Brand Clarity–Build The Brand of Your Dreams | Katie Leigh Jackson | Skillshare
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Brand Clarity–Build The Brand of Your Dreams

teacher avatar Katie Leigh Jackson, Offering 1:1 Bus. Coaching for Creatives

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Intro to Brand Clarity

      2:58

    • 2.

      Understanding Archetypes

      16:39

    • 3.

      Build Your Brand Guidelines

      12:29

    • 4.

      Get Started with Brand Photography

      10:52

    • 5.

      What is Your Brand Voice?

      5:11

    • 6.

      Create Your Customer Profile

      6:20

    • 7.

      Reach Your Ideal Customer

      9:11

    • 8.

      Understanding Pain Points

      10:57

    • 9.

      How to Use Your Client Profile

      10:59

    • 10.

      Intro to Facebook Ads

      11:02

    • 11.

      Your Elevator Pitch

      14:55

    • 12.

      Adding What You've Learned To Your Website

      22:12

    • 13.

      Social Media Strategy

      11:12

    • 14.

      Creating a Newsletter

      7:25

    • 15.

      Adapting Your Brand

      7:15

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About This Class

Starting a new business? Learn how to build the brand of your dreams by getting clear on who you are and whom you serve, and launch with a strategy in mind. Marketing Strategist Katie Leigh takes you through the steps she uses to help creative businesses succeed.

You'll learn how to:
• Build a brand + client profile 
• Develop your brand guidelines
• How to design your website
• Design a social media strategy that works
• and so much more

While Katie specializes in working with creative brands, this course is for anyone getting started with their first business or for brands looking to make a pivot. 

Along with this class you'll get worksheets and guides to stay organized, dive deeper into the content, and gain clarity on what you're building and how to build it. That's the benefit of Brand Clarity.

Meet Your Teacher

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Katie Leigh Jackson

Offering 1:1 Bus. Coaching for Creatives

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Level: Beginner

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Transcripts

1. Intro to Brand Clarity: As a former marketing director, I understand what it means to not be a 100% sure what you're actually selling. When I signed on with one of the companies that I worked for as a full-time marketing director. I had to sit down with them and say, you don't know who you are and you don't know who you're selling to. Because the reality is, you're not for everybody, you are for a specific group of people. What is it that you're actually trying to sell them? It's always more than just the product service. It's something deeper. Being clear and your brand will help you to connect with your audience. Save on your marketing campaigns, and create content that will allow you to build lifelong relationships with your customers. It sounds pretty great, and it's honestly not that hard. The hardest part is making the decisions that are right for your brand. I'm just going to guide the way and give you some insights on how you can do this. All final decisions are up to you. But let's talk a little bit more about what exactly brand clarity is. Brand clarity. Brand clarity means that we're going to find out who you are as a brand. What does it mean to be your brand? What do you sell? What do you offer your customers? And from there, we're going to deep dive into who is your customer. Because like I said at the beginning, not everyone is your customer. Use service a small niche. And I want to help you figure out what niche that is so you can speak directly to them and build stronger connections. When you sell to everyone, you sell to nobody. But through the specific, you hit the universal. I'm going to help you get specific so that you can create a brand that connects on a deeper level. The other benefit of having clarity in your brand is the ability to create content. When you know who you are, when you know who your customer is, you know what you need to build in order to connect with them. You can talk to their pain points. You can offer a blog post or social posts or freebies that will help take care of your audience. Brand clarity will also allow you to build audiences for ad spending that won't just wasting money. When you really know who your customers are. It's easy to create audiences that speak directly to them. Then by knowing exactly who you are and what you sell, we can create ads that are actually going to convert. Finally, the most important part of having a brand with clarity is that you don't just build an audience. You don't just have followers. You have customers for life. And that's what I'm here to help you build a sustainable business. Whether you are a business that creates sustainable practices or just a business that's in it for the long haul, ready to serve your customers. I'm here to help you get clear in your brand. Let's get started. 2. Understanding Archetypes: Since the beginning of storytelling, we've used archetypes. These are universal characteristics that you can see in any movie, book, or form of story anywhere. So it's no wonder that we can use archetypes for your brand to, because your brand is part of a story. There are hundreds of different archetypes out there. There are 12 main archetypes that we focused on in storytelling. Within these archetypes, there are strengths and weaknesses for every single one of them. And that's true for your business and for your customers. This is why I love using archetypes in business. I think there's so much value and depth that comes with using this tool to identify who you are as a brand. And also use it as a tool to get more clear on who your customer is. One of the processes I love doing with my clients is using archetype cards for them to discover more. One of the things I love using with the brands I work with are archetype cards that allow them to dive deeper into who they are as a brand as well as who their customer is. In a few minutes, I'm going to show you a one-on-one session I did with Alyssa from Mohan, a yoga and bar, where I spread out all of the archetype cards. And she goes through to pick out which cards represent her brand. From there she can take everything that she's learned about these archetypes and apply it to her marketing strategy. She as the guide of the story, how does she help her customers get from their pain points to the happily ever after? And then if she wanted to, she could repeat the process and do the exact same thing to build her customer profile. Learning more and more about who your customer is, what their strengths are, what their weaknesses are. Those same strengths and weaknesses are going to be true for her as a brand to. This allows you to see maybe some blind spots you never thought about with your business or how other people perceive your business and how you can get clear on making sure they know that those aren't your weaknesses are that doesn't apply to you as this archetype. There are so many different ways that you can use archetypes. The first thing to do is just get familiar with them and see how I've used them with other brands to get clear. So today I'm here with Alyssa at a Honda yoga and bar, and we're going to go through archetype cards to figure out what her brand archetype is. The idea behind this is we have all of these beautiful cards laid out and each one holds a different archetype or personality. So I'm gonna have listed here go through and she's just going to look at the beautiful images, the names on the card. And without reading the backs, she is going to pick out whenever one's registered for her as her brand. Now the idea is that we're going to slowly continue to get smaller and smaller and the groups. So the first round you can pick many as you want, and then we'll move everything aside. And it just gets harder and harder to choose, but it will really bring out some new ideas about what your brand is. So let's go ahead and get started. So you're just going to pick out whatever ones you know, are for sure, yes. We'll put in one pile and for sure know in another pile grades. And if you need to maybe pile looking grandma, maybe pile too. Okay. So definite yes. Is the caregiver card cool? Judges and no secret as a yes. On that same note, adventure as a yes and explorer is a yes. Well, it's hard to companion. Yes. And let's see. Liberate or no. Cloud know. Dreamer, yes. Pioneer know. Generalists, no. Guardian, yes. Entertainer know. Provocateur. No. Okay. Alright. We've probably got halfway ish. It'll only get harder from here. Sum up a little bit. Thank you, Amy, how many were trying to get down to try and get down to three at the most. You can get down on one or two. I always think it's more helpful, but I said three is the top. Okay. I kind of have an idea. So we'll see how it goes. It's interesting how different it goes with every brand. Like I've done this with another yoga studio and the answers are already completely different. You really believe that. Okay. So caregiver is going to definitely be a yes and that will always stay like that will be one of the final scrape. Okay. And then the other ones that I do believe would be top as well as caregiver. Let's keep dreamer. Instead of the, we can actually just whittle it down. We can actually take out exploring and venture because dreamer I think is more accurate. So those can go by combining go by two because we have a caregiver. Then I think securing idealists can go bye, Can visionary. That's all kind of the same. I mean, we have our brand is athletes but more so if the caregiver, so you can take away that architect, right? And that might also be more of the students that the brand, yeah, Exactly. Which is easy to mix up in here, but they're totally different things. Yeah, and I really think healer is the other card here. Like dreamer healer and caregiver. Or what I really feel like is the brand. And thank you for saying that there's a difference of the brand versus the student? The student, because I was kinda thinking students, yeah, But really this is like where it's I believe if we're going to three yeah. Because nothing else. Yeah. I would go I've personally would go with these three. Right. You simplify that quickly. Alright, so we will take her final three. And then I will open up. But this archive. And so what I'd like to do now is just kind of read through what we've found and make sure this partial registers. So the healer, their strengths, our inspiration, empathy, faith, passion and wholeness. Their challenge over at temptation to use power for gain, control or fame. Representation as the only answer and egotism. The healer is essentially conduit toward wholeness, acting as a catalyst in which nature is the ultimate healer. This arc type does not do the healing, but creates the conditions, beliefs, and structure for the healing to happen. Sensitive and empathetic to people's emotions. The healer has an intuitive and learn capacity for transforming pain and to restoration. The healer possesses a powerful vision of ease and health. And it focuses on positive, the complete, and the wellness aspects of the world. Love. I feel like that. Yeah. Totally nailed it. Yeah. Yeah. Especially the line about does not do the healing, but creates the conditions, the lease and structures for healing to happen. Agreed. I think that's an exit from this license. The Dreamer. Its strengths are vivid imagination, creativity in the form of ideas, plans, inventions, and concepts. There are challenges or lack of structure and needed to execute ideas. Possessing a vivid and powerful imagination, the dreamer is a master at drifting into the highest altitudes of pure potential. Preferring to live in a utopia of the mind is R-type can be swept away with the emotions and possibilities of ideas without ever needing to make anything concrete. The dreamer experiences life through symbols and science and it communicates ideas, abstracts lead with absolute passion. And for this R-type has the faith of a child believing that the mere act of jumping will present the requisite net. That also feels it's pretty loud. Yeah, I think. Yeah. Alright. And then the caregiver, which actually is in the same family as the healer. So that feels really cohesive. Two strengths, our altruism, compassion, patience and empathy, challenges our fear and instability over compromise leading to loss of balance, inability to say no. One word description for the caregiver is altruism, the unselfish concern and her devotion to nurture and care for others. This archetype is motivated to provide reassurance, service, advice, listening, and an open heart to support the welfare of others. The caregiver is compassionate, generous, efficient, self-sacrificing, patient, highly competitive, competent, and an excellent multitasker, able to find the silver lining in any Cloud. The caregiver remains calm in a crisis, makes friends with everyone and radiates the lightness of optimism also feels accurate. Yeah. I think Is there anything in these cards that you feel like is missing that speaks a represents your brand. Interesting question. That's a really great question. I mean, from a caregiver's perspective, it's, it's like looking at it from the view of one, where from a brand perspective it's unity or community or family. So I think that's one thing that's not really here. These all seem like self, self, self. Which is important because we're always self-reflecting. That's, that's really what it is, is like you're reflecting right now. Like I'm reflecting you you're reflecting the right. But they're Oh, Hannah, there is something that brings that altogether. So there's still one component, I would say that's not represented necessarily, yes. So you're saying that this is the individual as the brand or working on one-on-one with the customer. I would think that this is almost like an individual viewpoints of the brand versus really how Honda is. You know, it's just more cohesive. It's not just like a single entity, right? Yeah. It's all about the community. Yes. Yeah. Is there anything from what we left as yeses? Well, networker is, but it's kinda interesting because that's like family and that worker is all about connections, right? That is connections are the same thing. It's like bringing people together. Yeah, well, let's look at this one and see if it resonates at all. Alright, so the strengths of the networker or talent for creating communities and connection, outgoing personality, empathy, conversational skill, and social flexibility. There challenges our tendency to be disingenuous, to see people as leverage or use people for personal benefit, manipulation, gossip, the network or creates communities of collaborative peers for the mutual benefit of the collective. Finding commonalities between people, the network, or is motivated to expand its sphere of influence by forging alliances and making connections within, within disparate groups of people. This archetype demonstrates an ID, emotional sensitivity to the needs of other people, sometimes seen as a social butterfly, then that worker is generally good at putting people at ease telling stories and making preference. I like that. I feel like that is kinda the missing piece. Yeah. Do you think it replaces any of these or do you think that it is the addition? I think it's the addition. Okay. Alright, well, we'll break the rule and let you have for men, oh my gosh, that's so inspiring. So then from here what's nice is I like to take these and I'll create a document that outlines what's in each one and what that means for the brand. But how do we see this come out? What does this mean for her values? And how do you actually take what you've learned here and put it into the brand. And for me that comes down to like when you're making edits to your website or building a website when you're making a business decisions. It comes back to like, Is this who we are? Are we trying to hit the trends of what's latest and greatest? Are we trying to be somebody else? And it always comes back to like what is true for your brand and sticking to your brand values. And I'm just trying to be like the rest of the ground. I love it because it's a constant decision to come back to your roots and not just get charged by some latest fantasy, really, hasn't it? So unrelated to what you're doing, it's about being intentional with your brand. Let's go Awesome. So what you just saw, how I take a brand through the archetype cards to create who they are as a brand. Now, Alyssa is very in tune with who her brand is because she's spent so much time getting to know her brand and her customers, as well as working with me for quite a long time now. So her experience might be a little quicker than yours, but that doesn't mean that it isn't as valuable. Even she got new insights and learn new things by really breaking down archetypes in her room. So how do we apply this to your brand? It's really simple. Attached with this video is a worksheet that breaks down the 12 different archetypes. Again, there are hundreds of archetypes out there. But I wanted to focus on the top 12 that we see. These also don't take in any negative archetypes. We don't want to pose you as the villain. We're only looking for archetypes that are bringing value, trust, and community. So let's quickly review what these 12 archetypes are. An example brand of each one. The first archetype is the caregiver. And an example of that brand is Tom's. From there we have that every man, which is target, The creator, which is Apple, the Explorer, which is Patagonia. The hero, Nike, the innocent, dove, the jester. M&m's, the lover, Chanel, magician, Disney, the rebel, Harley, the sage, Google, and the ruler, Rolex. Now, in that worksheet that I provided you, I give you a little bit more of a breakdown of what these archetypes represent. What are some of their strengths, their weaknesses, and a little description to see if you identify with. You can of course, cut out each one, move them around the table and see what fits for you. Or as you read through, just see which ones sparks interests or you feel like you really identify with however your processes. That's up to you. From there, I've also provided an outline how you can take the information from your archetype and create it into a brand profile. This brand profile will continue to go in-depth on a couple of other questions. Just so you can create a really clear understanding of who you are as a brand. These same archetypes you can also use to see which ones sparks interests for your customer. Who is your customer as an archetype. And then add that information to the client profile you'll learn how to make later on in this series. So for now, go ahead and download your worksheet and get started. Find out what archetypal are you as a brand. 3. Build Your Brand Guidelines: Every brand should have a set of brand guidelines that they can give to new employees, contractors, or even partners when you're working on a promotional together. The idea behind brand guidelines is simply that it's the rules or the guidelines that your brand lives by so that you can create a cohesive experience across all channels and platforms. So what goes into a brand guidelines? Well, it's pretty simple and it's really whatever you want it to be. What are the things that make your brand your brand? Of course, there are a few things that are in every guideline. Things like fonts, colors, photography rule, your logo designs. All of those things can be included. But you can also include things like specific words or phrases that you do or do not use. You might have a whole section on copy that talks about whether or not you use cuss words, how your voice sounds. Are you really funny and entertaining or you more spiritual and educational? All of these types of things can go into your brand guidelines. The idea behind this document is that it's an easy to share PDF or even printable that you can give to anybody you work with so they know how to participate as your brand. Now this is especially important for bringing on new employees or working with contractors. This will allow them to easily merge into your brand so that there is a cohesive experience no matter what platform you're on or who's creating the content for that platform. As I mentioned before, you can really include anything you'd like in your brand guidelines. But there are four key components that I like to make sure are in my client's brand guidelines. The first one is your fonts. This is important just so that you remember what fonts you use and how you use them. It's as simple as listing the name of the font, as well as giving a preview of that font, both in all uppercase and lowercase letters. If you want to, you can also include what the fonts look like in italics or bold or underlined. It's really up to you. The reason that I have fonts on this page is that when somebody new is coming into the brand, they need to make sure they have these fonts available to them. Whether you're sending them the font file that they can download and put it onto their computer. Or they're going online and they're downloading the font file, they need to make sure they have the exact same fonts that you're using everywhere else in your brand. It's the small details that allow your customer to know it's you without them ever thinking it or seeing a logo or your name, they just automatically have that feeling, oh, this photo or this document or this ad obviously belongs to you. Now at fonts, there are millions to choose from. If you haven't already selected your go-to fonts, you're going to have a field day going through the hundreds of thousands of fonts you can choose from. But here are my suggestions for you. I personally like to play with a sans serif and a serif font. Now, this is getting really technical here, but a serif font, it feels a little bit more elegant, a little more old school. In recent years, sans serif, meaning it does not have those little dangling pieces have become really popular in the design world. I personally like to use a serif font for headings, texts. It's gonna be really big. It adds an extra elegance to your text. But the copy, all of the long format, the paragraphs that you're writing. I like to use in a sans serif font because we're all used to reading without the little dangling pieces, and it just becomes an easy fluid thing to do. Now, there's plenty of brands that I work with. Only use san-serif fonts for both of theirs. They might use one type of font for their entire brand and then use a bold and extra bold and a light for their texts. You want two dash three fonts so that you can create variety in any graphic piece that you're making. Now the font again, could be the exact same font and just different styles of it like bold, italic or thin. Your fonts are completely up to you. And it might help to work with a designer to find the right fit for your brand. But just know that you're going to want to list all of your fonts in your brand guide. And I would suggest having no more than three fonts. The next thing we're going to include in your brand guidelines is your colors. Now, most brands that I work with, who are coming to me already have their brand fully designed, they're ready to go. And that might be the same thing for you. If it's not true for you. Here's a couple of things to think about when choosing your brand colors. The first suggestion is to only have 234 at the very most colors for your brand. It becomes really chaotic when you have a ton of colors for your brand. And even of these 23 or four colors. You want one color to be your dominant color. This is going to be your call to action color for buttons on your website. It's gonna be your main logo color. This is the accent that is really your identifier as a brand. When you think of some of the big name brands out there, more often than not, one color comes to mind. For me, Teal is my pop. The majority of my colors are gray and white to allow photography to stand out. I always have a pop of teal in my logo, the buttons on my website, or any social graphic I create always has a little touch of teal in it. Aside from choosing two to four colors, you want to think about the emotions that come with those colors. This is where we get into a little basics of color theory. So each color that we see has an emotion tied to it. You can think of a color right now, and you'll have associations like yellow might be summer and warm, and fun, and outgoing. Green might be nature. Blue might be calming and serene. And read might be fierce. And in your face. Right off the bat. When you think about a color, there's an automatic emotional response. We can always change this emotional response when we get into Hughes, which is the wide variety of colors within a color. But for the purpose of this video, let's keep it really simple. When you're thinking about colors for your brand. You might stick with colors that are associated with your industry. A lot of yoga studios and up in the green spectrum for being about health and wellness and connected to nature. Banks, on the other hand, end up in the blue spectrum. These are brands that are looking to build trust. They're dependable, they're stable, they have strengths. As you can see, industries often have a color scheme of their own. Whether you want to fit into that or stand out from that is totally up to you. There's no right or wrong. And just because you choose to fit in with an industry's colors doesn't mean you won't stand out in other ways. So choose the colors that align most with your brand. Let's break down the seven colors of the rainbow. Starting with red. Red screams excitement. It's youthful, There's lots of energy behind it. Orange is going to be friendly and fun and playful. Yellow is bright, optimistic and warm. Green, like I used for the yoga studio example earlier, is natural. It's wellness, it's health. Blue is strong, it's optimistic, it's reliable. Purple is creative, it's wise, it's royal. Finally, there is white or gray for your logo, which gives the emotion of balance, of calm or of luxury. So there you have it. The seven colors of the rainbow broken down into color theory so that you know which emotions come from which colors. Now when you're choosing your multiple colors, you're going to want to make sure they go well together. A lot of times brands will end up using a spectrum. So if it's a red, they might use a couple of different shades of red or a red and orange, or red, orange, yellow, something that's kind of on the same side of the color wheel. When you start getting into color schemes that are going all over the color wheel, it just doesn't really feel like you're clear on who your brand is. Make intentional decisions with your color. Know the emotions that you're evoking. Know the reasons why you're choosing each color you're choosing, and then know where each color is used. That's the next step in your brand guidelines. Now that you have the colors you're going to use for your brand, you need to decide on the guidelines of where they're used. Can any color be used at anytime? What color is the dominant color? Are there specific places that specific colors are used? Maybe all of your headlines and print are always your dominant color. Or maybe buttons are always your dominant color on your website, newsletter, or anywhere else. These are the kinds of decisions that you'll need to make an ad to your guidelines so that anyone coming into your business knows exactly how to portray your brand so that it's cohesive across all channels. The next step in your brand guidelines is your logo, or we're not going to recreate your logo here. But what we do want to do is create some guidelines of the different formats of your logo and where different formats are going to be used. Now an example of this is you might have different sizes of logos, as in one logo that fits into a square, and one logo that fits into a rectangle. So these logos are gonna be used differently in different places. If one is just a graphic and one is a graphic with your full name in it. Those are gonna be used in different places. You want all formats of your logo in your brand guidelines. Then you want the rules of how they're used. Aside from just different shapes or sizes of your logo, you might have different colors of your logo. If your logo is going to be put on to a sponsorship banner, the banner is black. Having a black logo doesn't really work. So you're going to need a white version of your logo. Or if you have a colored logo and it's being put on a website where the background color is the same color as your logo. You're going to need a different logo so that it stands out against the background. I like to have two or three different versions of the logo. Make sure it is really clear for any person coming into your brand to know exactly what they need to do with your branding. This leads us to the last section of your brand guidelines, which is photography, one of my personal favorite topics. Now the next video you're going to watch really goes in depth into creating brand guidelines around your photography. Because there's a lot that goes into it. And I want to show you examples with photographs, so it's really clear for you. But just for a rough overview of what we'll talk about in the video, I want to share with you what I put into my brand guidelines for photography. The first thing is, is you want to come up with some words that describe the type of photography you use. It might be light and airy or colorful and crisp. Then you'll decide on the type of white balance you use. White balance is either going to lead you towards cooler shades of colors so that your white colors look more blue. Or warmer colors where your white is going to look more orange, then there's neutral or your white pure whites always look very white. Finally, you need to come up with a decision of do you allow stock photography? Are the rules around the stock photography like the fact that it doesn't look overly pose and it feels natural. Any of those kind of things are going to be included in your brand guidelines. But let's go ahead and head on over to the next video and get a really deep dive into creating photography rules for your brand guidelines. 4. Get Started with Brand Photography: In this video, I want to talk to you about brand photography. Now, what you may or may not know about me is as a brand strategist, I'm also a brand photographer. So I have a lot of opinions when it comes to photography. But just because I'm a professional photographer doesn't mean that I don't understand the value of stock photography or iPhone photos for your brand. The important thing is to create rules around your brand photography that allows photos to look and feel like you. So what I'm going to show you today is going through not only my Lightroom and my Later account, but also giving you a couple of examples of other brands, Instagram accounts to see what they're doing right? This will give you ideas about how you can create rules around your brand photography. So that no matter what, when somebody is looking at their feed, or they're on your website, or they see an ad from you. They know that it's from you without looking for your name or logo. That right there is huge when it comes to your marketing. Let's dive into this. Here. You'll see my light room account. So this is all of my photos that I have in Lightroom currently, which is a couple of thousand. I've chosen just some of the top tier already edited photos to break things down for you and give you a feel for things. For me. When I'm choosing photos, I like photos for my brand to be dark and moody. They need to be really sharp. All of my photos are lightened, area does not work with my brand. It's deep and sharp. Things are colorful. I like to make sure that the lighting is good enough that you can see what's happening in the image. It doesn't need to be so bright that it feels overexposed. I also have chosen a white balance that is neutral. This means that whites look like they're pure white. They don't run more yellow and they don't run more blue. Those are all rules that I have for my brand guidelines. This helps me in editing my own photos that I know I'm going to use in my marketing, or finding stock photography, or taking iPhone photos and then editing those on my phone. So in here you're going to see photos that I took on a recent vacation. In here we have this amazing hotel room. And I got some great shots that I knew I could use in my Instagram feed. Shots that featured the desk that was in there, the lounge area to talk more business-related posts. I also love to highlight the lifestyle of Colorado. So I have plenty of posts in here that are around Colorado nature and adventure. I was even able to grab a couple of product shots for one of the brands that I work with. You'll notice in these photos that they all kinda have a very similar feel to them. They're not identical, but a photo like this where there's a lot of white in it might not be a photo. I use my marketing. It could, it could make its way onto, say, Instagram because it's got a, because it's got a shorter lifespan. But it's probably not going to make it on on my website. However, a photo like this that are a little bit more dark and moody, they're very sharp and a few even highlight me in them are gonna be great for my website or social media, even my newsletter. I like to edit my photos by having a by having one. I like to edit my photos by creating presets that I'm going to use for my photos. Now, if you're getting professional photos, the idea would be that you use the same photographer over and over again so that there's consistency with your images. Or even perhaps bringing on an in-house photographer. When it comes to your own photos on your iPhone or stock photos. Your goal then is to try and get those images to look as closely as you can to the professional photos. Your professional photos are always going to be the most important when it comes to your brand because of the highest quality and they reflect your brand. So stock photos might be really high-quality. They're not going to have you, your employees, your products, your services, your logo, your colors, any of those things. And this is why you want to match all of your other types of photography that are either there. This is why you want to match all your other types of photography that are either not as high-quality or as branded to match your professional photos. In here, my Katie Lee standard preset is the one I most often use. I'll take this preset, apply it to a photo, and then tweak some things to make the photo look its best. But overall, the coloring and the feel of photos all feel the same because I use one preset. Now the great thing is, is that on my phone, I also have light room. So when I'm editing iPhone photos, I can use the exact same preset. You might be able to work out a deal with your professional brand photographer and see if they would share the preset that they're using or create a preset together so that they have it and you have it. And all of your photos feel consistent. Now that you've seen a sneak peek into my photo library, I want to take you into my later account. Later is what I use to schedule out my Instagram and Facebook posts. I find it really valuable because I can create a large photo library right inside. Now I have access to all the photos that I need for scheduling purposes. I can also schedule far out in advance if I want to, but I usually choose to only schedule a week at a time that I know what content is going out and make sure it applies to any current events that are happening in later. I'm able to drag and drop images to see how it's going to look at my feet. I can also see all my photos together in one place. So you can start to see what photos maybe don't fit in with the rest. In here you'll also see that I have a bunch of stock photography as well as iPhone photography mixed into my library. This allows me to have more photos to choose from when I'm using them on social. In most situations, iPhone photography patients, iPhone photography never makes it onto my website because my website is always going to be the highest quality imagery possible. But let's look into my images some more. We'll see that the stock photos, I have a little bit more of a brighter few images like this one that are really white and bright or something. I'm going to use sparingly because as you can see from my feed, I don't have a lot of white and bright. It's dark and moody. But an image like this desk is the perfect representation of my brand. It feels really on-brand. It's dark, it's moody, it's sharp. It also is showcasing a desk which I utilize in my social media or on my website so that I can talk about your business or brand. It all comes down to being intentional with your photography. Look at the images, see them side-by-side and figure out which image is make the most sense for your brand and which ones don't. Do they align with your brand guidelines? Are you a light and airy brand? Do your photos feel more warm? All of those are questions you can be asking and deciding and then putting into your brand guidelines. But let's take a look at another brand that's not just my brand. Honda yoga and bar isn't amazing yoga studio based out of Denver, Colorado. They are a brand I have been working with for a while now, and I absolutely love these guys. You can see on their social media feed that there's a lot of playful pieces to them. They are a yoga studio, so there is also movement. But they want to focus on this spiritual or inspirational side of things. You'll see photos that a little bit more calming and focused on meditation or self-care. You'll also notice in their photos that more often they're not, they lean towards a warmer color. They are not neutral in white balance. They are yellow, they're warm. They feel like they were taken during a golden hour. They'll also use brand cards in here, text boxes that have all of their brand colors and it to showcase their brand more, as well as post that, utilize their logo, whether it's on a product or in the imagery. This is a great way for them to continue to stay branded. They have colors that you see throughout. They stick to the same white balance and they utilize their logo in many ways. Now another brand that I've worked with is canine ancestral diet. This is the world's best dog food. It's a little bit more expensive, but it's totally worth it for the nutritional value that your pets get from it. Now, this brand doesn't have as many photos. They're very new brand. So they're still working on collecting their brand photography and utilizing that in their marketing. So they rely on a lot of stock photography or iPhone photography. Now, when it comes to their stock and iPhone photos, they're looking for the same thing. They have a more neutral, it's white balanced, but it kinda leans on the cooler side. Sometimes they like photos to be nice and clear and of course, to feature your favorite pet. There are a little bit more humorous and playful. And they want to showcase the nutritional side of their brand by highlighting the ingredients that you'll find in their product. This is a great way to showcase their brand as a new brand on social media. These same photos you'll also find on their website because they're still high-quality, even if their stock photos and they're slowly adding in more and more professional photos to their website. Make it really feel like their own. You can see from each one of these brands, including my own, that they've come up with rules with what works and doesn't work for their brand. What photos will be identified as that brands photos. Whatever rules you decide to come up with there, your rules. You get to make the business decision of what rules apply to your brand, what colors you use, what kind of adjectives are used to describe your photos. Put them together in a library so you can see the photos side-by-side and decide which ones actually fit with your brand plan. Once you've decided on the rules for your brand, it's time to add them to your brand guidelines. Again, your brand guidelines are gonna be used by any person who is representing your brand, whether as an employee or a contractor or a partner. So make sure you have all of your rules in there, including how you choose photos to represent your brand. 5. What is Your Brand Voice?: Okay, We're almost done building your brand guidelines. And the final step is to get really clear in your voice. The voice of your brand is gonna be the way that you talk, whether written or on video or in person. You want to come up with a cohesive voice that always sounds like your brand. The first thing to decide is, are you a funny brand? Are you in educational brand? Are you motivational, inspirational? Where does that voice lay? A couple of examples of this might be Joanna Gaines from Magnolia journal. When you read the writing from Magnolia journal, It's very sentimental. It's sweet, it's endearing, it's inspirational. It's very rare that I'm laughing because I read that. Now. On the other hand, I might watch a video or read an article from Rachel Hollis and I'll be laughing my bud off because it's high-energy and it's silly and it's sarcastic, and that's what it's meant to be. Now, both of these people are motivational, they're inspirational. They're pushing you to go create the life you want to create. But one person is doing it in a much more spiritual and serious mode. And the other person is making you laugh through the pain. So there's no wrong way to create the voice for your brand. You just need to decide on it, get clear, and then start writing that way. A couple of things to ask yourself when you're creating your voice, or things like, does your brand curse? And if you do, How far are you going to go? Are you throwing F bombs or do you say things like ****? These are all intentional decisions that need to be made now so that there's clarity in the future. One of the exercises I like to have brands do, sit down and write a list of ten to 15 brand isms that you guys say. Things that you notice yourself saying over and over and over again that are just so ingrained into your brand and you'll continue to overuse them in the future. There are part of your voice, they're a part of your brand. A few examples for me would be phrases like get clear. Even throughout these videos, you've heard me say the word clear, clarity and intentional about a million times. Those are obviously words that are associated with my brand. Because when you walk away from my brand, I want you to think about clarity and intentionality. An example for a yoga studio that I work with is they love to talk about your pelvic floor. That is their thing. They talk about it all the time. And so that's one of their brand isms. They have blog posts about it. They talk about it in their classes. If you are part of this brand, if you go and work out at this studio, you have probably learned more about your pelvic floor in those classes. Then you've ever heard the word used in the rest of your life. That's the idea. You're looking for ten to 15 phrases and they could all be similar, like get clear and words with clarity. There's still the same subject matter, just different ways of using them. You want ten to 15 of these words that are your brand isms. They're words that your audience will identify as you whenever they're reading copy. At the end of the day, anytime a customer interacts with your brand, whether they see your logo or see your name anywhere. I want them to know that it's your brand. That's what creating a cohesive brand is all about. The last thing to include in the voice section of your guidelines are really just copywriting rules. In creating a cohesive brand. There are some different grammatical ideas and debates out there, and you need to choose your stance on them. The biggest one, and probably my biggest pet peeve is the Oxford comma. I personally, I'm a user of the Oxford comma. Any brand that works with me, I add the Oxford comma into everything that they do. If you don't know what an Oxford comma is, it is the commonly used after listening, a couple of things before the word. And so if you said one comma 23, I would put a comma between two and the word, and that's the Oxford comma. It's small details like that, that feel like they don't mean anything, but they do because the devil's in the details. So come up with the grammar rules. Whether you've had conversations with your team or with friends about what should and shouldn't be in your copy. All of these things will end up in your brand guidelines. From choosing your tone of voice, to choosing the rules around whether you curse or don't curse. And the grammar that you want to use within your copy. All of these decisions are going to help you get even more clear on who your brand is. So that you can make sure your audience understands who you are. And they connect with you every time. 6. Create Your Customer Profile: Here's the problem. You're feeling like you're getting lost in the crowd. Like no matter what, your marketing is, just not hitting the spot. Sure. You get customers here in there, but it's not to the volume that you've been dreaming of. This isn't the brand of your dreams. You're trying to reach your customer, but you just feel like it's falling flat. Or maybe worst of all, your customers don't even know that you solve their problems. I get it. I've been here a thousand times with a 100 different brands, including my own, especially my own. The reality is, is that when it comes to your brand, you need to know who your client is. I don't just mean, well, we serve everybody. We're super inclusive. We serve absolutely everyone. That's all well and good. But that's not going to get you the conversions that you've been dreaming of. That's not even gonna get you the conversions. That's going to make your brand successful enough to stay in business. So here's the truth of the matter. You have to get specific. Your business does not serve everyone. That's the cold hard truth. Think of any brand that you know. Do they serve everyone? They probably don't. Their marketing goes to tailored people who actually shops with them. What problems do they really solve? The beauty about going specific with your audience is it allows you the privilege to know exactly who you're talking to and speak exactly to their needs. I'm talking. It feels like you are right in front of them, talking to them. That's powerful. That's marketing, that's actually going to convert. That's marketing. That's going to build lifelong customers. And that's what we want. After all. We want customers that don't just shop once, that aren't just followers. We want to tribe, we want people who are always coming back for more. And that only comes when your specific enough with your brand and you know exactly who you're serving. The benefit of getting this tailored in your audience is it makes it so much easier to build content. Because you know what your specific customer wants to read on your blog, wants to see on their Instagram feed, you know what videos are going to help solve their problems. Or at the very least, they're going to find entertaining. This allows you to make quality email newsletters that get higher open rates and especially higher engagement rates. And of course, when you know who your ideal audiences, you can speak directly to them so that they know you're the expert they need to go to in order to have their problem-solved. The best advertising is speaking to a specific person. When you're googling something on the Internet and you get Google ads that pop up. You want it to be identifying you and your needs. Those are the ads that you connect with. And the same is going to be true with your audience. I know for myself personally, and many of the brands that I've worked with, that mission is kind of an ugly word. Whether you call it a niche, niche. Nietzsche, it doesn't matter. It's still has value. And I can say from personal experience with my own brand and that of the brands that I've worked with. It's hard. It's uncomfortable. And it's necessary. You see by getting into a really target audience, that small group that you know are going to engage with you and love you. You feel like you're leaving a lot of people out of the cut. You feel like you're leaving money at the door. Conversions that could be building your business. But the truth of the matter is, it's not true. The power with a niche is actually that you can build content and speak to an audience on such a deeper level that you don't just bring onetime customers. You bring in customers for life. You bring in your tribe. You aren't excluding anybody. You aren't specifically saying, we're not going to sell to these people. You are more than happy to sell to anyone. You want your products to do well. You want sales to go up, and you want to help other people through the specific, you reach the universal. Let me unpack that a little bit. When I mark it and I talk about really specific things that identify with my ideal customer. For example, they love tea. They're huge tea drinkers. So on my social media, I might post my morning cup of tea or a local tea shop that I found. And I talk about TLR. I'm now connecting with T lovers out there because I know that my specific ideal customer loves t. Now, that doesn't mean that every tea lover out there is looking for a brand strategist. It also doesn't mean that I'm not going to accept somebody who drinks coffee. I just know that my ideal customer loves tea. I talk about T in hopes of hitting that person. To go even further with this analogy. I also know that my ideal customer loves to go hiking with their dog, and yes, they do have two dogs. So I know that this woman loves to go hiking. She's got two dogs, and she loves tea. I'm speaking to her on my social media. Now, that doesn't mean that people without dogs won't come to me. It doesn't mean that people who hate to hike but have dogs and love tea won't come to me. The idea is that I know my person so specifically well, that I can target her. And through going specifically to her, I'm still going to hit other people. I'm going to hit the T lovers who don't necessarily love to go hiking and the hikers who don't necessarily love t. The key here is that through the specific, you gain the universal. Which is why choosing a niche and getting really specific with your audience is important to having a strong marketing strategy. So in the next video, I'm going to share with you how to get clear in your audience by creating a client profile. 7. Reach Your Ideal Customer: In the last video, I explained to you why a client profile is so important. The power of getting specific with your audience will change your marketing game. It really will. It'll help you grow your business and help the right customers find you. So now we're going to talk about how to build a client profile. In this lesson, you'll have found a PDF that the client profile questionnaire. Feel free to download that and fill it out. But before you get to that, I want to talk a little bit more about what goes into a client profile. That worksheet is great and it's gonna give you a really good basis. But there's always room to go even deeper. So let's take a couple of minutes just to kinda go over what's in this questionnaire and what are the things you can be thinking about when building your client profile? The first thing to get clear on is how many audiences are you serving? Ideally, you're serving one audience. But there are some brands that have multiple products that therefore need different audiences. A great example of this would be a yoga studio. Yoga studio often sells a membership for classes, whether online or in-person, as well as like a yoga teacher training or some other form of advanced training. Now, these two audiences are most likely different people. They might have a lot of similarities, but the person who is going to be going for a yoga teacher training is looking for something much deeper. Or if it's like a 300 hour yoga teacher training, they already have to be a yoga teacher in order to hit that training. So that's a really specific audience that needs to go into that bucket. However, the audience that's going in for a membership, they might be new to yoga or have at least some experience and yoga, maybe you're even looking for advanced yoga practitioners. That's up to you. But that's an example of when you might need to audiences. Another way of looking at audiences is for a clothing brand. If you're a clothing brand and you sell two men and two women, you might have two different audiences, or you have the same audience, but one is men and one is women. It's still important to differentiate and make sure you know who you're selling to, especially when you start building audiences for your advertising. You're obviously going to want to sell men's clothing to men and women's clothing to women. Alright, you get it. You're going to need at least one client profile to, at the very most, when you start trying to serve more than two audiences, it gets overwhelming and confusing and your message is going to get left behind. So my suggestion is if you can stick to one customer profile for your entire brand. To it, the simpler you can make your brand, the better for you in the long run. If however, you really feel like you have two products that have two completely different audiences. I get it. And I will give you this one. You can create two client profiles. All of the rules will still apply. So let's get started. When you're creating your client profile. We want to start with the basics. Of course, what age are they? What gender are they? Do they identify as the gender? What salary do we they make? What location do they live in? All of these questions are relevant to your person. Now, don't get hung up on the details. You might say that your person lives in Denver, Colorado. That doesn't mean you can't mark it to people in Portland. You're basically saying they live in a metropolitan area or you're saying they live in a mountainous area, that is up to you. But just know we're choosing a general place because we're thinking of one specific person within our client profile. So give them a name. My client profile is Meghan. She is 35 years old and lives in Portland, Oregon. She makes a combined income with her husband of a 150 thousand a year. That's a great place to start. From there, we want to go into more specifics. What does your ideal customer do? Do they have their own business? Do they work for a brand? Are they in the corporate life? How many hours a day are they spending out work? All of those questions apply. You're then going to want to get into specifics of how they spend their free time. What does their family life look like? Are they married? Do they have kids? I mentioned in my previous video that my ideal customer has two dogs and is married. What do they like to do in their free time? What are their shopping habits like? Now, if you sell a product, this question is really important. And I like to get even more specific on their shopping interests by thinking of what are the brands that they buy from? How much of their income is expendable? Do they love to shop? Do they not like to shop? Are they looking for sustainable products? Do they like buying from corporations or do they prefer small businesses? Do they buy luxury goods, or are they Penny pictures? All of the questions about product sales are gonna be important to your business. If you sell a product, you sell a service. It might be. Is it a luxury service? Isn't something they do to treat themselves? How often do they treat themselves? Do they have a hard time treating themselves? What's their budget for this? Is there a way they can get their friends involved? Speaking of friends, what are their friends like? What did their friends think about them? How would they describe your ideal client? The list of questions can go on and on and on. I suggest taking the questionnaire I provided you and answering all of those questions. If more ideas pop up within ten or 15 minutes of filling this out, go ahead and write those down. But the rabbit hole of building your client profile can keep you away from the rest of your work. And we don't want to get lost in this. It's important and the specifics matter, but this shouldn't take up all of your precious time. Another way to look at your client profile is with arc types. I talked to you about an archetype for your brand and a previous video. And I want to bring it back on. And I want to come back to that here. Everything you learned in that lesson about building archetypes for your brand, to understand who you are as a brand. Completely work for who your client profile is to the exact same strategy you can use here to get more specific and more clear on who your client profile is if that strategy did not connect with you. Here's another one. I like to think of it in real life customer that I have and base my client profile of them. Who is your favorite person to work with? You know, the person that walks into your shop and you're like, thank you. Jesus. I'm so glad that she's here today. She is so much fun to work with. Or when you got a new product and she's the first person you want to call. Or if you have a service, it's the person that you cannot wait to serve. Maybe he was your first customer ever and you cannot wait to work with them every chance you get whoever just popped into your mind right now, write it down. That person might just be the picture of your ideal customer. What you can even do is asked to have an interview with them and ask all of these questions to that specific person. Maybe you do it for trade and you offer them a goodie or give them a gift card for helping you out with your business. This is a great way to get really clear on your customer profile. If you couldn't come up with somebody specific, there's one more strategy I have for you. And that's thinking of a famous actor or character in a movie or TV show that you think would be your ideal customer? I worked with a brand who did engagement photography. And the person they chose was Megan Merkel. Whether she was her character in suits or the Duchess, or an advocate for children in Africa. The many aspects of Megan Merkel fit perfect with their ideal customer by thinking of her when they were creating their profile, they were able to answer all of the questions honestly and thoroughly. The time has come for you to start working on your ideal client profile. Whether you use the archetype strategy from our previous video, the in real life person strategy. And you call, you call the customer that came to mind, the actor or a character from a TV show strategy. Or simply just come up with somebody who doesn't exist and fill out the questionnaire. This feels silly and it feels like it might not matter to your business. But I promise these precious moments that you're putting into this strategy right now are going to pay off when you start doing advertising, building audiences, and creating content. It's really going to make a difference in your brand. 8. Understanding Pain Points: The next step with getting clear in your client profile is understanding their pain points. What many brands forget is that you are here to solve somebody's problem. What problem do you solve? How do you make your customers lives better? These are really important questions when it comes to your client profile and your marketing in general. Because the reality is, is that when you're marketing, you're really speaking to your customer's pain point. You're putting it in broad daylight. You're showing them what the problem is and what solution you offer. When you think of any content you consume or any product that you purchased, you are trying to solve a problem. You have a pain point. Now you might say, no, that's not true. I just thought that lipstick on Wednesday because it was there and I felt like it. But there was a story going on in your head and there was a pain point you created in order to buy the lipstick. So let's break this down a little bit. When it comes to customer pain points. There are three different types of pain points. The first one is the obvious pain point. This is like, I don't have a candle. I need a candle or my nails look terrible. I need to get them done. Or maybe it's, we're going to have a baby, we need baby clothes. Those are the obvious. There is a need, there is a product or service, you make a purchase. But when we talk about trying to stand out from our competition, It's not really a great way to stand out because there's a ton of places that sell candles or can do your nails or sell baby clothes. So then how do you stand out from your competition? Well, we take it one step deeper by going to paint point number two, which is the internal problem. In the internal problem, this is the story that's going on in our head. This is the thought of when I buy this thing, I'm going to feel this way. My life is going to look this way. And that's really where your marketing begins. So let's break down those three examples with the internal problem. If you're in the market for a candle, you might say, I need a candle. But really what you're saying is, I need some peace and tranquility in my life, which is what the candle represents. Or I wanna make my bath time feel like a spot. That's how we take your marketing in the next level. For nails, you might say, I need a treat yourself moment and go get a manicure. And for baby clothes, it's not just we're about to have a baby. We need some clothes. We're about to have a baby. And we want to make wise decisions with what we buy. And so we're looking for sustainable baby clothes. Or we want sustainable baby clothes aren't going to hurt our child's skin. The internal problem might not be, I need a man of care, but I need to treat yourself a moment. The internal problem isn't I just need baby clothes. It's, I want my baby to be the cutest baby on the block. By taking your pain point from the obvious thing that they need to the story that's going on in their head. You're painting a beautiful picture. And this is why a customer is going to choose you over the competition. But we're not going to stop there. We're going to take this 20 steps deeper or go in like seven C's deep here. So in the third pain point, This is the injustice. This is going from just the story in your head to saying, No, this is not fair. You deserve this. For a candle. It might be. You deserve a spa night. That takes your mind off all your worries. For a nail salon, it might be you deserve to take care of those hands that work hard all day. For baby clothes, it might be your baby deserves the best clothes touching their skin. Do you feel the power that those statements had, the connections? Think about that. You could hear your baby needs baby clothes. Or you could hear your baby deserves to have the best fabrics touching their skin. The connection is so much more powerful when you get to pain points, 231 will always be the obvious one. It's why you started your business. But 23, create a story that builds connection with your audience and will create lifelong customers. I want you to take a couple of moments to think about what the three pain points are for your customer. Start with the obvious one. This is really easy and it just gets the ground rolling. What is the problem that your product or service solves? Very surface level. Why is your customer buying from you? Now go deeper. What is the story in their head of why they need your product or service? Now go deeper. Why do they deserve this product or service? What injustice are they facing that they need your product or service? Feel free to pause this video and go ahead and write out your answers. This is big stuff and it's gonna make a huge difference in your marketing. So take all the time you need to get really clear on the three levels of pain points. And you might have more than one. You might have a couple of options that go into each category. Feel free to include those two. Now that you've gotten yours written out. How do you use them? I don't want to just give you this a great tool and not tell you how to implement it. Here's the way to use the three pain points in your marketing. You want to start by including it in as much coffee as possible. Now, if you wrote down a 100 different pain points, I would choose your top ones. You're only going to need three or four total. In the internal. And the injustice categories. Leave, leave the level one pain points behind because they're not going to help your marketing. They're just declare a point for you. So with these three for pain points, you want to be talking about them in your copy. Talk about them one at a time, mentioned them altogether. Play with it a little bit. This should go on your website. It should go in your social posts. You should talk about in your emails. Literally, anywhere you put copy, you should be talking about the pain points. Now I know what you're thinking. Put it in all my copy does not get repetitive. Yes. That's the point. When we look at marketing today, seven to nine. It takes seven to nine times minimum for somebody to remember your brand. That's just with your logo flying around, let alone the copy that they have to read an actually ingest. This is going to take even more times. So even though you have it on your homepage and the landing pages and your newsletter and your captions. It is still going to take your customers a while to register it. So you want to be on repeat for those of you in the back who didn't hear that, let's say it again. You want to be on repeat. Your pain points are going to be repetitive. You're going to talk about them a lot. You're gonna build content that references them all the time. Because you're going to be known for solving these specific pinpoints. We've talked about wanting to be the expert in your field, which is how you differentiate yourself from your competitors. By being on repeat, by being known for those specific pain points that you solve, you become an expert. So your pain points go in all major copy. It should be mentioned again and again in your social posts. It should be referenced all over your website and included in any other major marketing assets, videos, blog posts, brochures, you name it, you should be referencing at least one pain point and all of those things. In a later video, I break down all of the ways you're going to implement your customer profile, your brand profile, and everything you learned in-between on your website, your newsletters, and your social media. But before we get into that in-depth dive, I just want to mention a couple of specific ways that you can be using your pain points in your copy on your website, specifically on your homepage, at least one to two pain points should be mentioned. This can be as simple as stating it as we did earlier. You deserve to have blank. It's not fair that you don't have blank. It's not fair that you feel blank. Obviously. You're obviously your customer's pain points goes into the blank. Taking the sentences that you built out for your level two and level three pain points. You can use that exact copy and just stick it on your homepage. Use it in your captions. It doesn't have to be fancy. You'll learn to play with a little bit too and different ways that you can talk about that same problem. But the idea is that whenever you're marketing to somebody, you always come back to the problem. In great storytelling. There's a problem. Every movie, every book, every story you've ever heard. There was a beginning, a middle, and an end. And in that middle is the climax. That's the pain point. We're talking about the pain so that there can be a solution, which is you creating that happily ever after. The idea about highlighting the pain point is that you also highlight the happily ever after. You have to paint the picture of how you are going to solve your customer's problems. Because if you just name their problems, now they're just aware that they're unhappy. But you also have to name what the solution looks like and how they get it. Now that you know what your ideal customers pain points are, start thinking of ways that you can implement them into your copy. How can you include this on your website? When will you include it in captions on social media? Does it fit into your next newsletter? Continue to think of ways of how you can highlight your ideal customers pain points. And then paint that beautiful picture of how you solve them. 9. How to Use Your Client Profile: The next step with getting clear in your client profile is understanding their pain points. What many brands forget is that you are here to solve somebody's problem. What problem do you solve? How do you make your customers lives better? These are really important questions when it comes to your client profile and your marketing in general. Because the reality is, is that when you're marketing, you're really speaking to your customer's pain point. You're putting it in broad daylight. You're showing them what the problem is and what solution you offer. When you think of any content you consume or any product that you purchased, you are trying to solve a problem. You have a pain point. Now you might say, no, that's not true. I just thought that lipstick on Wednesday because it was there and I felt like it. But there was a story going on in your head and there was a pain point you created in order to buy the lipstick. So let's break this down a little bit. When it comes to customer pain points. There are three different types of pain points. The first one is the obvious pain point. This is like, I don't have a candle. I need a candle or my nails look terrible. I need to get them done. Or maybe it's, we're going to have a baby, we need baby clothes. Those are the obvious. There is a need, there is a product or service, you make a purchase. But when we talk about trying to stand out from our competition, It's not really a great way to stand out because there's a ton of places that sell candles or can do your nails or sell baby clothes. So then how do you stand out from your competition? Well, we take it one step deeper by going to paint point number two, which is the internal problem. In the internal problem, this is the story that's going on in our head. This is the thought of when I buy this thing, I'm going to feel this way. My life is going to look this way. And that's really where your marketing begins. So let's break down those three examples with the internal problem. If you're in the market for a candle, you might say, I need a candle. But really what you're saying is, I need some peace and tranquility in my life, which is what the candle represents. Or I wanna make my bath time feel like a spot. That's how we take your marketing in the next level. For nails, you might say, I need a treat yourself moment and go get a manicure. And for baby clothes, it's not just we're about to have a baby. We need some clothes. We're about to have a baby. And we want to make wise decisions with what we buy. And so we're looking for sustainable baby clothes. Or we want sustainable baby clothes aren't going to hurt our child's skin. The internal problem might not be, I need a man of care, but I need to treat yourself a moment. The internal problem isn't I just need baby clothes. It's, I want my baby to be the cutest baby on the block. By taking your pain point from the obvious thing that they need to the story that's going on in their head. You're painting a beautiful picture. And this is why a customer is going to choose you over the competition. But we're not going to stop there. We're going to take this 20 steps deeper or go in like seven C's deep here. So in the third pain point, This is the injustice. This is going from just the story in your head to saying, No, this is not fair. You deserve this. For a candle. It might be. You deserve a spa night. That takes your mind off all your worries. For a nail salon, it might be you deserve to take care of those hands that work hard all day. For baby clothes, it might be your baby deserves the best clothes touching their skin. Do you feel the power that those statements had, the connections? Think about that. You could hear your baby needs baby clothes. Or you could hear your baby deserves to have the best fabrics touching their skin. The connection is so much more powerful when you get to pain points, 231 will always be the obvious one. It's why you started your business. But 23, create a story that builds connection with your audience and will create lifelong customers. I want you to take a couple of moments to think about what the three pain points are for your customer. Start with the obvious one. This is really easy and it just gets the ground rolling. What is the problem that your product or service solves? Very surface level. Why is your customer buying from you? Now go deeper. What is the story in their head of why they need your product or service? Now go deeper. Why do they deserve this product or service? What injustice are they facing that they need your product or service? Feel free to pause this video and go ahead and write out your answers. This is big stuff and it's gonna make a huge difference in your marketing. So take all the time you need to get really clear on the three levels of pain points. And you might have more than one. You might have a couple of options that go into each category. Feel free to include those two. Now that you've gotten yours written out. How do you use them? I don't want to just give you this a great tool and not tell you how to implement it. Here's the way to use the three pain points in your marketing. You want to start by including it in as much coffee as possible. Now, if you wrote down a 100 different pain points, I would choose your top ones. You're only going to need three or four total that are in the internal. And the injustice categories. Leave, leave the level one pain points behind because they're not going to help your marketing. They're just declare a point for you. So with these three for pain points, you want to be talking about them in your copy. Talk about them one at a time, mentioned them altogether. Play with it a little bit. This should go on your website. It should go in your social posts. You should talk about it in your emails. Literally, anywhere you put copy, you should be talking about the pain points. Now I know what you're thinking. Put it in all my copy does not get repetitive. Yes. That's the point. When we look at marketing today, seven to nine. It takes seven to nine times minimum for somebody to remember your brand. That's just with your logo flying around, let alone the copy that they have to read and actually ingest. This is going to take even more times. So even though you have it on your homepage and the landing pages and your newsletter and your captions. It is still going to take your customers a while to register it. So you wanna be on repeat for those of you in the back who didn't hear that, let's say it again. You want to be on repeat. Your pain points are going to be repetitive. You're going to talk about them a lot. You're going to build content that references them all the time. Because you're going to be known for solving these specific pinpoints. We've talked about wanting to be the expert in your field, which is how you differentiate yourself from your competitors. By being on repeat, by being known for those specific pain points that you solve, you become an expert. So your pain points go in all major copy. It should be mentioned again and again in your social posts. It should be referenced all over your website and included in any other major marketing assets, videos, blog posts, brochures, you name it, you should be referencing at least one pain point and all of those things. In a later video, I break down all of the ways you're going to implement your customer profile, your brand profile, and everything you learned in-between on your website, your newsletters, and your social media. But before we get into that in-depth dive, I just want to mention a couple of specific ways that you can be using your pain points in your copy on your website, specifically on your homepage, at least one to two pain points should be mentioned. This can be as simple as stating it as we did earlier. You deserve to have blank. It's not fair that you don't have blank. It's not fair that you feel blank. Obviously. You're obviously your customer's pain points goes into the blank. Taking the sentences that you built out for your level two and level three pain points. You can use that exact copy and just stick it on your homepage. Use it in your captions. It doesn't have to be fancy. You'll learn to play with a little bit too and different ways that you can talk about that same problem. But the idea is that whenever you're marketing to somebody, you always come back to the problem. In great storytelling. There's a problem. Every movie, every book, every story you've ever heard. There was a beginning, a middle, and an end in that middle is the climax. That's the pain point. We're talking about the pain so that there can be a solution, which is you creating that happily ever after. The idea about highlighting the pain point is that you also highlight the happily ever after. You have to paint the picture of how you are going to solve your customer's problems. Because if you just name their problems, now they're just aware that they're unhappy. But you also have to name what the solution looks like and how they get it. Now that you know what your ideal customers pain points are, start thinking of ways that you can implement them into your copy. How can you include this on your website? When will you include it in captions on social media? Does it fit into your next newsletter? Continue to think of ways how you can highlight your ideal customers pain points. And then paint that beautiful picture of how you solve them. 10. Intro to Facebook Ads: We've already gone through and created your client profile. You know exactly the audience that you're marketing to. So now with this information, we can create things for our advertising, like Facebook audiences. It's simple. And now that you have a clear understanding of who your ideal audiences, it's even easier to build audiences. So let's get started. First, you're going to want to head on over to Facebook and go to the audience section of your business tools. You'll find this right over here. Once inside, there's a bunch of different ways to create audiences. Look-a-like audience. There's custom audiences where we're going to start with custom audiences. So we'll go here. How I like to start building audiences is you're first going to bring in people who have visited your website or already already signed up for your email list. You can choose your website here and just add in. You'll just add in your URL. Or if you choose a customer list, you'll need to upload a CSV. For the case of this example, we're just going to use a website like we're going to start with. It's connected to my pixel. We want web visitors will say for the last 180 days, you can only go up to 180 days. So we're gonna do that. And then we're going to name this audience Katie's website, viewers. You can add a description if you need more details later. These are just for your ability to go through and find audiences again. So name them whatever you need and add descriptions if that's useful for you. When I create this audience. Now what we wanna do is create a lookalike audience. So we're taking people who have already been to your website and they know that they like you and other interested in what you have to offer. And we want to take that exact same type of person and create a lookalike audience with it. So we're going to create a lookalike audience. Here. You're going to select your lookalike source. Ours was the one that I just created Katie's website. Then you can select an event value. I don't have values setup with my website, so it doesn't really work for me here. I'm just going to skip this step. However, in the next step, I have the option of choosing a lookalike audience that's really narrow or really large, going from 1% to 10%. The idea of this is that they're going to take 1% of the population, of the US population. That looks like my audience and create an audience of that. Or they can go up to 10%. So here you'll select your lookalike source. If you have Value-based sources setup where you have a Shopify account or a way that people are purchasing and you can choose a value. You can select. From this section, otherwise, go to other sources, and we'll just choose from website. The next option is how many lookalike audiences you want. We just want one. Then you'll get the option of choosing from 1% to 10. 10% percent is going to create a huge audience. And it's not going to be specific. We want to get clear and who were selling to so that we can make sure we're tying our messaging to the right people. We don't want a huge audience. We want a specific audience that will convert. I always stick with 1%. From here, we'll create the audience. Now. It is doing its work to put that together. It'll take a little bit of time. But even while that's being put together, we can fine tune our audience in the Add section. So go ahead and click on the little dots and go to Ads Manager. From here, we're going to create a new campaign. There's a couple of different options you can choose. For most people, I start them with engagement or traffic. Engagement means my only goal is getting you to engage with the post, likes, comments, shares, that kind of thing. Traffic is the goal is to get people to your website. So I have a two tier Facebook strategy where I like to start people off on the engagement. And once people have interacted with my account, then they get a retargeted ad that is geared towards traffic. You need to have 21 convergence before you can start doing conversions campaign. Because Facebook needs to learn how conversions are happening before it allow you to do a campaign like that. So you need 21 conversions in 30 days. For this campaign will start with traffic. We'll hit Continue. You can name this whatever you want. Moreover, next, this asset again, name it what you need to. If you would like to have dynamic ads where you have different image options or different texts options. And then you can see the reporting on that. You'll want to turn this on. You'll set your budget. You can set it for lifetime or daily and then your start and end dates. But here's really where I want to get to. This is where we start getting super specific with your audience. In the search existing audiences, we can find the audience that we just built. That's the lookalike audience. We'll go ahead and click there. But this isn't all we want. We want to go so much deeper than this. So I want to go and say, I'm really only looking for people who are in Colorado. Now as a service-based business, that's not necessarily true. I might have specific states that I know my ideal client is in. And so I start there. Having all of the US is a huge territory and it makes more sense to start small with the states or the city's, you know, you're gonna do better in and start figuring out what's working and what's not working. They just throwing your money at everything. I'm a big proponent of starting small in the geographically and then expanding bigger. So we'll start with Colorado. From here. What is the age range of your ideal client? I know my ideal client is probably 282 at the most 50. Great. What about their gender? I know that my ideal client is a woman. That doesn't mean I don't work with men, but most of the people I worked with end up being women. So I choose women. Now we get into the detailed targeting. So I know that my ideal client loved sustainability. I would add in here things around sustainability. Once I click on one, I can view the suggestions and say, Oh, sustainable living, 0 waste, ethical consumerism. All of these things go together. That's great. But I know that my ideal clients not only interested in the environment, they're also run a business. So I want to narrow my audience further and say, they not only have to be interested in all of the sustainability asked aspects, but they also have to be interested in business. So here I would add business owner job titles. We can do that and then we get suggestions. Small business, entrepreneurship, business owner, manager, CEO, all of these you can go on and on and on. Okay, great. What else do I know about my ideal customer? I know my ideal customer loves the outdoors. So I might go even further and say they love REI and they loved the north face. I can continue getting suggestions, Patagonia, fuel Raven, all of these ideas to continue to narrow down. So now they have to like one thing within the sustainability section, as well as be interested in one thing in the small business section, as well as be interested in one thing in the outdoor section. As long as they are interested in one thing in each area of all three of those, they'll show up in my audience. You can even get down even more specific and choose a Income. Top 5%. Household income, top 10%, top ten to twenty-five percent. High net worth individual. So business class, all of these things. So I'm not only saying that they're sustainable and they love the outdoors and they own a business, but they also are profitable. They also are interested in luxury goods and have money to spend. These are all the things that I know come into my ideal audience and that's how I can create this audience. You'll continue to refine, get really clear. Right now. We can't see the potential reach because it's still formulating my lookalike audience. It can take up to 24 hours, but that's okay. What we do want to notice once that audience is fully loaded, is where this little dial is on the screen, it wants to stay in the green zone. I prefer it to stay in the middle or towards the left. I think getting specific is really helpful because the more targeted you can get your ads, the more specific your call to action can be in your drafts. So if you're a yoga studio, you're not just saying online yoga. You're reaching specific audiences, like yoga for back pain or yoga for moms, or yoga for married couples. Any of that kind of stuff. It gets really specific that would I'm an audit when I'm your audience and I see that ad, I resonate deeply with it. That matches me perfectly. And so I want to click on it and learn more. This is what, this is the beauty to understanding who your audiences is, that your marketing can get so much more specific and you can make smart decisions when it comes to your marketing. It's not only Facebook ads, but maybe you want to advertise in the magazine. The first question you'll ask is, who is your demographic? What are they like? What's their age range? What's their income? What's their gender? Where do they live? All of those questions are gonna be so helpful in making sure that your advertising is successful and you're not wasting money. 11. Your Elevator Pitch: We are making it through so much content. And I hope you are feeling more clear in your brand and in your audience. This next step is going to take the two things that you've been working on throughout the rest of the series and bring them all together. I want to work on your one-liner. A one-liner, an elevator pitch, a boss Bio, whatever you wanna call it, this is the key to your business. So what is this one-liner elevator pitch? Think of it this way. If you're on an elevator and you've got five floors to talk to the person standing next to you. How are you going to explain what you do and who you serve? In less than five floors, you really only have 30 seconds to a minute to talk to this person and get across what your brand is and how you can help solve their problems. Then you might hand them a card or give them your website and they can go do some more research on their own. So what we're gonna do in this segment is we're going to learn about the one-liner so that you are prepared for those quick pitches in any moment. A couple of questions you might have around the one-liner are who uses it? The quick answer to that is, anyone who is a part of your business. If it is a consultant that is talking about your business to somebody else. If it's an employee, if it's you, any person who is representing your brand should know your one-liner and be able to recite it. This means that it's a great thing to include in your brand guidelines or to make sure it's part of the onboarding process when you bring on new employees. This should be something that they're quizzed on and test it on because you want them to know who you are and who you serve. You might also be wondering, well, okay, I get who's going to use it? Everybody. But how do we use it? Well, your one-liner will be used everywhere. You can use it on the header of your homepage, on your website, or on the About page, or on pretty much any page on your website. You're going to use it on your social media. You can use it as the bios on Instagram or Facebook, or Pinterest or LinkedIn or any other social media platform. And of course, it's a great tool to have for print bios as well. If you're in a program or if you're talking about for a special event, having a short and sweet little bio about your company is going to get more eyes on it because nobody wants to read a huge paragraph. I want the gist of the thing. A one-liner is going to give you just that. So aside from being able to pitch really quick on the elevator, and aside from knowing that everyone in your brand needs to know what your one-liner is, here is the most significant reason of why you need a one-liner. A one-liner not only allows you to be clear in your brand of who you are, who you serve, and how you serve them. But a one-liner will also allow your audience to be clear in your brand. I cannot tell you the number of social media accounts I've gone to that are trying to sell me something. But I go to their profile page and read their bio and I'm like, I don't know what you do. I don't know what you sell or there's not even a link to your website for me to go purchase. All of those kinds of things. Go away once you learn how to use a one-liner. And as soon as you make this one liner, I hope you go and replace all of your bios on every social media platform. Enough about why you need a one-liner. Let's learn about how to create one. Now, I will go through all of the steps of how you create your one-liner. Let's take everything that you've learned so far and put it together. So you know who your brand is, you know who your audiences, and you know what pain points you solve. We're going to take bits and pieces from each one of those things that you have identified through these videos. To now create your one-liner. With this video, you'll find a PDF you can download to create your own Mad Libs form of a one-liner. Go ahead and download that now and we can start filling it out together. Just as we started all of these videos with getting clear on who your brand is, we want to identify your brand first in your one-liner. The first line of your one-liner is who you are, who you are as a solopreneur, like, I am a brand strategist or who you are as a business, like a yoga studio, sustainable clothing line, or a dog food company. With this first line, you're going to fill in the blank. I am a blank or we are a blank. Go ahead and fill it in. All right. Step two. Step two is all about who you help. This is the audience that you identified in your ideal client profile. Now the person that you created in that profile is hyper specific. So it's gonna be hard to name that person in your one-liner. However, you might have identified a genre, or a niche, or a group of people that will fit nicely in here. You might work with single moms, or maybe you work with people ready to retire, or maybe work with sustainable college students. Whatever that group of people that fits with your ideal client profile. That's what we're going to insert into the next section of your Mad Lib. So you said, I am a blank. Who helps blink. Go ahead and fill it in. Alright, step three. What do you help them width. Now? Yes, this always comes back to your product or your service. But more importantly, we want to name one of the pain points that we came up with earlier. You have a few pain points to choose from. What is the most significant, what is the one that you've talked about the most, or your audience talks about the most. What is the most prevalent pain point that your audience is facing that they want to hear about in your one-liner. So this could be about saving time or saving money. It could be about getting healthy. It can be about the health of the planet. All of those are hitting pain points. So you want to get clear about how you're helping them? Yes. Your service needs to be named in there because I want to know what you do. But I also want to make sure that you're hitting the pain point. So those two things need to be, need to come together. For an example, with my business as a brand strategist, I help business owners with getting clear in their marketing or getting clear in their brand. So I'm hitting the pain points. I'm talking about what the problem is. The problem is is you're not clear, you don't know what's going on, or maybe you're healthy dog food. An example would be that you are healthy dog food that helps your best friend with getting the nutrients they need. So you're identifying the pain point while still acknowledging what you actually do. Now part of your audience understanding what your brand does is going to be in the first statement. So this section can be more heavily based on your pain point. Go ahead and brainstorm ideas of what you help with in your Mad Libs. Alright, we've come to the last point, which is the vision of where they're going to be after working with your brand. This idea is the happily ever after. So you want to make a promise. What is life going to be like after they work with your brand? You've named your brand. You explain who you help, what you do, and what this will provide for them in the future. To finish off by one liner, I'm a brand, a brand strategists. I empower business owners to get clear in their brand so they can connect with their audience and build the businesses of their dreams. The final part, to take everything we just created and put it together in a cohesive, grammatically correct sentence. Makes sure it makes sense. Read it off a few times, keep it short and sweet because again, you only have 30 seconds to recite this. Not only does it need to be short for that reason, but you want your team to memorize it. And memorizing things is a lot easier when they're short. The final part is to take everything we just created, put it together in a cohesive, grammatically correct sentence, makes sure it makes sense, bring it off a few times, keep it short and sweet because again, you only have 30 seconds to recite this. Not only does it need to be short for that reason, but you want your team to memorize it. And memorizing things is a lot easier when they're short. 12. Adding What You've Learned To Your Website: You've learned a lot on this journey so far. Getting clear on your brand, getting clear on your audience. It's huge. And I want to make sure that you have tangible ways to take this and put it into play. So to start, we're going to talk about your website. You'll see here on my website, the very first thing you see is who I am. What I do spelled out in very simple letters on the very top of my page so that as soon as you get on my website, you know exactly what you're in for. Then from there, I have my one-liner. I explain what I do, who I do it for, and how it's going to help them in the long run. Then I have a quick call to action of the number one thing I want them to do as a service, It's schedule a call, get a free 30 minute clarity call. But as a product-based business, it might be to go to your shop so you can start shaping your products. So aside from my one-liner and making it really clear on what I offer, I want you to look at the photos used on my website. They fit all of my brand guidelines. They are darker and moody. They're very crisp. They showcase the outdoors, and they have lots of color to them. This is true with every photo that you see on my homepage. Along with that, I speak to my specific customer when I'm calling them out and talking about their pain points, that they're confusing their customers and all the ways not to be doing that. And then I clearly state what I'm going to do for them, how I'm going to make their life better. Once I've gotten clear on who I am, what I do, what my customers pain points are. I want to highlight testimonials. Use the word that people have said about you to build trust, to let them know you know what you're talking about. You provide a quality product. You have a service that people should be excited to use. All of that can be showcased on your homepage. Now, just as I had a call to action button at the top of my page, I have them throughout my page two, so that it's really easy to go to the page where I want them to convert. Whether this is your shop or a specific products that you offer. Make sure it's really easy and clear on how to get to those pages. You'll see at the top that I have all of my main conversion pages laid out in my menu bar, so it's easy for people to get where they need to go. The last thing that you need to have on your website is a blog. The blog allows you to build search engine optimization. But more importantly, it creates value for your customers. It answers questions that they have. It provides resources for them, it gets them inspired. You should try and produce at least one blog post a week that's in your brand voice and is answering commonly asked questions or pain points that you know, your customer is facing. Now that we've taken a dive into my own brands website, Let's look at another example. I want to highlight a Honda yoga and bars website. Here. They state clearly what they do and who they do it for. They have a call to action of the conversion they want you to take. You'll see photos and colors throughout their website that are on-brand. They give you testimonials to build trust. And then they make it easy for you to convert, highlighting their main products so that you know exactly what to buy. Of course, they also have a blog. And in this blog, you get answers to your commonly asked questions or things you didn't even know you needed. These resources can then be shared with friends found on Google searches or just used so that they can get the best value out of your business. The final example is canine ancestral diet. Again, they stay right at the beginning, what they offer. They give you an easy button to choose so that you can go and convert. They then keep their customer front of mine to talk about the pain points that their customers are facing and why you should choose them to fix your problems. They have a testimonial front and center to talk about why customers are loving their product and the option to go and read more reviews. You'll see that the photos throughout the site showcase more neutral to cooler tones. They always have a pump in them. And they give the idea of what your customer will look like once they've had the experience of working with you. Finally, they do offer a newsletter sign-up that gives you $5 off your first-order. So a free opt-in in exchange for your email so that you can try out their product and fall in love with it. All of these things that we reviewed are ways that you can implement what you've learned into your website. Put your one-liner on your website. Make sure your photographs follow your brand guidelines. Use testimonials to build trust, create a blog to add value and build off of your SEO, and have a newsletter opt-in that allows for people to get some sort of freebie, whether a discount or an actual download in exchange for their newsletter. These are simple ways that you can implement everything that you've learned into your website. So far. And I want to make it easy to take everything you've learned and put it into play. So I'm going to start off by showcasing you how you can take learn a lot on this journey. So it's sort of started. You'll see, second one. You'll see here my website. The very first thing you see is who I am. What I do spelled out in very simple letters on the very top of my page. Then as soon as you get on my website, you know exactly what you're aiming for. Then from there, I have my one liner. I explained what I do, who I do it for, and how it's going to help them in the long run. Then I have a quick call to action of the number one thing I want them to do as a service, it's scheduled call, get a free 30 minute clarity call. But as a product-based business, it might eat, go to your shop so you can start shopping your products. The next thing. So aside from my one-liner and making it really clear on what I offer, I want you to look at the photos used on my website. They fit all of my brand guidelines. They are darker and moody. They're very crisp. They showcase the outdoors, and they have lots of color to them. This is true with every photo that you see on my homepage. Along with that, I speak to my specific customer, whether I'm talking about my about page or when I'm when I'm calling them out and talking about their pain points, that they're confusing their customers and all the ways not to be doing that. And then I clearly state what I'm going to do for them, how I'm going to make their life better. Once I've gotten clear on who I am, what I do, what my customers pain points are. I want to highlight testimonials. Use the word that people have said about you to build trust, to let them know you know what you're talking about. You provide a quality product. You have a service that people should be excited to use. All of that can be hope. All of that can be showcased on your homepage. Now, just as I had a call-to-action button at the top of my page. I have them throughout my page two, so that it's really easy to go to the page where I want them to convert. Whether this is your shop or a specific products that you offer. Make sure it's really easy and clear on how to get to those pages. You'll see at the top of my you'll see at the top that I have all of my main converted pages laid out in my menu bar, so it's easy for people to get where they need to go. The last thing that you need to have on your website isn't blog. The blog allows you to build search engine optimization, but it also create, but more importantly, it creates value for your customers. It answers questions that they have. It provides resources for them, it gets them inspired. You should try and produce at least one blog post a week. It's in your brand voice and is answering commonly asked questions or pain points that you know, your customer is facing. Now that we've taken a dive into my own brands website, Let's look at another example. Similar to what we did for brain photography. I want to showcase of hatha yoga and bars website. I want to highlight a Honda yoga and bars website. Here. They state clearly what they do and who they do it for. They have a call to action of the conversion they want you to take. You'll see photos and colors throughout their website that are on-brand. They give you testimonials to build trust. And then they make it easy for you to convert, highlighting their main products so that you know exactly what to buy. Of course, they also have a blog. In this blog, you get answers to your commonly asked questions or things you didn't even know you needed. These resources can then be shared with friends found on Google searches or just used so that they can or just used so that they can get the best quality out of your business. They can get the best value out of your business. The final example is canine ancestral diet. Again, they stay right at the beginning, what they offer. They give you an easy button to choose so that you can go and convert. They then keep their customer front of mine to talk about the pain points that their customers are facing and why you should choose them to fix your problems. They have a testimonial front and center to talk about why they love. To talk about why customers are loving their product and the option to go and read more views. You'll see that the photos throughout the site showcase more neutral to cooler tones. They always have a pub in them. And it gives the idea of what your customer will look like once they've had the experience of working with you. Finally, they do offer a newsletter sign-up that gives you $5 off your first order. So a free often exchanged for your email so that you can try out their product and foam on with. All of these things that we reviewed are ways that you can you've learn a lot on this journey so far. And I want to make it easy to take everything you've learned and put it into play. So I'm going to start off by showcasing you how you can take. I'm going to show you how you can take the you've learned a lot on this journey so far. Getting clear on your brand, getting clear on your audience. It's huge. And I want to make sure that you have tangible ways to take this and put it into play. So to start, we're going to talk about your website. You'll see here my website. The first thing I want, you'll see here on my website, the very first thing you see is who I am. What I do spelled out in very simple letters on the very top of my page that as soon as you get on my website, you know exactly what you're in for. And then from there, I have my one-liner. I explain what I do, who I do it for, and how it's going to help them in the long run. Then I have a quick call to action of the number one thing I want them to do as a service, It's schedule a call, get a free 30 minute clarity call. But as a product-based business, it might be to go to your shop so you can start shopping your products. The next thing. So aside from my one-liner and making it really clear on what I offer, I want you to look at the photos used on my website. They fit all of my brand guidelines. They are darker and moody. They're very crisp. They showcase the outdoors and there, and they have lots of color to them. This is true with every photo that you see on my homepage. Along with that, I speak to my specific customer, whether I'm talking about my about page or when I'm when I'm calling them out and talking about their pain points. But they're confusing their customers and all the ways not to be doing that. And then I clearly state what I'm going to do for them, how I'm going to make their life better. Once I've gotten clear on who I am, what I do, what my customers pain points are. I want to highlight testimonials. Use the word that people have said about you to build trust, to let them know you know what you're talking about. You provide a quality product. You have a service that people should be excited to use. All of that can be hoped. All of that can be showcased on your homepage. Now, just as I had a call-to-action button at the top of my page. I have them throughout my page two, so that it's really easy to go to the page where I want them to convert. Whether this is your shop or a specific products that you offer. Make sure it's really easy and clear on how to get to those pages. You'll see at the top of my, you'll see at the top that I have all of my main conversion pages laid out in my menu bar, so it's easy for people to get where they need to go. The last thing that you need to have on your website is a blog. The blog allows you to build search engine optimization, but it also, but more importantly, it creates value for your customers. It answers questions that they have. It provides resources for them, it gets them inspired. You should try and produce at least one blog post a week that's in your brand voice and is answering commonly asked questions or pain points that you know, your customers facing. Now that we've taken a dive into my own brands website, Let's look at another example. Similar to what we did for brand photography. I want to showcase upon a yoga and bars website. I want to highlight a Honda yoga and bars website. Here. They state clearly what they do and who they do it for. They have a call to action of the conversion they want you to take. You'll see photos and colors throughout their website that are on-brand. They give you testimonials to build trust. And then they make it easy for you to convert, highlighting their main products so that you know exactly what to buy. Of course, they also have a blog. And in this blog, you get answers to your commonly asked questions or things you didn't even know you needed. These resources can then be shared with friends found on Google searches or just used so that they can or just used so that they can get the best quality out of your business so that they can get the best value out of your business. The final example is canine ancestral diet. Again, they stay right at the beginning, what they offer. They give you an easy button to choose so that you can go and convert. They then keep their customer front of mine to talk about the pain points that their customers are facing and why you should choose them to fix your problems. They have a testimonial front and center to talk about why they love. To talk about why customers are loving their product and the option to go and read more reviews. You'll see that the photos throughout the site showcase more neutral to cooler tones. They always have a pup in them. And they give the idea of what your customer will look like once they've had the experience of working with you. Finally, they do offer a newsletter sign-up that gives you $5 off your first-order. So a free opt-in in exchange for your email so that you can try out their product and fall in love with it. All of these things that we've reviewed are ways that you can implement what you've learned into your website. Put your one-liner on your website. Make sure your photographs follow your brand guidelines. Use testimonials to build trust, create a blog to add value and build off of your SEO, and have a newsletter opt-in that allows for people to get some sort of freebie, whether a discount or an actual download in exchange for their newsletter. These are simple ways that you can implement everything that you've learned into your website. 13. Social Media Strategy: Let's talk about how you use what you've learned on social. So here's the thing about social. When it comes to social. There, there are two things to remember. Consistency and quality. You want to be consistent in your messaging, in your look and feel, and how often you're posting and the style and type of content that you're posting. You also want to be creating the highest quality work you can possibly put out there. This means that if you need to make less content to make it higher-quality, then do that. It is less important to post every single day as it is to post high-quality content that your audience cares about. The worst feeling is putting out a post and getting 0 engagement on it. Instead, take the time to make it what your customers are looking for so that you get the return on investment. But let's dive even deeper. To start with your social media based on everything you've learned so far. I want to talk to you about who you are as a brand. When it comes to your social, you should be using a voice that matches your brand. And as mentioned in your brand guidelines, you also need to choose a theme for your account. Are you Educational? Are you motivational or encouraging? Or are you inspirational? There's a difference between all these types of accounts and it's important that you figure out who you are as a brand so that you can create content that aligns with that style. The other decision you'll want to make is how you're going to incorporate your brand colors or your photography rules that you created in your brand guidelines. These are going to help you create a consistency and feel for your feed, as well as any individual posts that your customers or potential customers come across in their feeds. Your goal on social media is that anytime somebody sees a post from you, they know it's from you. Without looking at the handle. You want to make your content veranda to who you are, so it's recognizable anywhere. The style of photos, the brand colors, the voice. Any of that can be an identifier for your brand. Now that we've gotten clear on the brand side of your social, let's talk about your audience. This is a big thing for brands. It's getting really clear and niche on your customer. You've already done the hard work by building out your customer profile, potentially using archetypes to get even deeper on who your specific person is that you cater to. Now it's about finding them on social so you can start the conversations. The way to grow your following or build engagement on social is to do just that, to follow other accounts and to engage on other accounts. In order to get engagement, you need to give engagement. And that's just how the game is played. What I like to do is I like to think of accounts that my customers following. If I know that my customer loves Magnolia journal, magazine, I might go and follow magnolia, leaves some comments and check out the accounts of other people who are commenting on those posts. If they feel like they might be a fit, I'll go ahead and start engaging on their profile. And the journey down the rabbit hole continues from there. You can spend hours either Going through the list of magnolia journal or whatever accounts followers and one-by-one checking them out. Or you can check out who's commenting on their feed and go check out accounts from there. This is just one way that you can be engaging with potential people who are your ideal client or at least fit some part of your ideal client. Another strategy is to figure out or guess what hashtags they're using. But by knowing what hashtags they're putting on their posts, you can go check out their posts. If you're a Portland based business, you might be checking Portland hashtags. You can find people who are in your area. If you're a coffee shop, you might be following hashtags that have to do with coffee. So you can engage with that audience, letting them know, Hey, if you need to order some fresh ground coffee, we've got you covered. Finally, you need to build content that your audience wants to see. Like I said before, quality is always more important than quantity. Yes, it is great to have one post a day go out on Instagram or any other social platform. But if you are feeling bogged down with how much you have to create, it's better to commit to three days a week and creating intentional posts that you know will add value to your customers lives. Some ideas of content you could be creating is focusing on frequently asked questions. Whether you get these from customers one-on-one, or you see them in a Facebook group that you're a part of. Collect questions that people are asking about your industry, your product and service, or about you, or about you as the business owner. We all love to see the behind the scenes of a brand, to understand how a product or service is created and implemented. We wanna know about the people behind the brand because we're going to be interacting with them. The more personal you can get in your brand and showcase who you are, what you're interested in. The deeper level of connection you can build with your future customers. This is just one of the ways that you'll turn those future customers. If a lifelong customers come back to the genre of what you want to be posting about. Is it educational where you go into tutorials and explain how to do things all the time. Is it motivational or encouraging where you're showcasing people, how they can be living a better life. You're telling them that they can do it. They can get through the hard things and you're here for them when they need you? Or is it inspirational? Talking about what the future could look like? All of these might be included in your feed, but one of them will become the more dominant piece of your feed. Another powerful piece of content is testimonials. We want the social proof that your product or service works, that it's changed somebody else's life and they agree that it's worth the investment. You don't need to overload your feed with testimonials, but having one here and there is a great way for customers to come across them and see what people are saying about your brand. Whatever content you're creating for your social media, it's important to be looking at your analytics. What posts are people engaging with? Where do you see the highest likes or comments? What do you know is working for your brand? What content is creating a higher reach? For me personally, I've seen that relies on instagram gives me the highest reach. But that's some of my more in-depth Instagram posts might give me the highest engagement. So I want to balance out creating reals, which we'll get in front of more people, but also creating the high-quality in-depth content. To make sure I'm creating conversations one-on-one with people who can become customers. The same goes for you using apps like later or even just the insights within your Instagram will help you to see who's coming to your feed, what posts are getting, what engagement, and what should you be creating. More of? The reality is, is that your social feed is not about you. Nothing about your business is about you. It's always about your customer. So if you have something you love to post on Instagram, but it's not getting engagement. Then it's content that you probably shouldn't waste your time creating. Save that for your personal account. But on your business account, use your time to create content that is going to get engagement and help you push the needle to find customers. That last, my last piece of advice when it comes to building out your social using everything you know right now, is that every post, every single post you put out there should have some sort of call to action. Now, this call to action doesn't need to be about buying something. It could be like this photo or double-tap. If you agree. It can be asking them to leave a comment. This asks should be a simple one, not a complex question that we need to write a paragraph, but something I can answer in around four words. Or even better, leave an emoji than it's your job to respond back and keep the conversation going. There are options for call to actions are to go to the link in bio to direct message you or DMU, and finally, to tag a friend. These are all ways to get people to start engaging. Just like engaging more will help you bring on engagement. Asking for the engagement will also increase engagement. So make sure on every single post on social media, you have a call to action asking people to engage. So from here, you have some business decisions to make. What is the overall theme and feel of your social media going to be like? Are you educational, motivational, inspirational? From there, you also need to make sure that you have all of the rules in your brand guidelines implemented into your social media. What is your voice? What kind of words and phrases do you use as an entire brand? What kind of words or phrases do you not use specifically? Do you curse? Then it's about creating a strategy for finding your audience on social media. What accounts are they following? What hashtags are they using? Start diving into those and engaging with accounts on there. They don't need to be a perfect match for you to engage with them. Great thing about social media is that one person might discover you and not be your perfect client, but their friends is somebody who is your perfect client. So they send your post to them. Or the next time a conversation comes up, they say, Oh, I saw this person on Instagram, you would love them. That's why just simply engaging on other accounts is powerful. It also allows the algorithm to see that people are engaging with you. They care about what you have to say and you'll continue to see growth just from that. Finally, creating a content strategy. What are you going to post and how often are you going to post? Start to get really clear on what content your audience is looking for. Use analytics to answer this question and then decide as a brand, how often you want to be posting two platforms. And know that this can change. Stick with it for three or four months. And if you decide, Hey, we can post more or this is becoming way too much for us. We need a post a little bit less. You can make that decision in a few months. Try and stick with whatever rules you're creating for at least three to four months to see how they work out for you. Now it's time to stop watching and to go figure out your plan for social media. 14. Creating a Newsletter: So I've shared with you how you can use everything you've learned so far on your website and on your social media. But how do you use it in your email newsletter? I want to start first with how to get people on your newsletter. So we take this back to your ideal audience, but something that would help out your customer. What questions could you answer? What value could you provide? This is what goes into a newsletter often. The idea behind this is that by giving you my email address, you're gonna give me something in return because my email is worth something to you. There is a monetary value to an email address, and it's different for every brand. But just know that their e-mail is valuable. So what are you willing to pay in order to get it? If you're a product-based business, this might be ten or 15% off your first order. If you're a service, this might be answering commonly asked questions or a guide to something that would be valuable to your audience. I personally sign up for options all the time. I love a good discount. I love a good free resource. I like to be educated and I'm more than happy to hand over my e-mail to see what you have to offer. If you start to send me too many emails, I can always unsubscribe. There's not a lot of risk for me signing up, but there's a lot of value for me signing up. So make it worthwhile for your ideal customer to sign up for your newsletter. Of course, you can have a just a regular opt-in on your website where they just plug in their name and e-mail and you get it and they get nothing in return. But I've found that majority of these don't produce a lot of e-mails. What do produce emails is an opt-in freebie. Think about your ideal customer. What are their needs? What are they wanting from you? Can you create a checklist or a guide that would help serve them? Or maybe it's just a discount. Try and experiment a few different options to see what works best for your audience and then market it on your social media, on your website. Word of mouth, let your friends know that you've got this new offering and see if they'll sign up for your e-mail to. Now that you've got a growing list of people coming onto your e-mail. Let's talk about what goes into your email. The first thing that you need to think about is the branding of your email. Again, heading back to your brand guidelines, what are the rules of your brand that go into this letter? Do you have your logo featured? How big is your logo? To add photos to your newsletter? What what are the rules around what photos you have in your newsletter? Then? Most importantly, what is the voice of your newsletter? Are you fun and energetic? Are you calm and spiritual? Make those decisions before you ever start writing your newsletter, define them as your brand. These will be the same rules that you apply throughout your brand on your website and your social. It'll show up here too in your newsletter. But make sure you're really clear on what your voice is as a brand. So brands often feel, for lack of a better word, picky, when it comes to their newsletters. It's not even just their newsletter, it's selling in general. We all just get that achy feeling when we think about having to sell something to people. But I want to change your mind about newsletters. Your newsletter is not necessarily about selling, it's about adding value. The idea behind e-mail is not even necessarily to make a sale with every e-mail that goes out. It's to stay in front of your audience. It's to put your logo in front of them and your name in front of them, whether they open your email or not, hopping into their inbox is one more time they see your name and they remember you. A great example of this was, I remember following a brand a few months back, looking into their products, kind of interested but not ready to convert. I had signed up for their email list months ago. And all of a sudden I was thinking, oh, you know what? I really need the products of that brain cells now, I don't remember what their name is. Lucky for me, I got an e-mail the very next day from that brand with a coupon code so that I could purchase one of their products. Now, had they not been sending out a monthly newsletter to remind me who they are and what they do. I would have gone on to find a different company to buy the product because I couldn't remember their name. But because they hopped into my inbox, I knew that was the brand I was thinking of. And I got a discount code to now go purchase from them. That's the goal of your newsletter. You want to stay front of face and provide value so that they aren't unsubscribe from your newsletter. My general rule is to send out at least one newsletter a month. Now this newsletter again, is value-driven. It doesn't need to be about by this. We're now offering this. Have you seen this? Instead, it could be highlighting a customer or testimonials showing how people are using your product or service. Highlight blog posts that you refer in that add more value and education to your audience. Of course, you will have sales emails, whether this is a sales funnel, that is an auto campaign for when people sign up for your newsletter or just the general sales e-mail here and there. Again, the idea is to try and add as much value as possible. So the more that you can miss your emails, meaning, I know that Bobby Joe has purchased a t-shirt before and then and then tailoring her emails to be all womens t-shirts. If you can get really focused on emails this way it adds value to your customers. Yes, you're selling, but you're selling the exact thing that I like, want or need. If you can't get that microphone focused. Or maybe you don't have that many product offerings that it's highlighting when you have a sale or when you're launching a new service. Try not to bombard your audience with sales emails. Instead, focus on how you are providing value. And maybe within that email, you're asking for the conversion. There's a monetary value of your customer's email addresses. This is because email has the highest conversion rate of any other marketing tool. Facebook and Google ads are great. Social media posting is wonderful, but none of them are going to see the conversion rates that you see with email. Because email people have already decided that they like your brand. They're interested in your brand. They want to know more about your brand. They've given you their e-mail. So now it's time to be trustworthy and honor the e-mail they've given you by sending them newsletters that add value and will help take them down the journey and your brand so that they become lifelong customers. 15. Adapting Your Brand: You've made it all the way through this journey to get clear in your brand. I hope it feels pretty awesome. You really dove in and deep into who you are as a brand. Who your ideal customer is, that one specific person that you can be serving, as well as how to implement these ideas into your brand to create a strategy that's going to serve you for the long run. I want to take just a minute to review a couple of things we've learned in this journey. We started with archetypes. What archetypal matches your brand? I hope you've taken the time to dive in deep, not only to the worksheet, but maybe even do a little exploring on Google to find out what exactly it means to be this archetype. What are your strengths and weaknesses? Whether they're true to who you are perceived by your audience. And how are you going to acknowledge these and not just shy away from them. Make sure that you put your weaknesses upfront and center. Let people know that this is what you struggle with or this is what your brain has a hard time with. Or better yet. This is what you might think, is the problem with our brand or the things you might think we struggle with. But this is actually what it looks like. Our business. From there, you developed a one-liner. Now this one liner will be used over and over and over again. The very first place you should implement your one-liner is in the bio of all of your social accounts. It is a quick and clear way to make sure people who are just checking in know exactly who you are and what you do. In your one-liner. You include who you are, what you do, who exactly you serve, and the outcome they get from working with you. This one-liner should not only be used on your social, but can be added into your email footer. It can be put on your website. And every single person who works for your brand should know this. They need to memorize it. That way. If they're at a conference or in an elevator and somebody asks, What do you do or what does your brand do? You have a quick answer. There's no fumbling over words. There's no confusing people. You weren't clear and concise so that potential customers know exactly who you are and what you do. Finally, as a brand, you developed guidelines to make sure that your branding is consistent across all channels. You know what logos to use, where, what fonts are, your brand fonts, and what colors to use. This will be huge when you're working with partners or collaborators, or just to have across a growing brand to make sure everyone is staying consistent. To make sure that no matter where your brand shows up, your customers know it's you. Aside from diving deep into who you are as a brand, you started to learn more about your clients, or specifically your one ideal client. This is a really hard task for pretty much every brand out there because we want to serve everybody. We don't want to discriminate or tell you we're not serving you and that's not what you're doing. You're getting really specific on a niche audience, adding value and other people outside of that audience want to work with you more power to them. Of course, they can come in. But by focusing on one specific audience, you become the expert. You become the brand to go to for that thing. And that in itself builds trust. So by knowing the one specific person that you serve, you can answer the important question of, does my ideal client find value in this? Ask this question whenever you're producing content, your newsletter, on your website, and your social, does your ideal customer find value in this? If the answer is, ever know, or even maybe it's time to go back to the drawing board and recreate the content so that the answer is always yes. From here, I want you to look at that checklist from the previous video to stay on track of implementing this into all aspects of your brand. It is great to learn all of this information and to know about it. But it means nothing if you're not applying it to your brand. So taking your one-liner and putting it on your social channels, adding it to your website, creating a newsletter that's going to add value and connect with your customers. Making sure your brand guidelines are given to all of your employees, as well as used throughout your marketing. All of this needs to be implemented. Set a goal for yourself. When is your deadline to have all of this implemented into your strategy? And make sure to start tracking your analytics from now. So that you can look back six months from now and see how things are performing. Are you growing? How are things changing? What about your social? Are you getting more engagement? All of those are great questions to ask to find out if things are working for your brand. I want to talk about one more thing. Adapting you as a brand are going to change because everything in life changes. If you're staying stagnant, there's an issue. We want growth. We want to see whether your revenue is growing or your audiences growing, that you as a brand, that you as human beings are growing. So that means things have to change. I suggest checking back in with who you are as a brand and who your ideal customer is. One time a year. Go through the profiles that you've created and see if they still connect. Do they still make sense? Are they serving your brand? If the answer is yeah, kind of or no, not at all, It's time to hit the drawing board again. Ideally, you wouldn't be adapting every single year. But it's good to check in at least one time a year just to make sure that you're on track. Or even maybe you've been creating content, but you've totally lost sight of who your ideal customer is. And it's time to refocus and start making content for that specific person. It's a good accountability strategy and it allows you to see that you're on the right track when it comes to your brand. Know that changes inevitable. Your brand guidelines, your logo, who you are as a brand, your ideal customer. All of that could change over time and that's okay. Just make sure you're coming back to these tools that you've learned to make sure you're on the right track with growing the brand of your dreams.