see what we can do here at the front. So let's just adjust this mask, something like that. Let's go a little bit backwards. Let's adjust the mask again. Then somewhere around here we can almost track everything in the shot. I'm going to readjust it like that. We can now include everything in the shot. If you scrub through, you'll see that your mask will be animated like that. Now we are ready to track. Let's scrub forward to maybe around here and now we can connect this mask to our tracker. I'm simply going to take the output of this polygon mask and drop it onto our camera tracker. Now if we select the camera tracker again, and I'm simply just going to go back to Options and just untick and re tick this darkened image. Now you can see our tracking markers are only on this area that we masked out. And we don't have any tracking markers on the trees in the background. And that's exactly what we want. Let's go back to the first frame and let's just double check some settings. Before we start tracking, let's click on this Track tab. One thing we need to check here is the bidirectional tracking. And that's basically going to track our shot forward until right at the end. And then it's going to track backwards again to recalculate those trackers to give us the best results possible. Now we are ready to track. We're on the first frame and simply click on auto track to start the tracking process. Yeah, you can see our scene is being tracked and we can see the movement of our camera. Let's just give it a few seconds to finish. Okay, our track has completed. Now what we can do on our tracking node, we can take this tick off that says preview auto track locations. That's basically going to show us new trackers. And we don't want to see any new trackers, we just want to see the trackers that we actually tracked. Now if we scrub through here, you can see we've got all these nice little trackers. But we have one small issue that is this pole here in the foreground that you can see moving across the scene. The tracking markers on this pole might actually confuse our camera track. Obviously, we can mask this out and redo our track. But I'm going to show you how to just manually delete these tracking markers and then later on we'll filter out any other bad tracks as well. What you want to do is you want to just scrub through your footage and then we're going to try and delete most of these trackers that's on this pole. You can simply just drag a box around them and press delete on your keyboard. I would recommend to delete the ones that's close to the edge as well because sometimes they can get stuck to that edge. That's not really anything that we want to track in the scene. Now, obviously if you scrub further, you'll see new tracking markers being created. But this doesn't have to be perfect. Just go through it quickly and just delete the ones that you see that's being tracked onto this front pole. I'm just quickly going to go through this and delete any trackers that's close to this pole. Okay? Once you have deleted most of those tracking points on this foreground pole, we are ready to do our first camera solve while we still have this camera tracker node selected, we're going to jump over to the solve tab right here in the inspector. Now, the reason we are skipping the camera tab is basically if you know all the settings for your camera, like the focal length and the sensor size, et cetera, you can actually input those values here. But we're going to tell Fusion to work out or calculate the focal length that was actually used. So we're going to jump straight into the solve tab right here. And here we can solve and we can also filter our tracks and delete some bad trackers in the scene. But let's first do a solve and see what error we get. And then we can try and refine that. You can simply click on Solve, and that's going to start solving our camera track, okay? So the solve has been completed. And if you look at this area here, you can see all this information about our solve. Here you can see the average solve error is currently 0.35 which is a really good number. You want to try and get that number as small as possible. Anything under one is usually good because that means your track will slide with a one pixel size in either direction. So if you can get that to like a really small number, then your track will be very solid and very stable. So as I mentioned, 0.35 is really good. But let's see if we can even get a better solve error than that. On the same tab, we have this track filtering, and this is where we can filter our tracks and delete some of the bad tracks, and then resolve to get a better solve error. As you can see, we've got these three tick boxes right here, and the first one is the track length. Then we've got the track error, and then we've got the solve error. So you can either do all three at the same time and filter them that way. But I like to just do one at a time and see which one gives me some good results. I want to filter my tracks with this maximum solve error. I'm going to untick the track length and also the track error, and then the maximum solve error, I'm going to adjust to just select those trackers. Here at the bottom you can see we've got a total number of 3,642 tracks. If I bring this slider, if I make this value smaller, you can see this first number actually increases and that's the number of bad trackers that it's finding with these values. It's basically checking if there is any trackers with a maximum solve error of 0.6 It will delete them if it's got a bigger solve error than this number or it's going to select them, basically, if we bring this down and maybe select like 300 to 400 of these tracks, we can delete them because we've got more than enough good tracks to work with. I'm simply going to click on this Delete button right there. And now we can resolve. Let's see if this gives us a better solve error. Okay, now you can see we have a solve error of 0.14 which is really, really good. I don't think we have to try and refine our solve any further because, yeah, that's a really, it's like a 0.1 pixel error. Now we can move on to this export tab right here, and this is where we're going to export our scene to a three D scene. So let's try and figure out where the floor plane is and where the middle of our scene is and where the camera is, et cetera. But before we export our scene to a three D scene, first let's tell Fusion where our ground plane is and also where the origin or the middle of our scene is. To do that we need to click on this unaligned to just unlock these values. And then we can zoom in here to find a track that's going to be the center of our world because we're going to add a character that's walking on this pathway. I want to set my center or origin around this path. You can just look for a track that's close to the pathway. Maybe this 11 thing you want to check is if you point to a tracker, you can see the track error and the solve error. This one's got to solve error of 0.3 which is good. And you can also see the number of markers, which is the number of frames. Basically, you want to select origin point with a good solve error and also with a couple of markers like maybe something more than 20 or 30 is usually good. I'm simply going to drag a box around the structure to select it. And then under origin, I'm going to click Set From Selection. This point will be the center of our world. Next we need to select some trackers that's on our ground plane. So I usually include the origin with the selection as well, because the origin is obviously also on the floor plane. And then you can simply just hold in shift on the keyboard and select some of these trackers, but make sure they're all on the floor plane or the ground plane of your scene. I'm just going to go through here and just select some of them. You don't have to select too many. I usually select just like a few like that. And then here where it says orientation, where it says x, z plane or ground. Just click set from selection. And now we've got those values set. Now we can simply click on Aligned again to lock these values. Now we can create our three D scene. Simply click on port right here. Now if we expand our nodes at the bottom, you'll see that fusion automatically created some new nodes. Just click and drag them to the bottom of your node tree so we can see them a bit better. You can see we've got a camera three D, which is a three D camera node. And then we've got a point cloud, a ground plane, a merged three D and also a renderer. What we want to do is we want to look through the three D node to see our three D scene, simply click on Merge three D and then press two on the keyboard to look through that node. Now you can use your mouse wheel and you can also hold in option to click and drag around your scene. You can see there's our camera can scrub through here and you can see the camera moving around. You can also see a point cloud of our scene, which is pretty cool. Let's look through this camera simply right click in this view area, go to camera and then select camera three D one. That's going to basically look through that camera. As you can see, our point cloud is a little bit crazy. Let's click on the point cloud node right here. Let's switch this over from cross to point here. You can also set the size of those points. Now if we scrub through our timeline, you'll see that those points are sticking to the scene pretty good. Now, Fusion also automatically created a ground plane, let's click on that first. Let's just set our material. Go to the material, and this is just the way that it's being displayed in the viewport. Usually by default it uses this light pink color. Let's just change this to a brighter white. You can just bring down the saturation and bring the brightness up all the way. Click on a K. Then maybe, let's go back to controls and untick this wire frame. That's going to make it a solid floor. We can also bring down the size, maybe something like that. Now if we scrub through here, you should see that plane sticking to the floor quite well. All right. I'm pretty happy with that. Before we export our scene to blender, what we can also do is we can create some reference geometry in the scene just to make our lives a little bit easier when working in blender. As you can see, we've got this fence here at the background and we've got all these tracking markers on this fence. Now let's say I want to know where that fence is in three D space. When working, say in blender, what we can do is we can create some reference geometry using some of these point cloud points. I'm simply going to just select a few of them. I think you only need to select three to create some geometry, but maybe just a couple like that. Right click, go to point cloud three D and then create image plane. As you can see, it created that little image plane right there in that area in three D space here in the no tree. It automatically created a new merge three D and a new image plane. What you can do is select this new image plane that it created and then go over to the transform tab in the inspector. You can just rotate it around to just match the rotation of that fence. Obviously, this is just a reference geometry, so we're not really going to use it, but it's just there to give us an idea where things are in three D space. Now if you scrub through, you can see that plane is sticking nicely to the fence. You can also just right click here. Go to camera, go back to perspective. Now we can look at our scene in full three D here. You can see our camera is at the front and then we've got our ground plane right there and our fence easier at the back. This is just to give us a nice reference of where that fence is in three D and it's just going to be easier to work in blender when we have all this information. One more thing before we export our scene as an FPx. I just want to show you if you click on your camera three D node, you'll see here in the inspector that we've got a focal length value minus set to 17.7 333. Yours might be different and this is the focal length that the camera tracker calculated for us. We're going to come back to this number later and we're going to copy that and then paste that onto our blender camera. But for now I just know that that is saved on the camera three D node. Let's create our FBX export node. So we're going to search for FBX by pressing shift in space and then just typing FBX. And we're going to add this FBX export node. Simply going to add, it's going to ask you where do you want to save that FBX? I've created a folder in my project folder called FBX, and let's give it a name. I'm going to call this tracking, and then simply click on Save. Now we want to connect our scene to this FPX export node. So we're going to take the output of the merge three D, make sure it's the middle merge three D and not this one. We want to export everything that's being connected into this merged three D. So we're going to take the output of this node and just feed that into our FPX export node. With the FBX export to selected. Make sure that your frame rate is correct. This should be the same as your project. Now we can simply go right to the top, click on Fusion and then render all savers. And that's going to go through all the frames and export it as a FPX file. Okay, so our export is completed. You can see that it exported all the frames 0-249 That's how long it took and everything is good. Click Okay, that's how easy it is to three D. Track your scene inside of Fusion. Go ahead and save your project, and then I will see you in the next lesson. 4. Lesson 03: Import FBX to Blender and Align World: And welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to import the FBX file that we exported from Fusion with our tracking information into Blender. As you can see, I've got a brand new blender project open. Let's go ahead and delete everything in the scene by pressing A on the keyboard. And then X to delete and then click delete. Now before we import our FBX, I usually like to set the frame rate of the project. First, let's go to this output tab on the right hand side. And let's set the frame rate to 25 as that's the frame rate we used in Fusion when we did the camera tracking. Now we can go to file and then import and select FPX. Then you're going to browse to the folder where you exported that FPx file from Fusion. The only thing we need to set here is the scale. By default, this will come in at a scale of one. Let's set this to 100, and that will just give us a better scale coming from Fusion to Blender. And then you can click Import FPx. As you can see this, import our camera and our floor plane, as well as the reference plane that we created. You'll see in the background test, this big plane that we can actually delete. That is basically the plane that Fusion uses to project the image sequence on. You'll see here in the outliner you've got a camera three D, which is the actual camera. And then there's a camera 3d10, which is this big plane in the background. You can go ahead and delete this plane. Just select it, press X and then delete. Now we can click on this camera icon here to look through our camera. And as you can see, things are not really lining up yet. And that's because we need to input our focal length of our camera. Let's jump back into Fusion to get that focal length here in Fusion. In our camera tracking comp, you can click on the camera three D node here in the inspector. You can see we've got the focal length in millimeters. And just copy this number. I just double clicking that to select that number And copying that, let's go back into blender, select our camera, then go to the camera section here on the right hand side where you see focal length, just past that new number. And press Enter. Next, we can also load our background image sequence into the camera with the camera, select it, tick this background images here on the right hand side, and just expand this. Then click Add Image, and then click open. Now browse to the folder where you saved your image sequence. So that is the 250 frames that we exported as an image sequence. Just press a to select all of these frames and then click open Image. Now with the camera selected, you can see our camera has got all these key frames. If we play or scrub through this, you'll see that everything is tracking really well. Let's click on the floor plane, go to the Material section, and you can just delete this Fong material which is like the default when coming from Fusion. Simply just going to delete that from this floor plane. You can do the same for the reference plane right here, while looking through the camera. Let's adjust our floor plane to match this pathway a little better. Because what we're going to do is we're going to import a character that's going to walk on this path. I just want to adjust the position of this floor plane. It's aligned to this pathway with a floor plane selected, I'm going to press and y to just move it back so it's almost aligned with this fence at the background. Then we can maybe scale it, press and then X to scale it on the X axis. Just scale it out, maybe something like that. And then scrub through and make sure that this plane stays in frame all the way. We're going to use this floor plane as a shadow catcher. We just need to ensure that it's big enough to catch all the shadows from our character. Maybe let's scale it up in the Y as well. I'm pressing and then Y on the keyboard, just to scale it up like that, Maybe a little bit in X as well. Now if we come out of the camera, you see we have something like that if we just scrub from the beginning. You can also go into wire frame by just going into wire frame at the top. Sometimes that's a little easier to see if your track is good. Now, one more thing. Let's say your scene is not aligned to your grid. Let's say, for instance, you may be rotated your plane inside of fusion or it just didn't align when you imported it into blender. What you can do is we can create an empty, so press shift A and then go to empty. And click on plane axis to create this plane axis empty in the center of the world. Then what you can do is select everything except the empty. Something like that. And then select the empty last by holding in shift and clicking on it. Then right click, go to parent and then object that will parent everything in the scene to this empty knoll, basically. Now what you can do is you can rotate the empty and that will rotate your entire scene. Now you can maybe look at this from the top and rotate that empty to just align your floor plane the way you want it. Let's say you want it on the y axis, like something like that. If you look through the camera, everything will still line up. That's just an easy way to align your camera and your scene to your grid inside of blender. I'm going to go ahead and delete this empty because my scene was actually already aligned to the grid. Just make sure that your floor is aligned to the grid inside of blender. Then save your project and I will see you in the next lesson. 5. Lesson 04: Mixamo Character and Basic Scene Setup in Blender: Hey and welcome back. In this lesson we're going to download a character animation from Mixamo and then add it to our scene. Let's go to Mixamo.com You can log in with a free Adobe account. And what we can do here is if you scroll right to the top, you can go to Characters. And here you can look at all the different characters they have. And I'm going to go with this ninja character as you can see here on the right hand side. But you can go ahead and use any of these characters that you find interesting. Then once you've got your character, let's go over to animations. And then let's search for walking. Just a simple walking animation. Now, you can obviously use any animation you want. You don't have to use the same one that I'm going to choose. So I'm just going to go through here and maybe just a normal walking animation like this one. Yeah, that looks pretty good. What we can do here is we can extend the frames just so that we have enough frames for our ten second animation. Another thing that we can do here is we can tick this in place. And that means he will just be walking in place. And we can animate him manually to walk along the path. You can also adjust some of these other settings, but I think this is looking pretty good. And now you can simply click on Download. And then make sure you have width, skin selected Ear and your frames per second. As you can see, there's no 25 frames per second year. I usually just choose one that's pretty close to the frames per second that I've gotten my project. So 24 is fine. And then click on Download. And then just download the FBX file in a folder somewhere. Just click on Save, and that's going to start downloading that FBX. Okay, so back in Blender, we can go to file and import FBX. And let's browse to that FPx that we just downloaded. And the only thing we need to set here is on the right hand side, if you expand armature, you just need to tick this one box that says automatic bone orientation. That just means that the bones will be rotated in the correct way. And then you can click on Import Px. That's going to import our model into our scene. And as you can see, he is pretty big with armature selected. You can just press S on the keyboard and scale them down. Let's look through the camera and just go to somewhere we can see his size and then just scale him down. What we want to make sure of is that he is standing on the floor plane. So as you can see, he's perfectly on the floor right there. And if we press play, you will see that we've got this one looping animation and it just stops there. Let's look through the camera again and let's scrub to maybe one of these frames around 100. And what we want to do is we just want to rotate him so he's looking the correct way. Maybe let's rotate him 90 degrees and we can maybe move him on the Y axis, press and Y just to get him aligned to this little pathway. If you scrub through, you will see that he is tracked into position, which is really cool. Let me show you how you can loop this walking animation. So we have enough frames for our full duration. With the amature selected click on this drop down here by the timeline, and then go to non linear animation. Here you will see we've got our camera with all the camera keyframes. And we also have the amature with the key frames, the walking key frames right here. What we can do is under mature, you can click this button here that says push action. And that's going to create this little clip for us that we can loop. And then here on the right hand side with this clip selected, if you scroll down and you go to action clip, you'll see this repeat number which is currently set to one. And if you increase this number, you can see here in the timeline that clip is kind of being extended. Now, that animation will just loop like that. That is exactly what we want. Now obviously we still need to animate the position of our character. So he's actually walking along the path. Let's do that now. Let's go back and change this back to timeline. Now you can see if we select our mature, we don't have any key frames right here, so we can now create those key frames of him walking. Let's go back to the first frame, and let's maybe move him on the X. So press and X. Just move him. Let's see where we want him to start. Maybe that's a good place then with the armature selected press to insert a keyframe. And we're just going to insert a location key frame. Then let's go to the last frame, frame 250. And let's move him along the X axis by pressing and X and just moving him this way. Press and then location to insert another key frame. Now let's play this back before we go back into our camera view. And what you want to do is you want to have a look at him and see if his feet are actually sliding and it looks like it is sliding a bit. What you can do is maybe just go to the last key frame and then move him a little further away. And then just update that key frame by pressing and location again. And let's play that back again. Just want something that looks a bit natural. It looks like he's sliding a little bit still. So I'm going to go to the last frame and just move him a little further away. Press and location, and let's see how that looks. Yeah, that looks pretty good. Now we can look through our camera and just play this back and see what we have. That's looking pretty cool, but I want him to be more on this side of the frame. What we can do is now we can move both those key frames at the same time. To do that, let's go to the graph editor and we can expand our object. Here. We still have the amateur selected. We just interested in the x location. I'm going to hide the Y and the Z. Now you can see we've got these two key frames. And you can select them both. And then press G and Y. And that will just move them both at the same time. I'm going to press Y and just position this so he is around here. And now everything should just work perfectly. As you can see there he comes into frame walking across the frame. Yeah, that's looking pretty cool. We can maybe shift these key frames up a little bit still, so I'm just doing the same thing again. And I can see he's coming into frame right here. That looks pretty good. As you can see, he's walking on the pathway and then near at the end is off the pathway right here. What we can do is let's hide the X location keyframes and let's show the Y key frames. With both of these, we can now also press and Y, and then you can move him in that direction, maybe something like that. Looks good. Just tweak the key frames until you are happy with the way your character is walking and also the position on the path. So just double check that, then once you're done, save your project, and I will see you in the next lesson. 6. Lesson 05: Match Lighting and Shadows in Blender: Hey and welcome back. In this lesson we're going to match the lighting and the shadows of our real world to our three D objects. Just to match the direction of the sunlight and also the reflections and the colors, et cetera. So before we do that, let's click on our camera here in the outliner. Go to your camera settings, and I just want to set the opacity of our background image to 100% If you scroll down here, you'll see this opacity slider. And just set this all the way to one. Now I can see our opacity of the background image is 100% Now let's go to our render settings and change our render engine to cycles and set your device to GPU if you have one. Let's jump over to the Viewport shading so we can see what's happening in our shot. Still under render settings, scroll down to film and expand it and then tick this box next to transparent. That will just ensure that once we render our scene that we will not render the background image with our render so it will be a transparent background. Now we can start set up our lighting. Let's go over to the shading tab and let's change this from object to world to work on our world lighting. Let's look through the camera and set this to the viewport shading. Now we can either use an HDRI or we can just simply use a sky texture. I think a sky texture will actually work fine for this shot. Let's create a new node by pressing Shift A, and let's search for sky texture, let's connect the color to the color of this background node. And now you can see that we have some lighting in our shot, and obviously this is not really matching yet. What you can do is we can start with a sun rotation. And can I just adjust this number until your shadow is matching the real world shadows? Now, if we just scrub through our shot, you can see this nice shadow of this pole. It's going in that direction and that's what we need to match. Let's go back to the shading tab and just scrub a little bit forward until we are. Yeah, so now we can see our shadow. Now you can just adjust the shadow rotation just to match that angle. And then you can also change the sun elevation. The shadow is not too long, so you can see that will actually adjust the length of that shadow, maybe something like that. So as you can see, the shadow is now being cut off slightly there. So we can just take our floor plane and just scale it in the y direction. And y just to scale that, make it nice and big. And you just want to make sure that your shadow is not being cut off at the edge of that plane. We can also go ahead and delete this reference plane. Remember we created this plane just to know where that fence is so you can delete it if you're not going to use it. Yeah, Just adjust the rotation of the sun and also the elevation to kind of adjust the length of that shadow and just make sure that it doesn't go out of this area. You can also actually just move this floor plane so it can press and Y to move it on the Y plane. Just make sure that you don't move the floor plane up or down because that will mess with our track. You can move it around on the floor plane, either in the X direction or in the Y direction. As you can see, our shadow is looking pretty good. It's not being cut off anywhere. That is exactly what we want. Okay, so now we can go ahead and just the intensity and the color of our light. So let's go back to shading and first of all, let's bring down the background strength. So maybe let's try 0.1 So as you can see, that is looking a bit better. It was very overexposed. And another thing that you can also play with is the sun size. And that will give you either sharp shadows or soft shadows. Now what we want to do is, again, we want to try and match any other shadows in the shot. So if you look at this shadow of the pole, it's not a perfectly sharp shadow, but it's not very soft. So if we make our sun size, maybe about three or maybe four to kind of get something that's not too sharp but then also not too soft. I think that is looking pretty good and I'm also pretty happy with our lighting. You can obviously go in here and you can change some of these settings as well. You can also adjust the air, and the dust, and the ozone. So this will give you a different color lighting on your subject. As you can see there, it's going more warm tone and more cool if you go that way. We can also adjust this once we do our compositing. Just try and get this as close as possible. So basically you're just trying to get the shadow direction correct and also the intensity of the sunlight. That's basically the main thing that we are trying to achieve here. Once you're happy with the sun intensity and also the shadow direction and softness, we can create our shadow catcher. To do that, let's select our floor plane, then go to this object properties right here on the side. Then we're going to scroll down to visibility and expand that. Then you can simply click on Shadow Catcher to make this a shadow catcher. Now you can see we've got this nice shadow on the floor that's actually being overlaid like that. That is exactly what you want. Now we can maybe go back, just scrub back slightly like that and then just try and compare it with another shadow in your shot, a real world shadow. And just see if it's still matching. Now don't worry too much about the darkness of this shadow and that shadow. You can see our character shadow is slightly lighter than this real world shadow, but we can adjust that once we do our compositing. You basically just want to get the direction correct and also the softness of your shadow. We can still blur the shadow once we do our compositing, but get it as close as possible. One more thing before we end this lesson. If we look at our character a bit closely, you can see some of the materials are really shiny. That's the way that some of the materials are being imported from Miximo. Let's just fix them quickly with our character selected. Go to the shading tab and let's change this from world to object. We see our object materials. Let's just make a little bit of space here and just move some of these nodes around. This is our color and this is the specula. What I usually like to do is I like to delete this normal map node. And let's create a new node by pressing shift A and search for bump and add a bump node. Then take this normal map and put that into the height and then the normal into the normal. And then bring down the strength to 0.1 and the distance also to something small, like 0.1 Now let's disconnect this roughness from the roughness input. And we can manually adjusted here exactly how shiny we want this outfit to be, so you can kind of play around with that. You can also play around with the metallic values to kind of get something nice there. Yeah, I think something like that looks a little better. So you can obviously go and make some more tweaks here, but I think this is looking pretty good. Let's go back to our layout and look through our camera just to kind of see how he is looking in our shot. Yeah, I think that is looking pretty cool. So once you're happy with your lighting and your shadows and also your materials, go ahead and save your project. And then I will see you in the next lesson. 7. Lesson 06: Render Layers and Render Passes: Hey, and welcome back. In this lesson, I'm going to show you how to set up your render layers as well as your render passes. Now the reason we're going to do render layers is we want to render our character on its own layer. And then we want to render the shadow on a separate layer so that we have full control of the character and the shadow independently. To do that, right here at the top of the blender screen, you will see it says view layer and this is where you can create different render or view layers. Let's rename this first one to character, just like that. So that's our character layer. Now we're going to create some collections. First of all, let's select our amateur. Right click on it and select Hierarchy to make sure that we're selecting the character as well as the amature here in the Outliner. Press M to create a new collection. Then click on New Collection. And let's give it a name. Let's call this character like that. And click okay. Now our character is inside this character collection. I can untick this to hide it and show it like that. Let's do the same with our ground plane or our shadow catcher. We can maybe just rename this to Shadow Catcher like that. With the shadow catcher selected, press M on the keyboard to create a new collection. It's called this Shadows and click. Okay. So now we have these two collections. One with our character and one with our shadow catcher. So what we can do is we can click on this little filter drop down and let just enable this arrow, which is indirect only, and then just move your mouse away. Now you can see we have this extra little option here next to our render settings. In the outline for our character render layer, we basically want to not show any shadows, but we don't just want to disable this layer. We want to tick this little arrow, which is indirect lighting only if I tick this, you'll see that our shadow will disappear in the scene. But the nice thing about this indirect only is light that's actually bounced on this plane, on this floor plane will still be rendered on the character. You can actually see if I disable this shadow layer completely. If I hide this collection, you can see that the lighting on our character is actually changing. That's because of the bounce lighting that's bouncing against the floor plane and then reflecting against the character. This is just a nice way to tell blender to only render the indirect lighting from this collection, but don't render the actual layer or the actual shadow. So now we can go to this view layer section here. And this is where we choose all the render passes that we want to render on this specific render layer. On the character render layer, we want to include the combined pass, which is basically all the indirect lighting and everything together. Then what we also want to include is the vector pass, this one right here. This will give us information for motion blur. Then if you scroll down, you can also tick the ambient occlusion and that will give us our ambient occlusion pass on our character. Okay, so once you have set that up, we can duplicate this render layer to create our second render layer, I'm going to click on this little Add View Layer button right here. And we can just click on New. And now we can give it a name. So I'm going to call this one Shadows. And now on this render layer, we only want to show the shadows. So now we can click this indirect next to our character collection. And now we will only see the shadows, but we're not going to see our character again. The same thing, the light bouncing from our character to the floor plane will still be there, but we just won't see the character. So basically you can see it will only render our shadow. Now very importantly, back to our view layer on the side, we can uncheck this combined because we don't want to render the combined again on our shadow layer. And the only thing we want to take if you go all the way down, is this shadow catcher. All right, so let's test this quickly before we move on to the next lesson. So I'm simply just going to click on Render and Render Image just to render a still frame And now we can have a look at our render layers. So I'm just going to make this a bit bigger. Here at the top, you can see this first drop down, we've got character and shadows. So if we have character selected next to it, we've got our render passes. So you can see there is our combined render pass and we can also look at our vector, this is for the motion blur. Then we have our ambient occlusion, which we will also use when we're doing compositing. Now if we go over to the shadow render layer, you can see here we've got a shadow catcher render pass and this is our shadow on its own. And that's exactly what we want, That's how easy it is to set up your render layers in blender. Go ahead and save your project, and then I will see you in the next lesson. 8. Lesson 07: Render Multilayer EXR Sequence from Blender: Welcome back. In this lesson, I'm going to show you how to render your sequence to a multi layer XR image sequence. Let's get started. Obviously, we are still on our shadow view layer, so we can't really see our character, it doesn't matter. But you can actually just click this drop down and switch over maybe to the character view layer so we can just see the character. But yeah, this doesn't really matter. Once we start doing our render, let's go to our render properties and just look at some of these settings before we render. Obviously, make sure this is set to cycles and GPU. And then under your render, let's set our maximum samples. I'm going to use 256 samples, but you can obviously set that to anything you like. Then another thing that we need to check under film, just make sure this is set to transparent, which is correct. Now we can go over to the output section here on the side, and this is where we're going to set our file format. So make sure this is set to open Xr multi layer. And you can set the color depth to float or half. That is perfectly fine. Now we can choose a folder where we want to save our render, to click on this little folder icon, and then browse to the folder where you want to export your render. And I'm going to call this walking animation. And then I'm just going to add an underscore at the back of this file name. And the reason I've got this underscore is that Blender will add the frame number after this file name, so 00010002, et cetera. Then just click on Accept here. One thing I usually do before I start rendering is changing this back to Viewport Shading. Once you're ready to render, make sure to save your project and then simply click on Render and Render animation. And this will then start rendering your full animation from frame one to 250. And it will include all those render layers and render passes for us. So yeah, let this run through, this can obviously take some time depending on the speed of your computer and your GPU. And then I will see you in the next lesson. 9. Lesson 08: Fusion Compositing Part 1 (Merging Render Passes): Hey and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to start the compositing process using Fusion. As you can see, I'm back in Fusion and we still have our tracking comp open. Let's start by importing our render that we render from Blender. In the media pool, you can just click the media pool at the top if you don't see it. Let's start by creating a new bin. So I'm simply going to right click and click on New bin. Let's call this one Renders. Let's go into that bin. And then right click and click on Import Media. Then browse to the folder where you render your ER image sequence. And we're going to select all the files. Click on the first frame and then scroll down to the last frame holding shift. And then just click that last frame to select it, make sure you've got all 250 frames selected. And then click open to import that image sequence. One thing I usually check is I just right click this render and then go to Clip Attributes. To just double check that my frame rate is correct. As you can see here, the frame rate is set to 25 and that's the same frame rate that we use in this project, so that's good. Then click on Okay. To confirm that, let's go to our comps bin that we created earlier. Let's create a new comp. Right click in this area, and then click New Fusion Composition. And let's give it a name. So I'm going to call this shot. One very importantly, we want to set the duration here as well. As you can see, by default, this is set to 5 seconds. And we know that our clip is 10 seconds in duration. Just going to change this to ten, and obviously our frame rate, make sure that is correct as well. We're using 25. And then click to create that new comp. Now let's double click this comp here in the media pool, this shot number one. And that's going to open up our comp here in the no tree. Next we can bring in the footage into the no tree. So I'm going to go to the footage bin that we created earlier and I'm going to drag in the MOV that we used. And I'm just going to connect that to our media out like that. Now if you scrub the timeline here, you can see that we have our clip in the viewer. Next, let's bring in our render image sequence as well. So I'm going to go back to the renders bin, and I'm just going to drag this into the node viewer like that. So now we have our plate, which is this node coming into our media out. And then we also have our render, so we can rename these nodes. Just to keep things a little neater, I'm going to click on this media in and then press two on the keyboard. And I'm going to rename this to plate. That is our plate or our footage. Let's rename our render as well. So I'm going to select this node, press two, let's just call this walking render, something like that. We'll probably rename this node again. Now we can go ahead and close our media pool here at the top just to make a little bit of extra space here. And you can press command or control to just fit this to the viewer like that. So let's begin by merging our render over our plate. I'm going to bring in a merge node, So I'm going to click on this merge node right here. And I'm going to drop this onto the line between the plate and the media out and make sure that you point to it so it turns a blue and yellow color. And that means it's going to be connected to that line. Now we can take the output of our walking render and just drop that onto the merge. There's still one thing we need to do before we can actually see the render in the viewer. Click on this walking render node and you'll see we've got this layer drop down here in the inspector. If you don't see your inspector here on the side, you can click the inspector button here at the top to display this panel here. You can see you've got this layer drop down, and this is where we have all our render passes for this first one. Let's select Character Combined. And that's going to show us the combined pass of our render. So as you can see, our character is now visible in the scene. But you can see the colors are looking a bit off. And the reason for this is we are using AGx when rendering from Blender. We need a color space converter to display this in the correct color space, basically. Now, before we can convert to a correct color space, we need to copy some files out of our blender installation that we can actually load into the color converter. Here I am in the finder. And this might be slightly different on Windows, but what you need to do is you need to write lick on your Blender app and then go to show package contents. Then we need to browse to Contents resources 4.0 data files. And then you'll see there's a color management folder you need to copy. You can either copy the color management folder or you can copy everything inside that folder. You'll see there's a confio file and there's also some lots and also a film folder. Just copy these three items, these two folders and the OCIO. You can copy it to your desktop or to your documents. And then we're going to load this config file inside of Fusion to convert to a correct color space. Basically, let's jump back into Da Vinci. And now I'm going to search for a node by pressing shift in space. And then I'm going to type OCC and we're going to select this OCIOlorspace node. Just add that to your node tree and we're going to insert this node right after our walking render node. Now to insert a node, you simply need to drag it around. Then hold in shift on the keyboard and wait until the line turns a blue and yellow or green. And just drop it there and that will be connected to that line. Now select this color space node here in the inspector. You can see it's asking for a conflict file. And that's the conflict file that we copied from the blender installation. Click on Browse and then browse to the folder where you copied those two folders and the config file. Then select the config file and click on Open. Now here you can see we've got two options here that we need to set. And this is our source color space and our output color space. Now for the source color space, we need to choose linear rex seven oh nine. And for the output space, we need to choose GX base S RGB. And that's going to display it as we rendered it from Blender. Now, we only need to do this on the combined pass, as you will see in a bit. Let's rename this Merge node, so that we know this is our character section right here. I'm going to select this Merge one and I'm going to press F two on the keyboard. And let's call this one character underscore MRG. We know that this is a merge node. Then click okay to save that. Now you can see, we can quickly see that this node is merging our character over our plate. A quick way to disable a node is just by selecting the node in the node tree and then pressing command or control that will basically toggle that node on and off. You can also select the node and here in the inspector, you can click this little switch here to toggle it on and off as well. Next, let's bring in the shadow. The shadow, we will merge before or under the character, which means this will be to the left of this little tree right here. I'm going to bring in another merge node again and I'm going to drop it on the line right here. Then I'm going to copy or duplicate this walking render. I'm simply going to select this node and then press Command or control C to copy, and then just click away and then paste it by pressing command or control V. Now I'm just going to connect this to this merge like that. Now we need to select our shadow pass. So I'm going to click on this node here in the inspector. I'm going to choose next to Layer. I'm going to choose shadows. Shadow catcher. As you can see, we've got this shadow catcher right here so we can hide our character. For now, I'm just clicking on the character Merge and pressing command to disable that node. You can see we've got our shadow, but we also have this white background. What we need to do is we need to select this merge node. And the way we're going to apply this is not with the normal mode, but we need to change this to multiply. And you will always use multiply when merging your shadows over your plate. Now if we zoom in here, you can see we've got this shadow and everything is looking good. Now we can bring our character back. So I going to click on this node and press command to bring that back. And as you can see, our character is now over the shadow. Let's rename some of our nodes. The node where we merge our shadow. Select that one, press F two, and I'm going to call this one Shadow. Underscore MR. G for merge. Now we know this is our shadow and this is our character. I can click on the Shadow Merge, Press Command to toggle that on and off, and I can do the same with a character. Let's rename this node as well. So I'm going to press if two, and I'm going to call this one walking render underscore shadow. That just makes things a little bit easier when looking at the node tree. Next I want to bring in the ambient occlusion pass and merge that over our character. But we want to merge it over the character before we merge our character over our plate. Let me show you how to do that. First of all, I'm going to duplicate our walking render. So I'm just going to copy that again and paste it on the side. Let's rename this one this one. We can just call for aminuclusion just to make it a bit easier to read. Next, we want to bring in another merge node. But this time I'm not going to drop the merge on this line to merge the aminoclusion over everything. I just want to merge it over the character on its own. I'm going to bring in a merge node and I'm going to drop it right here. I'm just going to move these two nodes up slightly so we have a little bit of extra space now. We can take the output of our ammunoclusion and make sure you drop it onto the background input. This little green input on the merge, not the blue, because the blue is always the mask. So we want to drop it on that foreground. As you can see, it actually swapped those two colors around. The blue, which is the mask is now on the left hand side and the green foreground is now on this side. So we can move this up and maybe just align that. Let's rename this merge as well. So I'm going to press two and I'm going to call this for aminoclusion. Underscore M RG for merge. Now we know that the aminoclusion is being merged right here. What we need to do next is click on this aminoclusion node. And we need to choose the layer for this node. As you can see currently it's still set to the combined layer. We need to change this to character for the aminoclusion pass. Now you can see things are changing a bit. Before moving on, let's just make sure we're looking through the correct nodes. If I zoom in here, you can see our media out with this little Tia below it. And that means we are looking through this node using viewer number two, You can click this media out, press two on the keyboard, and that will show this node through this viewer. Remember, we have two viewers here. You can click this little icon here and it will show you the viewer on the left hand side and the viewer on the right hand side. You can choose, if you want to look at maybe this note, you can select it. Then press one on the keyboard, and that will show this node through viewer number one. Then you can maybe choose, let's say I want to view this node through viewer number two. Just select it and then press two on the keyboard, and that means you're looking through this node on this side. But to keep things simple, let's just change this to one viewer and select your media out and press two to make sure that you're viewing through that node. Sometimes you obviously want to look at a different node. So let's say we want to look at this aminuclusion pass. We can select this node, press two on the keyboard, and that's going to show us that node. This is basically how the Amineclusion looks. So you can see we've got this black background and then we've got our character here. What we need to do is we need to change the way that this aminaclusion is being merged over our character. Click on the ammunoclusion, merge node and then simply change the apply mode from normal to multiply. Now let's look through this node to see what's happening with this AO merge node. Selected, press two to view through it. Now you can see we actually have our character back and things are looking pretty good. Let's disable or toggle this ammunclusion on and off to see what's happening with our image. I'm going to select the ammunoclusion node and then press command to toggle that. On and off here you can see what's happening. Our aminoclusion is being merged over the character. But because our aminoclusion pass has a black background, things are not working exactly the way they should. Again, let's look through the aminoclusion node by pressing two, and you can see this is exactly how our aminoclusion pass looks like. We've got this black background and we need to get rid of this black background basically. So on the aminoclusion node, we're going to go to the inspector and then go to the channels section right here. And here you can see we've got the red, green, and blue channels, but there's no alpha channel or transparency for this aminoclusion pass. What we can do is we can borrow the alpha layer or the alpha channel from one of the other render passes. Click on this drop down next to Alpha and then select this character combined. This means we are using the alpha channel from the combined render layer. Now you can see we've got this nice transparent background and we only have the aminoclusion over the character. Now if we look through this O merge node again by pressing two, you can see our character and our background is not black anymore. It's no transparent which is exactly what we want. So let's click on our media out again and press two to look through that node. Now you can see our character is looking pretty good. We can adjust the strength of the amunoclusion by selecting the amunoclusion merge node and then go to the setting stab here in the inspector and you'll see this blend slider. This is basically the opacity of this merge node or the strength of this merge node. If it's set to zero, then it won't affect your image at all. It's basically just bypassing it, and if you set it to one, it will be full strength. As you can see, you can just toggle this and this is the way that the aminoclusion now is being applied to your character. You can just use the slider just maybe something not too crazy, not too dark, maybe somewhere around there. This will obviously depend on your render and your plate and everything together. Tweak this value until you're happy with that result. What you can also do is just click on this O merge node and toggle it on and off to see the difference. Okay, so that's looking pretty good. One more thing before we close this lesson. If I zoom in and if we look at the shadow of our character, you can actually control the strength of this merge by just clicking on the shadow merge. And we can do the same thing we did on the ammunclusion on the shadow merge. Go to settings here in the inspector. Here you can change the opacity of that shadow. What we want to do is look at another shadow in the scene, maybe the shadow of this pole. And you want to try and match the opacity of these shadows. Obviously, if this is set to one, you can see the shadow of our character looks a little dark compared to this shadow right here. Maybe let's just move this down to create a bit of extra space. You can just drag this blend down and try and match the look of our character shadow with one of the real world shadows in the shot, maybe something like that. We're obviously going to come back to this when we tweak everything and make everything fit together. But this is just the basics to get everything into the shot. We've got our plate, We've got our shadow, this is our character which includes the actual combined render and then also the Amin occlusion on top of that that's being merged over the shadow and this is just the media out which is showing our final image. All right, so there's one thing I just want to mention to you guys quickly before ending this lesson. This is something that I'm not really going to go into too much detail, but I just want to show you guys what to do if you run into this problem. Now if we have a lot of adjustment effects on our three D render, you might see a dark edge appearing around your character. Now if you see this dark edge, you can search for a node that's called alpha multiply. You'll see there's a alpha divide and alpha multiply. Just add an alpha multiply node and then add that right below the last effect that you've added. That will then get rid of that line or that dark edge around your character. Now we don't have that problem in this scene, and I'm not really going to mention this node in this course, but just know that if you see that dark edge, then the alpha multiply node will fix that. Just kind of go through this and make sure this all makes sense. How you merging these things over each other and kind of just play with the settings on some of these nodes and see what they do. Then go ahead and save your project, and then I will see you in the next lesson. 10. Lesson 09: Fusion Compositing Part 2 (Vector Motion Blur): Hey, and welcome back. In this lesson, I'm going to show you how to add motion blur to our character. Now remember we included some vector passes when rendering from Blender. So we're going to utilize those vectors to actually calculate a realistic motion blur on our character. The node that we're going to use for this is called vector motion blur. Press Shift and Space to search, and then type vector and you'll see vector motion blur. Just click on that one. Then click Add to add this node. And we're going to drop this node on our character tree right here in the middle. Because we want to apply the motion blur to basically our whole character including the ammine occlusion. We'll add this somewhere right here. If we add the motion blur or the vector motion blur before our amminecclusion merge, then we're only going to add motion blur to the character. But we're not going to add motion blur to the ammine occlusion. That's why we need to add it under this merge. Let's drop our vector motion blur right here. Hold in shift to drop it onto that line. And then make sure it's connected like that. Now as you can see, nothing is happening in our shot. And that's because this node has got to input this green input, which is the vectors, that's the vector passes that we need to input here. What I'm going to do, I'm going to duplicate our render node. I'm going to copy that and just paste it. The walking render, let's just place it here somewhere between our shadow. We can actually just move this up slightly. Then what you need to do is you need to connect the output from this render to this green input on the vector motion blur node. Still nothing is happening in our shot, and that's because we need to set our channels correctly on this render node. Let's rename this one. I'm just going to call this vectors like that. Press two to rename. Now with this vector node selected, let's go over to the inspector, then go over to channels. If you look down at the bottom, you'll see you've got x velocity and y velocity. And these are the vectors that we render from Blender. We just need to click on these drop downs next to x velocity. And if you scroll down here, you'll see that we have these vectors. I'm going to choose character vector x next to the x velocity, next to y. I will choose character vector y. Instantly in the viewport, you will see we have some motion blur on our character. Now this might be a little bit extreme. Let's click on our vector motion blur node selected node. Now you can see in the inspector we've got this scale value. If I increase this, this will increase the motion blur. And if I set this all the way down to zero, then it will basically remove the motion blur. You can fine tune this exactly the way you want. I'm going to set this value to around 0.25 just to add a bit of motion blur. Obviously, this character is not running too fast across the screen. You can just control it exactly the way you want. As you can see, if I click on this motion blur and I toggle this node on and off, you can see the difference that it makes. You can obviously scrub through your footage right here. And you can see your character is walking across our shot and you can see the motion blur in action, and everything is looking pretty good. To resize your viewer here, you can obviously use the mouse wheel or plus and minus on the keyboard, or you can press command or control, and that will fit it to this viewer. Then when you change the size, it will adjust accordingly. Let's quickly look at our node tree before ending this lesson. Again, we start with a plate and then we have our shadows. Then we have our character, which includes the aminoclusion. And then after that, we've got our vector motion blur right here. And then all of that goes into our media out node. Make sure this makes sense to you before moving on and then go ahead and save your project. And then I will see you in the next lesson. 11. Lesson 10: Fusion Compositing Part 3 (Color Correction): Hey and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to do some color correction on our render, on our character as well as the shadow. Now let's start by, you can either search for a color corrector node by pressing shift in space, and then we can just type in color and you'll see there's a color corrector node like this. Or we can simply drag it from this tool bar right here. You'll see this little icon here. This is the color corrector. And you can simply drag this into your node tree like that. Now let's start with the character. This is our character section right here. And this is the shadow, maybe let's just move this up slightly so we can see things a bit better. I'm going to drop this color corrector right after the vector motion blur node, so that we add that color correction on everything including the ammunclusion and the vector motion blur. I'm going to hold in shift while dragging this around. Hold in shift and drop it onto this line right here. Now we can color correct our character. So I'm just going to zoom in here. There's one thing you need to know when using a color corrector node. If I select the color corrector node and let's say we adjust the contrast, you'll see that we affecting the plate or the background footage as well. That's not what we want, we only want to adjust the color of our render. What we need to do is we need to go to this Options tab right here on the color corrector. And then we need to tick this box next to pre, divide, post, multiply. That will ensure that it's making use of the alpha of our character. So it's only applying the effect to the character and not to the background. Just make sure that's ticked. Now let's go back to the correction tab. And now we can play with these values and that will adjust only our character. To reset any of these values, simply double click on the name. You've got a couple of different controls, like the contrast, the gain, the lift, the gamma and the brightness. And you can also play with the saturation and the U, and you can also tint the colors right here. What I want to do is I want to add a little bit of a warm or orange tint to our character. This color wheel is great for that. You can simply click this middle little icon and just drag it around. And as you can see, we are adding that tint color to our character. What I want to do is I want to add a little bit of warm color. Like a warm orange tone, but not too much, just slightly, something like that. If I click on this color corrector and I toggle it on and off, you can see the difference right here, just adding that slight warm tone to our character. You can also play with the contrast, the gain, the lift, the gamma and the brightness here. Just make some subtle changes and see what they do and how they affect your image. The gain will control your highlights. The lift will control the shadows. If you want to make the shadows a little bit brighter, you can adjust the lift like that. You can also play around with the brightness in the gamma. Just try and match it to your footage. Now let's do the same to our shadow. So I'm going to drag in a color corrector and I'm going to drop it onto this shadow line right here, just under the walking render shadow. And now we can tint our shadow as well. So if we zoom in here, you can see I can actually change the color of that shadow. So we want to do the same, we just want to add a little bit of warm color to that shadow. So let's toggle this node on and off to see the difference. You can see it's just adding that slight warmth to this shadow. What we can also do is we can bring in a blur node. So you can either search for a blur node like that, or we can simply just drag it in from this tool bar. This little drop icon is the blur node, So you can drag that in and drop it onto this line. That's if you want to add a little bit of blur to the shadow. If I increase the blur size on the side, you can see that we are just blurring our shadow. The best thing to do is just look at one of the shadows in the shot and just try and match the blurriness of the character shadow using a blur node. I just adding a little bit of blur, maybe something like that looks right. You can also add a blur node to your character. So let's say we want to add a blur node right below the color corrector node on our character. We can do that. Now. If we're just a blur size, we're only blurring our character. Now obviously we have some motion blur on our character. So we don't really need to add any more blur to the character. But that is only if you didn't use any motion blur and you want to match your character to the background or to your footage. You can do that. Play around with the color corrector node on the character as well as the color corrector on your shadow. And just play with those colors and the contrast and the lift and the gain, et cetera, to just match your character a little bit better to the scene. And then go ahead and save your project. And then I will see you in the next lesson. 12. Lesson 11: Fusion Compositing Part 4 (Rotoscoping): Hey, and welcome back. In this lesson we're going to look at rotoscoping. If you scrub through your shot, you'll see that we have a little problem here with this pole that's in the foreground. Our character is actually moving across it like that. And obviously our character needs to be behind this pole. Let me show you how you can rotoscope this pole and place it in front of our character. So what we're going to do is we're going to take our plate or our footage and merge it over everything. And then we're just going to use a mask to cut out this pole that's here in front and place it over our character. We can reuse this plate node and then merge it over everything again. But let's copy it. So I'm going to click on this plate node right here at the bottom. And I'm going to copy that node. And just click here off our node tree and paste it right here. And then we can merge our plate over everything. We can either drag in a merge node like this and then merge the plate over like that. And you can see our character and everything disappears because our plate is now over everything. But I just want to show you an easier way to merge something over here. We have our plate or the footage. What we can do is we can take the output of this plate and simply drag it over the output of this character merge and that will automatically create a new merge node for us. Now you can see this plate or the footage is being merged over everything, and obviously now we can't see our character anymore. Now we need to mask out this pole. And then we'll also need to add some key frames to that mask, so it actually animates throughout the shot. To roto this pole out, we need to bring in a mask node. Now we have a couple of different options here. We have a rectangle, an ellipse, and also this polygon mask, and also a B spline for this, I think a polygon should work perfectly fine. So I'm going to drag this into my node tree for now. I'm just going to put it here below the merge node, but I'm not going to connect it yet. Let's draw our mask first, and then we can connect it and see how it actually works with the mask node selected. I'm just going to drag this down so we have a bit of extra space now. We can simply just click somewhere to create a point. Then I'm going to click here at the bottom to create another point. Then just click and drag like this. If you click and hold, you can create a curve like that. You can also click on that point and you can adjust these handles separately like that. So I'm just going to delete this one point. Click on this point and then just continue drawing like that. And I'm going to draw a straight line up all the way to the top. And then just close it down like that. Make sure you close your mask right at the end. Now you can zoom in here and you can just move these points around to make sure that our mask is perfectly on the edges of this pole that we are masking out. Just go through those points and just make them nice and something like that. Just go through this and adjust these points to make sure they are on the edges of that pole. If I scrub display, you'll see we have this little white indicator here. And that means there's a key frame on this polygon mask on that frame. If you can see, if we scrub through the footage, that mask will stay in that area and it's not going to follow this pole. We need to create a couple of key frames to make sure that this mask follows this pole. Let's go further. Maybe around frame 160. Then what we can do is we can drag a box around the mask like this, and we can simply just drag and readjust it to the pole. Now obviously, we need to go in here and adjust some of these points individually just to match our pole. Again, just match it as good as possible. Something like that. Now let's go to frame. Going to zoom out here. Let's go to frame. Maybe 80. And let's do the same on this side. I'm dragging a box around the mask and just positioning it on this side. And then we just adjust these points. Everything is looking good here. We can change things around a bit. I'm not too worried about this bottom section because this doesn't really cover our character. I'm just going to make a very rough mask at the bottom. All right, let's scrub until that pole is completely out of the frame. And can I just move the mask? It's completely out of the frame. Then let's do the same at the back. Just scrubbing through here until that pole is completely out of the shot like that. And then I'm just going to select all the masks, move it out. Now we just need to make sure that everything is still working. What I usually do is I go to like somewhere between these two key frames, and as you can see, our mask is slightly off. I'm just going to select this and reposition these points. And then just zoom in and make it nice and tidy. Now, rotoscoping can take some time. Obviously, we'll have to make sure that this is working on all the frames. You can also add some new points, maybe here in the middle, if you want to, you can simply just click and add a new point. You just want to make sure that everything is on the edges of this pole. Now let's go to a frame between these two key frames. Somewhere around here as you can see that slightly off, again, I'm just going to adjust these points again to make sure they are on the edges. Okay, let's go to maybe a frame in between here, and as you can see, that's also slightly off. You just go through all these frames and just adjust them where they need to be adjusted. Just a little tip. If you are struggling to see the mask outline, you can click these three dots here in the viewer and go to Gain and Gamma here. You can actually bring down the gain of the footage. Now this won't affect the render anything, This is just our way to darken the image in the viewer so we can see our mask outline a bit better. You can just play with this and that will just make your life a little easier. Let's choose a key frame here in the middle again. And as you can see that slightly off, I'm just readjusting that to fit as best as possible. You can add as many key frames as you like. Just go through them and make sure that that mask is staying on the pole. As you can see, they go off. Just click a couple of frames and just double check if the mask is working and wherever it goes off from the pole. Just add some readjustments to the mask. Once you're happy with the mask, you can readjust this gain, so that is set back to default. And then you can click these three dots again and just click this gain gamma to remove that. Now we can connect this polygon mask that we created and we can connect it to our merge node where we merged the footage over everything. Again, take the output of this mask that we just created and drop it onto the merge. As you can see, that will be connected to the blue input, which is the mask input. Now if we scrub through here, you can see that our character will now be moving in behind this pole. If you look at this frame, you can see there is a bit of a problem here with our mask. You can simply just select the polygon mask again. You can just adjust these points to just fix that. If there's any gaps around these areas, you can just go in here and just adjust them like that. Sometimes you need to create a new point. Just click to create a new point and then just adjust that mask to get better results. You can see on this side as well, the hand is coming through the poles. Just adjust that mask again and then just scrub through and just look at the mask and fix it wherever it needs to be fixed. If the mask goes off at an area where the character is not really behind the pole, it doesn't really matter that much. You can literally just focus on the frames where the character is actually going in behind the pole. Just watch out that the shadow obviously will go behind the pole as well. Just keep that in mind. We can also soften the edges of our mask. If we zoom in here a bit and we have this polygon mask node selected here in the inspector, you'll see there's a setting for soft edge. If you drag this, you'll see that that will soften the edge of that mask. Usually you want to give it a little bit of softness, like something really, really subtle, 0.001 And then you can also increase the border width, or you can actually take that into the negative. And as you can see there, we can adjust it that way as well. Just adjust this to get the best results and if you click off your mask, you won't see the mask line. And that's a better way to visualize this in the viewer. Yeah, as you can see, our pole is now in front of the character. Go through the shot and make some adjustments to the mask wherever you need to. Then let's just rename this Merge, where we merged our plate over everything. Let's just rename this node by pressing F two. Let's call this poll underscore MRG. We know that is the poll in the foreground. If I click on this merge node and I disable it, you'll see that is what it's doing. Go ahead and save your project and then I will see you in the next lesson. 13. Lesson 12: Fusion Compositing Part 5 (Lightwrap): Hey and welcome back. In this lesson, I'm going to show you how to create a light wrap to integrate our character a little bit better into the shot. Now a light wrap is basically the background that's wrapping around the edges of your three D object. They feel that they're sitting in the shot a little better. Let's see how we can do this. So we want to create our light wrap before we merge this four ground pole over everything. So this four ground pole that we roto out, we want to add it before that, because we don't want to add a light wrap over this pole as well. So I'm simply just going to move these nodes this way to make space right after our character. Let's begin by creating the mat that we're going to use to basically merge our background or the footage over the edges of our character. The node that we're going to use is called a Matt control. Let's search by pressing shift in space and let's search for Matt. And you'll see there's a node with the name Matt control. Click that and then add it to the scene. Now as you can see, this node has got some interesting inputs. It's got a foreground input as well as a background input, and then you've got your mask, and you've got your garbage mask and a solid mat. And also the output, so we're only going to focus on the background and also the foreground. And then we're going to combine some mats together and do some math to create a nice outline mat for us. So what we're going to do first, we're going to take our walking render, so I'm just going to copy that again and paste it right here. Now you can re use this node, but I think it's a little bit neater if we just do it this way. Let's look through this Matt control node. So I'm going to click on this node and then press two on the keyboard. And then we're basically looking through this node. Just one thing we want to change for now on this node, if you look in the inspector, it says combine. What we want to do is we want to combine the alpha. Just select combine alpha right here. Now if we take the output of our walking render and simply drop it onto the mat control, you will see that we have this character. If I press A on the keyboard here in the viewer, you can see this is the alpha channel. So what we're going to do is we're going to combine two mats and then we're going to use some math to create that Matt. Now this can sound and can be a little bit complicated, but let me show you how it works. So what I'm going to do, I'm going to take the output of the render node and I'm going to plug that into the foreground, this little green arrow, so as you can see nothing is really happening. And what I want to do is on this Matt control node, I want to change the combined operation from copy to subtract. That's going to subtract the one from the other one because they both exactly the same. We don't see anything in the viewer. What we want to do is we want to blur the foreground input to create that matt for us. You'll see we've got the green and the yellow input right here on the mat control. The yellow is the background and the green is the foreground. So let's take a blur note, let's drag that in. And let's just make a little bit of extra space here, maybe. Let's move this up and I want to drag this blur node over the foreground input. So I'm holding in shift on the keyboard, dragging it over this line right here. And let's just move it out of the way so we can kind of see what's happening here on this blur node. If we expand the blur size, as you can see, we get this nice mat and this is basically the outline of our character. And this blur will control the thickness or the fade of that mat, just like this. This is exactly what we want to add, that light wrap over our character. Let me show you how we can use this. Just something to note here, the mat control is not connected to this line, it was just sitting on top of that line. Nothing is connected yet. We only have these three nodes. We've got our render going into the Mat control, and then the render goes into the blur and then back into the Mat control to give us this Mat. Now we can press a year again on this viewer to basically just show the color values of our render. Now we can use this as a mask. Let's take this mask that we created and move this below our line, maybe something like that. And now we can bring in another merge note. So I'm going to drag a merge note onto this line right here. And then I'm going to take our plate. I'm simply going to take this plate here and I'm going to copy and paste it. And I'm going to merge that into this merge. Now if we look through our media out again, by pressing two, you can see our character is gone. And that's because we are merging the background plate over everything again. So we want to make use of this mask that we just created and we want to mask this merge. So I'm going to take the output of our Matt control. I'm just going to move this one down so we have our Matt control here at the top. I'm going to take the output of the mat control and put that onto the mask input on this merge. Now you can see something is happening. It's almost like the edges of our character is slightly transparent and you can see the background through it, but that's obviously way too extreme. Click on this blur node that we created and bring down the value all the way to zero, and I can see we're back to where we started. If you increase this value ever so slightly, you will start getting that edge that we're looking for. And obviously as you can see, this is not looking too good. We have this little edge on the outside. If you click on the mat control, you can adjust the blur here as well. You can increase the blur right here to add a little bit of blur to that edge, maybe something like that. Then we can go back to this other blur node and maybe just play with this value as well and bring that back ever so slightly. As you can see, this is a very subtle effect on the edges. If I just toggle this merge on and off, you'll be able to see the difference. That is exactly what a light wrap is, is basically taking the background and adding it onto the edges of our character. What we can also do is we can blur the background as we are overlaying it onto our character. Let's add a blur node right here and then you can adjust this blur. This will just affect the blur of the background on the edges of our character. As you can see, if I increase this blur, you can see that blur is just affecting the area that's being overlaid. Another thing that we can do is click on the merge node and change the mode from normal to screen. That will just display the light wrap correctly. If we look at our character and I toggle this merge on and off, you can see that is the difference. It's just adding that light wrap around your character which will integrate him slightly better into the shot. So let me just zoom out here so you can see what is happening with the nodes. It's basically, we're just using this Mat control and we're using our render as the foreground and the background and then we're only blurring one of them. And then we're changing the Mat control to combine the alphas. And the combined operation should be set to subtract to get that mask. Obviously, if you click on the mat control and you press two on the keyboard, you can see what the node is doing. And if you press A on the keyboard, you can see the alpha mat that we're actually using. Then just press A again to switch back to color. And then let's look through our media out again. Let's rename this Merge Note. So I'm clicking on it and pressing F two. And let's call this light wrap, underscore MRG for Merge. And now we know this is our light wrap. So if I tug all this on and off, you can see the difference here in the viewer. So go ahead and make sure that your light wrap is working correctly. You can obviously go ahead and rename some of these nodes save your project, and then I will see you in the next lesson. 14. Lesson 13: Fusion Compositing Part 6 (Final Compositing Effects): Hey, and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to do some final color grading and add some effects just to tie everything together. These final effects we want to add right at the end of our no tree. I'm simply just going to drag this media out this way to make a bit of extra space here. You can see this is after our pole roto, which is right here. We want to add it on this side because we want to affect everything in our shot. So let's start with a color corrector notes. I'm going to drag a color corrector straight onto the line right here. Now with this color corrector selected, we can go ahead and we can change the saturation or the contrast. As you can see, that will affect everything in the shot. You can play with the game or the lift and the brightness, All of those things. I'm going to add some contrasts. I'm just going to drag the contrast slider this way to add a little bit of contrast to shot. And maybe let's increase the saturation as well, slightly. You can also play with a gain. See how that affects your shot. Maybe bring that down slightly to just bring down some of the highlights. The lifts will adjust the shadows, you can play with that. See what that does. Now if you want to see the difference, you can just toggle this node on and off by pressing command or control just to see the difference, what this node is doing. Next we can add a vignette. I'm going to search by pressing shift space and then typing vignette like that. And I'm going to bring that in, and let's drop that in after our color corrector node. As you can see, the default values are quite extreme with a vignette selected. You can adjust the size, you're on the right hand side in the inspector, maybe adjusted to something like that. And then we can go to the setting stab and bring down the overall opacity of this effect. Let's just bring it in so we have a slight vignette, maybe just something like that. You can take this vignette and toggle it on and off to see what it does. You can also select both of these nodes, the color corrector and the vignette, at the same time. And toggle them off and on to see what they do. Next we can add some foam grain because if I zoom in here, you can see the footage is slightly grainy, but our character is very clean and that doesn't match well with our background. What we can do is we can add some film grain over everything. I'm going to search shift space and then I'm going to type in film and you'll see there's one that's called film grain. I'm going to bring that in. I'm going to drop that onto the line by holding shift. As you can see, now we have this grain over everything. Obviously, this is way too extreme with a film grain selected here in the inspector. We can change some settings. You can change the complexity of the grain right here at the top. Or we can change the size of the grain. I'm going to make it nice and small. Some fine grain, maybe something like that. You can also adjust the strength. If it's set to zero, you won't be able to see anything. But if you bring it up slightly, you can see the noise is coming back into our image. Just make some adjustments, you just want to add a tiny bit of noise. What you can also do is you can go to the setting tab right here. And this will adjust the overall opacity of the noise. So kind of just play around with this until you have that nice film grain on your render as well as your background. And obviously, this is a personal taste, so depending on the style that you're going for, you can play around with that. Just to add that little bit of realism to your three D render. So the nice thing about working with nodes is you can always go back and make some adjustments like I want to make an adjustment to the motion blur because I think the motion blur is a bit too strong. I'm going to just zoom in here and I'm going to find this vector motion blur node. And then in the inspector we can change the scale of our motion blur. And I'm going to bring this down to 0.15 maybe. Let's see how that feels. Just a slightly less motion blur. I think that works a bit better. Finally, let's say you want to add a bit of a crop to this shot. Maybe just like a wide screen crop, it's very easy to do that. We can bring in after our film grain, we can bring in a background node, So you can just drag in a background from the toolbar, or you can simply search for background, and on this background node, make sure the color is set to black. And now we're going to merge this over everything. So let's drag the output from this background to the output of the film grain. And that's automatically going to create this merge node for us. Now I'm going to drag in this rectangle mask, and I'm going to place it here below our merge node. And then in the viewer, I'm just going to adjust this mask. I'm going to zoom out and adjust it, something like that. And then I'm going to connect this rectangle mask to the merge mask input. As you can see, this is a little bit inverted. So now we can simply click on this rectangle mask node and we can tick this box that says invert. And I can see that will give us those black bars at the top or the bottom and you can adjust it exactly the way you want it. Let's rename this merge node that we just created. I'm going to call this white screen crop something like that so we just know what that is. Go ahead and play around with these final effect nodes and just see how best you can integrate your render with your footage. Once you're happy with a look of your comp, go ahead and save your project and then I will see you in the next lesson. 15. Lesson 14: Export Your Final Render from Fusion: Hey and welcome back. In this lesson, I'm going to show you how to render your final shot from Fusion. All we need to do is we need to go back to our edit page right here at the bottom, click this edit icon right here. And if you don't see the media pool, just click the media pool right here at the top. And we need to create a new sequence. I'm just going to create it in our comps folder or the comps bin. So I'm going to right click here, go to Timelines, and click Create New Timeline. And let's just call this our final render. You can give it any name and then you can simply click on Create. Now with this final render timeline open, you can take the comp, the shot one comp that we were working on. You can drag that into the timeline like that. And now we have our comp basically on a timeline. As you can see, we can close the media pool and then we can go to this deliver work space right here at the bottom. This little spaceship icon. Click on that. This is where we set our render settings. First of all, where it says export video. Let's change this from PNG, let's change it to MP four. Here you can choose your video codec, either H 264 or H 265. And also the resolution and your frame rate, et cetera. Under audio, we don't have any audio, so we don't have to worry about that. Where it says location, you can click browse and let's create a folder. Let's call this final render, And let's give it a name. Now you can click this to Render button at the bottom. And that's going to create your job one or your render job. And then you can simply click on Render All to start the render. And that's going to save your render as a MP four video file in the folder that you specified. Let this run through and then I will see you in the next lesson. 16. Course Conclusion - Thanks for watching: And we've come to the end of this fusion and Blender V effect course. Congratulations for completing it and I cannot wait to see what you will create. Please share your renders with me and feel free to reach out. If you have any questions, kindly take a moment to rate and review this course as it really helps me to create more courses like this one. I want to wish you all the best with your V effect journey. And remember to practice your new skills. And most importantly, have loads of fun creating amazing content. See you in the next one.