Bust a Move! Animate Fluid Character Movement in Procreate Dreams | Jarom Vogel | Skillshare
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Bust a Move! Animate Fluid Character Movement in Procreate Dreams

teacher avatar Jarom Vogel, Digital Illustrator

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      1:47

    • 2.

      Class Overview

      1:11

    • 3.

      Sketching & Planning Your Character

      7:45

    • 4.

      Painting Your Character

      8:22

    • 5.

      Organizing Your Layers for Animation

      3:16

    • 6.

      Getting Started in Procreate Dreams

      6:20

    • 7.

      Importing Your Artwork

      2:04

    • 8.

      Rigging Your Character

      8:29

    • 9.

      Getting Started With Keyframes

      7:34

    • 10.

      Animating the Body and Legs

      6:12

    • 11.

      Animating Warp

      3:59

    • 12.

      Beginning the Head Turn

      6:47

    • 13.

      More Head Turning

      7:59

    • 14.

      Easing and Timing

      5:09

    • 15.

      Overlapping Action

      5:02

    • 16.

      Frame by Frame Accents

      7:27

    • 17.

      Audio and Exporting

      3:09

    • 18.

      Conclusion

      0:37

    • 19.

      Book a 1-on-1 Session

      0:21

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About This Class

Bring your drawings to life with Procreate Dreams! Learn how to use Procreate's exciting new app to create a character animation and get started with motion on your iPad.

In this class we'll use Procreate and Procreate Dreams to create a dancing character entirely on your iPad. Some things we'll be covering include:

  • Importing your existing artwork into Procreate Dreams
  • Basics of frame-by-frame animation and keyframes
  • Easing and timing
  • Creating seamless looping motion
  • Plus many more techniques to get your artwork moving!

Whether you're a seasoned digital artist who's interested in exploring animation, or just want to learn more about Procreate Dreams, this class is for you! While we'll cover some illustration basics along the way, it will be easier if you already have at least some familiarity with creating digital artwork. Aside from that, you'll need:

  • An iPad and Apple Pencil
  • Procreate
  • Procreate Dreams

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Jarom Vogel

Digital Illustrator

Teacher

Jarom Vogel is a freelance illustrator who occasionally dabbles in motion, design, and development. He enjoys beaches, fine ice creams, vanilla coke, technology, skiing, and making things. He graduated with a BFA in illustration from Brigham Young University in 2015. 

Previous clients include Apple, Procreate, Nobrow/Flying Eye Books, First Round Capital, HarperCollins UK, Aquila Magazine, Harmonix Music, and Cotopaxi. 


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Level: Intermediate

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Are you ready to bring your artwork to life? It can be really easy when getting started with animation to end up with motion that looks a little bit stiff and mechanical. In this class, we'll be learning how to animate fluid, smooth looking character movement using procreate dreams. Hey, I'm Jaron Fogel and I'm a freelance illustrator based in the Portland, Oregon area. I created artwork for companies like Disney, Spotify, Facebook, Adobe, and of course, procreate. Some of you might have watched my other class from a few years ago about creating an illustration of procreate. And I'm super excited to be back to teach you how to get started with procreate drinks. I chose the dancing character for the class project because I think it's a pretty approachable way to learn the principles that you used to animate and procreate dreams. The same principles could easily be used to create a more complex animation. If you want to take things further, we'll be going over a lot of techniques including creating, planning, and importing your artwork into procreate dreams. Key frame based and frame by frame animation. Easing timing, creating looping motion, and a whole lot more. At the end, you'll have a looping animation of your own dancing character. We'll start by creating most of the pieces of our character as layers in procreate. Then we'll import those layers into procreate dreams where we can talk about how to organize things for animation and start creating some key frames. As we go, we'll talk about some techniques to make your animation feel a little less mechanical. And we'll also go over how to add a bit more visual interest by including some hand drawn frame by frame elements. We'll also talk about how to create a three D head turn effect. When we're done, we'll export the animation so you can share it with the world. Whether you're a seasoned digital artist who wants to learn more about animation in general or you just want to learn more about perforate dreams. I hope this class has something for you. I'm so excited to be teaching this class and to help you learn more about animation. And about how you can use this incredible app to bring your artwork to life. But enough of the chitchat. Let's get started to make your drawing dance. 2. Class Overview: Before we actually start drawing, we need to quickly talk about a couple of housekeeping items. While we'll cover some illustration basics along the way, it will be a lot easier if you already have at least some familiarity with creating digital artwork. If you need a refresher or don't feel comfortable with drawing on an ipad, I'd recommend checking out one of my digital illustration courses. Aside from that, you'll need an ipad, an Apple pencil, and of course, Procreate Dreams. You should be able to use pretty much any ipad that supports an Apple pencil. Although you may run into some limits around how many tracks you can use, I don't expect to hit that limit for this project, but it is something to be aware of. Along with this course, I'm including a few custom brushes that I'll be using along the way. I'm also including a layered propriate template file that I'll be working from to help you quickly get started. You can download these from the Projects and resources tab below. Well, I'll try to make this as straightforward as possible. Animation can get a bit complicated. If you're worried about messing something up, it might be a good idea to create duplicates of your project at the end of each lesson, in case you need to start over on a section. While animation can be challenging, don't be afraid to try new things and push the boundaries. As with all art, I think animation is at its very best when you're having fun with it and really should put yourself into your work. It can be so rewarding when you start to see your artwork move. 3. Sketching & Planning Your Character: Okay, so we're just going to get started on a sketch here. I'm going to first create another layer, and we're just going to tap to rename this to sketch. Then you don't have to do this, but I think it's fun. So I'm just going to switch the blend memo to difference. And what that does is because I have this black background and this light character, I just want to be able to draw anywhere and automatically get this contrasting sketch color. So I don't have to worry about what color my sketches. Obviously, you can change some things, so that's just not an issue here. You can just choose a color that's going to contrast. So up to you. But I think this is kind of fun. But I'm just going to get started with some hair up here. We'll talk about this a bit more later. But because we want to create this three D head turn effect, I'm going to extend the sides of the front of the hair out just a little bit. This is going to be masked to the shape of the head when we're actually working on it. You won't see these parts that come out except when we move that side to side and we'll talk about that more when we get to the head turn park. But just be aware that you might want to plan for something like that. Then let's do maybe a nose of some kind. Eyebrows, a little chin shadow here. Something like this. I would draw some ears. I think I actually have some in ears. If I open up my body group and then open up this head group and then turn on these ears, we'll just use those as you are going with this. You're totally welcome, of course, to just create your own character. You can use this template as a starting point to make your own character. You can follow along exactly with what I'm doing and just copy my character if you just don't want to think about it. Or you can just use this as a reference and create your own document all the way from scratch if you'd prefer to do that. Yeah, let's just keep going on this sketch. I'm going to create some cheeks here, then before we start on the clothes with the sleeves and things like that, we're going to set up symmetry. And then I will show you what I'm doing with this little swaby Quick menuing. First of all, let's set up symmetry on this. I'm going to tap on the wrench menu up here. And then we are going to go into the canvas tab and then just turn on Drawing Guide. Mine will automatically be on Symmetry that might come with the document. I'm not entirely sure if it doesn't just tap on Edit, Drawing Guide here, then down here you can tap on symmetry. And that will automatically create this side to side symmetry for you. If it doesn't automatically turn on assisted like this, you can tap on the layer here and then just tap drawings. Then when you go back to draw, just automatically be drawing symmetrically on both sides. We're going to start creating these sleeve shapes. Just something to keep in mind as we go here is that when you cap off these limbs, you want to create a rounded shape because we're going to be rotating that limbs you don't want like a sharp edge on the eraser to stick out in places when you rotate that around, because it's just going to be really obvious. Just make sure you have rounded shapes that could easily rotate within the shape that it's overlapping. Let's talk about this quick menu really quickly. You can see I'm swiping around and switching between paint and erase really quickly. Like this. That's not turned on by default inprocriate. If you're not aware of this, you can turn it on by going into the Wrench menu. Then under pre your controls, it should be over here on the left side. There's a quick menu item. And we want to turn on tap modifier and touch what that's going to do is when you touch the screen with a finger, you'll just pull up that quick menu. Or you can tap on this to bring up the quick menu as well. Then if you want to customize it, you can just tap and hold on any of these things and choose whatever option you want here. Just something to keep in mind. As you're doing that though, don't choose something like merge layers or anything that's going to be a destructive action that you might not notice right away. You could do like clear layer because if you do that on X and you'll notice exactly what happened. But just keep that in mind as you're choosing what to put in there. Okay, so let's get back to our actual sketch here. Again, I'm just switching out to erase and I'm using the less scratchy pen, is my eraser from that brush pack that's available in the project resources section, I think it's called. We're just touching up our shapes a little bit here. I might not want that to stick quite so far into the body. So I'll just spend a little time on this. And I'm using the sketch Junior brush to draw with, by the way, as I'm going. It's not super important with this because I've already planned out a lot of the pieces in this template. But if you're creating your own, I like to just mark out where about I think my rotation points are going to be as I'm going. So we'll have one there ish for the shoulder, something like this for the head, and then something like here and here for the arm and the wrist. We can play with those a little bit more when we get to procreate dreams. But as you're drawing out your pieces, it can help to know about where you plan to rotate. So you can plan out those curve rounds, basically end caps, whatever you'd call those. I'm going to create just a little line for the elbow crease here. And then we're going to do some finger separations and maybe a little thumb game print. I don't know what you call that. Then let's to the pants line. We do want some hair. I'm just going to bring out some hair here. We'll probably finesse this a little bit when we go to colors because I don't want this to be perfectly symmetrical. But just for planning, it's pretty easy to do it that way. Just went right back to paint. Like you can see, it is pretty easy to use that quick menu on accident. Again, just careful what you decide to do with that. But once you get used to it, it can speed things up so much. It's a really nice option to, we need to use it wisely basically. Okay, so we're just creating these shorts shapes and then I want to create some little pocket shapes. Again, just our rotation point will be something like that. Maybe maybe a little. We'll play with it a little bit when we get into appropriate dreams and we can play with those a little bit more specifically. And then I think I'm going to turn off the symmetry for just a second to create the zipper on the pants. So we want to draw it right in the middle here, ish. And then just do our zipper. Okay. And then we can turn that symmetry back on, so we can do some shoes and things like that. Again, you tap and then choose trying Assist, Let's do a little cuff on the bottom of the pants just to make them look a little bit, I guess. Shorts, whatever you call these things. Okay, let's plan out our shoe shapes. We're going to make them sporty looking shoes. Do a cool little swooshy logo on the side. Not to be confused with I need particular swoosh logos and then a little tongue for the shoe and maybe, I don't know what you call this part. Somebody who knows sneak Rita Atomy. Let me know in the comments. Then we'll do like some or something here. We can clean that up again when we get to colors a little bit more. But the only other things I want to do are just plan out our knee rotation here and our ankle rotation. This one I want to do, I don't know what you call this, a ruddy patch on the knee. Whatever you call that, like reddish circle that you put there. Then our ankles will probably rotate right around here, maybe something like that. Then I'm going to turn off the symmetry again, just really quickly. Let's just do a cool little logo as a shirt design here. Something along those lines get her a little bit more character. I think with that we should be pretty much ready to move on to color. 4. Painting Your Character: We're going to go over a few different techniques for how to color this and procreate. So I'm just going to open up the layers menu here. And then on the sketch layer, we're going to tap on this little letter off to the right side. And then there's an opacity slider right below that. And we're just going to drag that down to about 50% Then you can tap on that letter again, to close that menu, you'll see we have three different groups here. We have our body group and then each leg separately. The reason we have it set up this way is I want the body arms and head to be able to rotate together. Basically, from here, that's the root of our character. And then each leg we want to be able to control a little bit more independently. You can rotate each leg independently as well. Then if we open up that body group, you'll see we have the body shape itself, we have the head, and then we have two different arms. Within each arm, you're going to have just the upper arm, which is this part here. And then the lower arm which includes the forearm and the hand. The reason we have it set up that way is basically you want to think about your parent, child relationships. We're going to be leading from this upper arm. If we rotate the entire group, we'll rotate all of those together. Then if you want to keep going down the bone chain here, then you can rotate the fore arm. And then if we open up that group, then you could rotate the hand separately as well. We'll talk about that more when we get into animation. But just consider those things as you're setting up your layer stack here. Especially if you're creating this from scratch rather than using the template. Let's start just coloring some things a little bit. So I'm going to go over to this body shape and you'll see there's kind of a checkerboard pattern in the background of that layer thumbnail. And that means that alpha lock is currently enabled. So what alpha lock means is if I go open up my brush menu here and just start painting on it, you'll see I don't paint anywhere that I haven't already painted on that layer. So basically, if something is transparent, I can't paint there. That's going to be really nice because we want to just be able to fill all of these shapes with color really quickly. So I'm going to go choose this pale yellow that I want the shirt to be. And then in my group here on the layer, I can just tap on it to bring up the layer menu. And we're going to say a fill layer that will fill that entire layer with this color. The way that I'm actually going to be doing this though, because that's a little bit tedious to keep opening up the layer menu for each one is I have fill layer set to my top left in my quick menu here. And then alpha lock is on the bottom right. So if you want toggle alpha lock, you might have noticed that you can just tap on this and choose alpha lock there. You can also slide with two fingers from left to right to toggle it really quickly, but I think the quick menu is probably the fastest way to do things. Okay, so again, we just have that on alpha lock already. And then I'm going to quickly flick up to that upper left to fill it with color. And now I want to show you another technique just to kind of speed up this process. We're going to open up the wrench menu over here. And then under the press tab we are going to go down to gesture controls again. And then down here, towards the bottom there's this section called layer select. And I'm just going to turn on this section called Modifier button plus touch. And so you can see it's on here. And then I'm just going to tap done. What that does is if I tap and hold on this modifier button between my size and opacity sliders, then I can move one finger around the screen and you'll see you get whatever layer I'm currently touching pops up basically. It's just a really quick way to select a shape. And then we'll just choose the color we want to fill that with. And then we can fill it with that quick menu. Again, we can just go really quickly through all of these and fill them with color. These all have Alpa lock enabled already, which is why they are just filling like that. If I go up here to the neck, I think that one has it turned off. So you'll see if I try to fill that, it will just fill the entire canvas. So I'm just going to do quickly use Alpha lock in my quick menu and then fill the neck. The other thing I wanted to talk about is clipping masks. We're going to go onto this body shape and I'm just going to create a layer above that. Then I'm going to tap on that layer to bring up that layer menu again. And then say Clipping Mask here. And you'll see it in dense a little bit and we get this little arrow pointing down. And we're going to rename this to pants. And then I'm just going to use my selection tool here and set it to a rectangle to fill in a little pants section really quickly here. And I'm switching to my brush tool and just choosing the color that I want my pants to be and then filling that in. The thing that clipping mask did here is you can see this is actually a rectangle shape. And if I unclip it, it shows up exactly where I made that selection. But if I clip it to the body shape, then it only shows up where they overlap. And this is also going to be useful on the head, for instance, where we want to create this hair in the front, we can, I'm going to use the freehand selection tool to just create this shape really quickly. Then we want this to overlap the head a little bit, which we'll talk about more later. And then I'm just choosing a different color. This can be useful when we go to create that head turn effect. We're going to want to slide that hair back and forth across the head shape. You can see I can move it back and forth and see all of that overlapping stuff when it overlaps the head. Then the only other thing I wanted to quickly touch on is we need to create some sleeve shapes and shorts shapes. And I want to talk about how we're going to do that and flip those over to be symmetrical. I'm going to create a new layer here and then I'm just going to rename it. We should go rename all of these layers. By the way, I'm calling this sleeve right, because it is on the right arm. This is called sleeve, right, And we're going into the selection tool. And just quickly creating that shape, I need to overlap this a little bit more than I did in my sketch. I think we'll just tap and hold on this body shape to select that color really quickly. Now we can duplicate this shape, flip it over, and move it over to the side. So I'm just going to slide from right to left. Hit Duplicate. And then we're going to tap to rename this. Then we want to go into our move tool, and you'll see we have this flip horizontal button down here. Then tap on the snapping option. So you have a couple of options in here. The one we want for right now is going to be magnetics. So I'm going to turn on magnetics and turn off snapping. And then I'm just going to move this over to the side and put it in place where it should be. What magnetics does is you saw that blue guideline. It snaps to the direction that you're moving it in, I think 15 degree increments. And it just makes it a little easier to move something without going up and down, unintentionally. Now, I'm going to select both of these. Open my move tool again, and you'll see that I have two different layers selected. And then if I open this up again and switch it to snapping and turn off magnetics the snapping tool snaps to landmarks or other layers, you can see I got that orange line. That basically means that now this is centered with the center of the canvas. I just need to move my sleeve left layer into the arm left group. And I want that to be a sibling to my upper arm left. And this one is a sibling to upper arm, right. But yeah, I'm gonna switch it to time lapse while I fill in the rest of the details. And just kind of like paint a little bit more on this. All right? I think we're just about done with colors here. But I did just want to point out one more thing before we move on to organizing things to export. And that is that we have this nose left. But because we want to do a head rotation in three D, we're going to need a nose or right, so it's pointing the other direction. And then also just a front on nose. So I'm just going to really quickly combine this nose outline with the little bit of color that I have underneath and maybe you can see this better. I'm just pinching to merge those two layers together. And then we're going to rename this nose left. And then just like we did with the sleeve, I'm just going to duplicate this and then use the move tool to flip it horizontally. And then we'll just carefully move it over to the side so it matches up with that other nose. And we're going to rename this to Nose, right? And then I'm going to turn that one off. Turn the Ocacity down on this one just so we can see what we're doing. And then with my scratchy pen and a black active, we're just going to create a little loop for the front view of the nose here, Okay, Then assuming you didn't redo the eyes or anything like that, then you should already have a closed eyes version and an open eyes version that we'll also be using in there. And then let's talk about how to organize this for export. 5. Organizing Your Layers for Animation: Okay, before we actually start animating, we do need to do just one more thing. While we're in procreate, We're just going to swipe from right to left on our projects here in the gallery and we're going to duplicate. So we're going to open this up. And our goals here are basically we want to simplify our layer structure as much as possible. We want to remember to name groups and layers if we haven't done that already. And then I just want to double check that everything overlaps how I expect it to. For instance, I think I'm going to need to reposition the neck and here. So let's just start going through this. I'm going to open up my layers menu. And then we'll just start at the very bottom. And for each layer and kind of especially layers that are clipped to it, we want to consider, do we want these things to move independently of each other at any point? And for the sock and lower lake, probably not. So I'm just pinching those together to merge them. If you don't want to use that gesture, you can just tap on this and open up the layer menu and hit Merge down. So same thing with the shoe. We just want to merge those. And those are both named how we want them to. I'm just going to start merging some things. So it was just the Nee patch, we have an outline on the shorts. And then I'm going to start closing these groups as we go. But you need to make sure you go through each subgroup and just clean things up. You could do this in appropriate dreams to some degree, but I think it's going to be easier and appropriate because once you're over there, it's just a little harder to keep track of where different layers are and things like that inside of the timeline. I think it's better to just approach it this way. Again, we're just doing that same thing as before. Double checking that everything is named how we expect it to be, and then closing layers. We're merging some things here. Merge and then opening up every group to make sure that we are doing the same thing and covering all of our bases. Okay, I've got both of the legs and both of the arms already done here. Then this is just some lines that are on the bottom of the back here piece here. I think all of our face things we want to keep separate except for this little outline along the hair front piece. Then we'll merge the pants and the body and this little swoop of the neck down together with the body. And then this is just some outlines on the body that we can also merge down. I think everything should be named how it is. Our only issue now is if we close this head group, you'll see that if I move the head, the neck moves along with it. Which seems like it would make sense. But when you actually go to animate this, it feels a little weird to rotate there. You actually probably want to be rotating here. I'm just going to pull that neck out of this layer group and put it right here. That looks like the same, but you can see it lost its intense. Now this is right above that hair back section. Let's close that head group again. Then we should have our neck head, our body. But I actually want this neck to be in front of the body so I can merge it together and get rid of this silly little loop thing we had to do. So we're just going to merge those together. But now you can see the neck is in front of the head. We're just moving some things around as we go here. Now the head is in front, then we have the body with the neck and then the hair back. The only problem here is when we go to rotate the head and that hair together, we want to make sure that the hair does not go in front of things that it shouldn't go in front of. Basically, we need to move that hair down. It's also below the left and right arm groups. This is going to be just a little bit hard to keep that hair and the head in sync, but I think we can manage it. With all of that done, I think we should be ready to start in an 6. Getting Started in Procreate Dreams: Before we import our artwork and start animating, let's take a quick tour of Procreate Dreams. So this first screen that you'll see here is called The Theater. And this just has a grit of icons that represent your movie projects, just like you'd seen procreate. But there are a couple of cool things that have been added here we don't have in procreate. So let's just take a look first at this little icon on the top left. If you tap on this, you'll notice that there's a locations section in here where you can choose to store your files in icloud drive or on your ipad. We're going to stick with on my ipad for now, but it is really nice to have that option. We'll just tap that again to close it. And then if you tap and hold on any of these icons, you'll notice you have the option to rename, duplicate, share, delete a bunch of things like that. You can also tap the Select button up here to choose multiple projects and then decide to delete or duplicate them. Or you can create a new folder. And you can actually nest these folders as well, which is not an option in procreate. Currently, we'll just call this test. Okay, When you open this, you might notice that you can't currently dragon drop files in procreate dreams as of the time of this recording. Just a little pro tip. If you want to organize your files or do some heavy folder, something here, you can go over to your ipad files app. So we're just going to go back over there and if you tap on this little sidebar and choose on my ipad, and then find the Procreate Dreams folder, and then theater. You can do whatever you want here. You can rename files, you can create folders, you can dragon drop them, whatever you want to do, and it will all be reflected in Procreate Dreams. When you go back, we'll just move those back here and delete this folder. Now when we go back to Procreate Dreams, you'll see my folder is gone and my files are back in the theater here. A lot of nice little additions here. Let's talk about how we would create a new project. There's this plus icon in the top right. If we tap on that, you'll see that you get a list of some pretty common sizes that you might want to use. So you have square, social, vertical, some different widescreen options. We're just going to go with square for now. There's a couple of things here that are worth pointing out. So if you tap on this little spot where it says HD, you'll get the option to change the resolution. So we can do 722 K or four K as well. I'm just going to stick with HD for now. Then if you tap on the little ellipsis up here in the top right, you can also change the frames per second. I want to leave this at 24 and the duration. I think this might be something else by default. But we're going to create a two second project for the moment. You can change the hours, minutes and seconds that your project will be. I would recommend just switching that to 2 seconds. And then I'm just going to tap on this little empty icon here to jump right into an empty document. And you'll see when we do that, there's two main sections on the screen here. Once you're in the Propriate Dreams interface, you're going to have this top section which is called the stage, and this bottom section which is called the timeline. And this is going to make a lot more sense when we get to a project that actually has some contents to look at. Let's for now just tap on this little icon at the top left of the timeline to return us to the theater. Then we're going to open a project that actually has some things in there. But you can see if we zoom out in this stage area at the top, there's basically three sections here that we want to look at. There's the actual stage, or you might consider this like the frame or the cannabas, depending on what you're used to working in. But this is the highlighted area in the middle. This is what will actually show up when you export your project. Then outside of that, you can see I have some extra artwork that's cropped outside of the frame there. And that's really nice because as we scroll through, you can see we can move that artwork in and out of frame and just have it in this backstage area. And then the other thing in this top section is the time code down here, which tells us what time we are currently looking at. If I tap on this, you have some options to edit the onion skin settings, which we'll talk about later. And you can also change the background color, which we will come back to in our project that we just made. Then let's look at the timeline section. Down here on the bottom, we already saw the Return to Theater button. And then if you tap on the movie title right here, then you'll open up a settings area that you can change some settings for your movie project if you want to. Again, you can change your parents per second here. Your duration, and then the resolution and a few other things. We're not going to get into this too deeply right now. Let's just tap done. And then over on the right you'll see there's a Play button. So if we tap that, we can play our animation and it will just loop through it. And there's a Perform button that we'll talk about a little bit more later then. This is called the timeline edit button. Let's just pause that for now. We're not going to get into right now, but basically lets you move and select multiple tracks down here at the same time. Then you have your drawing icon. If you tap that, it puts you into drawing mode and you'll see some pretty familiar looking interface up here if you used to appropriate much. So just your draw smudge, erase, layers, color, and then size and opacity sliders. And then if we get out of that drawing mode, then there's also this add button down here which basically lets you import assets from a bunch of different sources. So below that you're going to see your timeline ruler, which is divided into seconds and frames. You'll notice if you look really closely here, basically this is 1 second but divided into 24 frames, because we have our project set to 24 frames per second. And then below that you have your tracks. Right now you can see I just have one group. If I open that up and then scroll down, I have a whole bunch of different tracks. These are a lot like layers in procreate but arranged on a timeline. And then you'll also see some key frame tracks that we'll talk about a bit later. Aside from that, I think it's worth just talking about how you get around this timeline really quickly. And obviously, we'll be going over a lot of this as we go and using all of these things. But I think it's nice to have the overview first quickly. You can pan around with one finger, you can zoom in and out with two fingers, which is pretty intuitive. One thing to note when you're doing this though, is if you zoom in a lot, you'll notice that it only plays the section that is currently visible in the timeline. And this can be a really useful thing to focus in on a certain area as you're working. But just if you think suddenly your animation is clipped too short. This is probably why if you want to get out to your full animation, you can quickly pinch out with two fingers to show the entire timeline all at once. You can also flick the playhead here back to the start, and it will play from the beginning of your animation. Like I said, this is called the playhead. It shows where we currently are on that time line. The other thing to note here is, and this is pretty unique to procreate dreams. As you can scroll up and down with three fingers to scale things vertically, but not horizontally. And this can be really nice to see what you're looking at a little bit better or get a bigger picture of you. Then you can also scroll left and right to scale the timeline itself. This doesn't affect like how long anything takes, It just makes it easier to focus on a certain section. Then last thing to note is if you zoom in as far as you can and then double tap on a section, it will zoom in just a little bit more and let you focus on individual frames. If you want to do that, you can see you get a full label that says what frame you're on there. That should be basically everything. Now we can start pulling in our own artwork. 7. Importing Your Artwork: If you haven't already, tap the button to return to the theater and open the project we made earlier. There still isn't anything here. Let's import the artwork we made in Procreate. You can do this by exporting your artwork from Procreate to the Files app on the ipad, and then using the plus button here to go into the Files app and import it. But I think it's a little bit more fun to use the ipads multitasking system and Dragon Drop. You can see when you go up here to the top of the screen, there should be a little three dots menu. And if you tap on that, you have a couple of options here. We're going to use Split View. Just tap on that. It will push Procreate Dreams out of the way for just a second. And then you can choose another app to open on the side. We're going to choose Procreate and open that up on the right side. Then all you need to do is find that artwork that you made in procreate earlier and then drag and drop it straight the stage area. In Procreate Dreams you'll get a little importing screen for just a couple of seconds and then you can just drag on this little pill in between the apps to drag procrate out of the way. Again, you'll notice this fills up a little bit more space than we created for our canvas because the artwork was a little bigger than we created our canvas in procreate dreams. But I'm just going to go ahead and tap on that with my pencil, or hover over it, actually. And you'll get this bounding box around the whole artwork. And I'm going to scale that down until it fits inside of my stage area. Then we're going to just try to center that as well as we can. You'll notice we have some black outlines sticking out on the sides. That's because we were drawing on a black background. You can go in and clean those up if you want to, but I'm actually just going to go ahead and tap on our time code down here, the background color, and then switch it to black. The only other thing we need to do here is you might notice that you only have one track that's imported. If you tap on this to make sure it's selected, it should be outlined in pink like this. Then go into your drawing mode and open the Layers menu. You'll see all of our layers are here, but we need to convert those two tracks in order to be able to animate them. This is super easy to do. All you have to do is tap and hold on the track. And then choose convert layers to tracks. And you'll see this turned into a group with a little dialogue here. And if we tap on that and then scroll down all of our groups and all of our pieces of each of those things is there. And in the order that we created them in procreate, that should be it. The artwork is imported and ready to animate. 8. Rigging Your Character: Now that we have all our layers in place, we need to start rigging. Our character rigging is basically where you set up a skeleton structure or armature for your character to make it posible. Well, procreate reams doesn't support true rigging, yet we can get pretty far using nested groups and anchor points. We already created most of our nested groups when we were creating this in procreate. So let's talk mostly about anchor points right now. So I'm going to just tap on this body group and you'll see we get this bounding box around the upper body in the stage area. You might need to tap on it again to make that show up. Sometimes it kind of goes away on its own, but if I tap on one of these little corner nodes, you see we get a little curve that shows up around the corner. If we grab that and drag it around, you can see that we can rotate that entire group around together. And there's a little crosshair here which is the anchor point. The anchor point determines where the rotation is going to originate from and also where scaling will originate from. We want to edit this one so we can rotate around this point. Instead, up by the hips, I'm just going to tap on this little ellipsis and the top right, and then tap Edit, Anchor. And then we can move that crosshair up by dragging anywhere in the stage area like a track pad or you can tap it directly. If you'd rather do that, then you can tap done and then go and rotate it again just to check how that looks. And I think that looks a little bit better for what we're going for here. But just as a pro tip, you can actually just stay in that edit anchor point mode. We're going to want to edit those anchor points for the shoulders, the elbows, the wrists, and maybe the head. Let's just go ahead and open up this body group. We'll choose the head. Go back into our edit anchor mode. And you can drag that anchor point up here to about the chin. But instead of tapping down and testing it, we're just going to go ahead and choose the arm and keep editing those anchor points as we go. Then same thing with the arm left. This is going to be our shoulder joint. We might need to go back and finest them because we can't test these as we go. But I think it's useful to get that first stab really quickly. By the way, as you do this, I think it is a really good idea to make sure that your groups and layers are named the way that you want them to. Also, you can tap and hold on any of these and choose a highlight color. I think it's a good idea to just choose those for everything because it makes it easier to identify things later. I'm just going to make the lower arm for each of these yellow, we're just going to open up that group. Choose a yellow highlight for the lower arms, and then make sure that we are setting those anger points as well as we go. Then same thing for the hand to left. We're just going to go ahead and tap and hold, and we'll just make the hands a pink color and then move that anger point down here. Let's go find that other hand, wherever I left my lower arm here. And move our anchor point and then tap and hold to choose a high light color. We will also want to choose a highlight color for our right arm. So I'm just going to do red for right. And then wherever my left arm went, let's do green for left. Okay, we can go through and set up all of these things. I think we should be pretty good there. We've got our lower arm, we've got our hand. And then we'll check that same thing on the left arm. We've got the shoulder, lower arm and hand, we already did the head with all of that set up. Let's tap on done. And then just go ahead and test some of these. We're going to choose our tap on that little corner node and then rotate this, and that actually looks pretty good. We might need to slide things or edit this image just a little bit to avoid that poking out at the top of the shoulder. But I think this is going to work pretty well for now. But I did want to point out as we go through this, notice how when I rotate the arm from the shoulder, because this is the parent group of the arm, the lower arm and the hand move along with it. But when I go and rotate the lower arm, the upper arm doesn't move with it. This is pretty intuitive. This is called forward kinematics when you're talking about rigging or sometimes K. This is pretty intuitive to set up, but it isn't always the most intuitive to use inverse kinematics on the other hand, or K works the other way around and could feel a little more intuitive for certain types of movement. This is where you move a foot or a hand and the limb follows along and bends how you would expect it to. Well, procrate dunes doesn't support this yet. We'll want to fake something like it for the legs. The effect we're looking for is basically we want to be able to move that body group up and down. And we want the knees to just bend and the hip joint to follow the bottom of this body group. So we get a bounce effect, but we don't want to have to keep repositioning the feet to keep them in place. We basically want to lead from the foot, have that stay in place, and then be able to adjust the upper leg independently. So what we'll need to do is actually go in and just reverse the hierarchy for our leg groups here. So let's just talk about how we would do that. I'm going to tap and hold on this leg, right group. And we're going to say ungroup. And you should end up with three pieces. We've got shorts, right, upper leg, and then a lower leg group. And we want to ungroup that as well. Now we should have four tracks total that make up that leg. What we want to do is just lead from the part that we want to be the parent, which is going to be the foot. We're going to leave that alone. I'm going to tap on this time line edit button here. And we're going to just choose the shorts and the upper leg. And we want to create a group of those because those are basically always going to move together. And that's the tail end of our chain that we're creating here. You can see with the timeline edit, you can just draw over the pieces that you want to include. And that lets you select multiple pieces at once. And then I'm going to tap and hold and say Create Group again. We want to make sure that we highlight these and name them as we go to actually we need to get out of that timeline edit mode to do that. Tap and hold and then say rename and we're going to call this upper leg. Right and then hit Done. And then we want to choose a highlight color again. Let's just choose maybe like a yellow for this. Then I'm going to just tap and hold to delete these empty tracks that we left behind as we group things. Then we want to create a group that includes the upper leg and the lower leg. We're just going to go back into that time line it mode. Choose these two and hit Group. Now if I get out of that time line edit mode, we can tap and hold and just say, then we're just going to do that one more time. Choose the shoe and the leg and tap and hold and say group and then get out and call this leg, right? It's a little bit confusing, but basically what that leaves us with, let's go through and change those anchor points, is that if you open this up, we'll have the shoe, which is the parent piece, and then we have the rest of the leg. And then inside of that leg we have our upper leg and our lower leg. That's going to allow us to, if we get into our anchor edit mode here, we can still leave that root of the whole leg for our anchor point up here. If we want to rotate the entire leg together for some reason it doesn't really matter, You could put this at the bottom instead if you want to. But for the shoe, I don't think we'll be editing this independently, but we'll want the anchor point right about there. If we do, then for the leg, we want that anchor point at the ankle because that's going to be the head. We want to be able to rotate this back and forth and just keep that hip in sync as we go manually. For the upper leg, we want this to be at the knee. This will hopefully make a little bit more sense as we start animating it, but it can be a little bit confusing to start with. Let's tap down now. If we go in and want to rotate our leg, you can see we can rotate the whole thing together from the hip like this. Or we can go and just this leg piece here and rotate that independently. And then go and choose our upper leg. And rotate that as well. Basically, we could move that body up and down and have the leg like Bob as we go while keeping that shoe in place. If you want to, rather than redoing all of that ungrouping and grouping and stuff on this leg over on the left leg, we can just duplicate it and flip it over. To do that, we're just going to go up here to leg right. I'm going to copse that group and then I'm going to tap and hold here, say Track Options. And then Duplicate. You should get two things called Leg right Now, let's go ahead and rename this one while we're thinking about it, to leg left, then I'm going to tap on that. And then up here I'm going to tap on the little ellipsis and say flip horizontal. And that will get us most of the way to where we want it. I'm just going to tap and then hold with one other finger on the screen to snap. We should be able to get it pretty close to where that other foot is. Now, I'm just going to go ahead and delete this original leg left. And then we'll delete that empty track as well. We'll talk in the next lesson about how to reset these rotations and things like that. But for the rest of this lesson, I'm just going to switch to time lapse and we'll just be tweaking those anchor points a little bit more and making sure that we have layer names and highlight colors for everything. And then we will talk about animating in the next lesson. 9. Getting Started With Keyframes: To create our animation, we'll primarily be relying on keyframes. Keyframes in procreate frames are states that you set for a track along a time line. They can represent the tracks position, rotation, scale, opacity, and a bunch of other properties. For every frame in between these two key frames, the apple automatically interpolate between these values to create an animation from one key frame value to the next. If we sclide that across, you'll see we automatically get this animation just by creating these two spots on the timeline. How do we actually create these, let's go ahead and delete these two that we have. You'll see that keyframe track disappears and we just have our playhead. So we're going to move the playhead to the beginning of the track. And then we're going to tap on the little clapper board icon once to bring up our action menu here. Then you can create keyframes for either move and scale, or some different options here including opacity and blur and things like that. We just want to move this across. So I'm going to choose move, and then we're going to say move and scale. That automatically creates a key frame of that position that our circle is in here. I'm just going to drag the keyframe to the end of the track. Then there's a couple of different ways that you can create a keyframe here. The first one is pretty obvious. Grab this in the stage area and drag it straight across to where we want it. We're just holding one other finger to snap that to a horizontal movement. Now if I press play, you'll see that automatically just created a new keyframe for me where I dropped it. The other way you can do this, if you want to be a little bit more precise, is you can tap on that keyframe we made. I think we didn't have one to begin with. You move your playhead down to that position and then you're going to tap on the clapper board icon. Or actually you can just move it down to the keyframe track and tap on the keyframe icon there, and it will create a new keyframe. But that's just a copy of this one right now because it's in the exact same position, we're going to tap on that again. And then we can enter the value that we want manually. So I'm just going to say 11 50. And you can see that puts it over here. Now if we press play, you can see we get that same animation. The other way you can do things, and this is pretty unique to Procraate Dreams, is you can use this new perform mode. You'll see there's this little record icon here, and if I tap on that, then it turns into a stop icon and it says ready up at the top. This is really cool because it basically just records whatever action you perform on the screen and automatically creates keyframes along the way for you. We're just going to tap that. Move it up and down and across. And then if we press Play, you'll see it capture that full animation for us. That might look a little bit rough, if you want to, you can smooth it out by tapping on the modified button up here and then just turning up the motion filtering a little bit, and then you get a slightly smoother animation. I don't know if we're going to use this a whole lot for our animation here, but it can be really useful in a lot of situations. Let's use these keyframe techniques to animate our characters. Arm, We're just going to zoom in on that arm a little bit and then go find it in our tracks down here. We're going to be using this arm right group, we're just going to tap on. Remember, bring your playhead to the very start of that track, tap once to create a keyframe, we're going to tap, move, and then move and scale. And you'll see that created a keyframe for us at the very beginning. And we've got this keyframe track now that we can work with. So I'm just going to tap on this keyframe once. Remember I talked about resetting things to default values. You can see that we didn't rotate this quite to the right position when we were resetting it during that time lapse part. So I'm just going to tap on this and enter zero manually. And that will bring us back to our default position for that arm. Then we're just going to go and move our playhead to the very end of that track. And then bring it down to the key frame track area and then tap again. And this will effectively create a duplicate of that first key frame. Because this is a looping animation that we're going for, we actually want to have an exact duplicate of the first keyframe at the very end of the track that things circle back to the start before starting over again. If you leave it on a different position, it's going to look pretty weird when that looping motion starts. But now let's just go ahead and move that playhead to the very middle. So we're going to do this at 1 second. And then I'm just going to tap here to create a new key frame. Then I'm going to tap on one of these corner nodes and rotate this arm up just as a little type. You'll notice how my shoulder here looks just a little bit weird. There's an indent, you can just glide your limbs just a little bit to match up a little better if you don't want to spend a whole bunch of time trying to get your anchor points perfect. I actually think this makes things look a little bit more naturalistic as well, because your limbs don't necessarily glide on like a perfect axis. I usually do just a tiny bit of motion there. If you tap on this, you can see we move to this about one pixel to the left and about 13 and down. You don't have to fix those to be exact if you don't want to, but I think that will just help line things up a little bit more easily. Now, if we press Play, zoom out on our timeline and then press Play, you'll see we have this slow up and down arm motion. I actually want to make the arms move up and down twice. In this animation though, we're just going to rearrange things just a little bit. Remember we can slide up with three fingers to kind of zoom vertically. And then left with three fingers to zoom out or to condense things on the timeline a little bit. You can actually just tap and hold on any of these key frames and drag them along the timeline to re time things if you want to. We're just going to go ahead and move that middle key frame to frame 13 and the ending keyframe to 1 second. And then we're going to do the exact same thing here, where we're just going to tap on the ending frame, so that will duplicate the last keyframe. Then we're going to move to frame 13 here in 1-2 seconds, and we're going to tap that, and then just rotate that up again, And then again we'll just do our subtle little glide to line that up better. Now if we press play, then we should get a faster up and down motion that loops another protyp for you. By the way, this isn't going to be very noticeable here, but if you really want like a seamless looping animation, you're actually going to want to move this key frame one frame over. This is because if it's right here, then this frame and this frame are the same and it will actually play that frame twice. In certain situations. That's going to be a noticeable stutter when it starts over. To do that, we're just going to go up here and make sure we expand our main group by one frame. And then our body group, that's the head body group by one frame as well. Now we can expand that arm by one frame. And then we'll tap and drag that right over. Outside of the bounds of our animation. Now if we press play, you won't really notice. But technically this is a slightly smoother animation. Now let's do the same thing with the fore arm. So I'm just going to open that up and we're going to choose this lower arm group that we made, yellow. We're just, again, going to create a keyframe here. We're going to go to the very end, create another key frame. And then in the middle we can just rotate that up. Just glide that over. The elbow lines up a little bit more nicely. Now press play. We get a weird animation again. We just want to make sure that goes twice. So we're going to tap and drag things over to create that, pull it outside the bounds. Let's do that then. Tap there, and we will just do that same thing. Now if we press play, you get a little bit more of a complex motion where the elbow bends and the arm moves at the same time. Now we're going to just put it on time left to do the same thing with the hand. And then we'll recreate that same motion on the other arm as well. Okay, so now if we press play, you can see we get this arms moving up and down twice. Action on both arms. And also I need to do this on the other arm over here. But I also added just a little bit of a subtle animation to the sleeve so it kind of stays down a little bit as the arm moves up. 10. Animating the Body and Legs: Next, let's add some movement to the upper body as a whole. We want just a bit of subtle up and down bouncing motion along with a back and forth rotation from the hips. Let's just show how to create that really quickly. We're going to collapse the arms. I guess someone has already collapsed. What we want to be working on is just body group as a whole, this entire upper body area. We're just going to move the playhead to the start of that track and create a key frame if you haven't already. It looks like I already have one here. We're just going to tap on that and double check that everything is reset to the original position. So it looks like this one was shifted just a little bit unintentionally. Let's just manually enter those values to put that back in the center where we want it to be. Then to create that up and down motion, let's start with that. First of all, we want two bounces to coincide with our arm movements. We're going to be basically creating a copy of the current position. We'll call this our up position at the middle, 1 second. And then again at the end at 2 seconds. Then let's drag that last frame outside of the bounds of our play area. Again at muts. Just make a little bigger so we can see what we're doing. There we go. Then at 13.13 1-2 seconds, we're going to create more key frames. Then to move that up and down, we can either just move it in the stage area, but that might introduce a little bit of side to side that we don't want. So I'm just going to tap on this and manually enter a translate y value of, I think negative 15. You're just going to do 15 and the negative, and that should move it down a little bit. And then we'll do the same thing over here. Okay, now if we press play, you should see that you get just a very slight bobbing up and down motion as she moves her arms, which is looking pretty good. And then we wanted to add that rotation side to side as well. So let's go ahead and do that. What we want to have happen is have her start leaning to the left here or her right, and then slide over at one seconds to lean the other way, and then return to that original position at the end over here. We're just going to go ahead and rotate a little bit this way. Let's just see what that value is. Let's make it six, just so it's easy to remember what we need at the end right now. Let's go ahead and make this one negative six to go the other way. Then over here for this last frame, you can just tap on it and say, whoops, not translate. We want six again, Okay, Now if we press Play, that looks pretty good. But you'll notice that she pauses on those up and down bobs, and we really want that motion to go through smoothly in either direction. The reason that this is happening is basically when you create a keyframe on this move and scale track, it will automatically keyframe every property that it can control. So that's going to include position, scale, and rotation. This is pretty easy to fix though. All we need to do is tap and hold on that track and say expand movement scale. And now you'll see you have five rows showing all of those properties that can be controlled by this type of keyframe. And really all we need to do is delete these unintentional rotation points at the places where we created our Y values. Let's go ahead and just tap and hold, and say delete on those. Now if we press Play, that should look a lot better. And you can see that side to side rotation is a lot smoother. The next thing we need to resolve here is to deal with all of these legs. Let's go ahead and collapse this so you can tap and hold and say collapse, move and scale. We're just going to work on the right leg first. I'm just going to open that up. And you don't want to edit the leg itself because that will rotate the entire leg. We want to leave that shoe in place to remember, we're going to move our playhead down to this leg group that we made, and that includes the upper and lower leg. We're just going to tap once and tap, move to create a keyframe and move and scale. Then remember to tap on that and reset your rotation to start with, we've had this weird leg position going on this whole time. Let's go ahead and fix that now. We're just going to reset that one to zero. And then the same thing on our upper leg. We're going to move and scale and then reset that 20 as well. If any of your translate X or Y is off, make sure to reset those two. But let's go ahead and duplicate these initial frames at the 1 second and two second markers. So we'll just move the playhead here and tap once. And then same thing over here. We will need to expand the parent leg, right group one frame past the end of our play area again. And then expand any group that we want to key frame outside of there. And then we're going to move those key frames out. Then same thing on our upper leg right group here, which is going to duplicate that initial key frame and then move it outside the bounds. Okay, now let's move to our first down position. We're just going to go ahead and tap here to create a key frame. And then we're going to rotate this out a little bit and then do the same thing on the upper leg right group. Then we're just going to rotate this to match up with the hips as well as we can. Now if we look at that, we should get a leg that's moving down, as the body moves down. And I think that actually looks pretty good for a first try now, we'll just go do that at our second down position as well. Same thing. If you want to, you can copy your exact values. But I'm just going to eyeball it here again. We'll see something like that. I think maybe we need to rotate out this lower leg a little farther for that second one. Something like that. Okay, now if I press play, we should see something that looks pretty close to what we want. Then we're just going to do that exact same thing over on the other leg really quickly. That looks pretty good. There is just one more thing that I'm going to adjust here. As the body rotates back and forth, it looks like the hips get off side to side. We're just going to adjust for that by going up to that main body group. And we're going to expand our move and scale key frames again. And then just at the first position, we're going to move this translate x. So you can just edit this x value directly. We're going to move that five pixels to the left. And then at the middle position we're going to move five pixels to the right. And then at the very end we're going to do five to the left again. And that will just make it look like it syncs up with that rotation of the hips a little better. If we press play, that should look a little closer. We do want to delete these intermediate ones though, because then it's going to pause in the middle, weirdly, Okay, now if you press Play, it's pretty subtle. But it does look like it syncs up just a little bit with that rotation. 11. Animating Warp: This is looking pretty good, but let's use warp to make things feel just a little bit more organic in a couple of places. Warp is a really powerful tool that you can use to bend and stretch elements a bit. Let's start by using it to just deform the tops of the shoes. I'm going to zoom in on my shoe right track here. If I tap on that, you'll see this is the shoe over here, which I apparently forgot to rename. This should be shoe left because it is her left foot. Let's go ahead and fix that then. We're just going to bring the playhead to the start of the track tap once to create a keyframe, we're going to move, then instead of choosing move on scale here, we're going to tap on Warp and that will create a Warp keyframe. And you'll notice you get this little grid of dots over the element that you're working with. This is called a warp mesh, and each of these little handles is called a control node. You can see before we solidify that, you get a couple of options to change the number of controls. You can choose to have a whole bunch more, but we're just going to leave it at four for now. It is really important with this one to make sure that you duplicate this original key frame before you do anything else. Because there's no easy way to go in and manually fix your warp mesh once you've distorted it. We're just going to go and create those again, same thing, we're just pulling this out and dragging this outside of the play area by one frame. Now we're going to move the play head over here to Frame 13 on our down. And you can see that basically what we're trying to do is rotate just the top of the shoe to match the shin movement a little bit better. Because it moves out and it looks like the shoe is made of something stiff. We want that to be a little bit more fabric key and move with the shin. We're just going to tap here at once to create a warp key frame. You can think of this top area of control nodes as the area that we're trying to warp. What we want to do is just rotate that entire thing just a little bit. You can tap and drag on any of these control nodes to just deform the track underneath it. I'm just going to grab each of those and move these up and down a little bit. We're just taking our best guess. This doesn't have to be perfect, but we're just rotating this around a little. Now, if we move that, that actually looks pretty good for a first try. If you're happy with that, you can just leave it or you can go back and edit some things a little bit more. I'm just going to go and do the same thing for the second down position, and then the same thing on the other shoe. Okay, now if I press play and make sure my whole timeline is visible, you can see we get these nice bendy, flexible shoe tops. And that looks a little bit more natural to me. I'm also going to do this on the shirt because I want the pits to stretch along with the sleeves. When I raise those arms, it doesn't look like the middle of the shirt is a different item than the sleeves. We're going to go in here. Just open up this body group and find our body track here. Then I already made a move and scale key frame. We want to make sure we move the playhead to the track and not the key frame track. And we're just going to tap on, tap, move, and then create a warp keyframe. And this time we're actually going to increase the number of controls to six for both horizontal and vertical. Because I really am only interested in stretching this armpit area and not stretching like the neck and the moon thing in the middle quite so much. We're just going to do that again. We're going to go in and duplicate that original position at our down position where the arms are up. We want to create a new keyframe, and I'm just going to grab these handles here and stretch this and then these two as well. A little bit. This doesn't have to be perfect, but something like this. Now that should stretch a little bit as we raise the arm, which I think looks a little better. And then we'll go do the same thing on our second down position as well. And then on the other side, now we zoom out and press Play. That should look quite a bit better. 12. Beginning the Head Turn: Let's work on animating our head turn. This is going to be a little bit more complex, but if we break it down into different steps, it should be completely doable before we get started. A lot of the things we're going to be doing here might seem like really subtle adjustments. But layering a lot of small motion can add up to a pretty convincing effect. Knowing when to exaggerate motion or when to use it subtly can make your animations really shine. First we're going to just create a group using all of the pieces of the face. When we're working in procreate, we have to create clipping masks of each layer individually. But in procreate dreams, you can actually use a group as a clipping mask, which is really convenient. But that does mean that we're going to need to go in here and manually clip each of these layers. Find your base head shape layer down here should be just above the ears. Then we're just going to tap and hold and choose mask. None for each of these. The reason that we need to unmask all of these is if we were to just create a group of all of these pieces without unmasking them first, they basically wouldn't know what they're masked to anymore. And it would just effectively be invisible. Which is a little strange, but that's how it works currently. Now that we have all of those unmasked, we're going to go into our time line edit mode. And just again, we can select each piece that we want to include in this group and make sure you grab the hidden ones as well. We're just drawing over each one with that timeline edit tool and then we're just going to tap and hold and say group now I'm going to just clean up these empty tracks that we left behind by tapping and holding and then pressing delete track. Okay. Now don't forget to rename this to face then. We're just going to choose a highlight color of purple so we can keep track of this more easily later as we zoom in now. Okay, before we do anything with key frames, let's go ahead and create a clipping mask. With this, I'm just going to tap and hold on my face group here. And then we're going to choose mask and then clipping mask, you can see that now clips to that head shape that we created. Now we're going to just keep our playhead right here at the starting of the face group. We're going to tap once and tap, move, and then move and scale to create that first key frame. I'm just going to tap on this once and then say under the translate x field, we're going to move this 30 pixels to the left. Then we're just going to zoom out a bit, move to the end of that T group and tap again to duplicate that. Just like before, we need to expand our tracks so we can move that final key frame, one frame outside of the playback region. Now I'm going to move the playhead to the 1 second mark and just tap once to create another key frame. And then we're going to manually enter 30 there instead of negative 30 to move that head to the right. Now if we press play, you can see we already have a okay version of this head rotating back and forth. But we can do a lot better than this. By the way, you might notice as we edit that face, if let's expand, move, and scale and just make sure our cursor is in the track. You might notice that as we move this horizontally, it actually moves diagonally. The reason for that is the face is moving in its own local coordinate space. Meaning it doesn't know anything about the rotation or position of its parent. It will only move relative to its own original position. Let's go ahead and undo. So we don't accidentally create a key frame we don't want there. And then I'm just going to tap and hold and say collapse, move, and scale again. The other thing that we want to do here is create a little bit of a head dip when the head is in the passing position. The passing position, basically each of these points is called the extremes, where this is the farthest she's going to be looking to that side. And then this is the farthest or most extreme position that she's looking to this side. Our passing position is the point directly in between those. So this is going to be our Frame 13, and our other Frame 13 here. I'm just going to tap once to create another key frame there. And then we're going to tap and hold and say expand, moving scale. Again, we want to just create a little bit of a dip. Move the face down so it looks like the head is nodding forward a little. We're just going to tap this. Let's move the head down. We'll just see what we make that negative ten frames looks like it should look like she turns her head and move it down at the same time or nods again, we're getting a weird pause in the middle here on our side to side motion. I'm just going to go ahead and delete that X movement that we don't want. Then over here, we'll do the same thing at frame 13. We're just going to tap once, and then we're going to say ten down. And I did the same thing, negative ten. Okay. To make this a little bit more convincing, we're going to go up to our main head group and actually move the head down just a little bit as well. So we're going to tap on here, tap, move, and then move and scale. Tap on to translate this in the y axis. So we're going to say maybe five pixels down. Actually, this only needs to be at our passing positions as well. Let's go ahead and just create our main up positions there at zero, 1 second and 2 seconds. And then at frame 13, we're going to make this move down by five pixels. And then our other passing position as well here should be the same thing. Actually, we need to go and reset. I don't know why these are all negative five now. I might have done that at the start, and now it's a little confused. Reset all of our ups to zero and all of our downs to negative five. Now if we press play, you can see you get just a little bit of a head bob in the middle where it looks like she looks down a tiny bit. Actually, I think we could probably make that downward looking frame a little bit more extreme. Let's make that negative 15 instead. Now we'll press play and just see what that looks like. I think that's looking pretty okay. Then the other thing we want to do here is at our extremes, again, at 1 second, 0.2 seconds. I'm going to scale the face just a little bit as well. And we want to make this very subtle. But basically because we would be viewing the face a little bit off axis when it's turned, we want it to be just a little bit foreshortened. I'm going to go in here with my key frame tracks expanded and I'm going to tap on the original one because this is the extreme, this is where we're going to be seeing this. Just a little bit foreshortened and I'm just going to make this 0.99 on scale x. Then in the middle at our passing position, we're looking straight on, so we're going to tap and then make sure that's a scale of one. Then again, on the other side we're going to say 0.99 then passing position should be one. Then 0.99 at the end. Okay. Again, very subtle and you might not even notice it. But as we do all of these things, they start to add up a little bit. Let's go ahead and do the same thing on our vertical positions at 01.2 This isn't going to be the extreme for that up and down motion, because the up and down motion, the extremes where the head bobs down. At frame zero, we're going to make this one at frame 13, we're going to make it 0.99 at 1 second, we're going to make it one. And then again, we're going to do 0.99 at frame 13. Now if we look at that, it should be just a little bit more convincing, and we're just making a little bit of progress here. 13. More Head Turning: There's just a few more things we can do to improve our head turn animation. First, we want to add a blink on that head turn. People tend to blink during the head turn, right at that same spot on our passing position. We just want to add a quick blink. I don't know why people do that, but it's just a thing that humans do. And we'll add a little bit of realism if we add that in. First we're going to go down and open up this face group. Then let's just scroll down until we find our two eye tracks. If you prepared things beforehand, then you should have an eyes open track and an eyes closed track. If not, you might need to use the drawing mode, add a new track and just drawing some closed eyes really quick for this part, but we'll just assume we have that ready to go. First, we're going to bring our playhead down to the eyes open track down here. Just put your playhead on frame 12. And then we're going to tap once and then say edit and split to cut this track in half. Then we're just going to grab the very edge of this and drag it over three frames. We should have frames 1,213.14 We'll just appear blank right now. If you scrub that back and forth, you'll see the eyes just disappear. Then what we want to do is basically insert, this is closed track into that little spot. You don't even have to bring it down here. We just need to grab that left edge, drag it over so that it fits in this same space. And then we're going to grab the right edge and drag it over so it lines up with that gap. Now if we move our playhead back and forth, let's see, you'll see we get a really quick little blink animation. So let's just zoom out and see what that looks like. That looks pretty good. Now we just need to go add that on the other side as well on our other passing position over here. Again, we're just going to move the playhead to print 12 at it split. Then we're going to tap and hold on this little section that we made of our closed eyes. And we're just going to tap duplicate up here. And that will create a duplicate right after that. And then we can tap and drag that over here. It matches up with our other gap. Now if you press play, we should have a nice little blink animation. The next thing we want to do is swap out the nose when she's facing to our left. Then we'll see a left view of the nose when she's facing to the right, we'll see a right view of the nose. Remember we prepared that as we were drawing everything. We'll keep that face group open and we're going to scroll down here. And we should have three different nose tracks. There's the nose front, which is what we're seeing right now, and then nose right and nose left. Just exactly the same thing, except that we're going to have the nose left part visible when she's facing to our left over here. So let's turn that on. So we're just going to grab our nose front and we don't want this visible except on that passing position. So we're going to line that up exactly with our blink right here. Then on the nose left, we're just going to put our playhead right here at frame 12. Again, I'm going to tap once, tap edit split and then we're just going to go ahead and delete that part. On the right side now we should have a left nose view until we get to that middle spot. And then we'll see it at the front. And then we want the nose right to show up right after that. I'm going to move my playhead up here so we can split our nose front group. Same thing. We're just going to delete this extra part over here. Now we should have left front and then it disappears. And then we're going to turn on this right group, drag it over here. And then just make sure that's visible all the way up until we go back to the center. I'm just going to grab the right edge and drag it over here. Then again, we're going to duplicate our nose front here by just tapping and holding on this and hitting Duplicate and then dragging this over. And then we'll do the same thing with nose left all. Now if we press play, we should get a nice little nose turn animation as well. But because the nose is technically a little farther forward than the rest of the face, we're actually just going to give this a little bit of horizontal movement so that it looks like the nose moves farther back and forth than the rest of the face. To do that, we're just going to go to the first frame of our nose left. We're going to tap once to create a moving scale key frame. And then I'm just going to translate x by negative five to the left. Then on the regular nose, we're just going to leave it centered on the nose, right? We're going to do that same thing, but we're going to move it five pixels to the right. So make sure that's positive. Then just same thing here on our other side for the nose. Left piece, five negative. All right, now if we press play, you should see that lines up just a little bit better when you're considering a head turn animation like this. Think about where your pivot point is and where different pieces will move in relation to that. As the head turns our face because it's farther forward, in front of the neck is going to move to one side, while the hair that's in the very back is going to move to the other side. Because your head is rotating and moving these farther back parts differently than the farther forward parts. If that makes sense, let's go ahead and tap here to create a keyframe on our hair back track. Then I'm going to just tap on this once and we're going to translate x. We wanted to move the opposite direction of the face. We're going to do maybe ten pixels to the right here. Then I'm just going to go ahead and duplicate that at the very end. Then we'll expand that once and move that key frame out of the play area. And then we're going to create another key frame right here in the middle when we're at our other extreme over here. And we're just going to tap that and then move it to the left. Ten pixels left. Now let's press play. And I think that's already helping to solidify that head turn effect just a little bit more. The other thing we want to do is because the head is rotating on the X axis as well. So moving up and down. We want to move that hair up a little bit on our down parts for the head rotation. We're actually, let's not do that. Let's expand this. We're going to tap and hold to expand. And then we just want to create a Y keyframe here. We're going to tap here once, and then move the hair up by let's say ten pixels. And just see what that looks like. We want to make that a positive. I keep getting confused. Which way is which On the y axis. And then we'll do the same thing over here. Ten might be a little bit too much here, we'll see what it looks like. Now if we press play, you can see that the hair moves up, while the face moves down. Then we're going to do this with the ears as well. We just want them to move back and forth a little bit because this is a pretty subtle head turn animation. We're just going to tap here, create a moving scale keyframe for the ears, and then we're going to move those again. I'm going to make this a lot like the hair. We're just going to move at five pixels to the right instead of ten though, because they're closer to the center, so they won't move quite as much. Then we're going to do the same thing at the end. Then right here in the middle, we are going to make that at five and negative. Instead they move off to the other side. Now if we press plate, you can see those ears move back and forth just a tiny bit. The last thing we want to do here is to add a little bit of rotation to the head of the ears and the back part of the hair as well. Let's do the back part of the hair first. We're just going to come down here to our rotation. I'm going to rotate this by, let's say ten degrees. That's probably a bit much. Let's make it more like five degrees. Then over here we're going to say negative five. Then here for our last key frame, we want to make that five again. Now if we press Play, the hair should flop back and forth a little as she goes. And then we're going to make a very subtle rotation for the ears. Let's make sure we're only editing that rotation value. I'm only going to do one degree. We want them to rotate just a little bit this way when she's leaning to the left, just a little bit the other direction when she's leaning to the right, then one degree back this way. Again, we're just doing really subtle little things but they a little bit more character to the animation. Now we're just going to rotate the entire head altogether. I'm going to go ahead and collapse this head group. Then we're going to expand the move and scale keyframes for that. Then I just want a little bit of a subtle head rotation. We're going to go ahead and delete these rotation keyframes that were automatically created at the passing positions. Then I'm going to tap here, We're going to rotate the head by maybe three degrees on this side, maybe negative three here. We'll just see what this looks like. This might be a little too much. Then we'll do three over here as well. Now if we press Play, you can see we get a little bit of a head rotation going on multiple axes. So we have forward and back, side to side and left and right. And I think that should be pretty good for a head turn animation. 14. Easing and Timing: Taking a step back and looking at this again, I think I'd like to add just a little bit more bounce to the dance move. One of the cool things about key frame based animation though, is that it's relatively easy to make changes after the fact. Let's try to exaggerate that up and down movement just a little bit more. I'm going to go into the body group over here. We're just going to open that up, expand my move and scale key frames. Then we're just going to choose this down position for the translate y value. We're going to change that from negative 15 to negative 50. You can see that moves the body down a little bit more. And then we'll go do this other thing for that second bounce as well. Now we're going to need to adjust our leg rotations just a little bit to match up with that better. I'm just going to come down here to my legs and we'll do that. I think this is looking a lot better. But to really exaggerate that up and down movement, I think it's worth playing with the timing a little bit. This can add a lot more character to the motion adjusting. Timing is super easy. We're just going to go up here and find our body group and all you have to do is drag this keyframe over a little bit. Now this down motion is going to take a little bit longer, and the up motion is going to be a little bit faster. So she's going to pop up in between. Let's do that same thing on the other side over here. Just grab that keyframe and drag it over about four frames. So we're going to line these up with frames 17. You can see that that's highlighted. If you look closely on your screen, then we need to make sure that we do the same thing. Actually, let's press play first. Okay, so you can see she goes down a little more slowly and then pops up in between. Let's do that same thing on the legs and the shoes just to make sure that they all line up with those same key frames. So we're just going to drag these over to frames 17. Now if we press play, you should see that she pops up in between the legs, and the shoes should be synced up with that animation. You can also consider playing with the timing for any other animations. If you want to, I'm going to address the main arm animations and the hair a little bit. Now you can see the arms are just a little bit delayed as well. They move up more slowly and down quickly, and our hair swings back and forth at a different speed. The other thing we can do to really emphasize our motion here is to adjust the easing. Easing describes how the speed of an animation changes between two keyframes. If I press play, you can see we have four boxes moving from the left side of the screen to the right. These all have keyframes at the exact same positions on the x axis but are using different easing options. We have four easing options in proc dreams. The first one, the top, is called linear and this means that the speed of the animation will be constant throughout. So it doesn't speed up. It doesn't slow down, it just moves. At the exact same rate, ease in means it's going to start out really slow and then speed up towards the end of the animation. Ease out is the opposite, meaning it starts really fast and slows down at the end. Then ease in and out means it starts out slow, speeds up in the middle, and then slows down at the end. This is the default in procraate dreams. Usually this works out super well as a default option, but every once in a while we want to use something else. Coming back to our dance animation here, I think it might be interesting to use easing to adjust our head bob to bounce sharply at the bottom and then pop back up again, like how a ball would bounce on the ground. To do that first I'm going to go and actually emphasize that head bounce animation just a little bit more. This is just like we did with the body. We're just going to come in, expand our key frames for the head. We're going to tap on this first passing point Y value. And we're going to change it from negative five to maybe negative 20, and we'll just see what that looks like. And then we're going to tap here and do the same thing. Negative 20 on that second passing position. Down value as well. Now let's just press play and see what that looks like. Now we have a little bit more of an emphasized head bounce in the middle, but to make that more dramatic, we're just going to adjust those easing values. Still, with these keyframes expanded, I'm going to tap and hold between these first two Y keyframes and you're going to see a couple of options. There's one to set all easings and that will set every easing in that whole key frame track to the same thing. We don't want to do that right now, but we actually want to do is on this first down, so we're moving from an up position to a down position here. We're going to change this to ease in. That means it's going to start slow and then finish fast like gravity is taking hold. It's going to come down fast and then really quickly hit the bottom. We're going to tap on this set easing option below that set. All easing is one, we're going to choose ease in. And then on the next one, again we're tapping in between the two key frames. This is the actual transition that we're affecting here which happens in between those. We're going to tap set easing and then we're going to choose ease out and then we're going to do the same thing on this other side. Set easing, ease in for the first part and set easing ease out for the second part. Now if we press play, we should see that there's a little bit more of a dramatic Bob in the middle there. It goes down really quickly and pops up really quickly. Then we're going to want to do the same thing on the face. Let's open this up. And we're just going to open up those key frames for the face. We're going to adjust this value to negative 20 for both of our down positions. Then we're going to do that same thing, just setting those easings to ease in and ease out alternating. Now that should look a little more dramatic. You get this blink and like head bob in the center, that should feel a little bit faster and more snappy, I guess. 15. Overlapping Action: I'm pretty happy with the overall movement of our character, but to make it feel a little more life like we want to use some overlapping action. The overlapping action is an animation technique where you add a slight delay in timing between parent and child elements. For instance, the arm in the hand to make it look like an object has some weight to it. If we do this right, there should be a subtle whip effect moving from the upper arm down to the hand. You could do this by editing the keyframe values directly, but I found that that involves a lot of manually copying keyframe values, which is a pain and it's just a little harder to line things up correctly. We're going to use a trick where we can trim and duplicate and offset our animation tracks. This does get a little confusing, but it shouldn't be too hard if you just follow along. First we're going to open up this arm right menu. So this is our arm over here that we're working on. And we want to find the object that is the farthest down the chain here, the one that doesn't have any child elements itself. So that's going to be the hand. We're going to start with that and we're going to move down to this hand group. First we need to figure out all of its parent elements and we need to expand out a little bit for those tracks. We're going to choose the very top level group. This is a parent of the body, which is a parent of the arm, which is a parent of the lower arm. So basically you go down that chain, you need to go all the way up to the top of that. And we're just going to grab the right edge of that and expand it out about 1 second. And this isn't going to mess up your animation in any way. So this is all outside of the playback area, so you won't see any of this. This is just to make it easier for us to work, so we're going to choose that one. And then we're going to choose the body group. And then we're going to come down here to the arm, right? Extend that out as well. And then the lower arm and we're going to extend that out. And then on the hand itself, we don't want to extend it out. We actually want to crop off this last frame that we used for making that looping animation. So we're going to just take that right edge and drag it over one. And that doesn't actually delete that key frame, it just hides it from view. It's still effecting everything happens exactly the same way. And if we expand this out, that keyframe is right there waiting for you. We're just hiding it because we don't want to see it right now. What we're going to do is actually go over here to the left side of the track. And we're going to grab that and drag it all the way over to the length that we want our offset to be. I think I want it to be right around here. If we put our playhead here, it should be a Frame 22. This is the amount of offset we're going to add to that track. And I'm just going to grab this whole little track bite that we made here and then drag and drop it back to the start. Now, now we're going to tap and hold on that and hit Duplicate, and it will create a complete copy of that track. We're going to take that copy that it just made and drag that back over this way so that the left edge of it lines up with the end of our play area. And you should get that snapping pink line that shows up. Now we're going to choose that, we're just going to drag the left edge out to meet this offset piece that we have. Now, effectively, we've offset the whole thing by about three frames. Basically, this is the part that was playing right here before, and we've just moved it over here and then pushed the rest over. We'll still get the exact same seamless loop right here. And if we press play, you might need to zoom in a little bit so you can actually see what's happening. But you should see that that hand animation is offset from the lower arm animation. Just a little bit like lags behind a tiny bit. Now we're going to do that same thing with the lower arm. I'm just going to hit pause then to make things a little easier to see what's going on, we're just going to collapse this lower arm group. Then we're going to do the exact same thing we did with that hand. We're going to choose this, we're going to crop off that last frame and all that that we extended earlier. Then we are going to grab the left edge, drag it over here. We offset it by about three frames. Make sure that's on frame 22, or you can do a different amount. If you'd rather offset it more or less, then if I can grab this, we are going to pull this over to the left side. Then we're going to duplicate drag this over here so that it lines up with the edge of our playback area. And then we're just extending that edge back out. Now that should have created another offset with the lower arm. And then these pile up too. If we expand this, you'll see that the hand came with it and now our hand right animation should be offset. I'm not sure what happened here. I think I inadvertently didn't undo there. You'll see that we have a cascading offset. This is offset a little bit, and this is offset from that lower arm a little bit. Now if we press play, you'll see that you get this nice whip effect like we were talking about. If we zoom out, you can see how that compares to the other arm, where this one feels a little bit too stiff, like she's holding it really tightly as she moves. Where this one feels a little bit more loose and free and nice. Now you can choose what you want to add this to for me. I'm going to go and add this to the head animation. It's just offset a little bit. I'll probably do less frames, so maybe like one or two frames on that one. And then I'll probably do the hair as well. So now I've got a little bit of an offset on this on her right arm, a little bit of offset on the hair, and a little bit of offset on the head. And then I need to go do the same thing on this other arm. Everything should be offset the way that we want it to be. 16. Frame by Frame Accents: We don't have a lot of time to get super deeply into frame by frame animation. But it's worth quickly looking at how it works. And I think adding even just a little bit of hand drawn motion can really elevate our final result. We're going to just draw some quick animated excitement lines around the head here. The first thing that I want to do is come down here and undo that overlapping action offset that I added to the head group. If you do want to edit anything in one of these that you've offset like this, you'll need to undo that and then redo it when you're done with your edits. Just because otherwise you'd have to duplicate it in both sides of that group. We're just going to go ahead and undo that really quickly. Then I'm going to move to frame 13, so our head is centered here, or wherever that is in your animation. Then we're going to tap on this sketch group, and I'm just going to tap the plus icon over here to create a new empty track above that. Now I'm going to go into drawing mode. And then I'm using the scratchy pen brush from the brush pack in the projects and resources section. You can just drag and drop that straight into procreate dreams. Or if you want to use a different brush, I would just recommend using some like pen or pencil that you can get small straight lines. We're just going to go ahead and start drawing those little excitement lines in here. You might notice there's not a ton of room to draw in this stage area right now. If you want to, you can grab this little pill in the middle and just drag that down to enter flip book mode. This is really cool and we'll use it a little bit as we go, but it lets you more easily create new frames and just flip back and forth between them. We'll go over that as we're doing this a little bit, we'll just do something like that. Then I'm going to just quickly tap on the next frame down here to create a new frame. This is one of the things that's really nice about this flipbook mode. You might be able to see this in the screen recording, but it's pretty hard to see on my screen to edit this onion skin setting. Technically there's a very dim outline of that previous frame here, but we want to make that a little more visible. I'm going to tap on the time code down here in the bottom left. And we're going to edit onion skin. And I'm just going to choose a lighter color and then increase the opacity a little bit. You can also choose how many onion skin frames you see, but you can play with whatever you want to do here. Also, what color, whether they are frames behind you or ahead of you as well. I'm just going to tap outside of that to exit my onion skin settings and we're just going to start tracing over these little excitement lines. You don't want this to be perfect, definitely don't agonize over it. Basically, we want a little bit of variation between these because that's where the hand drawn look comes from. I want to create about six of these. We're just tapping on that flip book, next frame to create another frame. Also, don't worry about syncing up with the head, we're going to fix that later. Just try to trace over the lines exactly where they are. Probably would have made more sense to do this before animating the head, but shows you how to do it if you didn't have that foresight. Like I didn't. Okay. Now just to quickly check that you can slide back and forth between these and just see how that motion looks. Then when you're happy with it, you can tap here, and then there should be a little X that you can tap to it, that flip book mode. Now we should have six different frames down here, and they just show up as individual clips on that track. If we zoom in a little bit, set that to our playback area, we can pop. I want to redo that just to see what that looks like. That looks a little bit too fast. We don't really want those frames to play back that quickly. What we want to do is extend each of these to take about three frames to play. You might notice if you try to extend that out, it doesn't work, so you'd have to like shift these over. But there is a really cool trick where if you just tap and hold on that right frame and then hold another finger on the timeline, you can just slide that over and it will push everything to the right for you, which is really convenient for re, timing, things like that. We're just going to do that for each one and we want to extend each of these to three frames instead of one. You might hear this referred to as animating on threes. By the way, this is a really old animation technique for being a little bit more efficient with your animation and also just adding more of a hand drawn, crafty look. You'll hear animating on twos and threes a lot. Now that each of those is three frames long, we're just going to go ahead and press play. You'll see that if we zoom in, that's playing back a lot more slowly and I think looks a lot more natural and nice. We want to duplicate that so it fills up the entire duration of our playback of our animation. I'm going to just exit drawing mode and then we're going to go into time line edit mode and draw over, and just draw over all of those clips. Then I'm going to tap and hold to create a group. Now we're going to just drag and drop that group over it, lines up on the left side, and then we're going to duplicate it a couple times. Now just to keep things tidy, we're going to exit timeline edit mode, and then tap and hold on each of those groups and ungroup them to go back to our individual clips. Then I'm going to delete these two extras at the end. Then we're going to go back into time line edit mode and just draw over all of those and create a new group that has all of them in it. Now if we exit time line edit and just press play, you'll see that that fills the entire length of our animation and should loop nicely. The other thing that we want to do before we sync that up with the head is just add a little bit more subtle motion using our perform mode. In order to do that we're just going to take our playhead and drag it over to frame zero or the very starting up our track here. And we're going to tap once and then tap, move and move in scale to create a key frame that puts it right in this spot. And then we're going to go and make sure we duplicate that at the very end. And then extend out our track by one frame. And then pull that last frame outside of there. Okay, now we can pull our play head back to the beginning Again, we're just going to tap on this lips this up here, and tap edit, Anchor to move that anchor point so that it is in the bottom middle of our bounding box here. And then I'm going to tap done. Then we're going to go into perform mode here. We just want to add a little bit of subtle rotation back and forth for this two second duration. Then we want to make sure we lift up before we get to the second key frame, otherwise it might be overwritten on accident. We're just going to open this up to grab our rotation handle and then we're going to tap on that and just start moving it back and forth a little bit. Then let go before there. Now if we press play, we should see that it just rotates back and forth a little bit. Perfect. We're going to do the same thing, but with scale, we're just moving our play head back while still in perform mode. And then we're just going to grab one of these corners and scale it up and down a little bit. And let go right before we get to the end. Now let's press play and just see what that looks like. I think with that scale animation, it could be a little bit more dramatic. So we're just going to tap on the modified button and turn down our motion filtering a little. Then we can see that it scales up and down a little bit more that way. Let's go ahead and just press Stop on Perform and pause that animation. Now we want to sync this up with the head animation so it rotates and bobs up and down how it's supposed to. In order to do that, we're just going to grab this group. Make sure your head group is open down here before we grab that. Actually then we want to drag and drop this in between the face and the top of the head group. We're just going to grab this and drag it straight down here. And we should be able to drop it right in that spot. Now the thing that you will notice here is that it's moved down when we did that, because our head is actually moved down a little bit compared to that body. All we need to do is make sure that our head group is extended out a little bit, so we can see that last frame. Then we're going to open up our key frames. And then we want to change our y value to about 80 or whatever. Looks good to you. I think I accidentally did an undo there. And then we need to make sure we change that for that last frame as well. Okay, now if we press Play, you should see that that sticks to the head and still has that little bit of rotation and scale motion to it, along with our hand drawn animation. 17. Audio and Exporting: Okay, so after all that, I think I'm pretty happy with the animation itself. Before we wrap up though, let's talk quickly about how to add some audio and set things up for export. So first I want to export my animation with some music for sharing. So let's talk about how to import an audio track. I'm just going to hit Pause here and then bring my playhead back to the starting of my top level group. So just collapse everything else and use only the top group for this next part. And then we're going to tap on the plus icon over here. And we're just going to create a new track right above that. So your playhead should automatically jump up there. But if it doesn't, just move your playhead to this track above your main group, we're going to tap the plus again. And we're going to choose files. And then I'm just going to go find a audio file that I want to use. We're going to choose this Chipolina track. This is a song that I made in garage band. Definitely not a musician, But it should work well enough. Now if we press play, you should hear that song playback as my animation play. And it should sync up pretty nicely with the animation. If you want to adjust the volume, we can just do them in a little bit and just use the playhead and create a keyframe. Just like with anything else, we're going to create a level keyframe here. And we're just going to change the volume to zero for the first frame. And then we're going to move to frame 13, and we're just going to create another key frame and then move it up to 100% So you can see you can create this nice kind of fade in audio effect just with anything else in procreate dreams. You might have noticed though, if we press play, that the music seems to cut off prematurely. And the reason for that is that my song is 16 seconds long and my animation is only 2 seconds long. If we want that animation to play back more than once in the exported video to sync up with that song, we're going to have to specify that to do that, I'm just going to tap on the project title over here. And we're going to go into our project settings and up to this properties tab at the top left. And we're going to change the duration to 16 seconds. Then if I press done, you should see that the playback area is now extended to 16 seconds, and my animation is now a little bit short. Remember, we extended out this main group during the overlapping action part to give ourselves a little bit more work area. And you can see things start to look a little bit broken in that place. We need to just crop off that last second. We're just going to pull this over here and make sure that this is exactly 2 seconds long. If you zoom weigh in, it should look like the track ends just before the two second mark. That means that it is 2 seconds now. To make that actually fill the full duration of the track, all we need to do is duplicate that a few times until it takes up the time that we want it to. By the way, if you set things up with the same frame rate and everything that I did and want to make your own music, this one is set to 120 bits per minute, in 44, time to sync up with the dance animation. And now if we press plate, we should see that the animation should loop pretty seamlessly and the music should plate through. So with all that, we're ready to just export this. So I'm going to tap on the project title again. And we're going to go down to the share tab on the left. And then I'm just going to tab video and you'll see an exporting screen for a couple of seconds. So I'm just going to save this to my photo library and now we can go watch it there. 18. Conclusion: This is the end of the class. If you made it this far, take a break. Stand up, Stare out the window for a while. Maybe consider getting yourself a fancy beverage. You've earned it. If you enjoyed what you learned here and want to take things a bit further, you can use the same principles we covered here to do a lot more with your character. Consider making a walk or run cycle or even a simple waving animation. Whatever you make though, don't forget to upload your artwork to the class project section when you're done. If you like my work, you can check out my website at Jog.com or follow me on Instagram as at Jonogel. Don't forget to check out my other classes and follow me here on Skillshare as well. I really hope you enjoyed this class and learned a bit about animation and about procreate dreams. Thanks for taking the class, and I can't wait to see what you make. 19. Book a 1-on-1 Session: If you enjoyed this class and want to take your learning further. I'm now offering one on one sessions through skill share where you can book an individual private video call with me to answer any other questions you have or just get some feedback and pointers on your work. I'm currently offering two types of sessions. One about illustrating in procreate and the other about animation and appropriate dreams. You can find a link below to book a session or find out more on my skill share page. I'm really excited to see what you're working on.