Blooms & Shrooms: Draw Fun & Funky Art in Procreate | Cat Coquillette | Skillshare
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Blooms & Shrooms: Draw Fun & Funky Art in Procreate

teacher avatar Cat Coquillette, Artist + Entrepreneur + Educator

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Let's Go!

      4:03

    • 2.

      Supplies

      12:10

    • 3.

      Choosing a Motif

      7:30

    • 4.

      Thumbnail Sketch

      26:40

    • 5.

      Color Palettes

      16:52

    • 6.

      Filling in Shapes

      13:09

    • 7.

      Infusing Texture

      10:02

    • 8.

      Finalizing the Main Motif

      13:28

    • 9.

      Layering

      20:39

    • 10.

      Final Florals

      15:37

    • 11.

      Crescent Moon

      5:20

    • 12.

      Embellishments

      8:51

    • 13.

      Color Exploration

      10:18

    • 14.

      Next Steps

      5:27

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About This Class

Want to learn how to draw a retro-inspired blooms & shrooms illustration on your iPad in Procreate? Flowers and mushrooms are two of the most popular, on-trend motifs in surface design right now. Plus, they’re super fun to draw!

This class is short and sweet: it’s all about enjoying the process of creating fun and funky artwork while learning the fundamentals of Procreate. The goal isn’t just to create a groovy illustration, but also to draw something that will sell well.

You’re going to learn how to key into what’s trending and how to infuse your own unique artistic voice into your artwork so whatever you create is uniquely you.

This is a beginner-friendly class, so even if you’ve never used Procreate before, you’re going to be able to follow along just fine and create an awesome illustration. And if you’re already a Procreate pro, you’re going to get my best tips & tricks for creating professional-level illustrations.

This class is packed with insider resources and shortcuts. The idea here is that we’re going back to basics with a few fresh ideas. : )

Just like all my other Procreate classes here on Skillshare, I’m packing this one with a ton of free stuff! You’ll get free Procreate brushes from True Grit Texture Supply and a collection of on-trend color palettes that I created myself.

I’m also giving you a watercolor paper texture that’s prepped just for this class, so it’ll fit perfectly into your canvas.

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You'll Need:

Optional:

  • An Apple Pencil or other stylus.
  • Download your Bonus Freebies here.
    • These freebies are totally optional– you can use them OR you can use your own favorite Procreate brushes and color palettes. Either way, you'll wind up with a gorgeous Class Project!
  • See my full list of Supply Recommendations here.

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Who this class is for:

  • Artists
  • Surface Designers
  • Illustrators
  • Anyone interested in drawing & having fun!

–––

Ready for your next class? Create seamless patterns in Procreate here:

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Cat Coquillette

Artist + Entrepreneur + Educator

Top Teacher

Hello there! I'm Cat Coquillette.

I'm a location-independent artist, entrepreneur, and educator. I run my entire creative brand, CatCoq, from around the world. My "office" changes daily, usually a coffee shop, co-working space, or airport terminal somewhere in the world. 

My brand aspires to not only provide an exhilarating aesthetic rooted in an appreciation for culture, travel and the outdoors, but through education, I inspire my students to channel their natural curiosity and reach their full potential.

CatCoq artwork and designs are licensed worldwide in stores including Urban Outfitters, Target, Barnes & Noble, Modcloth, Nordstrom, Bed Bath & Beyond, among many others. ... See full profile

Level: All Levels

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Transcripts

1. Let's Go!: Hello! My name is Cat Coquillette. And today, you're going to learn how to draw a fun and funky mushroom and floral illustration on your iPad using the drawing app, Procreate. Why blooms and shrooms? Because these are two of the most popular motifs in surface design right now. I sell my designs through brands like Target, Urban Outfitters, ModCloth, Anthropologie, and more. So I always have my eye on what's selling best because that's how I make a living as an artist. This class is short and sweet. It's all about the process of creating a cool, on-trend illustration while learning the fundamentals of Procreate. This is a beginner friendly class, so even if you've never used Procreate before, you're gonna be able to follow along just fine and create an awesome illustration. After all, what better way to learn them by doing? And if you're already a Procreate pro, you're still going to get my best tips and tricks for creating professional level illustrations. I'm pretty much an open book, so you're gonna be scoring insider tips and resources that I use when I design in Procreate. The idea here is that we're going back to basics with a few fresh ideas. And just like many of my other classes here on Skillshare, I am packing this one with a ton of free stuff. You'll get free Procreate brushes from True Grit Texture Supply and a collection of on-trend color palettes that I created myself. And I'm also giving you a watercolor paper texture that I prepped specifically for this class, so it'll fit perfectly into your canvas. Don't worry, I will be showing you exactly how to use all of these freebies in the class today. One of the things that I hear most often from my students is, "Where do I even start?" That feeling of looking at a blank piece of paper can feel really daunting. In this case, it's a blank screen, but you get the idea. So to kick this class off, I'll walk you through my exact process for choosing a subject matter. My goal isn't just to create a groovy illustration, but it's to create something that will sell well. You're going to learn how to key into what's trending, as well as learn how to infuse your own artistic voice, so whatever you create is uniquely yours. Another thing that I hear from some of my students is that they're not super confident in their drawing skills. So even the idea of drawing in Procreate can seem daunting. I have a little trick for you. You can actually use reference photos to help you out. I do this all the time when I'm starting a drawing from scratch. In this class, you're going to learn my exact process for this. And trust me, it is super simple. By the end of this class, you're going to have a fabulous final illustration, as well as some newly acquired Procreate skills. The vibe of this class is fun and casual. So whether you're a newbie to Procreate and you just want to explore your creativity, or you're interested in illustrating on a professional level, you're gonna get some deep value bombs out of this class. If you're interested in receiving some more freebies, or you want to know when my next Skillshare class launches, you will be the first to know if you follow me on Skillshare. I sent out a lot of perks to my followers, including Skillshare membership giveaways, creative drawing prompts, and advice for artists. Just click that follow button up top and you'll be the first to know. You can also follow me on Instagram, @catcoq to get more updates and find out where in the world I'm living at the moment. So without further ado, let's get started creating some retro-inspired blooms and shrooms. 2. Supplies: [MUSIC] The supplies that you'll need for today's class are actually pretty simple, you'll need an iPad and the drawing App Procreate, and I'm also using my Apple pencil. If you don't have a stylus, you can always just use your finger. Depending on your iPad, some features in Procreate might be different for you than they are for me. Procreate will limit your canvas size and the amount of layers you can use depending on your model of iPad. Today, I'm using a 12.9-inch third-generation iPad Pro with one terabyte of storage. Because my iPad is really powerful, Procreate lets me use the largest canvas size that the app will allow. If you're using a non-Pro or an older iPad, you might find that Procreate actually limits you to a smaller canvas size and fewer layers. But if you're just illustrating for fun, no worries, a smaller canvas size isn't really that big of a deal. But if you're illustrating it with the intention of using your artwork professionally, like maybe art licensing, or selling it online through print on-demand sites like Society6 or Redbubble, then you may want to consider an iPad upgrade in the future so that you can have a larger canvas. Procreate is always updating their canvas sizes and allotted layers, so I recommend doing a little bit of research and finding out what iPad best meets your needs. I prefer illustrating on the largest possible canvas size that I can, because that means that I have more options for how I use my artwork. You can always scale down your designs and print smaller, but you can't scale up without jeopardizing the resolution. For me, I illustrate on big canvases so that I have more options for what I do with that artwork later. But again, if you're just illustrating for fun, you don't really need to worry about illustrating on a giant canvas, a small one will work just fine. Tech stuff covered, the other supplies that you can use today are the free assets that I'm providing for today's class. These freebies are totally optional in this class, think of them like an extra pack. You're welcome to download these freebie assets to use today, or you can follow up and complete your class project using your own favorite Procreate brushes and color palettes. It's entirely up to you. Either way, you're going to wind up with a gorgeous class project. I teamed up with True Grit Texture Supply to hook you guys up with some free Procreate brushes. I use their brushes all the time. I'm pretty sure I own every single brush pack that they have available, and for today's class, I chose three brushes that I absolutely love. One brush for outlining and two fun texture brushes. One brush is for building up some subtle dimension within your shapes, and the other is one of my favorite dot splatter brushes for infusing some cool textures within your illustrations. So big shout out to True Grit Texture Supply for their generosity and Pro Tip. If you want more free brushes, they have a section on their website called free stuff, and you can sign up to get even more. The other freebies today are the ones that I created, I scanned in a piece of watercolor paper and I resized it to fit your canvas in Procreate perfectly. I love infusing paper textures into my digital artwork because I feel like it gives it a really nice hand-drawn quality. It's crazy how dropping in just one simple texture can elevate your illustration into a professional piece. I also designed eight custom color palettes just for today's class. They're all based on trending color ways and colors that have been selling very well for me. I made these color palettes as Procreate swatches, which means you can import them directly into your iPad, and they'll show up in Procreate under your color palettes. These swatches will only open and Procreate, nothing else. They won't even preview on your web browser, these are 100 percent Procreate only. Because of that, I also made a JPEG that contains all of the color palettes on one page. JPEGs are pretty much universal file types, which means if you want to view the color palettes or open them up in Photoshop or Illustrator, or anything else, the JPEG file is there for you. I won't be using the JPEG in today's class since we already have the swatch files which work in Procreate, but you've got access to it in case you'd like to use it for other illustrations down the road. Speaking of that, the freebies that I created, the color palettes and the paper texture, are all royalty-free and for commercial use. That means you don't have to credit me or pay me, these freebies are my gift to you to use on whatever projects you'd like. Here's how to access all of these freebies. Go to catcoq.com/blooms and once you're there, you can type in your email address to unlock the freebies. This will add you to my email list, which means you'll get my weekly newsletters, and you can unsubscribe at anytime. Anyway, once you hit that unlock button, it'll take you to a Dropbox folder that contains all of the freebies. You don't need a Dropbox account to access any of these files on Dropbox. Real quick, if you've taken any of my other iPad classes and you already know how to import these assets into Procreate and your iPad, you can go ahead and skip forward to the next lesson, which is choosing a motif. If you're not sure how to get these assets to your iPad, no worries. I'll walk you through the steps of getting these files from Dropbox to your iPad and Procreate. Let's dive right in. I'm going to walk you through two methods for getting these files from Dropbox to your iPad and Procreate. The first option is if you're opening this Dropbox file from your Mac computer, and the second option is if you're opening this Dropbox file from your iPad itself. Let's do Mac to iPad first because this is the fastest and easiest. If you're watching this class right now on your Mac computer and you have your iPad in front of you to follow along, then the simplest way to get these files to your iPad is to AirDrop them from your computer to your iPad. Airdrop is a file-sharing feature that only works with Apple products, so this will only work if you're going from Mac to iPad. If that's the case, then open the Dropbox link on your computer and just hit ''Download''. Remember, you don't need a Dropbox account to do this, so if you get a prompt to sign into Dropbox, just ignore it. Everything will download in a zip file, so find your downloads folder and just click that zip to unpack it. Now, you can go through each folder and send those files to your iPad. It's super easy if you have a Mac, because you can just select all of your swatches and then AirDrop them all at once. Swatch files are super smart, and they know where they belong. When they arrive to your iPad, you'll get a prompt to open them in Procreate. They'll automatically load right into your palettes. When I important new swatches, they usually show up on the bottom of my palettes folder, we'll get to them later in this class. You can go back to your folder and AirDrop that paper texture to your iPad as well. It will go directly into your folder library, not Procreate. I'll show you how to bring it into your Canvas later on in this class. Finally, you can select those brushes and AirDrop them to your iPad too, just like the swatches, they'll automatically import right into Procreate. Depending on your iPad, your imported swatches can show up in a few different places. Sometimes mine show up in the imported folder at the very bottom of my brush library, other times they pop up in their own folder. We'll get into this later on in this class too. The other way to get these assets into your iPad and Procreate is if you do it all from your iPad itself. Enter your email, hit Unlock, and the Dropbox folder will open on your iPad. You can click each folder and download the assets individually. First, I'll start with color palettes, then I'll tap the folder called Procreate Swatches. Then tap that Download button up top to download them all at once. Confirm the download, which takes a moment then tap the download icon at the very top of your browser. Click the magnifying glass, and you'll see your swatches open in your downloads folder. My new downloads usually show up at the very bottom of the list. Tap the zip to unlock it, then open the folder, and you'll have all of your swatches ready to go. Tap each swatch individually and it will automatically import into Procreate, they show up here in my palettes at the very bottom of that palette window. I'm going to go back and do the same thing to get all my swatches into Procreate. [MUSIC] Once you've finished, again, all of those swatches will appear in your palettes, usually down here at the bottom. Again, we'll get into that later when we actually start illustrating. Once your swatches have imported, let's go ahead and grab those other assets. I'll go back to that Dropbox folder, go back to bloom's and trims and now I'll grab that paper texture, click to open the folder, tap Download, confirm, and once the load bar finishes, you can click that download icon to view it in your downloads folder. Again, it usually shows up at the very bottom, minus showing up arbitrarily right in the very middle, which is just fine. I'll click it once, tap the icon on the top right menu bar, and hit Save Image. Now that you've saved your paper texture, it will actually save in your iPad's camera roll, so we'll grab that later when we need it. Last but not least, let's get those brushes. I'll go back to the Dropbox folder, hit Class Assets, open up Procreate brushes, tap that brush set. You'll probably see a screen like this because just like swatches, procreate brushes only show up in Procreate, no worries. Go ahead and download that anyway, confirm the download, click your downloads icon up top, and tap that TGTS_Demo brush sets. They'll automatically import right into Procreate. They'll show up here in your brush library, either in their very own folder called TGTS demo or sometimes imports show up in your import folder at the very bottom. Sometimes you have to do a lot of scrolling to see them, but in this case, mine actually showed up here in their very own folder, which makes it a lot easier. Where the brushes show up, just depends on your model of iPad. Now that you have all of those class assets off of Dropbox and in your iPad, let's dive right in to choosing your subject matter. 3. Choosing a Motif: Time for the fun stuff: Choosing your motif. So spoiler alert: The subject matter today is going to be flowers and mushrooms. The class title kind of already gave it away, right? So I'm gonna be talking about why I specifically chose blooms and shrooms as the subject matter for today's class. Well, one: they are super fun to draw. And two: both of these motifs have one extremely important thing in common. They are both on-trend themes, which means both of these are very strong sellers in my portfolio. Since I make my living off of art licensing and surface design, I want to create designs that have strong potential to sell really well. After all, this is how I afford my lifestyle of traveling the world 24/7 and creating art as I go. The artwork I create is literally paying for me to be in Portugal right now, which is pretty cool. So anyway, a huge part of the reason why I've had so much success in art licensing is because I've really made it a big priority for me to key into trends and incorporate those trends into my artwork. I have an entire Skillshare class on trend-tracking and if you want to check it out, it's called, "How to Discover Profitable Design Trends Before Anyone Else and Create Artwork with Mass Appeal". Since I already have an entirely different Skillshare class dedicated to trend-tracking, I'm going to keep this lesson pretty short and sweet for now. I've used those same trend-forecasting models that I teach in that class and I've identified a mushrooms as a hot, current trend and florals as an evergreen, tried-and-true trend. So let's talk about the difference between those two really quick. Mushrooms are a current trend, and they have been that way for the past few years. Chances are if you've walked into Target or browsed through Anthropologie lately, you've probably seen some shroomy products. These types of trends really hold their own for a period of time. They're not a flash in the pan, but they're not everlasting either. They're popular right now. So that's mushrooms for you. Now onto florals. I mentioned that flowers are an evergreen trend. What I mean by that is that flowers will always have the potential to be strong sellers, no matter what decade it is. Go back in time and you'll see ornamental flowers and everything from fashion to pottery, to home decor throughout the ages. Simply put, flowers will never not be on trend. And this makes flowers a really safe bet if I want to create an illustration that not only has the potential to sell well right now, but also sell well for years to come. What I've done is I've combined the two. Mushrooms are highly popular at this moment, and they probably will be for at least a few years. And flowers are always going to be a safe bet. Plus, did I already mentioned that both of these are super fun to draw? Alright, so now that you've got a pretty solid grasp of why we're going with blooms and shrooms, let's talk about how to draw them. When I'm first getting started with a brand new illustration, I like to get my creative juices flowing by looking at examples for how this illustration could turn out. There are endless possibilities for how you draw, and I like to browse through some examples to get me started. One of my favorite resources is Pinterest. It's a visual search engine and I use it to get inspiration for my artwork, color palettes, cool typography layouts and more. In this case, I'm going to search "mushroom illustration" and see what's out there. Specifically, I'm browsing through to get an idea of things that I think are working really well or things that I'm not really that into. For example, I'm really loving these clusters of mushrooms in various shapes and sizes. I think this is working really well. And I think that this might be an idea that I can incorporate into my own artwork. I'm not so much a fan of having them all spaced out like this. It looks cool here, but I want my illustration to feel like a cohesive unit of combining mushrooms with flowers. So right here, I've been able to identify a direction that I want my own sketch to take: Cluster of mushrooms and flowers, not separated all out individually. On this one right here, the labeling is pretty interesting and I love how it incorporates hand lettering, but I don't really want to take that direction today. I think it might be a bit too complicated for my illustration. What else? I'm getting a really nice variety of color palettes here. Some really modern and bright, and others neutral and true to the motif. I'm seeing a lot of retro inspired palettes as well, probably since mushrooms were a really iconic motif in the sixties and seventies, so using a retro-inspired palette is a cool nod to that. Alright, so, noted. By scrolling through a bunch of visual inspiration and looking at it with an analytical eye, I'm basically fast tracking my own process. I could sketch out a million thumbnails and see what I like and don't, but by scrolling through visual inspiration like this, I'm able to quickly get a feel for the personal direction that I'd like to take. And in this case, here's what I've decided. I'd like my composition to be a cluster of mushrooms with a variety of flowers peeking through. Groupings of three also tend to be more aesthetically pleasing. I'm going to have three mushrooms as the hero of the composition and three clusters of flowers as those side elements coming through. There are a ton of different types of mushrooms out there, but I like that iconic shape of the pointy head ones with their little polka dots. It's cute and instantly recognizable as mushrooms. And I want to make sure that I'm infusing my own unique artistic voice into my composition. So I already have a lot of flowers and leaves in my portfolio. So I want to keep rolling with that same graphic style. Simple shapes, herringbone veining, and a sprinkling of embellishments like little stars, dots and Xs that I have in other illustrations in my portfolio. So now that I've made these mental notes for what I'd like to incorporate into my composition, I already have a massive head start before I've even begun sketching. So I encourage you to do the same. Scroll through and see what you like. See what you don't like. Are you leaning towards more realistic mushrooms and flowers? That's awesome. That's a great place to start. Or are you more into the look of abstract mushrooms and simple graphic shapes? Cool, that's a great option for your own illustration. Are you gravitating more towards, let's say, these groovy vibes of these retro shrooms? Then that is your path forward. So jot down a few notes of what you'd like to incorporate into your own artwork. That will be your head start for our next lesson, which is sketching out your thumbnail. So let's get started. 4. Thumbnail Sketch: It is time to get sketching. So I mentioned early on that I have a little trick I use using reference photos to help me sketch. I can literally draw over a reference photo to get my basic shapes down. And then delete that reference photo as soon as I'm finished with it. And this leaves me a nice, solid sketch as the backbone for my illustration. So I'm going to show you exactly how I do this. So first things first, let's gather some reference photos. I use Unsplash.com as the source for all of my reference photos. Unsplash has royalty-free photos, which is a huge bonus. So I'll type "mushroom" into the search bar and let's see what we've got here. Lots of good stuff. I don't really need to download the high-res. I'm just gonna go ahead and screenshot in on the ones that I really like. These guys right here. I like this guy right here. Screenshot. Awesome. I've got a few options of mushrooms. So feel free to browse through and screenshot as many mushrooms as you'd like. What we're using these reference photos for is to get the basic and general shapes of these mushrooms. Alright, so I've got a few good options already screenshotted. Let's go ahead and search for flowers. So I mentioned that I wanted three separate groupings of different types of flowers. So that's what I'm gonna be looking for. I like these. Alright, so I've got a couple of options for flowers. I want one more and I think for my final flower option, I'm gonna go with hibiscus flowers. I have a lot of hibiscus flowers already in my portfolio, so it feels pretty on-brand for me to incorporate them into this illustration as well. Remember, it's all about consistency and staying true to your own unique artist voice. Cool. So I've got a nice range of screenshots. The next step is to open up Procreate. When I open up Procreate for the first time, this is what my Gallery looks like. I wanna go ahead and start a brand new canvas. So I'll hit this plus sign on the top right. Click this "New Canvas" icon. And I want my sketch canvas to be pretty small. Eight by ten. That'll give me a lot of layer options. So I'll switch it to inches and have it be 8 by 10. 300 DPI is perfect. And check it out: That gives me 89 possible layers. Again, you might have fewer layer options depending on your model of iPad. But for me, this is perfect. I'll go ahead and press "Create". We'll go ahead and scale up our canvas to be much larger later. But for the thumbnail sketch, it doesn't really matter if it's low-res. The art I care about being high-res is that final illustration file. So for thumbnail sketches, I usually work on a pretty small canvas. The first thing I wanna do is bring those reference photos into my art board. I'll go up here and tap the wrench for actions. And instead of just clicking "Insert a Photo", I'm actually going to swipe left on that and insert a Private Photo. So the difference between the two is a Private Photo won't show up later in your time-lapse replay, but if you insert a regular photo, it will be there. So it's just a personal preference. I don't necessarily want my time-lapse replay to include a sketch over a real photo. So I usually go with "Private". If you don't see your screenshots, go ahead and click "Albums", "Recents", and this is where they should appear. So I'm just gonna go one-by-one and grab these in. I'll start with the mushrooms. Cool. They've inserted into my Canvas. And you'll see over here if you click your Layers icon, they are now their own individual layer, which is perfect. I'll go ahead and bring the other one in as well. So "Actions", "Insert a Private Photo" and grab that other mushroom. Perfect. You can always tap your pointer icon to set that transformation. Alright, so now it is time to start tracing. So to do that, I'm gonna go over here to my Layers panel. And I already have layer one already established. I'll go ahead and drag that up to the very tip top. Go ahead and tap that layer to select it. And now whatever I draw on this layer will only be on this layer. It won't be drawn on top of any of those other layers. You can always select your layer, hold it, and drag it around to rearrange the stack like this. But I want my sketch to be on top of everything else, So I'll put it on top of the layer stack. Now I'll go to my brushes and I want to select a nice sketching brush. Procreate already has a really nice default brush built into place. I have so many different folders here. Yours probably doesn't look as chaotic as mine. But yes, "Sketching" is one of the default folders that Procreate has. And Peppermint is my favorite sketching brush to use. It replicates a soft lead pencil really well. One more minor thing, I'm gonna go over here. Click this circle to open up my Palettes. Choose Disk. And when I sketch, I usually like sketching in a bright red. It's easier for me to see red on top of photos rather than a normal desaturated gray or black. Whenever you change your colors on your palette, it'll be indicated over here on the top-right circle as well. So if I were to switch to a bright blue, it would be indicated here. But remember in this case, I want bright red. So again, I'm on my Peppermint sketching pencil, which is in the "Sketching" folder. And I'm on a brand new layer, and it's indicated in blue to show me that that is the layer selected. Not one of these layers, but my own layer up here. Cool. You can always adjust the size of your brush over here to the left and the opacity of your brush as well. But I want 100% opacity and we'll just see how this size turns out. Perfect. So here's my mushroom. It's got some dimension to it. It has this little skirt hanging off. Then it has its stem. Cool. So, pretty simple. I probably didn't even need a reference photo for that, but it's still good to have. Now, if you go over here to your Layers and open it up, you can turn off the visibility of those background layers and you'll see your sketch all on its own. So that's perfect. But I did mention earlier that the mushroom I want to draw is actually one of those little pointy head mushrooms, but the dots in it. So I'm just gonna go ahead and adjust my sketch accordingly. So again, that sketch layer is selected. I've turned off the visibility of these other layers so that they're not distracting. I'm just going to draw, overhead, that pointy mushroom shape. Maybe its lip is a little bit asymmetrical like this. Perfect. And now I want to erase the part of my sketch that I don't need anymore. Erasing is really simple. Just go over here to your Eraser icon. I'm going to zoom in a little bit. And you can start erasing out the parts of your sketch that you no longer need. And I want to point something out real quick. If you tap your eraser, you can actually choose which brush you erase with. It's a minor thing, but sometimes if your eraser looks really weird, you might need to change the eraser brush itself. I prefer erasing with Syrup, which is one of Procreate's default brushes. You can find it under the "Inking" folder. Just like the brushes, you can change the opacity and the size of your eraser itself. So if I have a giant size eraser, I'll have less control. Oh, and by the way, two fingers will always undo whatever action you just made. So tap two fingers on the screen and it'll un-erase whatever I just erased. Three fingers will go back to where you were. So three, redoes the action and two undoes the action. You can also use these little arrows over here, which do the exact same thing. Alright, so I'm going to bring the size of my eraser down a little bit, just to give me a little bit more control. And I'm erasing out the parts of my illustration that I no longer need. I can go back to my brush to fill in those areas that I accidentally erased. It doesn't have to be perfect. Alright, so I have my first icon completely finished. It is the mushroom that is based off of this reference photo. So as you can tell, I took my own creative liberties as I drew on top of the reference. It's not a flat-headed mushroom, it comes up to a peak. And instead of being very symmetrical with its curvature, I gave it some asymmetry to make it more interesting. So at this point, I don't need that reference photo anymore. I can go ahead and swipe left on that layer and hit "Delete". Alright, it's time for my other mushroom reference photo. So I'll go ahead and toggle on the visibility of that layer. As you can see right now, it's overlapping, so it'd be kind of hard to draw while it's overlapping my other layer right here. No problem, I'll just move it around. So I'll tap that layer to select it. Again, it's in blue, so I know that layer is selected. And then I'm gonna go over here to my pointer icon. And this is how you move things around. I don't like "Free Form". I prefer "Uniform". And that way, if you scale something up and down, it stays proportionate. If you have it on "Free Form", it gets a lot more skewed. So "Uniform" will solve that for me. Alright, so I'm going to bring my reference photo over here. Maybe make it a little bit bigger just to give myself some room as I sketch out these mushrooms. Whenever you finished moving things around, you can press that pointer tool again to set that transformation. Alright, now I'm going to come over here to my Layers, and I'm going to click this plus sign to add a new layer. The key with thumbnail sketches is to keep each element on its own layer. And that way, it makes it really easy to rearrange those elements into your thumbnail sketch. Alright, so I have my brand new layer selected. It's on top of that reference photo, which is perfect. If it's not on top, remember you can grab that layer and rearrange it on the stack. I have my mushroom layer already on its own layer. I'm gonna do the same for this guy over here. So brand new blank layer selected. It's on top of my reference photo. I'll hit my Brush tool. Peppermint is perfect. And this one should be pretty easy. It's just a line and a few ovals. Cool. Again, I probably didn't even need a reference photo for that, but it's nice to have either way. So now I have this individual sketch on its own layer. I have my giant mushroom on its own layer. I'm going to go ahead, hit that plus sign. Start a new layer. I'll go ahead and do the same thing. Cool. So now I can go back to my layers, swipe left on that reference photo and hit "Delete". So at this point on my screen, I have three separate layers, and each layer is its own mushroom. This is perfect. This way, when I want to rearrange my composition and try out new things, by having everything on its own individual layer, I can move it separately without affecting the other layers. So now I'm gonna do the exact same thing and bring in my flower illustrations. So tap that wrench. Swipe left on "Insert a Photo" to insert a Private Photo. I'll grab these flowers first, and tap that pointer tool to set. I'll go to my Layers palette. Click that plus sign to add a new layer. Make sure it's on top of my reference photo. Select my brush. Same thing as before. I'm just gonna do a very simple sketch to help me get the basic forms of this flower down. I'm gonna go back to my Layers palette, Add a new layer, select my brush and make sure that each of these flowers is on its own individual layer. As you can see with my thumbnail sketches, they're just very general sketches. This sketch won't be in our final illustration. It's just to help us get an idea of where the forms should be placed. Alright, so I'll do one more of these flowers. So I'll select my Layers palette, hit that plus sign, and draw one more in there. Maybe this is just that bud right here. Perfect. I can go ahead and open up my Layers, delete that Private Image, and you can start seeing the cluster of shapes on my screen. It's fine that they overlap because everything is on its own individual layer, which means we can move it around if we'd like to. Alright, let's do the same thing with those other two flower sketches. And as you can see, my screen is pretty chaotic. This is not a composition whatsoever. This is just a bunch of individual elements scattered on the screen. So now it's time to start arranging them into something that looks beautiful. So when I'm working on a composition, I like to start with the biggest, most important elements and then work from large to medium to small. And that way I make sure that I have room for all of the important elements before finding little areas to put those details in. Let me show you what I mean. So I'm going to start by turning off the visibility of all of the layers that aren't that big mushroom. This is gonna be my hero element. So it's this guy right here. I've gone ahead and tapped that layer to select it. Now, I want to do three big mushrooms as the main part of the composition. So instead of redrawing each one, I'm going to be a little bit lazy and just duplicate those layers. So I'll swipe left on that layer, hit duplicate, and do it one more time. Swipe left and duplicate. So now I have three distinct mushroom layers. They're all perfectly overlapped with each other. So let's start breaking them apart. I'll go over here to my pointer icon. Again, make sure that "Uniform" is selected. And I'm just gonna go ahead bring these out and start rotating them around in a way that looks interesting. If your movements aren't very fluid like mine are, it means that your "Snapping" and "Magnetics" might be turned on. When these are toggled on, you have a lot less control with where your shapes go. They'll come in handy later. But for now, I want to have ultimate control. So I'll go ahead and make sure that "Snapping" and "Magnetics" are turned off. And what I'm doing here is using this green toggle to change the rotation. You can rotate your shapes. You can flip them horizontal or vertical. You have a lot of flexibility over here in your palette. So I'll make it a little bit smaller. Maybe overlap this mushroom skirt just a tad. Press your pointer tool to set that transformation. I'll go back to my Layers palette. Find that other mushroom that's underneath, and do the same thing. Grab my pointer icon, bring them off to the side, rotate just a smudge. Maybe bring it down a little bit. And when you're finished, go ahead and press that pointer tool to set the transformation. Now that we have that composition established for those three primary mushrooms, which are the hero elements of our illustration, let's go through and start peppering in those florals. So I'll go back to my Layers. And I want to start with the hibiscus flowers since those are the second largest elements of this composition. You can uncheck and check the visibility to make sure you're on the right layer. Don't forget to select it so that we're moving the right one around. Alright, I'll go ahead and go over to my pointer tool. Bring this flower down a little bit and maybe flip it horizontally so it's facing the other way. Maybe rotate it just a smidge. I like how it's overlapping this smaller mushroom over here. I think that's kinda nice. Maybe it just overlaps a little bit. Cool. Press that pointer to set the transformation. Go back to my Layers, turn on the visibility for that other hibiscus and select that layer. Go over to my Transform and same thing. Maybe I'll rotate this one around a little bit, too. And play around until I find a nice spot for it. Cool. That's looking pretty nice. I'll press the arrow to set that transformation and now go back to my Layers. Alright, it's time to bring in some of those other flowers. Alright, so as I look at this composition, it's looking pretty good. Although I have this negative space right here, that feels a little bit awkward. So I think I want to fill up that space with something to give it a little bit more purpose. So in this case, I think what I'm going to do is add a crescent moon up here. So I'm gonna go over here to my Layers, hit this plus sign to start a new layer. Make sure my brush is selected. And now I'm going to draw a circle. So Procreate actually has some pretty cool shortcuts to help you get a perfect circle. Here's how to do it. If I were to just draw a circle like this, it looks okay, but it's certainly not perfect. It's a little bit lopsided. Two fingers to undo. Instead, I'm going to draw a circle, but leave my pen touching the screen. And that way it's going to snap into this perfect oval. But I can do even better than that. If I take three fingers and press and hold them on my screen, you can see that that oval snapped into an absolute, perfect circle. This is exactly what I want. So I'll go ahead and release my pen and then release my fingers. I mentioned I wanted a crescent moon, not a full moon. So I'll show you a quick way to make crescents in Procreate. I'm gonna go over here to my Layers. Make sure that it's my circle that's selected. Swipe left, hit "Duplicate". Go to my pointer tool. And I'm just going to resize it a little bit until it feels like a nice crescent. Maybe it comes off this way so that the flowers are overlapping. Press your arrow tool to set that transformation. Now, I'll go back to my layers and I'm going to merge both circles into one layer. So you can take two fingers and simply pinch them together. And now they're on their own layer. With that layer selected, I can go to my eraser tool and just erase out the parts of that crescent that I no longer need. Perfect. So now I have my crescent moon with the flowers overlapping it to give this composition a little bit more purpose. Alright, so I have finished my first thumbnail sketch. If you want to try out a few more layer thumbnails, I'll show you a quick shortcut. So I'm going to go back to my Layers palette. Click this plus sign to add a new layer. Go over here to my color palette and just pick a color that contrasts what's going on here on the screen. So maybe I'll choose a mint to contrast that red. And now, you can literally grab that circle and drop it right into your composition like this. So now everything has turned mint green. But we've also blocked some parts of the illustration. So let's go ahead and go to our Layers. And reorganize just a little bit and bring that background color to the very bottom. And right now my Layers palette is a little bit chaotic, so I'm gonna go ahead and group them together into one folder. So to do that, I have my background layer selected. I'm just going to swipe right on every single one of these layers. And then up here hit "Group". And now you can toggle this carrot down. And all of your layers are contained within this one group. And the reason I want to do that is because I want to duplicate this sketch and try a new one. So with this entire group selected, I'm going to go over here to my pointer tool and just make this composition a lot smaller. Again, press that pointer tool to set the transformation. I can go back to my layers. And remember, you can toggle down your group to see all of the individual layers or hit that carrot to consolidate it. What I wanna do is swipe left on the group and hit "Duplicate". Now, using my pointer tool, I can grab this new composition and bring it over here to the right. Set that transformation. And now I can rearrange the individual elements in this second thumbnail to try something new. And now this is the beauty of having all of these elements on their own individual layers. You don't need to redraw anything. Instead, you can simply rearrange. I'll show you how. I'll go back to my Layers palette. Make sure that this is the new group that I want to work with. I always check by toggling off and on the visibility of that layer. Toggle down my carrot. This is where I can try some new compositions. So I'm just gonna go through layer by layer and try rearranging into a new composition to see if it's working better than the first. Alright, so now I have these two distinct thumbnails. I'm going to go through and clean up that original thumbnail a bit so that I have a better comparison between the two. So I'll go back to my Layers palette, hit that carrot to consolidate that new thumbnail. Select my old thumbnail, toggle down on my carrot. I'm just gonna go through layer by layer and erase if I need to. Alright, cool. So I've gone ahead and cleaned up both compositions. And now we can look at both of them together and decide which one I'd like to move forward with. And by the way, at this point, you now know how to duplicate your groups and try out a new thumbnails and rearrange, erase, all of that jazz. So you can go ahead and create more thumbnails if you'd like to. In this case, I'm just gonna go ahead and stick with these two because I think they're both great options. But if you're still working out a few kinks, feel free to go ahead and duplicate those groups, maybe a third or fourth thumbnail until you find one that's really hitting home. But I'm gonna go ahead and take a look at these two and decide which one I'd like to move forward with. While I think the balance on this one to the far right is really intriguing, I think ultimately, I'm still geared more towards this first thumbnail. I think that slight asymmetry is really appealing. I love having the moon in there. And I liked these different clusters of all of these flowers kind of grouped together coming out from behind the mushrooms. So I think this is the composition that I'll move forward with. And also, one really important thing I want to point out: You'll notice that on both of these thumbnails, none of these elements are getting cut or cropped off the edge. I'm doing that intentionally. For all of my compositions, I like keeping them within the boundaries of that canvas. And the simple reason why is because later on, I like having the option to turn all of these illustrations into a seamless pattern. And for seamless patterns to work, it's best if your element is whole and not cropped off in any weird way. We're not going to get into seamless patterns in this class, but I do have another Procreate class that teaches you all about creating seamless patterns right here in Procreate. Alright, so I've decided that this left thumbnail is the one that I'd like to move forward with into my final illustration. So let's go ahead and start infusing some interesting color palettes. 5. Color Palettes: Now that you have in your thumbnail sketch finalized, it's time to start playing with color. I'll show you how. So first things first, I'm gonna go ahead and click "Gallery" to go back to my main Procreate gallery. Now I'll go to "Select", select this canvas and hit "Duplicate". Go ahead and hit that X To undo the selection. Now I've just made a perfect duplicate of that original sketch Canvas. I'll go to "Select" one more time, grab both of these guys, and then hit "Stack". Hit that X. A Stack in Procreate is essentially a grouping of canvases together. So from this point forward, we're going to go ahead, open up our Stack and work within this itself. This just helps us stay a little bit more organized in Procreate. Alright, so speaking of organization, I'm gonna go ahead and click where it says "Untitled Artwork" and change this to "Thumbnails". And press Done. And then hit where it says "Untitled Artwork" for the second canvas. And change this to "Color Exploration". Perfect. I'll go ahead and open up that "Color Exploration" folder. And I know that this is the thumbnail I'm interested in moving forward with. So I'm gonna go ahead and delete this one over to the right. So I'll open up my Layers, find where it says "New Group". Toggle that carrot. And turn on and off the visibility until I know which layer it is that I'd like to get rid of. Swipe left and hit "Delete". This thumbnail sketch is finalized, so I no longer need all of those individual layers of each individual piece of that illustration. I'm going to flatten them all onto one layer. So I'll toggle down that carrot. Click to select the first layer in my group. And I'm just gonna go through and start combining them together like this by pinching them together. Be careful though, because I do want to make sure that that background color and the illustration itself are on two separate layers. This is important so that we can try out different background colors that don't affect the illustration itself. Let's get into it. Oh, and one more thing I want to point out. So over here, now that our layers are flattened, if we want to move anything, it moves together as one whole group. We can no longer move individual elements around because they're all flattened into one layer. But, if you ever want to go back and tweak some of these elements, you can always go back to this general Stack, open up that original "Thumbnails", and this is where you have the flexibility to move these individual elements around. So by the time I finish with my Stack, I'll have a complete collection of this illustration from start to finish. The whole idea of this is it's all non-destructive editing techniques, which means if I ever need to go back and fix something later, even if it's flattened, I have the flexibility to do so. That's how I'll continue duplicating each individual canvas until I get to my final illustration. But that's jumping ahead a little bit. Let's get back into color exploration. So I'm going to open up this "Color Exploration" canvas. Click the red dot to get over into my color palettes. And down here at the bottom menu bar, go ahead and tap "Palettes". When you import palettes into Procreate, they generally import at the very, very bottom of the stack. So you might see them down here, but depending on your model of iPad, they might be up here at the very tip top as well. So go ahead and make sure that you have all of the color palettes in place if you'd like to follow along with one of mine. And I'm gonna go ahead and pick one to get started with. Let's see, I like this Orchid Truffle palette. I think this is the one I'll start with. So I'm gonna go ahead and click these three dots and choose "Set as Default". And now whenever I'm in any other option and I go back and open up my color palettes, Orchid Truffle is gonna be the first one that pops up. It just makes it a little bit easier. So for this one, I'm actually going to start by determining what the background color is. I'll go over here to my Layers, and make sure that background layer is selected. This is why it's important to keep those two layers separate: the sketch and then the background. Alright, so my background layer is selected. I don't want that bright cyan blue. So I'll come back to my layers. And let's try this dark green right here. So I'll select this green, make sure that the indicator changes here. And then again, with that layer selected, I can grab that circle and drop it right into the background. If you want to try any other color, you can just go through, select different colors, grab that circle and see how it looks. But I like that dark teal green. So I'm going to start with this. Alright, so instead of filling in color on that layer thumbnail itself, I'm actually going to do it on a brand new layer that's sandwiched between the two. So I'll hit that plus sign and make sure that my blank layer is underneath that layer thumbnail sketch, but above the background layer itself. So now whatever I draw on this layer will be underneath a thumbnail sketch, but over the background. Now I'll go to my Brushes. And instead of filling in the color with a pencil, which would just take forever, I'm going to choose an inking brush that's a little bit easier to fill in. So I'll scroll up here to the top of my brushes. Find that TGTS Demo, and go ahead and grab the Round Liner. So with this brush selected, and if you tap that brush, it'll take you to a Brush Studio. We don't need that right now. Just go ahead and click "Cancel". This is the brush. That's whoops. This is the brush that's selected and start with the largest elements and then work from large to small in terms of color. So I'll grab that cream color. You can press it once to select it. Again, make sure it changes up here. And double-check that you're on that blank layer. And I'm going to start by just filling in the moon. As you can see, very, very rough interpretation. So you don't actually need to go through and fill in all of your colors like this. That would take forever. Instead, you can just fill in these shapes. And to do that, It's the same thing we did in the background. You can grab your color, drag it over and release it right into your shape. So if your entire art board just turned the color of your shape, I'm going to show you what happened. So two fingers to undo and I'll show you how you can really control that fill. Alright, so I'm gonna grab that color. But instead of dropping it and releasing my pen, my pen tip is still touching the screen. And I want to point out this thing over here called "Color Drop Threshold". You can actually control how much of that color is filled in. If it's at –oops– If it's at a full... –let me try that again– If it's at a full 100%, it's going to fill in everything on the entire canvas. If it's too low, you'll start seeing this halo around the edges. So with that pen still touching the screen, you can find a really nice perfect balance where the whole shape fills in, but not the background itself. Alright, cool. So what I'm going to do is just go through and start filling in some color to get a general idea of what a palette could look like for this illustration. Again, I'm going to start with the largest shapes and work my way from large to small. Alright, I'll go back to my Palettes. And I'll have this main mushroom be this kind of melon color. Again, let's just double-check that were on that middle layer. Cool. So we're going to put all of our color fills on this layer itself. Alright, so I'm just drawing a basic shape for what that mushroom head looks like, dragging it, filling it in. Remember, if your whole screen just changed color, keep your pen touching the screen and play with that Threshold until you fill it in at a percentage that makes the most sense. Alright, so I'm just going through, selecting colors and filling them in. I'm keeping it pretty loose. And all of the colors I'm using are within this Orchid Truffle palette. Alright, so I'll grab that pink. Maybe that's the side mushroom. And how about this ochre yellow, for this guy right here. Sometimes I use Color Fill, sometimes I just fill it in if it's gonna be quicker. Again, just super blobby shapes to get an idea for that color in these areas. The idea here isn't that we're completing this final illustration. It's that we're getting a really quick color study so that we know what kind of color palette we'd like to move forward with. I want to point something out real quick. So when I filled in this left side of the flower, all of the colors kinda keyed into the same pink. That's a Color Threshold issue. So two fingers to undo. So instead, I'm going to grab this, keep my pen touching, and then adjust that Threshold until only the petals fill in, but not the rest of the illustration. Cool. Alright, and just like that, we have one of our first color palettes already established. So rather than just moving forward right now, I want to try out a few more and see if one resonates with me more than the others. So, like with most things, when it comes to art, usually your first try isn't the absolute winner. But the second or third is gonna be the home run. So with color palettes like this, it's really fast and easy to try out a few different solutions and see what works best. I'll show you how to do that. I'm gonna go back to my Layers, tap where it says "New Group". Swipe left and hit Duplicate. Now with this new group selected, I'll go over here to my pointer tool. Then bring this palette over, press the pointer tool to set that transformation. Now, just like before, I'm going to try out a new color palette and see what's working and what's not working. So I'll go ahead and open up my layers. Select that background layer itself. Remember, you can double-check by toggling on and off that layer visibility to make sure you're on the right layer. Here's a pro tip. Before you spend all the time and effort of creating a new color palette, try swapping that background color first and see if that does the trick. This is the easiest thing you can do when it comes to trying out new color palettes. It's just trying a different background color. Cool. That actually feels like a completely different vibe from that original illustration with that turquoise background. This new one feels pretty retro and mod. I like it. I think what I'm gonna do now is try out one of my other color palettes. I have a lot of fun swatches over here. So I'm gonna go ahead and make another one. We'll go back to my Layers. Swipe left where it says "New Group", hit Duplicate. And with that new group selected, I'll go to my pointer tool. Just go ahead and bring it down. Press that pointer tool to set the transformation. Alright, with this new guy down here, I'm gonna go ahead and choose a brand new color palette to explore. I like this Magic Mimosa. I'll hit the three dots, set it as my default. So it always pops up front and center. Alright, I think I want to try a cream background for this. So I've selected the cream, verified that it changed colors up here. And I will go back to my Palettes. Select, make sure by turning on and off the visibility that I have that background layer selected, I'm just going to click and drag and fill in that background with that cream color. And now I'll go back to my Layers. Select that blobby color layer, and I'm going to start replacing these colors with the colors from this Magic Mimosa palette. I probably won't even have to redraw anything. I can just color-fill over the original colors. Alright, so I'm going to start with the biggest element, which is the sun. I'll use the yellow for that guy and just click it and fill it in. Triple check them on the right layer. Perfect. Alright. What if this main mushroom is that darkest purple? And again, if you're finding that the colors are skewing to the entire color palette like this. Remember that's a Color Threshold issue. So to solve for it, keep that pen touching the screen. Here I'll show you real quick. Two fingers to undo. Keep that pen touching the screen, and move it more to the left or more to the right depending on what needs to be filled in. And in this case, I need to bring that threshold down a little bit so that only the mushroom cap fills in. Not the rest of the illustration. Cool. So I'm going to go through and start filling in the colors to replace all of these with the Magic Mimosa palette. Oops. Sometimes if you don't land exactly where you're supposed to, the whole background area will fill in. No worries. Just two fingers to undo. Cool. So now I'm gonna go see all of my palettes together. I think I'll do that same background swap just to try a new background with this Magic Mimosa palette. Go to my Layers, select that New Group, make sure it's the right group. And swipe left where it says "New Group", hit Duplicate. Use my arrow tool and move it over. And for this one, I think I want to try a bright yellow background. So I'll turn on and off that layer visibility to make sure I'm on that right layer, make sure it's highlighted in blue. Go to my color palettes, grab that yellow and just drop it into fill in the background. For this one, I'll need to change those yellow icons to be a different color so that they actually pop out from that background. So make sure that you're selecting the color blob layer itself. I'll go to my color palettes and fill in all of the yellow to be a cream. Alright, cool. So I've got a lot of really nice color options here. As you can see, they're very, very abstract, but that's fine. Again, the whole point of this, so that I can get a general idea of what's working, what's not working, and have a good color palette that I want to move forward with. And in this case, bottom-left is definitely the winner. I really love where this color story is going. I think it pops off the background well. It makes a really nice contrast in colors. It feels fun, feminine and retro all in one go. So this is gonna be the color palette that I move forward with. So at this point for you, you can go ahead and continue exploring color palettes. Maybe you haven't found the exact right one yet. That's all right. You can continue exploring this and see what works best for you. I'm gonna go ahead and stop here, choose this bottom-left palette and use this as my color inspiration for moving forward to the next step, which is starting our final illustration. Let's get going. 6. Filling in Shapes: So now that we have our color studies finished, and we have zeroed in on the color palette that we'd like to move forward with, it's time to start our final illustration. So to do that, I'm going to go back to my Gallery. And at this point, we're going to start a brand new art board at that larger canvas size. And if you accidentally went out into the full Gallery, no problem. Just to go ahead and tap into your Stack and you'll get back into your grouping of illustrations that we're doing today. Alright, so I'm gonna hit this plus sign at the top right corner and start a new canvas. Click that other plus sign, change it to inches. And this is my big boy canvas. I want it to be a lot larger than that original eight by ten. So this one is gonna be at 24 by 30 inches, which gives me a DPI of 300, which is perfect, and six available layers. So remember, when we worked on that earlier canvas, it was a lot smaller. So we got a lot more layers. But when we work on larger canvases like this, Procreate will restrict the maximum amount of layers you can use. But in this class, I'm going to show you some workarounds for this limited layer issue. Real quick, I mentioned earlier in this class that some iPads are different when it comes to the maximum amount of layers and canvas size you can use in Procreate. If you can't get this 24 by 30 inch canvas at 300 DPI, no worries. Just try working with some smaller canvas sizes until you find one that your Procreate app allows for your iPad. All right, I'm gonna go ahead and click Create. Cool. So this is my brand new large canvas. Looks lovely. The first thing I want to do is go ahead, go back to my Gallery, which opens up my Stack. I'm gonna go ahead and click this canvas, then bring it all the way to the right. And this just helps me stay organized. It's the progression as I go. So thumbnail sketches, color studies, and then we're going to start our artwork over here. But I'm actually going to go back to my thumbnails. And what I wanna do is grab that thumbnail sketch that I want to move forward with, copy it and paste it on that new canvas. So I'll open up my Layers, consolidate these groups by toggling that carrot. That's the one I want. So I'm going to hide that other group. Hide that background color layer. Toggle down that carrot. And hide that cyan background. So the only thing we should be seeing here is the sketch itself. It looks like I accidentally have a little blob on there. No worries– sometimes that happens. So just going to double-check, the only thing on this art board is just the sketch. There's no background colors, anything like that. So what I'll do is take three fingers, swipe down and hit "Copy All". So by copying all, it's gone ahead and copied that entire sketch. It's everything available on the canvas. And since we turn that background layer off, it's transparent. So now we can go back to our Gallery. We're back in our Stack. Tap "Untitled Artwork". Three fingers swipe again. And we're going to "Paste". And there is our perfect sketch. It's really teeny tiny because remember, we were working on an eight by ten canvas. Well, we were working on a quarter of an eight by ten Canvas because we shrunk our sketch down. No worries. I'm just gonna go ahead and enlarge this guy so that it fills up the entire frame of the canvas. If yours is skewing a lot, that means you have "Free Form" selected. That's when it does stuff like this, which we don't want. Two fingers to undo. Go ahead and make sure that "Uniform" is checked. Cool. So I'm just going to size this to a nice place. When I feel like it fits, I'll go ahead and tap that arrow to set the transformation. Now what we have done is we have put our thumbnail sketch on our final large canvas. So if you go over here to Layers, there should only be one layer. It's just that thumbnail sketch and it's transparent. If you turn the background off, it's a transparent sketch. And now that we have our sketch placed on our large canvas, it's time to start working on that final illustration. So the first thing to check is to go over here to your Brush Library, make sure you have those sample brushes imported. Of course, you're welcome to use any brushes you'd like. These are just the freebie brushes that came with this class. Also, we can go ahead and check our color palettes. And we have our color palettes imported as well. I'm gonna go ahead and move forward with this Magic Mimosa palette. So to get started, the first thing I'm going to do is go ahead and fill in this background color. Background color layers are default in Procreate. So this layer will always be here. You can't swipe left and delete it. But that's cool. I can go ahead and tap that thumbnail and change it to that cream background of the color palette I had decided to move forward with. Cool. So now we have our background color established. By the way, you can go back anytime and change your background colors to whatever color you'd like. But again, for this one, I like that kind of off-white cream. Alright, cool. I'll go back to my Layers. And now I'm going to add a new layer. So hit that plus sign. And my layer is above my thumbnail sketch. And this is just a personal preference. You can either draw your final over your sketch or under it. Either way, that's sketch is going to get deleted later. So whatever works best for you. If you prefer to have your sketch overhead, you can bring that layer down and keep it underneath that sketch. Alright, now I'll go to my brushes and I'm going to use this Round Liner brush to outline all of the elements. This brush is kinda cool. It's got a very slight texture to it, which adds a little bit more character to your illustrations. And I'm gonna go ahead and go back to my color palettes and start with this really deeper, darker purple. And I'm going to start with my primary element, which is this first large mushroom. Alright, so I've chosen my color palette. It's indicated up here in the top-right corner. I am on my Round Liner brush and I'm on my new blank layer. I'm not sketching on the thumbnail, I'm sketching on a completely blank layer. And this is really important because later on, we're actually going to be deleting that thumbnail sketch and just have our final illustration come through. So whatever you do, make sure you're not drawing on your thumbnail sketch because we want to be able to just delete that later. So, new layer is selected. It's completely blank and we're ready to start drawing. So I'm going to zoom in a little bit. Triple check that I'm on the right brush. Cool. The opacity of that brush is up at a 100%. Right now the size is at 100. Let's see how that looks. That looks pretty good, although I might bring it down just a smidge, so it's not as textured on those edges. Let's see 40 percent. Oh yeah, that feels a little bit better. Alright, So two fingers to undo. And now with that brush at 40%, I'm gonna go ahead and outline my mushroom. If you ever mess up your lines, remember two fingers to undo and start again. Cool. So what I've done is I've drawn an entire shape, and that shape has connected entirely. There's no gaps, so it's not like a little gap in that circle. It's filled in entirely. I'm actually going to go back to my layers and bring that sketch above my thumbnail so it's easier to see. Cool. So with this shape filled in entirely, I can grab my color and drop it right into the shape. But remember, we want to keep an eye on that Color Threshold. Because if I zoom in now you see this halo kind of coming around. That shape didn't fill in in its entirety, but I'll show you how to fix that. So two fingers to undo that Color Drop. So I'll grab that color. But instead of dropping it in and letting go of my pencil, my pen is still touching the screen. And now I can play with that Color Drop Threshold. Too far to the left, I get this weird halo. Too far to the right, it fills in the whole screen. I want to fill it in just enough so that it fills in the entire shape, but not the outside edges. So again, my pen is still touching the screen and that's how I can take a look at that Color Drop Threshold. So 97%, that looks fantastic. I'll go ahead and release my pen. Now the entire shape has filled in and there's no weird halo effects on those edges. So what I'm gonna do now is go ahead and fill in the base shapes for my primary mushroom. I'm going to do all of those on separate layers so that I can texturize them later. So I'll go back to my Layers, click the plus sign to add a new layer. Go back to my color palettes. And I'm going to use this lighter fuchsia color again on its own brand new layer. So it looks like this. Awesome. So something I want to point out real quick. If I tried to fill in the skirt, right now, the entire canvas would change to pink. And the reason that's happening, two fingers to undo is because the shape isn't entirely contained. It's got this huge open gap. So if we close that shape and then fill it in, perfect, we have filled in the entire shape, not the entire canvas. And now I can simply go back to my Layers, grab that skirt, and bring it underneath the cap of the mushroom where it belongs with the illustration. Alright, so I'm gonna go ahead and finish filling in the rest of the basic shapes for this primary mushroom. So new layer, change my color to this dark indigo. And I'll do the base of the mushroom. Remember, fill it in entirely so that you can close that shape. Now I'll go to my layers and bring that base underneath so that it stacks really well. The last part of this mushroom, I want to get is this, this bottom part right here under the fold of the primary top. And last but not least, let's go ahead and fill in the underbelly of the mushroom head. So I'll go back to my Layers, tap that plus sign to add a new layer. Go to my color palettes. I went to the underside of this mushroom to be the same color as the top of the head. Later on, I'm going to fill it in with some shadows through that texture brush so that it looks like it's underneath and darker and has a little bit more dimension. But the base color of it, I'll do that same color as what's at the top of the mushroom. So I have that kind of darkish purple selected. Go back to my Layers, verify that I'm on a brand new layer. And what I'm going to do is just have it come from this direction, swoop in and connect. Remember, when we fill in those shapes, it's really important that the shape is connected all the way. Otherwise, the color floods out to the rest of the canvas. If you ever want to double-check, you can turn off the visibility of these other shapes and make sure it's connected all the way. This one looks perfect. So I'll go ahead and pull that Color Fill in. Now I'll go back to my Layers and turn back on that mushroom head. Perfect. So I have all of my basic shapes finished. Those only took up four layers because there's only four basic shapes of this mushroom. And I also have my sketch layer down below. This is great because I think I might be at my layer max or close to it. Let's see. Okay, Can I add one more layer? Yeah. But when I tried to add more than six, I get this notification: "Maximum limit of six layers reached." So luckily, I was able to fill in the shape under the layer limit, which is perfect. I'll delete that extra layer that I didn't use. Cool. So at this point, this is what my canvas looks like. I have my sketch down here at the very bottom, and then I have my mushroom divided up into four separate layers. And the reason I wanted to keep these as four separate layers so that I can start texturizing them individually to add some depth and shadow and a little bit more dimension to this mushroom. So that is what we're gonna get into in the next video. 7. Infusing Texture: Alright, cool. So now that we have our basic shapes down, I'm going to show you how you can use texture to infuse some depth into your illustration. Alright, so first things first, I'm gonna go over to my Layers. And I think I'll start the texture to do just this main mushroom cap right here. With that layer selected, I'm going to tap it once and hit Alpha Lock. So you'll notice here on that layer thumbnail, you have this checkered background now behind whatever you drew on that layer. That's Procreate's way of telling you that that layer has an Alpha Lock applied to it. Which means whatever you draw on that layer will only be drawn on the existing elements within that layer before you applied the Alpha Lock. So kinda confusing. I'm just going to show you exactly what I mean. So if I were to just take any color right now, with my brush, sure, if that looks good, draw on this layer, the only area where it's actually going to fill in is where I have that shape already established within that layer. So anything I draw outside of that shape never shows up. But if I draw it within the shape, then it's visible. So the way that I use Alpha Lock is for adding texture into my artwork. So I want to be able to add some texture only on the shape itself, not have that splatter over into the edges. Alright, so two fingers to undo that little practice. Cool. Alright, so I have my Alpha Lock added. Again, you can always click that layer and verify that there's a checkmark next to Alpha Lock. That means it's applied and ready to go. Now I'll go to my Brushes. And I'm going to start with this Dead Subtle 4, which is one of the Speckle Tone brushes. And you can see what this brush looks like by tapping it, you'll get a little preview. It's a very, very subtle kind of grainy brush that I use to add depth and texture into my artwork. So with that brush selected, with my layer selected, with Alpha Lock applied, I'm going to go over here to my Palettes. Select the same color as whatever I used for the cap of that mushroom. And then I'm gonna go over here into Disk. Actually I'm gonna do Classic. Cool. You have this bottom menu bar within your color palettes. It's just different ways to get colors that you're looking for. I'm usually over here in Palettes, but sometimes I'll dip into Classic to give me really, really subtle color differences. So in this case, I'm just dragging that color down slightly so that it's just ever so darker than the original. If you ever want to go back to the original, you can tap it down below, and then just bring that circle down a smidge to get it darker than the original color. Alright, so now what I can do is start infusing some depth into my mushroom. So I'm just going to draw very, very slightly like this. You can see it on screen here. It's this texture coming through on the mushroom. Because I'm applying the texture on this far outer edge, you're only really seeing it here. You're not seeing it on this side of the mushroom. So I can go back to my Colors, maybe choose an even deeper purple. And really just kinda build up that texture on one side of the mushroom that I want to be darker than the other. So it's really, really subtle, but it's things like this that can elevate your illustration into a more professional level. Alright, so I built up a little bit of depth over here. I think it looks nice. The next thing I want to try is going back to my Brushes and choosing this Sharpie Sparse Fill Demo brush. So what this brush looks like Is a bunch of polka dots. If you use this brush at a massive level, you get a big splatter of dots. If you use it at a really small level, it'll be very teeny tiny dots. So what I'm gonna do is have this brush selected. Go back to my Color Palette. Start with my original background color, make it slightly lighter. Bring that brush size up to 100%. And just add some very, very, very sparse speckle tones coming through with that brush. I think that looks pretty interesting. You can always play with the size of your brush over here. If you want very, very tiny speckle tones, you can do that as well. But I like using, again two fingers. I like using this brush as an accent filler with these polka dots. I like using it at the very largest size I can possibly get. Alright, so that is a sample for how I add texture. I'm gonna go ahead and do that for the other shapes that I've done as well. So we'll go back to my Layers. Let's do the skirt of the mushroom. I'm going to start with the Speckle Tone brush, that really subtle shading. Go to my Colors. Choose the color, that's the skirt anyway, and make it a little bit darker. Now I can start painting in just a little bit of texture. You can see it here. And shadows within that area. They can make it even darker. Or maybe, oops. One thing I want to point out, I forgot to turn on Alpha Lock. So all of the shadows I'd been doing have been splattering to the outside. No worries. It happens from time to time. I'm just going to use two fingers to undo. Until I got rid of, there we go, all of that shading. Go back to my Layers and don't forget to turn Alpha Lock on. Now when I add those shadows, cool, they're only adding to that area within the layer itself, not outside of that shape. Perfect. So I'm just gonna do a little bit of dabbling to make the top part a little bit darker and the bottom part a little bit lighter. I'll do the same thing. I'll use that dot fill. Go back to the original color, make it a little bit lighter. Maybe add a few dots at the bottom. Cool. Same thing. This is that under lip right now of the mushroom cap. So I'll tap it. Turn on Alpha Lock. Go to my Colors. Start with the original. I want to make this one a lot darker because it's underneath the cap of that mushroom. Go to my Brushes, choose that Dead Subtle brush and fill it in like this to really add some nice depth to this mushroom. Now it really looks like that cap has some dimension and weight to it and curves around and you see this bottom shaded area. So this is what I mean with using texture brushes to give some depth and dimension into your art work. Alright, same as before. I'm going to use that Sparse Fill. Make the color a little bit darker and do a few dots. Cool, I think that looks great. Last but not least, is the stem of the mushroom. So I'll tap that layer, hit Alpha Lock, go to my Brushes, start with that Dead Subtle shading brush, Color Palettes. Start at the original blue. Now this blue is already really dark. So instead of adding shadow, I'm actually going to bring that color up to be a little bit lighter. And now I'm going to add some highlights. So now, here I'll zoom in so you can see, I'm using that Dead Subtle brush to make this blue a little bit lighter. And now I'll go to my Brushes, change it to that Sharpie Sparse Fill. Maybe get it a lot lighter. And maybe just do a few dots down here. Cool. With this brush, you really don't need too much. Just a smattering of dots will usually do the job. But I like having them just contained to one small area, these little chunks, I think it's a little bit more interesting. Awesome. So now if I go over here to my Layers, I can turn off the visibility of that background sketch and see how this mushroom looks. So this will be the illustration style for all of the mushrooms and flowers for this piece. We have some nice dimension happening. We've got some cool textures with those dots and a really intriguing color palette. So now that I'm totally finished with this mushroom, I'm gonna go ahead and flatten all those shapes together. I no longer need to be able to edit each one individually. I think it looks perfect as is. So I can go ahead grab everything and flatten it together in one layer. One thing to note here is that I did not flatten my sketch. I still left that as its own individual layer because I want to be able to delete that when we have our final illustration finished. The only thing I flattened was that mushroom itself. The reason I flattened it is: One, to keep my layers panel a little bit more organized. And two, because we do have a layer of restriction here, so that whenever I have an opportunity to consolidate my layers like this into just one, I can go ahead and do that so that I can add more layers later on the same canvas. Alright, so now that I have that basic mushroom completed, I have the rest of the illustration to work on. So I'm gonna go ahead and fill in these other two mushrooms using those exact same steps. So, that is coming up in the next lesson. 8. Finalizing the Main Motif: At this point, you should have one of your mushrooms finished, and I'm gonna go ahead and finish the other two on this exact same artboard. So same steps as before. I have a brand new layer over here. Again, I'm not drawing on that mushroom layer, and I'm not drawing on the sketch layer. I'm only drawing on this blank layer that I made for this second mushroom. So this second mushroom cap is going to be yellow. So I'll select that over here from my Magic Mimosa palette. I'll go to my Brushes, make sure that that Round Liner brush is selected. Let's triple check that I'm on my own individual layer. And I'll go ahead and get started. I'm just drawing the cap of the mushroom, making sure that I connect to that shape all the way so that when I bring that Color Fill in, it fills in entirely. I'll smooth out this edge just a little bit. Perfect. Alright, so that is one layer. I'm going to add a new layer for the bottom of that cap. Oops. Remember if you ever mess up like this, two fingers to undo. Alright, so I'm just going to connect this at the bottom. It's hard to see, but I wanna make sure I connect to that shape entirely. You can always turn off the visibility above to make sure, and then that way it fills in entirely. Alright. So I have those as two separate layers. Time to do this skirt. I'll hit the plus sign to make a new layer. Go to my Palettes. And you know what? I think I'm actually going to use the same yellow as I used on the cap. I'll just use the shading later to make it either darker or lighter to make it stand out a little bit more. Alright, so brand new layer. And I'll draw that skirt in. I want to make sure that I can hide the layers above it so that I can connect that shape to fill it in all the way. Alright, I can put those back in action now. And last but not least, I'm going to go ahead and do that stem. Hit that plus sign. Grab my color palettes. Use this indigo. Triple check I'm on a new blank layer and I'll draw this stem. Cool. So I'll do a little bit of rearranging. I know I went that stem to be at the very bottom. Awesome. Alright, now, same as before. I'm just gonna go through each of these individually and turn on Alpha Lock so that that part is done. And then all I have to do is work on texturizing. Alright, I will start at this main guy right here, which is the cap of the mushroom, which I'm actually going to bring up to the tip top of the layers palette, since that overlaps everything underneath it. All right, I'll go to my Brushes. Start with Dead Subtle. Go back to my colors. Start with that same yellow of the mushroom cap, but make it just a little bit darker. And start filling it in. So I want this left side to be a little bit darker than the right to stay consistent with the way I treated this original mushroom over here. It's underneath this primary mushroom, so there's probably a little bit of a shadow anyway. Maybe I'll make it even darker for some areas. Perfect. Again, this is a really nice and subtle brush, which is one of the reasons I really like it. You can do very, very gently build up a gradient and really add that depth. All right, that's looking great. I'll switch back to my original yellow. Make it a little bit brighter, and switch to that Sharpie Sparse Fill Speckle Tone. And I'm just gonna do a smattering of speckles right there. Perfect. All right, what's next up? I'm going to bring the underside of that mushroom cap up one layer so that it's over the skirt itself. Now will go to my Brushes. Choose that Dead Subtle 4. Start with my original yellow. Bring it down to be even darker. Verify that I'm on the right layer. And I'm going to start filling this in. Remember, I want the underside of this cap to be a lot darker than the top, just to show that depth and that dimension. It might even make it even darker for some areas like the corners. Cool. I think that looks great. I'll go to my Speckle Tone. So I'll start with the original. Get a little bit darker, and switch to that Sharpie Fill and just add a few dots. Alright, one thing I noticed is I actually need to bring this skirt up one layer. You can grab it and bring it up. Cool. And that way it makes more sense with the depth. We have the backside of the mushroom cap behind the skirt, but the front of the mushroom cap covering the skirt. One thing I want to point out here is within the skirt layer, I actually got it a little bit over, which isn't a big deal. I'm just gonna go ahead and erase part of it. So I'll go to my eraser. And remember, you can choose whatever eraser you like. I prefer Syrup, which is a Procreate default brush that's under the "Inking" category. And now I can just erase that part that came over slightly. Not a big deal, but just a little thing that can help out. Alright, so I'll go back to my Brushes. Start with that Dead Subtle 4. Go to my color palettes. Start with the original, get just a little bit darker. Go to my Layers and make sure that I'm on that skirt layer. I'm just going to add a very subtle amount of dimension. You know what, actually I want to make this a little bit darker because it's blending in with the front of that mushroom a little bit. So I'm going to actually be a little bit more dramatic with that dimension up here. Cool. That makes me think I need to get a little bit dramatic over here to the underside of the mushroom, just so that it doesn't blend in with that skirt right here. So I'll make the color even darker. Make sure that I'm on that under fill layer. And I can just paint in a little bit more darkness like that. Perfect. Alright, I'll switch to my dotted brush. Go back to my colors. Start with the original. Actually maybe the original will work here. So I'll go to my skirt. I think that's a little bit too intense. So I'm gonna make this a little bit darker. Perfect. All right, and last but not least, the stem of the mushroom. So I'll go back to my layers. Select that stem, go to my brushes, work on that Dead Subtle 4 brush. Choose the original blue. Make it a little bit brighter, and start painting it. And this one's really subtle. So we'll go even lighter. Cool. I'll go grab that dotted brush and try a few dots. Awesome. Alright, two mushrooms down, one to go. So at this point, I'll go back to my layers and consolidate that entire second mushroom into one layer. So now I have my pink mushroom all on its own layer, the yellow mushroom all on its own layer. And the sketch is also its own layer. So I'll get orange on my palette. Grab that Round Outline brush, go to my Layers panel, and click that plus sign to add a new layer. And same as before. I'm just gonna go ahead and outline the shapes and fill them in. Each one on its own individual layer. Okay, cool. I've been waiting for this to happen. So I can't finish the stem because as you can see here, my maximum limit of six layers has been reached. So what do you do? I'm going to show you exactly how I handle situations like this when I just need to finish one or two layers within the illustration. So what I'm gonna do here is go ahead, texturize this top part of the mushroom and flatten it into one layer. And that's going to buy me the room to get that final layer for the mushroom stem. So I'll go ahead, select each of these. Turn Alpha Lock on. And I'll start with the top of the mushroom, which I'm actually going to bring to the top of that grouping. Go to my Brushes, grab that Dead Subtle brush, make it a little bit darker. And add some shadow here. Maybe a little bit darker. Cool. I'll do the same thing, adding some of that darker shadow to that underbelly. Maybe this one gets a lot darker. Cool. And last but not least, to the skirt of the mushroom. Anytime you want to go back to that original color, you can click it right down here on the palette and it'll jump up here on that color square. For this one, I'm actually going to make it a little bit lighter. And just do some light areas down here at the bottom to give it a nice contrast between the top of the mushroom. Alright, now I'll switch my brush to that Dotted Sharpie. Go back to my Layers. I'll go ahead and start with the skirt. Go to my Colors. Start with the original and just add a few dots in. It's really subtle. I love that. Alright, I'll grab the top of the mushroom. Same thing, just a smattering of dots. And inside, exact same thing. Except I'm going to make it a little bit darker. Cool. So now that I've finished the whole top of this mushroom, I can go ahead, go to my Layers, consolidate all of these together on their own layer. Remember, that's its own layer. I'm not merging it with the existing mushrooms. Now, I've bought myself extra room within my Layers so that I can start a new layer to finish that stem. Alright, so I'll hit that plus sign. Change my color to that deep indigo. Grab my brushes and go back to my outline brush. Verify that I'm on a brand new layer and I'll start filling it in. Perfect. I'm going to go ahead and grab that guy and put it underneath the mushroom, tap it once, turn on Alpha Lock, go to my Brushes. Start with this very slight buildup Speckle Tone and make it a lighter blue. And then I'll switch to that dot brush and add just a few little smattering of dots over there. Perfect. Now we can go back to my Layers and very carefully pinch those two together so that now they're on their own layer. So at this point, I have all three of my mushrooms completely finalized, texturized, all on their own layer. So I think it's looking really nice. And that sketch itself is also on its own layer down here at the bottom. So one thing I want to do real quick is add a little bit more visual intrigue to the top of these mushroom caps just by drawing some little embellishments. So I'm gonna go ahead and do that on these layers right now, before I move on to the next segment. With each layer selected, I'm gonna go to my Brush Tool, grab that Round Liner Demo, change my color palette to, let's do that same cream as we're using on the background. And I'm just going to draw in a few little embellishment shapes like this. Right on top of the layer itself. I'm actually going to make my brush a bit smaller. Cool. Alright, that one looks nice. I'll go to my orange and draw on that one next. And finally, I'll do the same on yellow. Cool. So at this point, I have my hero elements completely finalized. Again, each of these shrooms are on its own layer. And now it's time to start filling in some of these other floral elements. So that's coming up in the next lesson. 9. Layering: Now that we have our main motif finalized, it's time to start working on some of those floral elements. So to do that, we're gonna go back over here to Gallery. Hit "Select", grab that piece, and hit "Duplicate". And hit that X. So in the spirit of staying very organized, I'm going to tap where it says "Untitled Artwork" and change this to "Mushrooms". The second one I'm going to call "Right Flowers". Because, spoiler alert, that is what we're painting in this lesson. So why did I just duplicate the canvases like that? So when I work in Procreate, because we have these limits with layers, I can't just have one giant canvas with a million layers and groupings. You just can't work that way in Procreate. So instead, what I do is I'll do segments of my canvas at a time. And once that's completely finalized, duplicate it, flatten everything and then work on top of it. So by doing it that way, I can always go back to previous canvases. Maybe I want to change something with that right mushroom or change the color or remove the texture. It doesn't matter. Whatever edit I want to make, I now have that flexibility because I can go back into a previous canvas where I have all of those layers separated and ready for me. As I work, I'll go through, duplicate canvases, flatten everything, and start building on top of that. But if I want to go back and make changes, I can. And the other big benefit of working like this is I want every single element of my illustration to be on its own individual layer. By the time we finish, a lot of it's going to be flattened and that's fine. We can go back into these previous canvases, export them, and have those layers already established. And the reason this is important is because I do a lot of seamless patterns with the elements that I draw in Procreate. So I can always go back into those previous canvases, export them into Photoshop, and have each individual element on its own layer. I'm not going to be going into that in this class. I want this class just to be Procreate. But if you want to learn how I take individual layers like this and turn them into a seamless pattern in Photoshop, I've got another class for you called, "Watercolor a Seamless Pattern: Surface Design in Adobe Photoshop for Print on-Demand." In that class, it shows you how to take any sort of rasterized artwork, including watercolor, including acrylic, including Procreate, and arrange it into a seamless pattern. So if you want to learn that later, that class is available. But the whole point of me explaining this is that's the reason that I work in canvases like that. I just want to make sure that every element is on its own layer somewhere, even if it's like twelve canvases back. Alright, I hope that makes sense. So at this point, we have a duplicate of that canvas we just created. I'm going to go ahead, open that up. Go to my Layers and flatten all those mushrooms into one layer. So now we have that mushroom layer. We have the sketch layer, and we have the background itself. Since these mushrooms are now flattened into their own layer, if I wanted to move them around, they all come as a bunch together. I can no longer move them around individually. So if I ever want to adjust that placement, again, I can go back into my Stack and still have the option over here to work with them individually. So that's the reason I'm duplicating these canvases and flattening existing artwork. Alright, I'll go back to my brand new canvas, which I've named "Right Flowers", because I'm going to start filling in these flowers over here to the right. Alright, so I'll go back to my Layers. Click this plus sign to work with a new blank layer. So for the sake of simplicity, I'm just going to keep all of these buds on the same layer. Alright, so I'll go to my color palettes. Let's see, I think on my color exploration, I had that lighter pink. I'll go to my brushes and make sure I'm on my Round Liner brush. Triple check that I'm on a completely new blank layer, and I'll start drawing. Actually, I'm gonna make my brush a little bit bigger. And now I'll start drawing. I'm just keeping these petals pretty abstract. I'm not following my thumbnail sketch exactly. I can take some creative liberties here. And again, I want to make sure that all of these shapes connect entirely so that when I fill them in, it fills in the entire shape and not the background. Taking a lot of creative liberty to move away from my thumbnail sketch a little bit and utilize this extra space that's over here. Cool. Now I'll just drag in this Color Fill to fill in all of these shapes. Alright, so I have my basic blooms filled out. Let's go ahead and add some texture to these. So I'll go to my Layers, tap that layer thumbnail, and turn on Alpha Lock. Now I'll go to my Brushes, select Dead Subtle 4. Go to my color palettes. I'm just going to make it a little bit darker, to start adding a little bit of variation into these flowers. Maybe on the right side, it gets a little bit lighter. So remember, you can always tap your color palette to reset. Then make it a little bit lighter. Alright, so very, very subtle, but that that's the way I like to add dimension and depth. Alright, so I have these blooms pretty much finalized. Let's go ahead and do the stems. I'm going to start a new layer. Change my brush back to that Round Liner brush. Change my palette to that dark indigo. Triple check that I'm on a blank layer and start filling this in as well. So with these flowers, I think I'm going to have these little caps that hold them in place. I'm going to grab these mushrooms, bring it to the top of the stack. And I want to be able to see what I'm doing as I draw these stems. I'm actually going to click this "N" that's next to my mushroom layer. "N" stands for "normal" because it's a normal blending mode. I'm actually going to grab this opacity and bring it down to like 50%. And that way, whenever I draw these stems in, I'll be able to see exactly where I am behind the mushroom. I'll bring those mushrooms back up to 100% when I'm finished with this. But right now, it's gonna be helpful for me to be able to see what's behind them as I draw. Alright, so I'm definitely on my stem layer, not on my mushroom layer, not on the flower petals, but stem itself. Let's start filling it in. Cool. One thing that I don't have in my thumbnail sketch are leaves for these flowers, but I don't have to follow this thumbnail sketch perfectly. It's up to my own imagination. So even though it's not in the thumbnail, I think I'm going to draw some leaves in to just give these flowers a little bit more interest. And the way that I want to have my leaves work is have some leaves overlapping the mushrooms and then some going behind the mushrooms just to give it some more depth and interest. And this is where masks are gonna come in handy, which is what we're using in this lesson. So first things first, as I draw these leaves in here, I want to think about what leaves are in front of the mushrooms and what are behind. Again, I'm on that stem layer. So maybe one leaf right here comes in front of the mushroom. So I've drawn that in and filled it in. Again, we are on our leaf layer. And maybe another leaf like this one goes behind the mushroom. We're going to determine that exact placement when I finalize this layer when we start using the mask. Right now, just a mental note. Alright, I'll have another leaf here. I think it'd be kinda fun to have a leaf that goes over that moon a little bit. And maybe one right here, that goes behind the petals themselves. Perfect. I think there's one more opportunity here. Awesome. Alright, so now that I have my stems and leaves finished, let's go ahead, tap that layer, throw on an Alpha Lock, and add some texture to it. I'll start with that Dead Subtle brush. Go to my palettes, and make it a lot brighter. And just very gently add some texture into these areas. I'll grab that dotted brush and do the same thing. I don't want dots everywhere, just in a few select places. Cool. Oh, and I realized I actually forgot to Speckle Tone those dots for the petals themselves. But since they're still on their own layer, I can always add those back in. So that's another benefit of having things separated out onto their own layers. If you need to go back and make a few adjustments, it's all still completely separated out from the rest of the illustration. So you can do so. Alright, so at this point I have my layers over here. I have my mushroom layer, which I'm gonna go ahead and bring back up to 100%. I have the leaf layer right here. And I have the petals themselves. So now that we've finished the florals over here to the right, it's time to decide what overlaps and what underlaps. And this is where I use masks. So right now, everything is determined by the order of layers. So the mushrooms cover everything because they're at the top of the stack. The stems themselves come next, and finally, the petals. So what I wanna do is figure out what leaves are going to go over, what petals might go under, things like that. One way to do it is to simply use your eraser tool. So with that layer selected, you could use your eraser tool and erase out parts of the illustration where you want things to overlap. The problem with this is it's destructive editing. By erasing, I'm erasing out part of this mushroom right here so that this leaf can overlap. But what's happening is I'm losing this space over there. I can always undo it and be a lot more precise about exactly how I erase. But it's going to take forever and it's not gonna be perfect. You're always going to get these little cutouts here. So I'm going to undo that. Instead of erasing, what I like to do is use layer masks. So you can do the same thing, erase. But what you can do with the layer mask is you can also redraw in those areas. So I'll give you a quick visual to help you understand how masks work. This hand is the illustration. This is the mushroom illustration with all of our beautiful textures and illustrations. And this hand is the mask. So this is completely covering the mushroom illustration. If the mask is black, it covers everything underneath. But I can take my scissors and cut out some areas from this mask and have my underneath illustration show through. If I want to get rid of the mask altogether, my illustration is exactly how I left it. So I can cut away areas from my mask, I can fill them in. All of these changes are happening to the mask itself. And this underlying illustration is staying intact. So this is the reason why I use masks. I can do a bunch of layering, underlayer, overlayer, get rid of things. But I'm only doing it to the mask and I'm preserving that original, precious illustration. So let's just go ahead and get into it so you can see a visual on your iPad, not with my hands. Alright, so the first thing I wanna do is have this stem of the flower actually overlap the mushroom itself. Right now, the mushroom is covering it simply because the mushroom is at the top of the layers panel. So what I'm going to do is tap that layer and click Mask. So what this has done, there has been no visual change to the composition whatsoever. But it's added this white mask on top of the layer. So with Procreate, white basically is a completely clear mask. But to make it opaque and hide areas, you paint in with black. So I'll show you what I mean. So first things first, I'm gonna go to my Brushes and make sure I'm on my Round Liner brush. Then I'll go to my color palettes. Procreate is smart. They know that if I have a mask in place, I'm going to be painting in with black. Those are the only two options for a mask. It's either black or white. Black will cut away parts of your illustration. White will build it back in. This is what I mean. So black is selected right now. If I were to draw it in this, I'm actually cutting away parts of that mask. My illustration underneath is perfectly intact. I'm gonna go ahead and uncover the rest of this stem. If you're looking at this, you think that I just deleted part of that mushroom. When actually that mushroom is still perfectly there. It's only the mask that I've cut it into. What I want to do is make that whole stem visible. And now I can switch to white. Again, I'm drawing on the mask, not the shape itself. And now I can start to brush back in that mask. So I'm very, very, very carefully drawing on the edges to have this. Sometimes it helps to work with a smaller brush. And what I'm doing is just going through, I'm filling this in like so. Again, that mushroom underneath is still perfectly there. The only thing I'm doing is finessing the mask. Remember, with masks, your two options are black and white. White will start covering that mask back up, whereas black will remove that mask. So at this point, I'm just going to make sure that I'm on a white color. I'm gonna go through along the edges of that stem and very carefully paint that mask back in. Remember, you can change your brush size as much as you need to. Really fill in these areas. If you ever accidentally cut too far in like that, you can always switch back to a black brush and paint it back out. White to cover up that mask again. Sometimes, I'll switch to a larger brush to fill up larger areas. And then I'll go back to a smaller brush to fill in along those edges. Alright, cool. So now, thanks to using a mask, I have part of that stem overlapping the mushroom and then the other part of the stem going behind it. You can always go back over here and see that mask in place. So if you turn off the mask, you lose that cutout. But if you turn it back on, you see it there. Remember, everything under that mask is still perfectly preserved. You're not erasing anything, just erasing from the mask itself. This is why I love using masks. Alright, so let's go through, look for some other opportunities to have some overlaps. How about right here? We'll have this stem actually coming up over the skirt of the mushroom. So same thing. Mask is selected. I'm going to switch to, yeah, I'm gonna switch to black. And very roughly find that entire leaf. And then I can switch to white and be a little bit more careful about filling it back in. Cool. Alright, so we have some overlap, some underlap. Overall, this is giving us a really nice sense of dimension for this illustration. And now I actually want to address some overlap, overlap here within the flowers themselves. I want to have this leaf behind this petal. So I'll go back here to my layers. And for this one, I'll make sure that my leaves and stem layer is selected. Tap it once and add a mask. Cool. So same thing. Oops, got to remember to switch to black. Cool. So same thing. I'm just going to paint those petals back in. I'm not worried too much about the white space on those edges. Cool. And then I'll switch it back to white. And this time do a much more careful job of painting back in that leaf. Cool. So just for the fun of it, I'm gonna do the same thing here. So I'm going to have this part overlap. No, I'm going to have this part under lap and this part overlap. So I'll go through, switch back to black, bigger brush, and then switch to white with a smaller brush to get those edges very carefully done. I think that's actually looking really nice. I'll go ahead and turn off that sketch so we can get a better feeling for it. Yeah, this looks really cool. We have some really nice underlapping areas, some overlapping areas, and it's creating a really intriguing composition. So I'm going to turn that thumbnail back on and see what's left. So at this point, I'm gonna go ahead and finish drawing these florals on this composition using the same techniques that you've already learned. So let's go ahead and wrap this up. 10. Final Florals: Time to finish the rest of these florals. So here's what my illustration is looking like so far. I'm actually going to go back to my Gallery. Same thing as before. "Select." Select those "Right Flowers" and hit "Duplicate". Hit that X. And I'm going to rename this one, "Left Flowers". And guess what I'm doing next? Left flowers. Open that one up. Same thing as before. I'm just going to flatten everything on that illustration. That's not the sketch. So now I have all of my flowers and my mushrooms on one single layer, so they're no longer individual. They all move together. They're flattened. And I have my sketch layer also as its own unique layer. So remember, I have this duplicate saved back in the main Stack. Alright, so same as before, I'll hit that plus sign to start a brand new layer. Go to my Brushes, make sure that I'm on my outline brush. So I'm going to switch my color over here to that darker orange. Verify that I'm on a new blank layer. And same as before, I'm just going to start by drawing in these petals. Alright, let's go ahead and add some texture to these guys. So I will select my layer, hit Alpha Lock, grab that Dead Subtle brush, go to my Palettes. I'm going to make this one a little bit lighter. Now I can start painting in some lighter dimension. Again, it's really subtle, darker area over here, lighter over here. And let's grab that dot brush. Same thing. Just a smattering of dots, maybe on one edge of those flowers. Perfect. Alright, I'll go back to my Layers, starts a new layer by clicking the plus sign. Go to my Brushes, back to Outline. And the center of these flowers are going to be yellow. I think this one has a little bit of an odd placement. So I'll show you how to move that around separately. You can go over here to Select. Freehand looks perfect. I'm just going to grab that yellow part. Go to my pointer tool and move it up a little bit and maybe resize it. Cool. You can press the arrow to set that transformation. Alright, I'll go back to my Layers. Click that layer thumbnail, turn on Alpha Lock and do the same thing as before. Cool. And at this point, I'm gonna go ahead and flatten those two together. So now all of the flower heads are on the same layer. Time for the stems. So we'll hit that plus sign to get a new layer. Go back to my outline brush and choose that same indigo. Make sure I'm on that new layer. And let's draw in those stems. For here, I'm gonna go ahead and do that same thing and make that top layer a little bit more transparent so I can see what I'm doing. So I'll click that "N", and bring it down to just about 50%. Go back to my new stems layer. And now when I draw, I'll be able to see what's happening behind those mushroom layers. And same as before, I'm going to add some leaves to these stems as well. Cool, I think that's looking great. I'll go ahead and turn Alpha Lock on. Grab that Dead Subtle brush, and start making some textures. Alright, let's go back to Layers, and I'm going to click that "N", bring that opacity back up to 100%. And for this one, I'm just going to have one little leaf overlapping. So I want this leaf to be overlapping that main shroom. So we'll go back to my Layers, tap the mushroom layer. Remember it's back at a 100% now, you can always tap that "N" to adjust the percentage of your opacity. And I'll tap that layer, put on a mask. My brush has automatically changed to black, which is perfect. I want to make sure that I'm on my outline brush. I'll make my brush size a lot bigger. Just find out where that leaf is going. Cool. And now I can switch to a white brush. Finesse my brush down to a smaller size. And then carefully, maybe a little bit bigger, and then carefully paint that back in. Cool. So just a little bit of overlap on that one. All right. Now that I have those left flowers finished, I'm gonna go back to my Gallery. Hit "Select", grab those flowers. Hit "Duplicate". Press X to end the selection. And I'm going to title this one, "Hibiscus". Alright, I'll open up my new one. Go to my Layers, flatten everything, but keep that sketch on its own layer. So we are really coming along here. We have most of the illustration finished, just a few more pieces to fill in at this point. So let's go ahead and wrap it up. So I'll hit that plus sign to start a new layer. And I'll start with my left hibiscus, which is that lighter pink version. So I'll go to my Brushes, make sure I've got my outline brush. Change my color palette to pink. Triple check that I'm on a new layer and draw in my hibiscus. And now it's time to add some texture to the blob. So I'll go back to my Palettes, select that thumbnail, put on Alpha Lock. And same thing as before. And at this point it's just one big textured blob. So I want to be able to define those petals a little bit more. And I'm going to show you how I do that. I'm going to grab my sketch layer, and actually bring it up to the tip top so that I can see where the definition of those petals is happening. So instead of just drawing lines on top of the petals to indicate each individual petal. I'm actually going to be using a white space technique and have negative space represent the individual petal lines. I'll show you what I mean. So I have my blob hibiscus layer selected. I'm going to hit my Eraser. Instead of erasing with Syrup like I normally do, I'm gonna go up here and erase with the same brush that I'm using as the outline for everything else, which is that Round Liner. Alright, so that is my new eraser. So now what I can do is erase out parts of this illustration to indicate where the petals are themselves. You can always change the size of your eraser over here, just like you do with brushes. Alright. So we have this guy coming in like this and another petal making its way out. Alright, I'm going to turn off that sketch. And now it's looking a lot better. It's looking a lot more like abstract flower petals. And last but not least, for this hibiscus, I don't want to forget the most iconic part of a hibiscus, which are these pistils that come out from the center. Alright, so I'll go back to my Layers, start a new layer, go to my Color Palettes. I'll use the darker purple. Brushes. I'm on that round brush. Perfect. Again, I'm on a new blank layer. I'm going to start by replicating that same abstract blob. Perfect. I'll go ahead and add some texture to it. Don't forget to turn on Alpha Lock. Alright, I'm going to flatten those two together. Like this. Perfect. Start a new layer and now do the pistils that kind of shoot out from the center of the hibiscus. Alright, I've got my outline brush. I'm going to change the color to this darker indigo. Make sure I'm on a new layer and draw those in. I'm gonna go ahead and turn off my sketch visibility. It's a little bit distracting. Alright, that's looking really nice. I'm gonna go ahead and add some texture and then do the second hibiscus. I'm gonna go ahead and Alpha Lock those pistils and add a little bit of a texture to it. Cool, very slight. And at this point, I'm gonna go ahead and flatten my hibiscus, so it is all on its own layer like this. I'll turn my sketch back on and do my second hibiscus in yellow. Alright, outline, brush, yellow color. Click that plus sign to make sure I'm on a brand new layer. And I'll start outlining the flower. And now same as before, I'm going to define those individual petals using my eraser. So I'll go to my Brushes. Nope. I'll go to my Eraser. Make sure that I'm on that Round Liner Demo. Sizing looks fantastic. And this is the layer I want to be on. I'll just go through and really define those individual petals. Turn off the sketch so I can see what I'm doing. Yeah, that looks good. All right, now same as before. I'll add a new layer. Make this one a little bit darker. Make sure I'm on my outline brush and I'll do that same kind of wobbly center area. Alpha Lock that and add some textures. At this point, it probably feels like second nature: it's very methodical. Brushes, layers, color palettes. I'll flatten those two together. Start a new layer for the pistils. Perfect. Now I can go ahead and merge those pistils with hibiscus itself. And now we have each hibiscus on its own layer. I'll go ahead and turn on my sketch. Awesome, we're almost there. The only things left to do are gonna be these little detail shrooms and the crescent moon, which I'm saving for last. So first things first, I'll go ahead and finish out these mini mushrooms by going to Gallery. Select, grab the "Hibiscus", duplicate it, hit that X, and change this to "Mini Shrooms". Perfect. I'll open that guy up. Go to my Layers. Flatten everything that's not the sketch. So now we have the sketch on its own layer. We have the main illustration on its own layer. And the background is here as well. Alright, I'll click that plus sign to start a new layer and start filling in these little mini shrooms. So this next part might be a little bit tedious, but I want to give each individual mini shroom its own color palette. So I'm just going to go through, rinse and repeat that whole process that I've done for the rest of the illustrations. So merge all three of those together. Once shroom done, two more to go. So I'll just rinse and repeat that same process. And for this one, I'm gonna go ahead and keep all of these mini mushrooms merged together on one layer. Perfect. So two down, one to go. Alright, excellent. So I'm gonna go ahead and turn off the visibility of that sketch. Grab these mini mushrooms and bring them underneath so that they're hidden behind the petals of this hibiscus. Excellent. So we have all of the main components of this illustration finalized. There's some really interesting overlaps, underlaps, texture. It's a very beautiful limited color palette. And at this point, the only thing I have left to do to complete the composition of this illustration is that crescent moon. So that's coming up next. 11. Crescent Moon: Time to add that final motif to our illustration, which is the crescent moon. So same as before, I'm gonna go ahead and go back to my Gallery. Hit "Select". Grab the "Mini Shroom" canvas. Hit "Duplicate". Hit the X. And change the name of this one to "Moon". Perfect. I can use an emoji. Alright, I'll press "Done". I'll open this one up. Flatten my layers so that again, I have my sketch layer all on its own, the illustration layer all on its own, and that background color all on its own layer. Alright, so I'll go ahead and hit that plus sign to start a new layer. I'm going to turn my sketch on so I can see. And now I'll go to my Brushes, grab my outliner brush, color palettes. My moon is going to be bright yellow. Verify that I'm on a brand new layer. And this is where we can use that same trick in Procreate again to draw a perfect circle. I'm going to draw my best attempt at a perfect circle. And then keeping my pen touching the screen, it's now snapped into a perfect ellipse. But if I put three fingers down on the screen, it's now snapped to a perfect circle, which is awesome. So I'm able to expand and contract it like this because my pen is still touching the screen. As soon as I let go of my pen and then let go of my fingers, it's finalized and in place. I can go ahead and fill it in like that. So we have a full moon, which looks pretty cool, but I want a crescent moon. So I'll show you how I create that. I'm actually going to go ahead and swipe left on my moon layer. Hit Duplicate. Change this new color to the same color as my background. Fill it in, go back to my Layers, make sure it's selected. And now I'm gonna go to my pointer tool and make it a little bit smaller and position it in the exact place where I'd like it to be, where it feels like a very intriguing crescent moon. Yeah, that actually feels perfect. I'll go ahead and press the arrow to set the transformation. But I can't just finalize it like this, even though it looks good here. What if later on I decide to change that background color to something else? Now I have a big circle where the moon is supposed to be. So I'll show you how to fix for that. I'm going to go into my Layers. Tap my layer once and hit Select. So now everything in that layer is selected, which is that circle itself. Now, with that selection in place, I can go back to my Layers, hide the visibility of that other circle, select the moon itself, and now go to my Eraser, turn it all the way up. And I can literally erase out the part of the moon that I don't want anymore, that part of the crescent. Sometimes it might help. Sometimes it might help to switch to a larger eraser brush. I'm gonna go back to my tried and true default, which is my Syrup brush. Cool. Awesome. That crescent moon has been erased out. Oops, a little bit more. Okay, cool. Yeah, so this technique is really nice because now I'm retaining that same rough edge that I have on all of the other parts of my illustration. So that just helps it feel a little bit more consistent. Alright, to go ahead and end that selection, I'm just going to go back to my Layers, delete that tinier sphere. You no longer need it. Press your selection to go ahead and end that selection. And now I have my perfect crescent moon in my composition. I'm going to go ahead and turn off that sketch, then grab that moon and hide it underneath. So now it's at the very back of this illustration. And last but not least, let's go ahead and add some texture. So I'll select my moon. Click Alpha Lock. I'll start with my Dead Subtle brush. Select my yellow a little bit darker and fill it in. So I think I'm going to have my moon darker on the bottom and lighter on the top. Now I'll grab my dot fill. Start with my original, a little lighter. Oops too much. Just have a few dots at the top. A few at the bottom. But I'm gonna do a darker color. Perfect. Alright, so at this point in our illustration, we have everything filled in. If we turn on that sketch layer, we can see that everything we've sketched out in our thumbnail has now been completed in our final illustration. So the last step I take before I call this a finished composition is adding in some of those fun details that I mentioned earlier, some dots, Xs, stars, things like that, that I incorporate into my other work to give it more of a magical touch. So that's coming up next. 12. Embellishments: Before I wrap up this illustration, I want to add one of my signature touches that I do and some of the artwork I create, especially in Procreate. It's adding embellishments to my piece just to finalize it. So I'll show you how. I'll go back to Gallery. Hit, Select, grab my crescent moon, hit Duplicate. Press the X and call this one "Embellishments". Perfect. I'll go ahead and open that up. Go to my Layers, same as before. Flatten everything down into the same composition, start a new layer. And this is going, oops. And this is going to be the layer that I add all of my little embellishments too. So for that, I'm going to go up to my Brushes, grab my outline brush, and I'll start with yellow. Alright, so I'm working on a brand new layer. I'm simply just going to go through and add in some little detail touches, something I do with most of my illustrations. Well, a few of them that I do in Procreate, I just add these little embellishments throughout. And I feel like it's a cute little way of adding some magic into my illustration after the fact. Plus, it gives it a little bit more visual intrigue. I'm just going through, slightly smaller brush, drawing some stars, X's, circles, things like that. I don't want it to cover the entire canvas. Instead, I just want to have a few clusters. So what I'm doing now is I'm just starting out where those clusters will be. Ideally, I'll have a few different color palettes coming through. So I'll start with yellow. And I like to do one color at a time because that way I can add the texture to that color all in one go and then start a new layer with a different color. So it just speeds up the work process for me. Alright, let's do one more right here. So these will be all of the yellow embellishments. I can go into my Layers. Alpha Lock that layer, grab my Dead Subtle brush, and then just go through and add. You can barely even see it. It's just little dots of texture coming through. Cool. So pretty simple. I'll go back to my Layers. Add a new layer, change my brush back to the outline brush. And let's do this darker pink. Same thing. I've already established where those groupings are gonna be. So I'm just going to go into each one and draw a really simple shape. If you're following along with this, you don't have to do X's and stars and circles like me. You could come up with your own shapes as well if you like the idea of these embellishments. Alright, the layer is done. I'll go ahead, throw Alpha Lock on there, make it slightly darker. Grab that Speckle Tone brush and just dab around. Again, very, very subtle. I can go ahead and merge those two layers together, just to consolidate my layers a little bit. Start a new one. Let's go back to that indigo. Change my brush and do the same thing. These are perfectly imperfect shapes. I'll zoom in so you can see how that texture looks. It's just that very, very subtle texture that makes a little bit more dimension to that indigo blue. Alright, same thing. I'll merge those two together and I'll just do one more. Instead of orange. I think I'll do light pink for my final embellishments. And we'll go ahead and merge those together. And now I have all of my embellishments on one layer and my main illustration on the next. And now our illustration is 99% complete. The other 1% is really easy. It's going to be adding that paper texture and our signature. So let's go ahead and do our signature first. I'll go to my Layers. Start a new layer. And I think I'll have my signature be in that same dark indigo using that same outline brush. Again, the new layer is selected. When it comes to adding a signature, every artist is different. I usually tuck mine in to the bottom right corner. So I'm gonna go ahead and sign "CatCoq". And if you're wondering why I sign all of my artwork "CatCoq" instead of my full name, which is Cat Coquillette, It's because CatCoq is my brand name. So if someone were to purchase this artwork, maybe on a framed art print from Society6 and hang it in their house, then they can easily see with my signature, which is very legible by the way, that CatCoq is the illustrator for this piece. So they can always Google me and find more of my artwork. So I definitely use my signature as a way to attract more clients and more customers. So it's super legible and it's unique. If you're going to Google CatCoq, it's only me. Alright, so signature is in place. Let's go ahead and add that paper texture. So way back when, early on in this class, we went ahead and got that paper texture off of Dropbox and put it into our iPads. So when you import JPEGs like this, they don't show up in Procreate. They show up in your camera roll. What we're going to do is add it to our canvas. So just like we added those reference photos, I'm gonna go to that wrench. Not insert a private photo because I want this one to show up, but insert a photo. If you don't see it right away, you might want to go to "Recents". That's where mine popped up. And all you have to do is click that paper texture and it will automatically fill in your entire art board. I made this paper texture 24" by 30", which means that perfectly fits right on your art board, if you are able to get a canvas that size. Go ahead and press the arrow to set the transformation. And if you're wondering why we just covered our entire beautiful illustration with the paper texture, I'm going to show you why. So first things first, if your paper texture came in maybe at the very bottom or somewhere in the middle of your layer stack. Go ahead and drag that up to the very tip top. Now to have this texture applied to everything underneath, I'm going to click that "N". Remember that "N" stands for normal. And I'm gonna change it to a transparency mode that allows it to overlay everything underneath. My two favorites for paper texture are either Multiply or Linear Burn. They're both very similar. So I'll zoom in so you can see what I mean. Alright. So here it is without the paper texture. So it's a very flat, clearly digital illustration. But when you turn on the visibility of that paper texture, it feels a lot more hand done and professional. So anytime you want to change that transparency mode, right now it says "LB" for Linear Burn, you can just tap that and try a different one. Again, Multiply and Linear Burn are my two favorites for applying paper texture. Alright, at this point, I can go ahead and swipe left on that sketch and delete it from my canvas. I no longer need it since I have finished my illustration. So congratulations for completing this entire process. You have a final bloom and shroom illustration at this point. But before we end, I want to show you one more thing, which is my favorite thing to do with illustrations. It's playing with different types of color palettes now that we have our final artwork. So that's coming up in the next lesson. 13. Color Exploration: Time for my favorite part of illustrating. It's playing with some different color palettes after you've finished your piece. So I'll show you how I do it. First things first, back to Gallery. Select, grab the "Embellishments", Duplicate, and press X. So I'm going to call this one "Magic Mimosa", because that's the name of the color palette I used in Procreate. Alright, let's go ahead and open it up. I'm gonna go flatten everything except that paper texture and background. So now we have our entire illustration on one layer. Background is all on its own layer. And that paper texture is on a separate layer. So when it comes to exploring color palettes, my favorite place to start is just by changing the background color. It's really simple, but sometimes it can make a massive difference. And oftentimes I can use that as a totally separate design from the original. So just like that, I have two illustrations instead of one just by changing the background color. So let's try that out first. I'll go ahead and tap where it says "Background Color". Let's try some other options. If I use any of the background colors from this palette, that means certain elements might get lost. So instead, I might try pulling from some of these other palettes. That's kinda cool with a bright cyan background. So I'm just going through, trying out different color palettes, seen if any of them work better than others. I really like this mint. Oh no. Okay, well, this is the winner. This really nice teal turquoise background color, I think looks really nice with this illustration. So right here, I've gone ahead and created a totally separate color palette just by changing the background color. So what I'm gonna do is call this one finished. I'll go back to my Gallery. Select, grab "Magic Mimosa", duplicate it, hit that X and change it to, let's call this one "Teal". Cool. I'll go back to "Magic Mimosa". Go back to my background and change it back to the original, wherever you were. Magical Mimosa, your original of where it was before. Cool. So now in my Gallery here, I have two separate color palettes. I have "Magic Mimosa" and I have "Teal". Let's go ahead and try another one. So I'll go to Select, grab that original, hits Duplicate, and pull it to the very end of my Stack so that I stay in order. Alright, let's open this one up. The last color exploration was really simple. All we did was change the background color. For this one, I'm also going to keep it really simple just by making one tool adjustment, but it's going to make a total difference to this entire piece. I'll show you what I mean. Alright, I'll go to my Layers. Make sure that my artwork layer is selected. And I'm gonna go up here to my magic wand tool which represents adjustments and go down here to Gradient Map. So this is one of my favorite tools in Procreate. You can go through this gradient library and try out different gradient maps to see how they work with your illustration. Venice is super cool. Okay, so noted, I might move forward with that one. Blaze looks nice. Gradient. Neon. That's pretty awesome. I love that gradient in the moon itself. Yeah. So basically you can go through and try out different gradient maps. And it just gives you a really quick idea of what different colors can look like for your illustration. I think the one I'm going to move forward with though is Venice. I really like how this is turning out. These kind of melon peach tones against this indigo. Alright, so I'll go ahead and tap my magic wand to set that selection. Just like that, I have a completely different color palette from the original. Now, we want to play with some different background colors as well. So earlier I showed you how to change the background by tapping the thumbnail next to "Background Color". I'm going to show you a different way that you can do the exact same thing, just to have it in mind. So I'm gonna go ahead and click this plus sign, add a new blank layer, click it and drag it so it's the very bottom of my stack, just above the "Background Color". Now, I'll just grab any arbitrary color and fill it in. Honestly, that could be finalized because that looks awesome, but that's not what I want to show you. So with that fill layer selected, you can go up here to your magic wand tool, which opens up Adjustments. Hue, Saturation, and Brightness. This is a really good opportunity to see in real-time what color differences could look like in Procreate. If I just want to see a lot of options all at once with really subtle changes to the saturation or the brightness or lightness or the hue itself, Hue and Saturation is my favorite tool to use. I like this blue coming through. Maybe I'll make it a little bit less saturated. Nope, bring that saturation up. Yeah, I think this is looking really nice. So Hue and Saturation and Brightness allows you to fine-tune color adjustments that you want to make. So this is the other way that I determine background colors. Once you're happy with the selection, you can hit your magic wand. And now we have a brand new color palette finalized on our screen. I'll go back to my Gallery and I'm going to call this one "Indigo Peach". Perfect. Now I'll show you one more trick I use for playing with color palettes in my final illustrations. So I'll go to Select, go back to that original palette. By the way, when I adjust palettes, I usually start with the original and work from there. Alright, so that original palette is selected. I'll hit Duplicate, press that X, grab it and put it at the very end of the stack, just so everything stays in order. I'll open it up, go into my Layers. And this time I'm going to play with Hue and Saturation again, but not with the background, but with the illustration itself. So with that layer selected, I can go to my Adjustments, Hue, Saturation and Brightness and do that same thing. So I can scrub along this hue spectrum to see some really, really cool palette options. You can do the same thing here. Completely desaturated, completely wild and oversaturated. Actually for this motif of mushrooms and flowers, super bright actually works pretty well. But I liked what was going on over here with these kind of green and blue mushrooms. And I'm going to bring that saturation down a bit. So it feels a little bit more sophisticated. So 25, it looks great. Go ahead and tap that adjustment to close the window. And now I'm gonna make one more fine tuned adjustment to the color tonality of these mushrooms and flowers. We'll go back to my Adjustments and this time choose Color Balance. This is the other way that I like to explore colors in final illustrations. So before I start messing with these scrubbers, we're gonna go over here and choose what I want to focus on, Shadows, Midtones, or Highlights. For this one, I think I'm going to try out Shadows and see what I get. Alright, so let's see what happens if I bring up the red. Cool. So this is only affecting the darkest area of the illustration because I selected shadows. So I do like what's happening when I bring it a little bit more cyan. Let's see, green versus magenta. I'm going to keep that one about in the middle. Let's try yellow versus blue. Okay, this is cool. I'm going to skew it a little bit more towards blue so that I don't have those yellow undertones. Awesome. You can do the same thing playing with midtones. Oh, that's awesome. This is the best thing about color adjustments. You can really have a lot of fun exploring and come up with new colors that you weren't even really planning on putting together in a palette. Alright, so that's really cool. I'm going to stop getting super excited. I think this color balance is really adding that little final touch that you couldn't quite get with Hue and Saturation. It's a little bit more nuanced and you get some really playful color interactions. So at this point, I'm going to go back and change the background color and finalize this last palette. Alright, I'll go back to my layers, and let's see how some different background colors look here. I'm just going to toggle through actually that plain white I think is really nice. But let's see some others. Ugh, no. Purple, It's a little bit too crazy. So one thing I'm liking about this original palette is the harmony of these colors. They're all very cool. They're not super saturated. They're not too overpowering either. I think it's really nice. I can't go too dark with these background colors because then we're losing the leaves and stems. So I think I'm going to trust my gut and stay with this very stark white. I think that looks really nice. Alright, so that is our final color palette. We'll go back to my Gallery and real quick change the name of this one to... Let's call it "Mint". Perfect. So at this point, feel free to continue duplicating your canvases and continue exploring colors to your heart's content. For every single one of my final illustrations, I typically have anywhere from five to a dozen different color palettes just out of that one single design. And I cannot wait to see what you create, not just your illustration and the direction you take it, but all of the different color palettes that you make as well. Which brings me to our next lesson, which is talking about your class project for today. 14. Next Steps: So first of all, huge congrats on completing your Blooms and Shrooms illustration in Procreate! I learned Procreate myself a few years ago and I know how daunting it can be to dive into a new program. But you are now miles ahead in terms of understanding the app and some of the cool things you can do. And I am super excited to see what you drew in today's class! Under this class, you'll see the Student Project Gallery. It's under the "Projects and Resources" tab. So please, please, please share your project here. And just a heads up. The best way to share your project is simply by taking a screenshot in Procreate. We worked on a pretty giant canvas today, so if you were to save these as JPEGs, those files would be too big to upload. Screenshots straight from Procreate work great for Skillshare. So here's how to share your work. On the right, you'll see a green button that says "Create Project". Tap that. Once you're there, you'll have the option to upload a cover photo, add a title, and write a little description. You can include both text and images here. And I would love to see your progress too. So feel free to snap some screenshots showing your sketch, color studies and your final piece plus the alternate colorways. Once your project is uploaded, it will appear in the Student Projects Gallery. You can view other projects here. And I encourage you to like and comment on each other's work. If you decide to share your project on Instagram, please tag me @catcoq and Skillshare @skillshare, so we can like and comment on your work there too. And bonus: From time to time, I decide to highlight student work in my email newsletters. So there is always a chance that your project could get featured there as well. Speaking of emails, if you want to get an email heads up as soon as I launch my next class, please click the Follow button up top to follow me on Skillshare. Not only will you be the first to know as soon as my next class comes out, but I also send out messages to my followers and they're packed with useful tips, freebies and artist resources, and the occasional free Skillshare membership giveaway. These perks are for my Skillshare followers only. You can also follow me on Instagram to see new artwork I'm creating, new product partnerships and where in the world I'm living at the moment. Right now, I am in an Airbnb in Lisbon, Portugal. Last month, I was hosting a watercolor retreat and the south of Spain. And my next two destinations are Germany and Switzerland. I've been living out of a suitcase for the last six years, so life is a complete adventure. And last thing for today: Throughout the class, I mentioned a few other Skillshare classes that I teach that go into more detail about some of the things you learned today. If you want to learn how to take this illustration to the next level and turn all of those individual elements into a seamless pattern, I have two different classes available. One in Procreate and the other in Photoshop. Or Procreate pattern class is called "Drawing Seamless Patterns in Procreate Plus Professional Surface Design Tips". And that is another beginner-level class. So if you made it through this class, you'll be able to make it through that one just fine. My other seamless patterns class is in Photoshop. It's called, "Watercolor a Seamless Pattern: Surface Design in Adobe Photoshop for Print-on-Demand". If you want to use your blooms and shrooms elements from this class, you can skip ahead in that class to the second portion, which is arranging those individual elements into patterns using Photoshop's, Pattern Preview tool. The end of that class even shows you how you can upload your designs to print-on-demand sites like Society6 and Redbubble, so you can start earning income from your artwork. I have a handful of other Procreate classes that you might be interested in as well. "Draw Animals in Procreate Plus Tips for Art Licensing Sales" is exactly what it sounds like. You'll learn step-by-step how to create your very own animal illustration in Procreate, plus learn my best tips for monetizing your designs, all peppered throughout the class. "Draw your Dream Home in Procreate" is another favorite. You'll learn how to trace photos to create your very own dream home design. This class makes a great gift if a friend or family member recently moved and you want to create a custom illustration for their new home. Alright, if you enjoyed my class today, please leave a review, even if it's short and sweet. I really love reading through all of these reviews to learn what you thought about my class. These reviews also help my classes get more traction here on Skillshare. So thank you in advance. You guys are awesome. Alright, so that is a wrap for today. Thank you so much for joining me for this funky Bloom and Shroom journey. I'm looking forward to seeing your creations, so have a wonderful day and I'll see you in my next class.