Electric Guitar Beginner Masterclass - Level 1 | Sascha Rebbe | Skillshare
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Electric Guitar Beginner Masterclass - Level 1

teacher avatar Sascha Rebbe

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Intro

      1:18

    • 2.

      How to use this class?

      0:52

    • 3.

      What do you need?

      5:59

    • 4.

      Electric guitars explained

      14:47

    • 5.

      How to hold an electric guitar

      4:41

    • 6.

      How to hold and use a guitar pick

      2:50

    • 7.

      How to tune a guitar

      9:07

    • 8.

      How to set up an guitar amplifire as a beginner

      6:12

    • 9.

      Open strings and muting techniques

      5:10

    • 10.

      How to fret notes on the fretboard

      7:51

    • 11.

      How to read basic guitar tablature

      3:51

    • 12.

      Rhythm basics & how to play to a metronome

      7:46

    • 13.

      Learn your first guitar riffs!

      1:55

    • 14.

      Guitar Riff Exercise 1

      2:00

    • 15.

      Guitar Riff Exercise 2

      2:17

    • 16.

      Guitar Riff Exercise 3

      2:47

    • 17.

      Guitar Riff Exercise 4

      2:31

    • 18.

      Guitar Riff Exercise 5

      2:58

    • 19.

      Guitar Riff Exercise 6

      4:54

    • 20.

      Famous Rock Guitar Riffs

      1:30

    • 21.

      Smoke On The Water

      2:45

    • 22.

      Iron Man

      2:48

    • 23.

      (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction

      2:00

    • 24.

      Seven Nation Army

      3:00

    • 25.

      Crazy Train

      2:54

    • 26.

      Breaking The Law

      2:42

    • 27.

      Heartbreaker

      2:46

    • 28.

      Sunshine Of Your Love

      3:29

    • 29.

      Power Chords Explained

      12:39

    • 30.

      Tablature and Chord Charts

      3:51

    • 31.

      Power Chord Exercise 1

      6:21

    • 32.

      Power Chord Exercise 2

      7:31

    • 33.

      Some Important Tips

      4:17

    • 34.

      Power Chord Extension

      6:14

    • 35.

      Power Chord Exercise 3

      6:37

    • 36.

      What is Palm Muting?

      5:33

    • 37.

      Palm Muting Exercise 1

      5:17

    • 38.

      Palm Muting Exercise 2

      4:43

    • 39.

      Simple 12 Bar Blues Shuffle

      7:55

    • 40.

      Simple 12 Bar Blues Shuffle (Alternative)

      4:39

    • 41.

      "T.N.T" Inspired Riff

      4:46

    • 42.

      "Iron Man" Inspired Riff

      5:20

    • 43.

      "Rock You Like A Hurricane" Inspired Riff

      3:35

    • 44.

      "Blitzkrieg Bop" Inspired Riff

      8:01

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About This Class

You want to learn how to play the electric guitar from home and you want to play rock, pop, blues or metal music?

Then this is the perfect class for you!

In my Electric Guitar Beginner Masterclass you will learn everything you need, starting from zero - no prior knowledge needed!

This class starts with the absolute basics and then gradually increases the level of difficulty. 

What you will learn

  • Equipment that you need as a beginner
  • Everything about the different parts of an electric guitar
  • How to properly hold an electric guitar
  • How to hold and use a guitar pick
  • How to properly tune a guitar
  • Tips to set up a guitar amplifier 
  • How to fret single notes on the guitar
  • Different muting techniques
  • How to read basic guitar tablature
  • Rhythm basics and how to play in time
  • A lot of different basic guitar riff exercises
  • How to play some famous rock guitar riffs
  • How to play power chords
  • Different rock riffs with backing tracks
  • Palm muting technique
  • 12 bar blues shuffle

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Sascha Rebbe

Teacher

Hey, my name is Sascha!

I am guitarist, guitar instructor and content creator. Some people might know me from my guitar videos on Instagram/TikTok/YouTube!

I play the electric guitar for almost 20 years - in my courses I want share my knowledge about all guitar related topics. 

See full profile

Level: Beginner

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Transcripts

1. Intro: Hello, my name is sascha and iron Man, Online Guitar instructor and content creator from Germany. And this is Level one of my electric guitar beginner masterclass. This class is tailored to absolute beginners with no prior knowledge who want to learn how to play the electric guitar, no matter if you like Rock, Pop, Blues, or metal. This class, you will learn the basics which are needed for all of those genres. In the first few lessons videos, I will give you an overview of what equipment you need to play the electric guitar, how to hold an electric guitar and a guitar pick. How to properly tune a guitar, and how you should set up your guitar AMP as a beginner. Then we move on to the first real Guitar Lessons, which start very simple and then gradually increase in difficulty. You will learn some really cool guitar riffs. How to read guitar tablature, and how to play to a backing track. Speaking of backing tracks, this class includes a lot of different play long treks, which I made specifically for the exercises in this class. And I can tell you it is a lot of fan to learn and play to those tracks. Alright, now GREP you electric guitar and I hope you enjoy Level one of my electric guitar beginner masterclass 2. How to use this class?: So how should you use this course? You can see this course like a structured guide, which walks you through all the important topics. And a majority of the lesson videos are building up on each other. So it makes sense to go through this course step-by-step, of course, in your own pace. So you won't miss any information that you may be needed later in a different lesson video, even if you already have a little bit of prior knowledge, let's say you already know how to play power Chords. You should still go through the power Chord lesson videos simply to consolidate your knowledge even further and also to close potential knowledge gaps. I tried to make the lesson videos not too long, so they are like ten to 15 min maximum. So you can go through the course in small chunks and you won't get overwhelmed. 3. What do you need?: In this video, I will give you an overview of the equipment you need to be able to play the electric guitar and also to be able to follow along this course. First of all, and most obviously you will need an electric guitar. And I guess in most cases you already have one. If not, here are a few of my personal recommended brands and types of guitars you can buy as a beginner, because I know there are so many different brands, guitar shapes and also price points. And this can be very overwhelming as a beginner. First of all, if you are from Europe, then I can recommend you to get a guitar from Holly Benton. Caliban is a brand from the Toulmin music store in Germany, which is the biggest music store in Europe. And these guitar are pretty affordable and they have a really high-quality. At the same time, I played and also demoed a lot of Taliban guitars in the past. And I also still own some of the models and they're just absolutely great for beginners. Then another brand which is great for beginners to is squire. These instruments are also offering very good quality for the price, and they're also very popular beginner guitars. Squire is owned by fender, which is one of the biggest names in the guitar industry. Yes. Why guitars have a very good reputation over the past few decades. This is another brand that I can recommend. The third brand is also very popular for beginners. It is API phone. Mp4 is owned by Gibson, which is also one of the big names in the guitar industry. The prices for Apple iPhone guitars is a slightly bit higher than Foursquare's or dependents. So depending on your budget, this could be an option for you as well. Regarding budget, I can recommend you to spend at least €160 are the same amount in dollars for an electric guitar as a beginner. And this should be entry-level holiday guitar, from which I know that they are good for that price, but better would be spending 200 €300. For this price, you will get really solid instruments which will be reliable and also usable beyond the time as a beginner. Then the second thing you will need is an guitar amplifire. You can play the electric guitar without an amplifier. But this makes no sense. And it is absolutely no feng to play without an amplifire compared to playing electric guitar Riff and amplifire, the term amplifire is also often shortened and simply called AMP. So just that, you know, when I say AMP somewhere here into course, my recommendation for an amplifier is the boss katana, in my opinion, the best amplifire for a beginner and also beyond, I will use a boss katana most of the times here in this course as well. And I will also give you some little tutorials on how to use it later in the course, there are different versions of the bus katana. If you are mostly playing at home on your own, then the post-Katrina 50 mark two is the perfect MPP. If you are planning to also play with other people, maybe you want to play in the band, then you could go one step higher and get the katana 100 MC2, which is also the AMP that I use here in my studio. So we have a guitar and an AMP. Now, we need something to connect these two pieces. For that, you will need a guitar cable, or also called an instrument cable. These cables have 6.3 millimeter jack on each side. I recommend you to get one with a length of at least 3 m. Better would be 6 m if you want to play in a band, for example. But for at home 3 m are absolutely okay. Also make sure to not buy the cheapest cables. These will mostly break very fast and they are often not very high-quality. So make sure to spend just a little more on a solid cable. The next thing you will need is a guitar pick, which you can also just call pick. On electric guitar. You will mostly play with a pig, and this course is focused on that as well. There are different thicknesses and shapes of guitar picks. I can recommend you to get one of these multi boxes where you can get standard shaped pigs, but in a variety of thicknesses on most of the pigs, you can find a number which tells you how thick it is. Sometimes there's a term like heavy, medium or light. I can recommend you to use a peak with a medium thickness, which should be between point 8.1, 0.2 mm. But don't be afraid to try other peaks over time as well. That's why I recommend you to get some kind of multi-pack with different sizes. The next thing that I will recommend you to get is a tuner for you, electric guitar, there are different types of tuners. You can get a clip on tuners, pedal tuners, or tuna apps for your smartphone. Which one you get doesn't really matter, but you will definitely need one of them. I recommend these clip on tuners. They are not that expensive and are very handy. Okay, So these are the main things you will need, but there's still some other stuff that you can get. In addition, for example, a guitar strap if you want to play in a standing position as well, also a set of replacement strings, because sooner or later one of the strings will break or you're strings will get old and rusty, and then you will need to change them. But I will explain more of that in a dedicated lesson video later in the course. Alright, now you hopefully have everything to be able to go through this course and to learn how to play the electric guitar 4. Electric guitars explained: Alright, so in this lesson I want to give you an overview of the major parts of an electric guitar, because it's always important to know some more details about a guitar when you read stuff like fretboard, hats, the hook, tuners, body and stuff like that. And it's just good to know the meaning of those terms. And I want to give you an overview in this video, starting with this guitar, or let's say I do the majority of the explaining on this guitar. It's a very common guitar shaped for an electric guitar. And the first major part on an electric guitar is the body, which is this whole thing here. And this model is called a single cut model, simply because this cutaway down here, It's also known as a Les Paul model for some of you may be because of the Gibson Les Paul, but in general, it's a single cut body shape. And of course there are a lot of other body shapes for guitars, and I will show you some of them later in the video. But in general, this is the body, so this whole thing here. Then the next major part is the neck, which is this part here, from here to here. And attached to the neck on the front is the fretboard, which is this part. It's also sometimes called fingerboard. And more on that in a minute, let me first show you this part here, which is called the headstock. This is where also the tuners are attached. These are tuners. And with them you can tune each individual string. So you have six of them. That's the same amount of strings you have on an electric guitar, at least adenine, standard electric guitar, which we are talking about in this course. And as I said, each tuner is for one string. And with that, you can tune the guitar, which we will learn later on this specific guitar, we have sweeteners on the top of the headstock and three on the bottom of the headstock. There are also other configurations where our six units and one side, which you will see in a minute. The next important part is this year. This is called the nut. It's like a transition for strings which go from the fretboard to the tuners. Then the most important part on a guitar, It's where the magic happens. It is the fretboard. This is where you create different notes. And to be able to get a certain node, we have threads which are dividing the whole fretboard or the whole range of notes on the fretboard into smaller chunks. So fret are these metal wires here. Okay. And usually you have 22 or 21 or 24, depending on the model. On an electric guitar. On this one we have 22 frets, and the space between two frets always is a certain note on each string. So this space between this fret and this fret. If I grab this node here, this is one individual node. You have one individual node on each string between each of those threads. Okay, and there's a specific way how you count those frets. So when I say play a note on the third fret, then I don't mean the third metal wire. I mean the space between the third and the second fret. Third fret is this space. Fifth fret is this space. Okay, so fifth fret, fifth fret wire and forth fret wire and the space in-between that is the fifth fret. Okay, so just let you know if someone says, or if I say play note on the fifth fret, it's not the fifth fret wire, It's the space white before. So between the fourth and fifth fret. And what helps you to not get too overwhelmed with the positions of nodes. You have? These fret markers. These markers make it a little bit easier to navigate through the fretboard and usually have them on the third fret, fifth fret, seventh read ninth fret on the 12th fret. And there's usually a bigger one or one that looks a little bit different. And then the 15th read, 17th, read 1,921 fret. Sometimes you also have one on the first fret, but that depends on the guitar model. So these fret markers are really helpful to navigate through the fretboard. And you can also find them on most guitars. Here on the top of the neck A little dots. And just because you are looking from this perspective on the neck and not always see it like this. But more on that later when we are actually Learn To Play. The next part, we're going to the body again. Next parts are pickups that are these things here. And there are simply picking up the sound from strings. So the vibration from the strings and sending that sound to an amplifier. There are different kinds of pickups. These pickups are called haben Bucher pickups. There are usually a little bit bigger. They have two of these coils, so this is one coil. And if you have two of them next to each other, that is called a humbuckers. And this humbuckers, which is next to the neck, is called the neck pickup or neck humbuckers because it's next to the neck. And this one is the bridge humbuckers or rich pick up because it's next to the bridge. And then we come to the next part, this here. And also this this combined is called the bridge. It's what it is. It's a bridge. Rather strings are going over, and it's also the other end for the strings here on the body. This part can look different on other guitars, but you will see that in a minute on some other models. But basically, this is the bridge, the bridge pickup. This is the neck pickup. And these types of pickups are called humbuckers. Then we have some controls here. And with these controls, you can set volume and tone. For the humbuckers. On this model we have four controls. So this is a volume control for the bridge humbuckers. And this one is a tone control for which can Bucher. So volume is self-explaining. If you turn it to ten, then you have the full volume of the humbuckers. If you turn it down a little bit, it will get less loud and a little bit quieter and tone, you can see if it is on ten, you get the brightest sound. And if to turn it down, your sound will get a little bit darker. But we will get to that later in the course when we talk about how to get a certain guitar sound. But basically, this is a tone control which likes, changes the brightness or darkness of the tone. And this is the volume control. So these two are for the Bridgetown Bucher and here's the same so volume and tone, but this time for the neck humbuckers. Then we also have this switch here. And if it's on the down position, which is called treble, in this case, we are on the bridge pickup, so everything you play will be picked up. But this pick up. And if you are in the up position, everything you play comes through the neck pickup. If you are in the middle position, then both pickups are on. So everything you play will come through both pickups at the same time. Okay, so that's a general overview of the electronics. There's one missing part here. This is the output jack where you plug in your guitar cable. Let's do that. This is a guitar cable, and you can plug that in here. And the other side of the cable goes to your guitar M. So what else we got? We got these pins here on the back and on the front of the body. And this is where you can attach a guitar strap if you want to play in a standing position. And one thing that I want to show is the transition from the body to the neck. Because on certain guitars, different, this one is set in neck. That means we have a neck and body, both made out of wood. And they are glued together in this case. So it gets like one piece. And now we take this tune the transition to a different guitar model. Now we have this one which is a T style or Telecaster style guitar model. And let's flip it over. And you can see this is a bolt on Next, so you have displayed with phosphorus. And the benefit of this is if something breaks on your neck or on your body, which you can't repair, you can simply replace the neck or the body. So you have some options or you can put on a different neck if you like, different neck on the guitar. So this makes it very easy and it's not that easy to do on set index which are glued. So just that you know that. So as I said, this is a T style or Telecaster model. It is pretty similar actually to the body shape of the SASE model. It also has this single cutaway, but there are some obvious differences, except of the color. The fretboard is light here It's a maple fretboard. And what you can see, the tuners are on the top only, so you have all six university on the top. And in general, the headstock shape is different And also the pickups are different. In this case, you can see there are a little bit smaller, but we have also two pickups here. And these are called single coils because you only have one coil, a single coil. And this is also single coil. It's also just with a cover here. And these pickups sound a little bit different than a hamburger pickups. I would say humbuckers pickups are more for heavy distorted, more rock sounds. Just general. And single coil pickups are more for like the softer stuff, like more clean guitar. And of course they're also working for walk and more heavy stuff. They're just like we actin different and have slightly different sound. But for most beginners, that doesn't really make a difference because mostly won't even hear the difference, or maybe just a minor difference. But just that you know that there are differences in sound, and these are called single coils and the other pickups on the previous guitar or humbuckers. And we also have a different looking bridge, but it's also called a bridge. And we have two controls only on this guitar. This is a tone control. So it brightens up the tone or darkens it. And this is a volume control and also a three-way switch on this model. And it works the same. So this is the neck pickup which pick up. This is both pickups together. And the volume and tone works for both pickups at the same time. Then this is another very famous electric guitar body shape, which is called S type or Stratocaster model. And the main difference here to the previous model is, of course the body shape. It's a little bit different. And we have, we single coil pickups on this one. And we also have a five ways which on this one. So we have five positions. Down position is the bridge pickup, up, position is the neck pick up, middle position is the middle pick up in this case. Then we have these in-between positions where we have on this position, these two, and on this position we have these two pickups. And control wise we have one volume control and to tone controls. It's like a different configuration of tone and volume. You have that one tone control works for every pick up, Of course. And the tone controls are working for these two pickups in this case. And this one doesn't have a tone control. But for now, I can recommend you to simply put everything on ten. So everything turned to the wide and just choose the bridge or the neck pickup, no matter which guitar model you have. And just start out Playing with that and don't get much into the controls and stuff like that. That's something for later. You first want to learn how to play and then later you can try all that stuff. And like, learn how to use these controls to change your tone. One thing I wanted to show you on this specific model, on Stratocaster models is the vibrato system. So you also have a bridge, Of course here, but this is a rich with my parietal system. And you can screw in an arm like this. And you get like these effects with it. So you can make your strings vibrating. And I cannot recommend you to do this as a beginner because it can get your guitar out of tune if you use it extremely and if you have guitar isn't set up perfectly for that. So if you have Stratocaster style model, make sure to unscrew this arm. If it is in. If it is not screwed in, then just don't screw it in it for the moment, because it makes everything even more complicated for a beginner. But I just wanted to show you that this stuff exists and mostly on stretch Stratocaster style Guitar models. I think now you have an overview of the individual parts of an electric guitar. And yeah, let's move on to the next lesson. 5. How to hold an electric guitar: Alright, so in this video, I want to show you how to properly hold an electric guitar. And most of the times you will practice in a sitting position. And that's what I want to show you first. So if you are right-handed person and have a right-handed guitar, just like me. Then you take your guitar and you place it on your right leg like this. So that this curve here is perfectly sitting on your right leg. And make sure to be very close to your body. You are guitar should actually touch your body here with the upper part. And also make sure that it's very straight or let's say parallel to your body. So please avoid something like this. Because beginners tend to do stuff like that to see their fingers better on the fretboard. But it's actually much harder to play because you have a very unnatural and very uncomfortable risk position. So it's important to have to guitar pretty straight on your leg. And that also means that your upper body should be very upright and straight. So not like this or something like that. I know in some cases you will look on your fingers to see where you are on the fretboard. But try to be as straight and upright as possible because over the years it can harm your bag and your shoulders and stuff like that. I can recommend you to sit in a very straight and applied precision. So your picking hand, so your right hand, if you are a right-handed player, should be around here. So in the middle of this string space here. And for that, you should place your arm here on this position. So you can really lean on the body of the guitar so that the hand is in this position. What do you should avoid is something like this that you come from behind here. That's very uncomfortable and you won't get good control of your picking. And what do you also should avoid is something like this. So the perfect position is around here. So make sure to try that and find a comfortable position that looks similar to this position. If you are not true, then maybe take a photo or a video of you when you hold your guitar like that and you compare it to what I'm doing. So you can see if you are doing is white or wrong. And then your left hand or your left arm is to grab the notes on the fretboard. And grabbing doesn't mean to grab a guitar like this. But what we mean in guitar terms is holding the neck like this. So that means we're at thump is on the back of the neck like this, and fingers are on the front on the fretboard. And this part of the hand never touches the neck. So it's not really like grabbing something. It's really just the thumb on the back of the neck and the fingers are on the frontier on the fretboard. So this part of the hand should never touch the neck. That's very important. Another thing that you should be careful with is when you're guitar does something like this. So when your neck is going down a little bit, because then it's also harder to grab because you've risked has to do an unnatural I'm position and motion. So make sure to have it pretty much straight. So like this, if you want to play in a standing position, you need a strap for you guitar. So let me put on a strap on this one. So if you want to play in a standing position with a strap, make sure to not have to Guitar very low. So what I have is actually already a little bit too low for me. So perfect would be something like this. And you have to keep in mind that the higher you have to guitar, the easier it is to play. So make sure to find a position somewhere here in this area. And not too low. The lower you have the guitar, the harder it gets to grab Chords and notes. And you have to do very unnatural and very uncomfortable whisked position. So it is much easier to play if you have the guitar on a higher position like this. You can also use the strap when you are playing in a sitting position like this. And it's sometimes helps so you can have your hands-free and the guitar won't fall down. So this could be an option for you as well. 6. How to hold and use a guitar pick: Alright, so in this video I want to show you how to properly hold a guitar pick and how to properly use a guitar pick. And I told you in a previous video which kind of pick you should use as a beginner. And this should be a medium-sized pig. So not too thick and not too thin. That's perfect for beginner. And let me show you how to hold it first. It's important to know that you should hold a guitar pick between the index finger and thumb and not between the middle finger and thumb or between three fingers. So index finger and middle finger and thumb. So only the index finger and thumb is involved here. First of all, we are placing the pig on the side of our index finger like this. And the tip is pointing in this direction. So in the same direction as your fingernail is. And then you simply put your thumb on top of it. And then you have to pick in the right position. And it's important that the tip of the guitar pick is standing out like 1 cm, roughly, so that you have enough space to touch the strings and you're not touching the strings with your fingers. And if you have to pick position right, then tried to simply pluck a few strings. So something like this. Okay? And most of the times you are plucking or Playing the strings with the tip of the pig and also like parallel to the strings. So that means like this. Not like this, and also not like this. Okay, so parallel. But it makes sense to use a slide for what angle like this. So that's too much, but just a slight angle like this. That's how I do it. So you can do it parallel. And that's completely right. But for me, I found out it helps to use a slide forward angular this. And then you also have to find like the perfect amount of tension and pressure between your fingers and the guitar pick. But that's something you develop over time. It will happen that you lose your pick. And it will also happen that you like get cramped at some point because you are holding your pick too tight and you have to find a balance between that so that it's not too tight and also not to lose 7. How to tune a guitar: Alright, so in this video I want to show you how to tune a guitar. Because if you guitar is out of June, then everything you play sounds wrong. And that's not what we want. We want to sound great as guitarists. And that's why I want to show you how to properly tune a guitar. Before we start tuning, we have to know which node each string should have. We will start with the highest string, which is also called the first string. So when we count strings, then this is the first string and this is the sixth string. Okay, so 123456, just that you know, the first string will be tuned to an inode. The second string will be tuned to a B note. The third string will be tuned to a G note. The fourth string will be tuned to a D note. And the fifth string will be tune to an a node. And the sixth string will be also tuned to an E node, just like the first string. Okay, and that's why we also call this string the sixth string, the low E string. Okay, So this is the low E string. And this is the high E string. And these note names, so a, D, G, B, E. You should memorize from the beginning on. So that's very important because you should tune daily. So before every practice session, you should tune your guitar. It's very important to know these nodes from the beginning on. And that is a little like help sentence that you can use to memorize these nodes. And it's called Eddy Ate Dynamite. Good, by Eddie. Yeah, if that helps, you can use the sentence to memorize the note names to each string. But don't forget that this sentence goes from the lowest string to the highest string. So not from the highest to lowest. So many. Dynamite that are the notes that we want to tune these strings to and to tune a guitar. I said it in a previous video. You need a tuner. And I recommend these clip on tuners that I will use now. So you clip these on your headstock here and turn it on. These tuners are working with the vibration of the guitar. So when you play a string, root of vibration, the junior knows which node is ringing and this node is the perfect. So now let's ditch unit. And you see now there's another node, okay? So I tune it a little bit lower by turning the tuner here, the junior for the low E string. And if I turn counterclockwise, I'm increasing the pitch and I will to up to the E. And you have to be very careful with turning the Tunis. So you have to develop a feeling for that. Because a lot of beginners doing stuff like they are using the tune as very heavily and turning them too much. So you have to get a good feeling for that, okay? Okay, you could actually see it. I pluck the string and let the note ring. And while it rings, then I'm turning on the tuners. Okay? And when a node is too high, so let's say like this. So you can see it is yellow and wet now. It's too high and it has to be here in the center and green. So you turn clockwise, but makes sure to turn a little bit lower than the actual inode. So something like this. And then you increase the pitch again so you turn counterclockwise. The reason for that is that a string will be staying better in tune if you are increased attention of the string, whether then lowering the attention of the string, okay? So if you are a string is too high, then make sure to go a little bit lower. Then increase the pitch. To go to the E. Next spring. The anode. Same here. If it's too low, then go counterclockwise until you are on the a And if it's too high, then you go back clockwise. And then you increase the pitch again counterclockwise until it's perfectly in the center and the light is green. And you do that for every strings. And this needs a little bit of practice. So tuning is not easy at the beginning. And take your time and do it wide. It's very important. A problem that I had as a beginner and also a problem that other beginners have is if you're guitar is wildly out of tune. So like the ease tune down to, let's say like D. And if you are new to music and guitar, you have probably not that familiar with music theory and the note values and which node comes after which node. So it often happens that you are seeing this and you don't know, should I tune lower or should I tune higher to go to the E that I attached a little document down below where you can see the target notes. So this would be an E and the notes that are before and after that node, so that you can see if you are tuning, let's say the G string. And you see an F on your tuner, then you know, okay, I have to increase the pitch to go to the GI node. So if you get into a situation like this band, this hopefully helps. If you don't have a clip onto una that I use. You can also use a smartphone app. So you can download any guitar tuner app on your smartphone. So I downloaded this very simple app here, and this works a little bit different. So it works with the microphone of your smartphone. So it doesn't go through the vibration of the guitar. And that means you have to be quiet when you tune. So you can see when I'm talking here on the phone that it shows certain nodes. So you have to be quiet and your environment have to be quiet when you are tuning like that. So in general, it works exactly the same. This app, in this case, there is no green light when you have to write node, but you can see that the arrow has to be in the center position. And then you are on the right note. So this can be useful tool as well if you don't have a clip on tuna. And as I said before, there are a lot of different tuna apps available and most of them are completely free. Just have some ads maybe. But for just tuning a guitar, they definitely work 8. How to set up an guitar amplifire as a beginner: Alright, so before we start with the actual Lessons and the exercises, I want to show you how you should set up your guitar and for practicing, because all the controls and different terms on an guitar AMP can be quite overwhelming for a beginner. And that's why I wanted to make this video so that you can easily set up a tone that is useful for practicing. And you can focus on practicing itself and not get lost in setting up an guitar M, okay, in general, you can roughly divide guitar tones into two categories. The first category is clean tones, and the second category is over-drinking or distorted tones. Okay, so for example, this is a clean tone. And it sounds the same like if you would play without an amplifire, just amplified. Okay, so there's no distortion overdrive. That's why it is called clean tone. And this is a good way to start. This is a great tone if you want to practice. And the second category is over driven or distorted guitar tones. And to make it simple than over-drinking guitar tone has a light amount of gain or distortion, and this mostly sounds like this. So you have this slight amount of grid in the sound. And this is actually the perfect sound for practicing, in my opinion, because of this little grid you have in the tone, you have a slight compression in your sound. And this is really a great sound for practicing because you can easily hear your mistakes when you play. And that's important for a beginner. And it actually sounds pretty good if you Playing something, right? So if we come to the power Chord section and you play a power Chord, this sounds, and it also feels very satisfying. And I think that's the sound that you should go for. But I also want to show you a more distorted tone. So you have a lot of more of this grid and gain. And then it sounds something like this. If we do even more than it sounds like this. This is a great sound and it is a lot of fund to play with heavily distorted sound. But it can also cover up certain mistakes that you make. And this is not what we want as a beginner. I mean, you can play with whatever sound you want. But I recommend you to lower the gain a little bit and have a like slightly over-drinking sound, something like this. That's the perfect sound in my opinion. So you have a little bit of that grid, a little bit more sustained than in clean sound. And it is FUN to play and you'll also hear all the mistakes that you are make. So that's a good sound to start and how do you set it up? So let's take a look at the controls of the AMP, okay, if you see this for the first time, it can be a little bit overwhelming. But I tried to explain it as simple as possible. On this control here, you have the option to change between different like AMP settings. Here you can see clean. Clean is what I said, a clean sound which I showed you first. And if you go to crunch, for example, you have this light overdrive and sound. But you can also get distortion sounds on that. And if you go to lead or brown, these are more heavily distorted sounds. Okay? So I would go to crunch if you have this EMF maybe, and then you have the controls, volume and gain. So volume is pretty much self-explaining. Just set up a volume that works for you. And gain is the amount of overdrive. If I play a note here, you can hear when I turn up the gain, you will have more of that overdrive or distortion or grid and the sound. And I prefer to have it like around this area, then you will get the sound that I showed you before. So that light over driven and gritty sound. And you have equalized, that's like a tone control where you can set the high frequencies, the middle frequencies, and the low frequencies, and just keep them at 12:00. Like these are, That's the best you can do for the beginning. And on this section there are effects and we don't want to use effects at the beginning. So make sure to make everything on zero or turn it off. And all this stuff here isn't that important? Presence is like extended treble control, I would say in simple terms. And master is the overall volume of the amplifire. It works similar to this control here, to the volume control. And with this here you can set the power level of the AMP. I have it on 50 world, but you can also go lower or higher, have this M. But these controls aren't that important. The important thing is that you go to crunch set of very low gain level so that it's slightly over driven and do like 12:00 equalizer settings. So bass middle and travel on 12:00. And then you are good to go 9. Open strings and muting techniques: Alright, so in this video, I want to make you familiar with two very important muting techniques. And what I mean with Muting is something like this or this. Okay, So basically these are techniques to make your strings stop winging. And that is a very important technique which you should learn from the beginning on before you will learn everything else. And that's why I show it very early in this course. And you can mute with your white hand, with your picking hand. And you can also mute with your left hand or your grabbing or Fretting hand. So let's start with the right-hand muting and we simply play an open E string, the low E string, okay? So your left hand doesn't really have to do anything. So you play that note. And when you want to mute it, you simply have to place your palm slightly on the strings. Once again. You can practice this by Playing three open notes. So three notes on the open E string. And then after the third note, you mute the string. So something like this. So very simple but very important. So Muting is one of the most important things on the electric guitar, especially if you lay to play with maybe more distorted sounds. So this is the light greedy over-drinking sound that I showed you in the previous video. But if you add more gain at some point, then this comes even more important. Okay, so try this on different strings. You can do the same on the a string. So you can try that and all strings. Okay, So that is the right hand muting technique. And we also have a left-hand muting technique, which goes like this. So I played the open E note again. So it basically works the same. So you place your hand on the ringing string. The string is muted. And the benefit of the left hand or the fretting hand muting technique is that if you play the open E string, you can place your index finger here somewhere on the fretboard, just slightly on the other strings, on the other five strings. And this is important because these strings are now automatically muted. But this string, the open E string, isn't muted, okay? So we won't get any unwanted noise from the strings. So only the open E string will wing. You can place the index finger wherever you want in this case. So these five strings are automatically muted. And then if you want to mute the low E string, you simply tap your other fingers or the middle finger and ring finger are just one of them onto the low E string like this. And you can do it here as well. So it doesn't matter where you build a string. In this case, when you only play an open node, at the same goes on the a string. But in this case you have to move your index finger, of course, a little bit down so that the highest for strings are muted. So the D, G, B and high E string. And the a string isn't muted and also the low E string isn't muted. And of course, it also works on the D string. Just make sure to move your index finger one string below. Of course, on the high E string, you can place your index finger, but you can still mute it with the left-hand as well. As you can see, you can mute strings with your left hand, with your white hand. And make sure to practice both. So go through all strings and practice the right-hand muting. And also the left-hand Muting 10. How to fret notes on the fretboard: Okay, In this lesson, it will get serious. You will learn your first little guitar with and before you are able to play that, you have to learn how to properly fret notes or how to grab notes on the fretboard. Because before we only played open strings, so we didn't really use our left hand only for muting. And that's what I will show you first how to properly fret notes. And I told you in a previous video how the fretboard works and how to count fret. So if I'm saying I play on the third fret, then it's the space here between these to fret wire. So the second and third one. And in addition to that, you have to know if I say stuff like play the note on the fifth fret, D string, then you know, okay, I play the D string. But at the same time, I grab the fifth fret. That means 12345. And I grabbed the node, play the D string. And that's to note that I want to hear, okay? Or another example, play the seventh fret on the a string. And I know, okay, this is the a string. Seven squared is 1234567. It's this node. Okay? So how you actually fret notes? So first of all, we're starting with the index finger because it's mostly the strongest finger. And you are grabbing notes with your fingertips. So with this part here, and you are grabbing notes by pressing down the string. Let's start with the third fret on the low E string, which is here. You're simply pressing down the string just a little bit, not too much. And on the back of the neck, you have your thumb, which presence in the opposite direction. But you're not really using much pressure to press. When I say press down the string, it's just a slight amount of pressure that you are using to press down the string. And the best place to press down the string. If I say play on the third fret is next to the third fret wire. So not here. The perfect spot is here. So right next to the third fret wire, it won't always work. Because if you are playing like complicated Chords at some point, you can always place your fingers right next to the fret wire. But if it's possible, this is the best spot to grab a node. Okay? So you're pressing down with your fingertips and then you play the note. If you're here, something like this, then you're not pressing hard enough. So you have to use a little bit more pressure until it sounds like this. And if you are using too much pressure than it can sound like this. So you can hear that the pitch gets too high and you don't want that, you just want to use the least amount of pressure. So start with a very low pressure and pick the node and then increase the pressure. I'm tilde denote wings perfectly like this. Don't press too hard, okay, So nothing like this. And that's very important to practice. So to figure out how much pressure you should use to grab a string. And if you're slowly get comfortable with that, then you can try other fingers as well. The easiest way to do that is simply starting here on the third fret. And then you take your middle finger and place it on the fourth fret, then the ring finger on the fifth fret. And then your pinky on the sixth fret. Just that you get a feeling for grabbing notes. You should practice that on the other strings as well. And it's very important to practice that on all strings because the strings have different gauges and that means it feels different. If you're play the third fret on the low E string compared to the third fret on the high Eastern. And you really want to get a feeling for different strings and how much pressure you should use to fret note. And that's why you can practice this little exercise on all strings. I will play it once for you on all strings. Okay, so that's just that you get a feeling for grabbing notes with all four fingers on all six strings. Okay, So I told you in the beginning that you will learn your first little width and that's what I will show you. Now. Let me play it for you once. So we have three different notes that we are playing. And the first two nodes are open E string. And then you are grabbing the third fret on the low E string and played that note twice as well. And then you take your ring finger and grab the node on the fifth fret low E string, and played this 14 times. Okay? Of course, you can practice this little wave on all six strings, and that's how it sounds on the a string or on the B string, for example. And if you are finished with the wave, that makes sure to mute the strings, of course so. So you can use one of the muting techniques that you learned before. And yeah, make sure to practice this Riff and the little exercise for all four fingers. And then you can move on to the next lesson. 11. How to read basic guitar tablature: Alright, so in this little tutorial, I will show you how to read basic guitar tablature. If you don't know what guitar tablature is, it's a simplified way to read sheet music for guitarists because transporting the standard notation to a guitar fretboard is quite complicated. And guitar tablature is a pretty cool and simple way to have sheet music for guitarist. What we see first-year on the top is a mention of the tempo and tuning. We have standard tuning and 90 PPM. That's pretty important if you're using a metronome or want to practice my tabs to a metronome, then you know the exact speed which you have to set. Then down below we have the standard notation here, Riff the five lines than here at the time signature, which is 44. So also a pretty standard time signature. And then down below we have the tabs. Tab, which is the short form for tablature. And this is a little bit different than the standard notation. And with different, I mean, easy for guitarist. And you basically have six lines here. And you may guess it, the six lines are basically your strings of the guitar. The bottom line here, this is your low E string. Then we have the a string, the string G string, B string, and the high E string. So it can be a bit confusing at the beginning. So you have to imagine if you're Poggio guitar on your lap and watch from the top of your fretboard. And then you can see it like this. So the low E string is next to you, are here on the bottom. And the high E string is more away from you, are like here on the top. So this is the low E string. This is the high E string. And then we also have this numbers here and a zero like this. And this means you play the open E string. So the zero is on the E string, open E string, open E string. And then here we have the 3.3 means you play the third fret on the low E string, because the three is also on the bottom line. The bottom line is the low E string. So we have two times open E string, then two times the third fret on the low E string, then the next bar, so this is 1 bar. We have the 54 times and five means the same as with the three. It means play the fifth fret on the low E string. So I hope this makes sense for you. What is pretty cool on the software I'm using here. This is guitar pro aid. I can play the tabs so that you can hear how it should sound like. You may notice that this is the exact Riff from the previous lesson, and this is how it looks like in tabs. And the same is if replay this Riff, let's say on the D string, it would look like this. So the same numbers because you play the same fret and same open strings just on the D string. So pretty simple. And when we go over to Chords and stuff like that, I will do another video like this. 12. Rhythm basics & how to play to a metronome: Alright, so in this video, I want to show you how you play to a metronome. And to be able to play to a metronome, you have to understand some basic with them and notation stuff. And I don't want to go very deep into Music Theory because that can get quite boring as a beginner. And I'm also not a big fan to teach music theory for beginners, because beginner should play guitar and have FUN, but you have to know some basics, and that is what I want to show you now. Okay? First of all, I wanted to show you note values. We have different kinds of nodes. You can see here, this is a whole node. It looks like this. This is a half node. It looks like this. This is a quarter note. This is an eight node. This is a 16th note, and this is a 30-second node, and so on. And then we have the time signature which you saw before. In this case we have 44. And the bottom line where presents the note value in a numeric term for mean squatter. But they could also be like to eight or 16 or something like that. But usually there is a four and also everything in this course will have a four here on the bottom and the top number. So the top four here were present. How many of those quarter notes fit in 1 bar? And 44 means we have four quarter notes that fit in 1 bar. And as I said before, this is 1 bar. And we can fit in four quarter notes. So let me demonstrate that this is whole note. But now, okay, now the bar is full with quarter notes. That's 1 bar. If I play, it fits exactly in that Bar. But let's say we want to have eight nodes in that Bar. Then we can fit in more than four. We can fit in eight of them. Okay? Let's say we want to have half nodes. Then we can fit in two of them. Or a whole note. We can only fit one of them. Okay? And let's say we would change this to three for power, for example, which is also pretty common. Then we could add in three quarter notes in 1 bar, okay, So then it would look like this. And the bar is full. Or in eight nodes, that would mean 68 nodes and the bar is full. Okay, So that was just another example. We go back to 44. Okay, now we have our Exercise again. So that little width that we learned before. And you can see that this wave only contains quarter notes. So we have four nodes in this bar, four nodes in this Bar. And the metronome when we are in for four hits in quarter notes as well. And that means that on every metronome hit, you are also playing a note. Okay, let me demonstrate that. Okay, So as you could hear, on each hit, we played a note and let's do a different example. If we would have eight nodes here. So let's say we have just open strings and eight nodes. In this case, the metronome still does quarter notes, but we are playing eighth notes. And this means that we are also Playing the nodes in-between the metronome hits. So this node is on the metronome hit. This node is under metronome hit. This node is on a metronome head and also this node. And these nodes, this, this, this, this is in-between the hit's. Okay, So let me demonstrate that the metronome is still doing quarter notes, but you are playing eighth notes K. Now, another example with half nodes. This case you are just playing on the hit one and under hit three in 1 bar. So you're playing 1234 and then the next Bar, 1234. Okay? Sounds like this. Or if you are doing a full node, then you are playing just under one. Let's go back to quarter notes. And what you heard in all these example is the count in. And usually on every exercise I'm doing, or if you are playing to a begging direct for example, you always have a count in, and usually you have a quarter note count in like this. So we are doing 1234 and then on the next one you start to Playing so like this, 1234. But in some cases, it could be something like this. I can demonstrate it with two metronome, so I will count in how it is, would be something like 121234. Okay. That's the count in one less thing that I want to show you, are West. A West means on this part you are not Playing. And West's also have note values. So for example, this is a quarter note West. This is a half-note West, this is a full node, or whole note West. This is an eight node, west, and this is a 16th note West, and so on. So let me show a very simple example. So we have three quarter notes and a quarter west, and this would simply sound like this. Here, another example. Okay, so it's pretty simple to understand. So it's just the same note value as the spotter nodes. And in this time we're simply not Playing. Alright, so I really hope this lesson was helpful for you. Now you can move on to the next one. 13. Learn your first guitar riffs!: Alright, so in this lesson you will learn your first guitar riffs. These are pretty simple and they also work great as exercises and to make it less boring for you and to make the whole experience of practicing more FUN, I created a backing track for each of the exercises, which you can play along to. A backing track is basically a guitar or less tracks. So you have drums, you have pace, sometimes other instruments, but in this case you have drums and bass. So you can play the exercises to these backing tracks and fill the gap of the missing guitar. And in this lesson videos, I will also play along to these backing tracks so that you also can follow along me and play together Riff me. And you will also see what I'm doing on the fretboard. And you will also see the tabs on screen. So it's a great way to learn these little riffs and also to get comfortable with playing with drums or to a drum track instead of only playing to a metronome. And you will see that it's much more often than practicing to a metronome. And that's why I also included it, because you should have FUN while practicing. And the most important thing that we want to practice with these exercises is the coordination between your picking hand and your fretting hand, because that's not easy as a beginner. So we will start with pretty simple riffs that you get comfortable with that and you have to be careful with the timing. Try to be as precise as possible. Try to play exactly to the beat. And if you don't know how to play perfectly to the beat and just listen what I do and watch what I do and try to play as close as you can do that what I drew and overtime, you will automatically develop a feel for with them and for playing to the beat and in general, get a better feeling for timing. 14. Guitar Riff Exercise 1: Alright, so let's start with the first exercise. This exercise doesn't need much explanation because it's basically the same exercise that you are plate before. So this one here. I still wanted to include this Exercise even though we had it before. But you haven't played it to a backing track before. So try to do that before you move on to the next Exercise. 15. Guitar Riff Exercise 2: Okay, So the second Exercise is actually a little bit easier than the first exercise. It includes the same notes, but this time we're Playing half nodes. Okay, so instead of we are playing this. So it's less to play for you, but it's harder to nail the timing, at least in my opinion. So if you're play this Exercise, be very careful with the timing. Try to play on point to the beat. And yeah, I hope you have fan 16. Guitar Riff Exercise 3: The third Exercise is again, basically the same Riff, but this time we are playing eighth notes, okay, So this will probably be a little bit harder for you than the previous exercises. So try it on your own first without a backing track and get comfortable to the highest speed, I would say you can play it all with downstrokes like I did. So. But what do you also can try is doing something that is called alternate picking. So that means that you are doing down and upstrokes alternate. So like this. So you can try both versions and it's also important to practice both versions. So if you are comfortable with these two versions of the exercises, then feel free to play it to the backing track 17. Guitar Riff Exercise 4: Okay, So on the next exercise we are adding a new string, in this case the a string. And the way if we wanted to play goes like this. Okay, So these are all quarter notes, and we're starting with the open a string twice. Then third fret on the a string. I'm also twice. Then the third fret on the low E string, then the fifth fret on the low E string. Okay, So with this exercise, you can practice to change between the low E string and the a string, which is also important to learn and get comfortable with this exercise and then feel free to play to the backing track 18. Guitar Riff Exercise 5: On the last exercise, we will add a rest to the width. Okay? It goes like this. Okay, so that's also the first time where you can practically use your muting technique. I used the white hand muting technique for this exercise, but you can also use the left-hand Fretting hand muting technique as well. So we're starting with the open E string twice. Then the third fret on the low E string. After that, the first West. So then the next part is two times the fifth fret on the low E string. Then the third fret on the a string. And after that, again, a West. The West are all quarter west. Okay? So they are exactly the same length as each of the nodes. Once again. Okay? Again, if you are comfortable with this Exercise, then have FUN Playing it to the backing track. And 19. Guitar Riff Exercise 6: Now we come to the last Riff of this section. And of course, it now gets a little bit more complicated, but it's still doable. And it's also a lot of PFK-1. And the Riff goes like this. And here is it with the backing tracks, so it's easier for you to hear that with them and the timing. Okay, so we're starting on the fifth fret of the D string with our index finger. Then 75 on the a string, wing finger, index finger. Then back to the seventh fret on the a string. And then you mute the strings with your white hand and you do a little west. Then the fifth fret on the a string again, again, arrest. So muting and rest. Okay? And then it's basically the same with them, just different notes. So we're starting on the fifth fret, a string this time. And then 75 on the low E string. And back to seven. Then again, arrest, so mute and rest. Then we are ending on the third fret of the low E string. And again, rest, so mute and rest. Okay, So it's basically the same with them as the first part. And altogether it's this. And then you repeat the first part. So this. Then you do the seventh fret on the low E string. And then you go to the third fret of the low E string and played like this. So four times. And then you go to the fifth fret of the low E string and play that also four times. Then it all starts over again. So once again slowly. Okay, practice this and then you can go over to the backing track. And I can guarantee that you will have a lot of fan Playing this 20. Famous Rock Guitar Riffs: Alright, so in this section, I will teach you some famous rock guitar riffs in very sure you heard at least a few of these songs are riffs before. The thing is, besides learning these Exercise riffs which we had in the previous section, I think it is also very important to learn well-known or famous guitar riffs from songs that you know, because this can be extremely motivating. It is the same for me still today, when I hear a new song with a cool guitar Riff or a cool guitar sound, then I will want to learn how to play it. This is also exactly the motivation that most people have if they want to learn how to play the electric guitar. And I'm sure it's the same for you. Okay, so the riffs that I choose are all playable with single nodes. So it is pretty similar to the previous exercises. Again, start very slow, Get comfortable with the notes you have to play and focus on a good Left, right hand coordination. And then you can slowly increase the tempo of the Riff. This time, I don't have backing tracks, but I played the Riffs to a metronome. And you will also see the beats per minute that are used for my metronome on the screen for a reference. You will also see the tabs on screen. And of course you can download the tabs for each Riff below the video. Alright, now have FUN learning these famous rock guitar riffs. 21. Smoke On The Water: Okay, So the first Riff is smoke On The Water by deep purple. And this is probably the most famous beginner guitarist with ever. It's, I think the first Riff that I learned to, or at least one of the first words that I learned. And I will show you a simplified version. Because on the original you have like power Chords or simplified power Chords. And I wanted to show you a single note version so that you can have FUN playing it. And it goes like this. Okay, So we are only on the low E string and we start with the open string. And then a mute, preferably with the right hand. Then third fret on the low E string. Mute again, and then fifth fret, again, a mute. So we got this on the fifth fret notes. You let it ring a little bit longer. Select this. Then you mute the string and make arrest. Then the next part is the first two nodes are the same, so and then we do 65, then mute. Then we play the first part again. Then the last part is three. And then open E string. Okay, So we got this. Right. Now I will play it to the metronome and you can see the tabs on screen 22. Iron Man: The next Riff I want to show you is iron Man by Black Sabbath. And it goes like this. Okay, we're starting on the seventh fret of the low E string. Fifth fret, a string. Then this one again. Then seven thread on the a string, twice. Riff, a little Muting in-between. So, um, so, okay, and then we go to the D string and we play the fifth fret and the fourth fret like this. Okay, so make sure to use your middle and index finger. And the index finger can stay on the fifth fret so you don't have to lifted. You can hold the note and you just add and released the middle finger on the fifth fret. So, okay, so then we go to the fifth fret, a string again. So once and then West. Then again, bringing a little bit longer. Then we end on the seventh fret. Riff, the same with them. Okay, altogether. Okay, now, again to the metronome and with tabs on screen 23. (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction: Alright, so the next wave is from the song, I Can't Get No Satisfaction from the band will link stones and it goes like this. Okay, so it's all based on the a string. And restart on the second fret with our index finger and replayed once and then do a rest. And then we play it again and let it ring longer. Again. When I say West than you mostly use the right-hand muting technique. Okay? Okay, then, so again, two, then four with the ring finger and five Riff the pinky. And then 52 times and then 42 times. And then again, the second fret. Then it starts all over again. So okay, Now again to the metronome and with tabs on screen so that you can play along and see what is happening 24. Seven Nation Army: Okay, So the next Riff that I wanted to show you is from the song seven Nation Army by the white stripes. And it goes like this. Okay, We start on the seventh fret, a string. We played, tries the first one a little bit longer, and then you go to the fifth fret on the D string. Then you do a little west. It's a very short rest. So you mute strings with the white hand. And then you go to the seventh, fret, a string again. That you can also do a mute, again, a quick mute, and then you go to the fifth fret of the, a string. Like this. But if the Muting is too much or too fast for you than you can also play it without Muting. So you can do. That's totally fine. But if you want to make it correct, I would say then you have to include this little rests. Okay? Then the next note is the eighth fret of D low E string. And then the seventh rid of the lowest ring. And together it sounds like this. And then the second part goes like this. So the first half is the same, so we do. Then you go again to the eighth fret of the low E string. Then you go back to the seventh thread of the a string. Fifth fret of the a string, of course. Then back to the eighth, read low E string again. And then seven on the low E string. So you do that. So again. Alright, so now I will show it again. We have the metronome, and of course with tabs on screen 25. Crazy Train: Okay, So the next Riff is from the song crazy Train by Ozzy Osbourne. And it goes like this. Okay, so in this Riff we don't have a rest or any muting. It's just playing and picking the strings on the low E string and the a string. And we're starting on the second fret of the low E spring with our index finger. Play that one twice, and then we go with our ring finger on the fourth fret, a string. That back to the second fret, low E string. And then the pinky on the fifth fret, a string. And back to the second fret, low E string with the index again. And then fourth fret on the a string again. Again, the second fret, low E string. We have this. That's the first half of the Riff than the second half of the Riff is index finger, second fret, a string. Then pinky on the fifth fret, low E string. Then ring finger, fifth tread low E string, and both fret, of course. Then back to the fifth fret. Then second fret, a string again. Then 54 again on below eastern than the open E string. So once again the second part. And together. Okay, now again with metronome and taps on screen 26. Breaking The Law: Okay, So the next Riff is from the song breaking the law by the band Judas Priest, and it goes like this. Okay, so we start on the a string Riff, open string, second fret, third fret. And then you basically do the same but in a different with them like this. So what is different is the length of the open a string. So that's the first time and on the second and third time it's so it's shorter. Okay, Then the next part of the Riff is so low E string, first fret, and then third fret, the open a string. Then you repeat that again with the different timings. So the first node is cricket. So then the last part is third fret low E string, and then third fret a string. Second fret a string. Okay? Once again, altogether. Okay, Now, again, with taps on screen and metronome 27. Heartbreaker: Okay, So this wave is from the song heartbreaker by the band Led Zeppelin. And it goes like this. Okay, so we start with the third fret on the low E string. And you can do slight bend of the strings. So you bend the string a little bit downwards. So like this. So just a little bit, not too much. Then you do the open a string, third fret on the a string, and open D string. So we got this. Then you do 1.2 on the D string, and then you end on the low E string. Third fret, again. It's a bit confusing. So again, then you do with the open a string four times. I prefer to do that with alternate picking. So you do, now, I'm down because if you only do downstrokes, it's a little bit fast. So try to do alternate picking down. Then third fret on the a string again, open D string, then 12 on the D string again. And you end on the third fret low E string. Okay, so once again, and after that it repeats. Okay, once again to the metronome with taps on screen 28. Sunshine Of Your Love: So this Riff is from the song sunshine Of Your Love by the band Cream. And it goes like this. Okay, we start on the 12th fret, D string twice, and then ten on the D string back to 12. Then you mute. And to arrest than trove on the a string. Nude 1110. So we got this. Okay, so you always get the rest inbetween and muting the strings. Then the next part is, now we come to a new technique. It's called slide, and it goes like this. You're grabbing the eighth fret of the low E string with your ring finger. And you pluck that string. And then you hold the string down and then you slide over to the 10th fret. So this happens pretty quickly. So you pluck the string and then directly slide over to the 10th fret. And then eight on the a string. Then back to ten on the low E string. Once again. For the last part. For this, you can also do an alternate version, which is an octave higher, and it goes like this. So you do basically the same Riff, but starting on the, I'm Ken, fret D string. You do the slide to the 12th fret D string. Then you do ten on the G string, and then back to the 12 on the T. So that way you can Play it alternated. So that sounds pretty cool, like this. And so on. Okay, so once again, with tabs onscreen and metronome 29. Power Chords Explained: Alright, so in this video, I will show you how to play power chords. So if you don't know what a Chord is, basically on a chord you play at least two nodes at the same time, sometimes three, sometimes four nodes, sometimes more. And a basic power Chords has two different nodes. So you have one node which is called the root node, and the other node is called the fifth. And that's why a power Chord is sometimes also called a fift Chord. But in general, this is how a power chord sounds like. Okay, so it's great for work riffs for Playing what guitar, also metal and also for Blues sometimes depending on what type of Blues you're playing. But if you're mainly in the rock genre, and this is the main Chord that you will need, and it's also the easiest Chord to learn. Okay? And we have different types of power Chords. And the first three power Chords that I will show you are called open power Chords. And this means we have one open string in each of those courts. We will start with an E power Chord. And by the way, a power Chord will be written down as an E five. So if you read E5 somewhere, then this is a power Chord. And this simply means E is the root node. And five, the fifth of the E. I don't want to dive deep into music theory, but just that, you know, if you read somewhere like E5 or A5, you know, this is a power Chord. So we start with the E5. And that means we have the open eNode. That's the first node of the power Chord. And the second node is the fifth. In this case, it's the second fret on the a string. It's a B node. But as I said before, I don't want to dive into Music Theory now. So you simply grab the second fret of the a string and then you play the open inode. So to open E string and the a spring where you grab the second fret. And it should sound like this. Okay, so it's maybe not easy for you at the beginning to play two notes at the same time. What you also have to do, or what makes sense to do is that if you grab that note here, that your index finger is laid down a little bit flat so that it touches the strings which are below the a string, okay, so that these strings are muted so that do not accidentally play these strings or touch the strings were fewer pig or something else that you only hear these two nodes, okay? And then simply try to play these two nodes at the same time. Okay? This is an E power Chord in the open position. Then the next power Chord in the open position is an A5 power chord. And It's very simple. So you just move your index finger one fret below, one string below on the D string. And you play the open a string. Enter fret, second fret on the D string, and you do the same. So you play these two strings. Don't play the low E string. So make sure to not play this strings. So you have to look where you're pick is, where you're picking the strings. So only the a string and the D string. Okay, So this is an E5. This is an A5. And it's very simple to memorize because this is the E string. This is the a string and the name of the Chord is the same as the lowest string that you play on these courts. So E5, low E string than A5, open a string. Then the next chord, the third chord in the open position is the D5. Very simple. Again, you go one string below on the G string. So grab the second fret on the G string with your index finger, and then you play the open D string. And the fret, second fret on the G string, okay? Same here. Make sure to not play the low E string and the a string. Only the D and G string. And the highest strings are muted. Okay? So you have to get a little bit of a feeling for your picking hand, where you are on the strings. So on which screen you pick, OK. Ok. Now we have E5, A5, and D5. And again, these are open power Chords because we have one open strings in each of the courts. But we also have another type of power Chords, which I call movable power Chords. And on these types of power Chords, we are grabbing two nodes at the same time, so we need two fingers to grab these courts. I will first show you a G5 power Chord. And for that we go on the third fret on the low E string with our index finger. So this node, and then you put your ring finger on the fifth fret, a string, okay, snowed and this node, and you play these two notes at the same time, like on the open power Chords. Same here with the index finger. Make sure that it's not angled like this. So more flat like this, but not pressing down to strings here, just touching them slightly that there is some kind of Muting. Okay? So these two nodes, this is a G5 power Chord, Y, G, because the lowest node here on the third fret, low E string is a G note. The benefit of movable power Chords is, you may guessed it. You can move this shape around across the fretboard. And this means when we go to our G5 chord and take the shape two frets higher on the fifth fret, low E string, and seventh fret a string. We now have an A5 power chord. Okay, so the distance between the fret is the same. So we have one fret in-between and one node on the low E string, one node on the a string. So the shape is the same. We are just on different threads. So you can move it around wherever you want on the low E string for now. Okay? So this is a G5. Then this is an A5. Because the lowest note here, this is an eight node. And if we go higher on the seventh fret, seventh read low E string, and ninth fret a string. We have an b5 power Chord. And we can do that on every precision. And another cool thing is you can do the same on the a string. So if you start with your index finger on the a string on this position, or a string, third fret for example. And then wing finger, fifth fret, D string. You can also play power Chord. And in this case, this is an S5 power Chord because this node, those node is a C. Then you can move it up here. This is a D5, for example, E5, and so on. And what really makes sense to do is to learn the notes on the fretboard, at least for the low E string and the a string, or let's say like this. If you learn the notes from the C major scale and you will now see little picture of a fretboard. You will see what I mean. So it makes sense to learn this node open E string, of course, an inode than F, G, a, B, C, D. And now here starts with E again. So everything until the 12th fret. And from this position on it starts all over again. This is the same like the opening. This is to say like this one. First thread. Then the same on the a string we have then a, B, C, D, E. Again the and here. And then it starts all over again. So you see the document, you can download it. And I can recommend you to learn the positions of the node. Because when I say play a G power Chord based on the low E string, then you know, okay, this is a G note and a G power Chord. Here. When I say play a G power Chord based on the a string, then you know, okay, where is my G on the a string? And then you look and you see, oh, okay, it's here. That's the G, and this is the G power Chord. Or another example. If I say play an E power Chord based on the low E string, then you know, okay, low E string, E, This, and this case then it's an open power Chord. Or what you also can do if you go up this position, which is also an E, then you can play a power Chord like this. Also based on the low E string. Or if you go to the a string and look for an inode, you will find it here on the seventh fret. Then you can play the power Chord like this. Okay? I know this is maybe a little bit much, but of course you can watch the video again. Practice the power Chords first that you get comfortable with the shape, and then just try to memorize the notes on fret markers or the C major scale notes on the a and E string, because it will make sense. It makes stuff a lot easier for you. And now I will show you how to read tablature with power Chords, how this is shown on tablature, and also how to read Chord Charts, which you will also need and see often in the future also in this course. And after this video, you will see some exercises with power Chords, and then you will learn some really cool guitar riffs with power Chords 30. Tablature and Chord Charts: So now I will also show you how you we'd power Chords or Chords in general, in guitar tablature and Chord Charts. So we start with to tablature. And this here, for example, is an E5 Chord. So for an E5 Chord, you have the open E string and the second fret on the a string. What do you see here is zero for the open E string and the two for the second fret, a string. And you write Chords and tablature on top of each other. So that means everything that is in a vertical line here will be played at the same time. Same here with the G5 chord. So third fret, E string, fifth fret, a string played at the same time, and you have G5. Same here with the D5 fifth fret, a string, seventh fret, D string, played at the same time and you haven't T5 Chord. Okay? Now let's take a look at Chord Charts, which is this here. So it's a different kind of thing, how you can view Chords and it shows you which fingers you use. And it really makes sense if the Chords getting more complicated. But you can also use it for power Chords. And let's start with E5. This is how it looks like in a car chart. So what we have here is some kind of fretboard. So these are the six strings. So low E string, a string, D string, G string, B string, and high E string. And the frets are in this direction. So first fret, second fret, third fret, fourth, fifth fret. And what do you see here is a blue circle, which means you play the open strings. So the open E string, because it's above the first fret. Okay, So this means open E string. And then we have here the second fret. So first fret, second fret on the a string. So this is the E string, a string, second fret. And the one means you're using your index finger. Okay, So all the numbers you are seeing in Chord Charts are your fingers. So it shows you which fingers to use. In this case, it's easy. You have one finger to use. Your index finger, second fret, and the open E string. What do you have here is these Xs, and that just means you don't play these four strings. Okay, let's move on. Tune G5 chord. And here you see you have your index finger on the third fret, E string, and then you wing finger on the fifth fret, a string. Okay, same here with the x's, so it just play the E and a string. Here. Another example, D5. And here you can see if you go above the fifth fret. So if you're using, for example, 6789 squared, then you will see this number here. And that just means this is the fifth fret, sixth fret, seventh wet, and so on. These Chord Charts are only shown you five frets. And depending on where the courts are on the Mac, have a number here for the fret, which is here on the top, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth wet. And the D5 is on the a string and you don't play the E string. That's why here is an X. Then you have your index finger on the a string, fifth fret, and your wing finger on the seventh fret, D string. And also the other three strings are not needed for that Chord. 31. Power Chord Exercise 1: Alright, so in this lesson I will show you the first power Chord Exercise. So I don't want to make it too complicated, but also not too simple. So I hope this matches your actual skills. And let me play it for you to the backing track first so that you get an idea what you will learn. Okay, So we are almost always playing eighth notes in this Riff or Exercise. And we're starting with an E5 power chord in the open position, okay? You play that eight times, okay. Then you go to see power Chord. You're on the a string third fret and D string fifth fret. And you also play that eight times. And you go to G power Chord. So you move just up to the low E string and a string, and you play that also eight times. Then you go to an, open, a card here, and you also play that eight times. And that's the first half of the whole width. And let me play it altogether for you. Okay, So the second half of this wave is pretty much the same at the beginning. So you are plating this. So the first three chords are absolutely the same, but the ending isn't a Chord as on the first round. It is a be Chord which is just next to the C chord. Second fret on the a string and forth fret on the D string. And then you play this, you play that be Chord four times. Then you played a fifth time. Then you go to the sea, then back to the B. And you let that ring a little bit longer. Okay, So you got this. So you actually played five times the B chord. Then you move over to the seat and then back to the B. Okay, so let me play you the second part together. And then it all repeats. I will play it once again altogether. So the first part and then the second part. And then it all just repeats. Practice that on your own without backing track. You can practice it to a metronome, Of course. The begging correct, is 110 beats per minute. And if you got it up to that speed, you can, of course, played to the backing track because that's much more FUN. Alright, I hope you enjoy this exercise. 32. Power Chord Exercise 2: Okay, so now we come to Exercise two. And this one is a little bit harder to play. And before I start explaining how to play it, I will show you how it sounds like with backing track. So it's a pretty cool Riff or a combination of riffs. And it might be a little bit overwhelming for you at the beginning, but you will get there. You can start very slow before you go over to the backing track. And now what I will explain you what you have to do. So basically, we have again movable power Chords and open power Chords. And the first one we are playing an E power Chord here based on the a string, seventh fret, a string, and ninth fret, D string. And then we play that four times. Then we're muting the strings. Okay? Then we go down to a C power Chord. So third fret a string, and fifth fret D string. We play that twice and muting the strings. And then we got this. Okay? Then we go to G power Chord on the third fret low E string, and fifth fret, a string. And we played that 14 times. And then again mute. Then we go to an, a power Chord here on the low E string fifth fret and a string seventh thread. Then we play that like this two times, and then we go back to the G and we play that one time. Okay, it sounds weird if I paid very slow. So here again in the context. Okay, That's the first part. Once again. Then the second part also starts with an E power Chord, but this time not on the a string. This time we are using an open E power Chord here on the low E string, open E string. Second fret, a string. We play that four times as well. And then we're muting the strings with our picking hand. Then again we go to the sea power Chord and then we play that twice again. But this time we're letting the second Chord ring. And then we go to a B power Chord. So just one fret lower here on the second fret, a string and forth fret, D string. Then we're playing it like this, four times. And then we're going up to D power chord, fifth fret a string, and seventh fret D string. Again, four times, okay? Once again, the second part together. Then it starts all over again. So you move up here to the E power Chord based on the a string. Okay? Now, altogether a little bit slower than the backing track. Okay, Take your time and practice that very slow. There's a lot of Muting in it, but you will get that. It's not that hard. If you start very slow and if you get it up to speed, then you will have a lot of farm to plate to the backing track. The backing track, you can hear a little breakdown in the middle of the song. But this only means that the drums are getting slower, not actually slower. They're playing in half-time and it sounds different, but you are playing the same. And it's a cool change in the whole chord progression. Just that you know, you have to play the same tempo, the same stuff, the same Chords. But it sounds difference because the drums are playing a little bit slower, and that's pretty cool. So I will now play the whole thing to the backing track and then you will hear the whole track as a backing track. All Swift taps on screen and stuff like that. Like you know it from the previous exercises 33. Some Important Tips: Okay, so here's a little tip. If you have problems with Muting certain strings while you're playing power chords, okay, so I already showed you that your index finger is responsible for muting the highest strings, okay? So that these strings are always muted. But if you are playing a power Chord based on the a string, this T Chord, for example, D5, to be right. And maybe you have problems with the low E string, so that in some cases, the low E string is still ringing. Even though if you don't play where if you pick, can hear that. Sometimes only through the vibration of the other strings. The low E string will start to ring, and there are different ways to avoid that. And one way could be to place your index finger a little bit higher. So not like this, more like this. Okay, so you're pressing down the, a string on the fifth fret, but the top of your index finger here is touching the low E string. So the E string Can't ring. What you also can do, what I really prefer is placing the middle finger on the low E string like this. Okay? So I really just slightly touched a string. And the reason why I use this technique is when I play like more streaming stuff with the right hand, which will also learn later, then I don't have to focus on not hitting the low E string. So I really can hit all strings basically. But the E string is muted and the highest strings are also muted. So if I mute any strings, then it would sound like this. So just like a big mess. And when I really be careful with Muting on the index finger here and with the middle finger here on the low E string. These rings are all muted and that's really useful. So you really don't have to focus much on hitting the right strings. So if you accidentally touched the low E string, it's not a big deal. So I can recommend you to practice that if you are comfortable with the power Chords itself, and it will help a lot and you're playing will sound much cleaner. And it's just a good technique. But I mean both techniques are good also with the index finger, but I really prefer to do it with the middle finger. What I also sometimes do, maybe I will do it accidentally in this course, is Playing the power Chords with my pinky instead of the ring finger. Like this. That's the thing that you also can do if you want. I don't know why I do it. I think I saw Angus Young doing it like this. And it was a big inspiration for me when I started, and I think he plays power Chords like this. From him. I also learned the Muting. I always see him placing the fingers here on the low E string. Okay, just a few little tips. I hope these help. And now you can move on with the next lesson. 34. Power Chord Extension: So in this lesson, I will show you what I call the power Chord Extension. This Extension is basically adding another node to the power Chord. But this edit note is no new node. It's just adding another root node, but this time an octave higher, so it's the same node, but in a higher pitch. And this helps to make your power Chords sound bigger. So I will give you an example. So let's say we played this A5 power chord based on the low E string. That's the usual shape that you already know. And then we simply add the pinky on the seventh fret of the D string, one string below, same fret as the ring finger. And this is also an, a node, same like this, just an octave higher. And if you play these three nodes at the same time, you still have a power Chord, but it sounds bigger. Okay? This is basically the shape for the movable power Chords. You can also move this around. Same on the a string-based power Chords. So if we play in D5, you simply place the pinky on the G string. Seventh fret. So same shape as on the low E string. Without. And you can also move it here on the a string. And of course you can also do that with the open power Chord shapes. And we start with the E5. So this is the standard E5 Chord. And if we want to add the extension, it's this node. So the second fret on the D string, and there are two ways how you can grab this Chord. The easier way for beginner is using two fingers, so the middle finger on the a string and ring finger on the D string, or index finger on the a string and middle finger on the D string. What you also can try is only using the index finger and you laid down flat, okay? So your press down the D string also with the index finger. Okay? Okay, so this can be a little bit harder for a beginner. Make sure that your thumb is right behind in the middle and your press against it and try to lay down your finger flat so you can try it if that works for you. But you have to be careful that you are not pressing down too many strings, are playing too many strings. Because if you're play the G string accidentally, That's not an E power Chord anymore. That is not that what she wanted to play. So you have to be very careful that you only play the a and D string. That's why I recommend you to do it with two fingers like this, or like this. At least at the beginning later. You can also try to do it with index finger only then A5 power chord and the open position, same thing as with the E5. So this is the to note version and the Extension is again pressing down The note that is below on the G string second fret. This is the more advanced version with one finger, but you can also do it with the two-finger version. So index finger, middle finger, middle finger, and ring finger. Pretty much the same as with the E5 power Chord Extension. And then when we go to the D5, which is this, It's a little bit different. This time we have to put our ring finger on the third fret, be strings. So we have, so this doesn't Burke. The shape from the E and D. A5 chord doesn't work here. You have to move your finger one for tire, and it makes sense to do it with the ring finger. Why the ring finger? You will learn that later when we play open Chords. Just use the wing finger. It makes more sense. Okay, So you have these three nodes. Okay, so a5, a5, and D5. Okay, So this is the power Chord Extension. I don't do a dedicated exercises for this because you can basically play the previous exercises with these extensions as well. So you can try that if you want. So simply practice these shapes. And then you can move on to the next exercise where we will build up on this 35. Power Chord Exercise 3 : Alright, so in this lesson I will show you a new Exercise with and for this width, we are using the power Chord extensions which we learned before. So the power Chords with three nodes. And the special thing on this exercise is that we play the chords arpeggiated. And that means that we play each individual node of the Chord, not at the same times, but one after another. So instead of playing an, a chord like this, we will do something like this. Okay, so we don't play the chord notes at the same time. This is also called a speciated. If you play a chord Apache aided, then you play all the Chord notes one after another and not at the same time. Okay, let me demonstrate you the Exercise Riff. Okay, so we start with an A5 power chord in the open position. And I grab this Chord with my index finger and I do a bar across the D and G string. So one finger is squaring two nodes, but you can also use two fingers like this. And we will simply play the lowest node, the node in the middle, and then the highest node. Then we go back to the node in the middle. So what I'm doing here is do downstrokes on the first two nodes. On the third and fourth note, I do upstrokes. Okay? But you can also do all with downstrokes. But I'd like to do upstrokes when I go from highest to lowest strings. And when I go from lower to higher strings, I do downstrokes. Okay, so that's the thing that I like to do, but you can also do only downstrokes like this. Okay, so that's the first Chord. Then we go through and see power Chord. And then we play simply from the lowest to highest node. And then we go to G chord. So just one string lower, doing the same thing. And then we start with the a again. Then again the C. Can we go to D power Chord here on this position? Fifth fret, seventh thread. Once again. And one thing, I didn't mention it on the movable power Chords. I'm also doing an upstroke on the highest note, so that's the thing that I like to do, but you can also do an upstroke On that note as well. Just do it the way that you feel most comfortable with. Okay? And what I can also recommend you if you use sound with I'm a little bit gain that I showed you in the previous videos. Then I can recommend you to turn your volume control on the guitar a little bit lower. So when it's on ten, you turn it to eight or nine. And then your sound will lose a little bit of that gain or just torsion. So the nodes are sounding a little bit clearer as if you would use too much gain. Okay, So that's just an recommendation. If your sound maybe gets a little bit muddy or you can't really hear the individual notes when you're playing. Alright, so now, as always, I will play this exercise to a backing track and you can jam along 36. What is Palm Muting?: Okay, So in this lesson I want to show you a new technique, and this one is called palm Muting. And this is a very important technique that you will always need if you play pop music, if you play rock music, if you play metal, if you play blues, at some point, you will always need palm Muting. The reason why I show it to you now in this section is because you can practice it very well with power Chords. And you can use it very well with power Chords. And that's why I want to show it to you. Now. I will play something now, first without palm Muting and then we've palm Muting so that you can hear the difference. Okay? Now we've Palm Muting. Okay? Of course you hear the difference. The sound is more muted, Of course, because it's muting technique. And it sounds pretty cool in a lot of chord progressions and riffs. And what do you have to do to do palm Muting is placing this part of your hand, the palm of your picking hand, of course, on the strings. So let me turn around a little bit. If you have a guitar with rich, like I have, then it's usually the place right after the bridge here. And then you place your palm. Let's take the a chord again. And the palm is just touching the strings. That's not really a lot of pressure, It's just the weight of the hand, I would say. That's the perfect position for this kind of bridge, but it depends on which guitar you have. You have to try to find the perfect spot because if you move your hand in this position, let me show you what happens. Then. You can see it sounds different and it also almost loses the complete tone. So you have to find the perfect spot on your guitar. And as I said before, if you have a bridge like this, it's really right next to the transition here, where the strings are going over the bridge. And you can also increase or lower the amount of Muting. Okay, so I'm doing that by moving my hand just a tiny bit in that area. Okay. You have to try it on your guitar, depending on what you guitar you have, it's a little bit different, but in general, it works on every guitar and just have to find the right place to do it. Okay, So let me turn back. And let's say we do a little Chord progression like this. And yes, so get comfortable with that. And the next step would be to alternate between palm Muting and not palm Muting. That's the stuff that happens a lot in very cool riffs. And let me show you a complicated example. What I mean. That's a little bit too complicated, I think for your state at the moment. But let me show you a basic example also that you can practice that something like this. So the first node is always without palm Muting. So you let that bring a little bit longer, it's a quarter note. And the other courts that come after that are eight nodes and they are all muted. And by the way, if you are looking at the taps, then you will see PEM, white above the notes that are permuted muted. So that's pretty simple to see on tablature just for information. But basically, what I wanted to show here is it can also be both. So not power muted and power muted parts within a Riff. And it mostly sounds pretty cool. Okay, so in the next video, you will see exercises. And I haven't recorded the exercises at that point when I'm filming this video. But I will try to put in everything that I showed you now in these exercises so that you can practice that to a backing track 37. Palm Muting Exercise 1: Alright, so now we are here and we gonna do some palm Muting exercises. I will show you two exercises, and these are both based on the Exercise, one from the power Chord section. And let me show you that again. If you don't remember. Yeah, I guess you know how to play that. And we will use this width or these waves and at some palm Muting is to it in two ways. The first way I will show you now, it's a little bit easier. And it's also something that I showed you in the previous video where I explain the palm Muting. And what we're doing is this to each court. On the first chord and then, and then, okay, So you play the first Chord of each Chord section without palm Muting and a little bit longer, so it's a quarter note basically. And then you do the West after nodes, power muted, okay? Then when the chord changes, you do the same. Again. What you also can do in this case, because I think it sounds a little bit better, is that when you do the palm Muting, that you only play the lower note of the Chord. So for the E, that means you basically only play the open E string when you are palm mute. And when you play the full Chord on the beginning, you play the full power Chord. Same on the sea. You're only play the low end note while you're palm Muting, it sounds a little bit clearer as if you are playing both notes of the Chord. It also sounds cool, but I think in this context we will do it like this now. So only the lowest node. Okay, So we have Second part. Okay, So when you come to the Picart, you're, do, you do the first Chord? Again? I'm not muted in a quarter note and then you do to palm use. Then you do the okay, so practice that. And after you are able to play it up to speed, then you can enjoy the backing track which you will hear and see now 38. Palm Muting Exercise 2: Okay, So the second Exercise is also based on that Chord progression, as I mentioned before. Let me show you how this goes, okay? Okay, so the beginning is pretty much the same as on the previous one. You do one long chord that is not palm Muting and then to palm muted Chords or open intervals, okay? Then you do exactly the same. And then you end with one long and then one pound muted low E. And it sounds like this if you played all together. Okay, Once again, then you change the Chord and do exactly the same. Okay? This needs a little bit of practice. It's pretty, I would say, yeah, a little bit faster back-and-forth between palm Muting and not palm Muting. And you have to get comfortable with the hand or motion and just start very slow. And played like I drew. Then the second round. Here on the last Chord, it's a little bit different. So you do the first three bombings or notes are the same as on the previous Chord. So then you do the Chord twice without muting, and then you go up to the sea and back to the B. And then it starts all over again. Okay, so as on the previous exercises, practice very slow. And if you get it up to speed 110 beats per minute, then you can Play it a backing track and have a lot of font with that 39. Simple 12 Bar Blues Shuffle: Alright, so in this lesson, I will show you a simplified version of a 12th Bar Blues Shuffle. And this Blues Shuffle uses power Chords. I would say the standard version of that Blues Shuffle uses only open power Chords. And that's what I want to show you now in this lesson. So let me demonstrate you what I mean with that. Okay, so this can be a lot of PFK-1 to play. And this is really a Basic version. And they are a lot of like extensions and like lakes and stuff that you can implement into this kind of Blues Shuffle. But we will stay with the simple version now. And yet the first thing that you have to learn is that Shuffle with them. And we will simply take an A5 power chord. You can simply use that to note power Chord. So this one, and then simply try to get that with them. Okay? Okay, So let me do it slow. Okay, so you start with a single courts drum and then you need to strings. And then you do the courts drums twice. Then you mute the strings, and then it repeats with the Chords played twice, okay? Okay, so try to get comfortable with that, with them first. And when you are comfortable then you can add that second node. So simply adding your wing finger on the fourth fret of the D string. And you also play that with the open a string. And while you are here with your ring finger, you can let your index finger west on the second fret where you are Fretting the a chord. So you don't have to do something like this. Don't have to jump around with your fingers. You can really let that index finger on that second fret D string and simply add that wing finger on the fourth read and then release it, added, release it. So that's much more comfortable to play if you do it like that. So try to get that with them with these two chords. Okay? And then the other Chords, it's pretty simple. You simply go to a D power chord, to an open D power chord, one string lower to the G string, and you do basically the same. Okay? Then there's also the E power Chord and exactly the same. So you do the open E power Chord and then you add your ring finger on the fourth fret, this case on the a string. Okay, let me play it to you slowly before we go to the backing track. Okay, So when you are comfortable with that, then you can try to play to the backing track and have FUN with that. 40. Simple 12 Bar Blues Shuffle (Alternative): Okay, So there's also another way how you can play a Blues Shuffle. It's like an alternative way, which ****** it up a little bit. And it sounds like this. Okay, so instead of going back and forth from the A5 Chord and to the fourth fret of the D string. You simply go one fret higher after the fourth fret and then back to the fourth grade. Okay, so you can of course do that on all the courts. So on the D chord it would sound like this. And on the E chord like this. Okay, pretty simple, but it sounds different and it's a cool alternative way how you can play it. One thing I want to mention is you can use during finger and slide over to the fifth fret. You could also use your pinky, for example, like this. If you use your pinky, It's actually a pretty cool like Exercise to get strength into your fingers. So I can recommend you to do it this way to practice your flexibility of your fingers. But of course you can also do it with sliding over, which the wing finger. Just find a way that works for you. But keep in mind that if you do with the pinky, It's a very good exercise to get your fingers flexible. Alright? If you are able to play it this way, then you can, of course, enjoyed the backing track 41. "T.N.T" Inspired Riff: Alright, so in this section you will learn some new famous rock reefs. This time we will of course, include riffs with power cords, because that's what you learned before in the previous section. And I really hope you have fun with it. And the first width that we will learn is an AC DC inspired riff from the song Tn T, which you probably know, let me play it for you. It is pretty simple to play. We just have to power cards and one single note in that wave. The first chord that we need is an open E5 power chord. You play it once and then you mute the string. Then you play the third fret on the low E string. And you're muted again. And right after that you play in a five chord. And your mute that again. So as you can see, there's a lot of mutant going on. So let me play that part again. Once again. Then the next part is, so you play the third fret on the low E string again, but this time palm uterus. Then you go back to the A5 chord. Then back to the third fret low E string, but this time not Paul muted. And then open E5 cord. Once again slowly, the whole riff. What I forgot to tell you is after the last single node. So the third fret on the low E string, last time when you play that on that roof, you're doing a muting again. Okay, so okay, let me play that once again in the loop for you. And that's also an alternative way how you can play with different kinds of power chords. And it goes like this using movable power chords here. And the fact Fred low E string is actually a power chord in this case. So a G power chord. This is actually the, I would say, simpler version, the basic version. And that what I showed you first was the real version, okay. And that's also the version that I used in the tabs. But of course you can play whatever you want. There are multiple options how you can play any riff. And I just wanted to tell you that. Okay, if you are comfortable with that wave, then of course you can have fun playing it to the backing track 42. "Iron Man" Inspired Riff: Alright, so in this lesson, I will show you an updated version of the Iron Man riff which we learned before in the previous lesson. I guess you will remember that one. And the original width from the song is played with power chords as well. And as we now know how to play power chords, I want to give you an update how you can play this with power chords. Because it's much more FUN playing it with power chords and also playing it to a backing track with power chords. Okay, let me show you how it sounds like. Okay, We are just using power Chords based on the a string. So we just have to move on the a and D string with our fingers. And the first power Chord isn't B5 power Chord here on the second fret, a string. And we go to D5 power Chord on the fifth fret a string. Then we go to an E5 power chord seventh, read a string. And then we've got this. When we combine these, I won't explain all the Muting again. I guess you still know how to do that from the previous Iron Man Exercise. So then we got that fast part, and there we go to the 10th fret power Chord. It's a G power Chord. And we automate that with the F sharp power Chord, which is based on the ninth read. And we go back and forth like this. Okay, and then back to the D5 power Chord on the fifth fret. And then the E power Chord on the seventh fret again. Okay, Once again, Okay, It's a lot of movement on the fretboard, but it's a good exercise to do that. And what I can recommend you to do is to not lift up your fingers very high. So just a little bit and it's okay to hear some sliding noises like That's totally okay because it's pretty fast to change between these chords on one string or an to strings in this case. And what I can also recommend you to do is, or at least I like to do that and it's much more FUN. I showed you before how to mute power chords or the lowest strings with your middle finger here. And I recommend you to do that on this width because then you can really strum into that Riff. And you don't have to be careful with not hitting the low E string, okay? That really hit the low E string, the a string, entity string. But the low E string is muted on all the Chord. And it's much easier for the white hand to strum the right strings if you simply mute the low E string. So you can of course try it first with just playing the a and D string and being very precise on that. But if you are comfortable with that muting techniques, I can really recommend you to do it like this. And yeah, just try what works best for you, okay? If you are comfortable with the width than half a lot of fond playing it to the backing track. 43. "Rock You Like A Hurricane" Inspired Riff: Alright, so this wave is Inspired by the scorpions song, Rock You Like a Hurricane. And it goes like this. Okay, so it's a pretty FUN with, and it should be pretty easy to learn for you if you are able to play all previous exercises. And we're starting with an A5 chord here on the a string seventh fret. And I'm using the power Chord Extension on all these chords of this Riff. And you can play this chord like this. But what you also can do on this song is adding the low E string because it sounds much fuller and bigger in this context. And this basically always works. If you do an E5 power chord in this position, you can always at the low E string here if you want to have more full sounding, okay? So you play that three times. Then you mute the strings with your picking hand. Then you go to G5 chord here on the third fret low E string. Play that twice, then you mute the strings. So you go to an A5 chord here on the fifth fret, low E string. Play that twice again. Then you go to an S5 Chord here on the third fret, a string, you play that once. Then you mute the strings with your picking hand again. And then you go to D5 Chord here on the fifth fret, a string. Play that twice again, then muting, and then it starts all over again. Okay, so once again, slowly. Okay? As always, if you are comfortable with playing this, you can move on and play this width to the backing track 44. "Blitzkrieg Bop" Inspired Riff: Okay, so this Riff is Inspired by the song Blitzkrieg Bop from the Ramones. And on this width we have a little bit more strumming. Okay, That's something new that we haven't done before in this course. And let me first play you the Riff. Let's get the courts first. So I'll power chords, of course, and we are using the power Chord Extension. So that means with three fingers. And we have an A5 power chord. Fifth fret on the low E string, then a D5 power Chord. So fifth fret on the a string. And E5 power chord. Seventh fret on the a string. That are the three chords that we need for this Riff. And what's different here is strumming. As I said before, we usually have played like all downstrokes. So now we are playing down and upstrokes. And the first bar is pretty simple. So we play eighth notes and we're playing down, up, down, up, down, up, down, up. Like this. Okay, try to get comfortable with this alone. You can also play it longer. Just try to get comfortable with down and upstrokes. And here it's very important to mute the upper strings. So because when you are doing the upstrokes, you can touch these strings. And it's important that these strings are muted, okay? Okay, Back to the width. The first bar. You can do on the last strum, it's an upstroke. You can release your fingers, okay? Because this is the transition to the next Chord. And if you release the fingers and play the last strumming with just open strings, you have a little bit more time to grab the new card, okay? The next card is the D5. And you play it like this. Okay. Altogether. Okay. So just twice the Decartes with and then open with a downstroke. And then you go to the E cart and you start with an upstroke. And it brings a little bit longer. It's a quarter note, and then you do an upstroke again, then a downstroke, and then again an upstroke with open strings. So okay, when you do the open strings, it really doesn't matter which strings you hit. You can hit all strings are just the middle tooth or the D and the G string. That doesn't really matter. It's just that you are staying in the flow. So let me play that again very slowly for you from the beginning. Then it starts all over again. You play that three times in total. Then the last part goes like this. Okay? Once again, slowly it's only an a and a deep five power Chord. So that's pretty much the same on these two chords at the beginning. And then we end on the A5 cards like this. Once again. Okay, let me play it once again for you slowly and then you will hear it to the backing track. I reduced the tempo a little bit of the backing tracks, so it's not that fast than the original Blitzkrieg Bop song. It's little bit slower, but it's still a lot of foreign to play with it. And yeah, Here again, the Riff. And then after that with the backing track