Blender 4. x Beginners Course | IVito . | Skillshare
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Blender 4. x Beginners Course

teacher avatar IVito ., Helping You Learn Creative Skills!

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      1:14

    • 2.

      Downloading and Installing Blender

      2:04

    • 3.

      Tour of Blender Interface

      2:42

    • 4.

      Interface Customization/Startup File

      5:54

    • 5.

      How to Navigate in Blender 3D Space

      5:06

    • 6.

      How to Create Objects

      1:44

    • 7.

      Selection Tools

      4:19

    • 8.

      Move Rotate Scale Tools

      9:38

    • 9.

      Create a Basic Table

      2:23

    • 10.

      Object vs Edit Mode

      5:56

    • 11.

      Edit Mode Advanced Selections

      4:27

    • 12.

      Transform Orientation

      3:45

    • 13.

      Transform Pivot Point Origins

      4:22

    • 14.

      Snapping

      11:20

    • 15.

      Proportional Editing

      3:19

    • 16.

      3D Cursor

      4:18

    • 17.

      Outliner

      5:32

    • 18.

      Duplicate vs Linked Duplicate

      3:24

    • 19.

      Viewport Shading

      5:33

    • 20.

      Annotate and Measure tools

      4:32

    • 21.

      Add Interactive

      1:21

    • 22.

      Join and Separate

      5:48

    • 23.

      Parenting lol

      4:53

    • 24.

      Extrude

      6:22

    • 25.

      Inset Faces

      2:07

    • 26.

      Bevel

      1:58

    • 27.

      Loop Cut

      1:26

    • 28.

      Knife

      4:24

    • 29.

      Poly Build

      2:16

    • 30.

      Spin

      2:58

    • 31.

      Smooth

      1:20

    • 32.

      Edge Slide

      1:54

    • 33.

      Shrink/Fatten

      2:12

    • 34.

      Shear

      4:39

    • 35.

      Rip Region

      1:28

    • 36.

      Modifiers

      16:23

    • 37.

      Rendering Basics

      12:42

    • 38.

      Materials Basics

      11:11

    • 39.

      Making a wallpaper in blender

      6:18

    • 40.

      Final Project - Base Shape

      20:35

    • 41.

      Final Project - Modeling PC Desk

      15:46

    • 42.

      Final Project - Modeling Clock, Painting & More

      15:48

    • 43.

      Final Project - Modeling Monitor, Switch & Keyboard

      17:08

    • 44.

      Final Project - Modeling Chairs

      27:06

    • 45.

      Final Project - Modeling Tablet, Controller, Plants & More

      23:59

    • 46.

      Final Project - Organizing Scene

      14:19

    • 47.

      Final Project - Adding Materials

      13:15

    • 48.

      Final Project - Rendering

      16:13

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About This Class

Hi! Welcome to Blender Beginners course.

Whether you're diving into the exciting world of 3D graphics for the first time, switching to Blender 3D from another software. the Blender Beginners Course is designed to guide you through the foundational steps of mastering Blender 4.x

We'll cover all of the essential features that you'll need to know in order to build your very own Blender projects. No excessive cutting or distracting music in the background. You can follow along in real-time.

We'll start by downloading and installing Blender. After that, we'll explore the Blender interface, taking the time to learn what it consists of and how to customize it. After that, we'll learn how to navigate in 3D space. Then we'll learn the basics, such as creating objects, moving, rotating, and scaling. Next we'll dive deep into blender topics like advanced selections, transform orientation, pivot points, snapping, 3d cursor, modifiers and many other features. Then we'll jump into modeling tools and learn all the modeling tools available to us, tools like extrude, inset, bevel, and more. After that, we'll cover rendering tools, including lights, cameras, and materials. And that’s not all.

As a final project for the course, we'll create a beautiful isometric room in blender to apply the tools we've learned throughout the course. In the end, you'll have made your very own isometric room from scratch in blender.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

IVito .

Helping You Learn Creative Skills!

Teacher

Hi! My name is Vito and I make videos to help you bring your creativity to life. Learn new skills and create projects you love.

Professionally produced, highly focused online video training that will teach and inspire you. The Vito style is different :)

See full profile

Level: Beginner

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, welcome to blender beginner course. Whether you're diving into the exciting world of three D graphics for first time, switching to blenders three D from another software. The blender beginner course is designed to guide you through the foundational steps of mastering blender. For 0.0 we'll cover all the essential features that you'll need to know in order to build your very own blender projects. In excessive cuttings or distracting music in the background, you can just follow along in real time. Will start by downloading and installing blender. After that, we'll explore the blender interface, taking the time to learn what it consists of and how to customize it. After that, we'll learn how to navigate in three D space. Then we'll learn the basics such as creating objects, moving, rotating, scaling. Next, we'll dive deep into blended topics like advanced selection, transform orientation, pivot points, snapping three, decursor modifiers, and many other features. Then we'll jump into modeling tools and learn all the modeling tools available to us, Tools like extrude inside Ble and more. After that we'll cover art tools including lights, cameras, materials, and that's not all. As the final project for this course, we'll create a beautiful isometric room completely inside blender and apply all the tools we've learned throughout the course. In the end, you'll have made your running on isometric room from scratch and blender. Let's get and get started. 2. Downloading and Installing Blender: Hi and welcome to the course. In this first video, we'll go ahead and download and set a blender on our computer. And to do so, open any web browser that you like and then head to Virtue Blender.org website. Now here on the homepage you'll see this download button. Just click on it and it's going to take you to the next page. Now on this next page, the latest version of the Blender at the time of recording this video is Blender 4.0 0.1 but you can download the latest version when you're watching the video and it's going to automatically detect your operating system. In this case I'm using Windows. I can simply click on this patton to download it. But I've already downloaded this. I'm not going to download it again. You can also click on this dropdown and you can download this portable zip version if you don't want to install this on your computer. Now we'll be using installers. I'll go ahead and minimize that. I've already downloaded that here. We'll go ahead and select Next. Accepted a license agreement. Next. And then we have the location where this is going to install. It's going to be under C Drive program files, Blender Foundation and then Blender 4.0 I'll go ahead and click next and install. Now it's going to take a few seconds and then installations should be completed. Now that we have installation completed, we can go ahead and click on Finish and Open Blender from our desktop by clicking on the shortcut. When you open Blender for the first time, you'll be greeted with this quick set up window. Let's quickly go over some of the options here. First, we have our language, then we have our keyboard shortcuts. If you're coming from apps like Maya or thereto S Max, you can select this industry compatible if you're familiar with those keyboard shot goods. Next we have select now prior to blender version two point, you would select objects, right most, but in blender, but that has since changed. And if you're coming from an older virgin of blender and you're used to that workflow, you can change that here. Next we have Space Bar, It plays our animation. But we can change it to Accessor Tools or Search For. Now we're going to leave everything a default and click Continue. Now this is the splash screen of Blender, and every time when you open a blender, you'll see it. To get rid of this, you simply click anywhere in the empty area or press escape key. This is the default interface blender, and that's what we'll be exploring in the next video. 3. Tour of Blender Interface: That we have blender set up on our computer. It's time to take a look at the interface. Now, when you first open Blender, it might seem a bit overwhelming because we have tons of buttons and menus. But don't worry, because you'll never be using all of this functionality at the same time as you progress through the course step by step, all of these menus and buttons are going to start to make sense to you. Understanding the lender interface becomes really easy if we break it down into different parts. All I want to do is remember some of the names that I will be telling you. For example, later in the course, I might say, go to your Outliner. You know what Outliner is and where it's located on your interface. Let's start at the top first. We have this area called menu bar. Within that we have individual menu later in the course. If I say good to edit menu, you'll know that I'm talking about this part of the interface. Next we have our work space buttons. Now, work spaces are simply different arrangements for the interface layout, and we're going to explore that in the next video in more detail. Then here in the center, we have our three D viewport. And this is the area where you'll spend 99% of your time working on your three D models. On the left of the three D report, we have our tool bar. If I go through these different tools, you can see we have tool settings above the toolbar as I changed through these. Now this above, this three DVport is called header, but it's part of a three D viewport. You just have to remember that it's called header. Then on the right here we have our outliner. Now outliner basically outlines everything that you have in your three D world. Right now it shows us we have a camera cube and a light, and all three objects that are visible here in a three D world. Below that, we have our Properties Editor. Properties Editor gives you extra details about here, three objects that you have selected. For example, if I select this cube, you can see we have several tabs here on the left side. Now all you have to remember is that it gives you a bit extra details about here selected acid. Then at the bottom, we have our animation timeline, and this can be used to animate objects. And then at the very bottom, we have our status bar. This is the entire Internet phase of Blender. Just to quickly recap, at the very top we have our menu bar. Next we have our work space buttons that we have our header. And then in the center we have our three D viewport. On the left we have our toolbar. And then on the right we have our Out Liner and Properties Editors. This is the default interface. There are two keyboard shortcuts that I'd like to go over. These are helpful, you don't have to remember them right way, but I'm going to just go for them. If you want to hide this toolbar, you can press on your keyboard and then you can press again to enable it. Again, it's a toggle. Then you can also press N on your keyboard. And that's going to enable what is known as sidebar. Again, by pressing N again it's going to hide. You can toggle between on and off with N or that's all you have to remember for now. 4. Interface Customization/Startup File: Now that you're a little more familiar with the interface of blender, it's time to take a look at how the blender interface is made up. Because the way blender works is that when you save files, those are saved in file known as blend file. The layout of your interface is also saved in that file. Often when you download files from Internet, the interface might look completely different because the person who worked on that project might have their interface set up differently. Also, Blender is a very customizable application and if you can really fine tune it to your liking, then it makes it fun and easy to work in it. The wave land interface works is that we have different areas within those areas. We have what are known as editors. We have this one giant area for an editor for this three D viewport. And then we have one for our outliner, one for our properties editor, one for an animation timeline. If you look closely in the top left corner of each editor, you'll notice that we have the same button in all of these different editors. This lets you change the type of editor in that area. For example, if I want to have a three D viewport in this area, I can just click on this button and select three D Viewport. Now using my middle most button, I can rotate the view. Now I have two identical panels in my interface and I can do the same thing done here. Now we have three different panels that are exactly same. Now we can resize any of these areas by simply covering your cursor over these voters and then dragging and changing the scale. If you want to add additional areas to your interface, that's pretty simple. You simply hover your cursor in corner of any area. For example, I can cover my cursor in any of these corners, and you can see that the cursor changes a little bit. Now you can simply left click and hold and drag. And here you can see that I added a vertical split, but if I drag towards the top, then that's going to be horizontal split. Now we have many different areas. Now if we want to go back, we can just go to Outliner at the top and then properties edited at the bottom. Then maybe we can resize it if you want to collapse or remove an area from your interface. That's pretty simple. Also, you simply hover your cursor again and then you simply left click and hold and then drag. In this case, we're moving or collapsing our top panel towards the bottom, just like that. Let's do same thing for this area and then we can do the same thing for the bottom. Now you can do this in a different way, and that's a bit easier way of doing it. And I personally, to do it that way, you can right click on any of these borders and it gives you this area options. Then you can add a vertical or horizontal split. In this case, we'll go with horizontal split. Then you simply hover your cursor and left click. Let's change that to our properties editor. And we can also resize it, sort back to a default layout. If you right click you have join area. This is going to let you collapse and you can also swap the panels if you need to for joining. You can cover your cursor to expand the bottom panels towards the top or top panel towards the bottom like that. Now I personally like to just simply right click on these borders and use these options instead of covering my cursor in the corner of an area. Next we have these buttons at the top. These are called known as work spaces, and this basically is a different arrangement of the layout. For example, if we go to Eve editing, now this is going to make a complete sense to you. So we have an area on the left side, we have an area on the right side. We can simply right click here and swap these two. Or we can change the type of panels that we're using. You can select a three D editor on this side, and then we can click here and select our UV editor here. Now you're able to customize this and how everything is made up on the interface. If you download a file from Internet and the interface looks completely different, now you have a pretty good idea how you can make it look like, the default layout as these buttons at the top. What I usually like to do is get rid of all of these different buttons because I mostly work in this layout workspace, I just keep that. And a few custom buttons. Now you can change these by simply up clicking on top, and then you can rename it to your liking. You can also right click on top of it, and then you can duplicate this and then use it as a starting point for customization. You can delete it. You can move these work spaces to front or back, which basically means moving it to the very left or very right of the interface. And then you can also cycle through these. Let's quickly go ahead and delete some of these work spaces that we can change our interface layout. And don't worry about messing up anything because you can always roll back very easily. Also, you can click on this plus symbol and then you can pick one of these previous work spaces as a starting point for your customization. For example, this layout is exact copy of an original layout. And then from here maybe we want to resize these panels. I like my something like here. I can do that. Now one thing to keep in mind here is that all of these changes that we're making so far are not saved. If we close blender and reopen it, all of these changes are going to be discarded because we have to save what is known as a start of file to make these changes permanent. Just to demonstrate, I'm going to go ahead and click on this File menu New and then Journal. And we're not going to save our current file. And you can see everything resets immediately. Let's go ahead and change everything again. We're going to rescale this. Let's just double click here and type Endmaw to make these changes permanent. We can go to File Menu, and then to west the bottom we have defaults. Let's click on Save Startup File, and then confirm that we want to save our start of file. And at the bottom status part, you can see Stato file was saved. Now these changes are permanent. If we go back to file menu journal and don't save, you can see those changes are there. Now if you mess something up and you saved your stato file, you still don't have to worry about it because you can go to the File menu and then again to the default menu, and then loot Factory Settings. When you confirm that it's going to loot the factory settings and make blender look like the way you downloaded it now since these settings are looted, but we haven't saved our stato file, we're going to go ahead and save these default or factory settings to our stato file. That's how you can really fine tune and customize blender to your liking, how that entire interface of blender works. 5. How to Navigate in Blender 3D Space: Let you know how the interface Blender works. It's time to take a look at how you'll navigate in this three D world. Inside Blender, navigation is done using a combination of keyboard and mouse shortcut. There are some visual buttons, but I wouldn't recommend using them because this can really slow you down and make your work very inefficient to navigate in. Blender is pretty simple. You simply hold on your middle mouse button and you can rotate the view. Now this is called orbiting, but I like to call it rotating view. Next, if you want to zoom in and out, you can use your mouse curl wheel, and this is going to let you zoom in and out. Now you'll notice that it's more of an incremental zoom. If you want to zoom in more smoothly, then you can use the keyboard shortcut and the mouse combined to zoom in and out more smoothly. You hold on control key on your keyboard and then hold on middle sparen and then move your mouse up and down. You'll notice that this is much smoother zoom. Now, I personally use my mouse for most of the time, but when I'm working on something really precise, then I use the smooth zoom. Finally, to pan your view around you, Hold on shift on your keyboard and then middle Moparin. This is going to let you pan your view. Now using combination of these three navigation controls, you'll be able to navigate anywhere in this three space. For example, let's say that I want to look at this object in that corner over there from the other side. I can start by orbiting my view. Let's rotate by holding down middle mop. Then we can zoom in using our mouse scroll wheel, hold on shift and middle click and move this into the center of the screen. You can see I am exactly where I want it by just using these three navigation controls. Now we have some additional navigation controls that are going to make your life a lot easier. Let's go over this now. Often what happens is that if you accidentally move your view really out like that and you don't know where everything is, in that case, you can go to this view menu. And then down here you'll notice we have frame all option. There are keyboard shortcuts listed to the right. You don't have to remember all of these from the start, but as you use Blender over and over again, you'll be able to start to memorize these. You can click on this menu icon or you can use the keyboard shortcut. When you do that, it's going to frame everything in your three D scene into this view. We have a camera light in this three D cube. Another way of doing this would be to select an object in the outliner. We can left click on this cube and then go to View. Then we can select frame Selected. This is going to frame the selected object into our view. Then we have some additional controls, like if we go to Viewport, we can go to our top view front and right, and there are keyboard shortcuts listed here. The important ones are pressing one on the numpad to go to the front view. If you look in the top left corner of the viewport, it says front orthographic view. Then you can press three on Numpad to go to the right view, and seven for the top. You can go to the opposite view by holding down control and then pressing one that's going to be back. And then holding down control and pressing three on the pad. It's going to take you to the left view. Going back to the perspective view is pretty simple. You simply hold on middle spirent and you can go back to your three perspective view. Finally, which way to navigate in this three D space would be using these gizmos on the right of your three D viewport, You can click on any of these different axes and it's going to move to that particular view. You can also left click and hold here to orbit or rotate the camera, You have this magnifying icon. You can left click and hold here, and then you can zoom in and out. Then using this hand icon, you can pan the view. I don't like to use these because when you're editing and working on complex objects, you don't have time to go back and forth between that, it's going to really make it inefficient way of working. Finally, there are some settings that I'd like to go over that I'd like to turn on when I install blender. If we go into Edit menu, and then at the very bottom we have our preferences. Let's move it to the center of the screen. Down here we have navigation tab. Let's go to that. Then here I'd like to enable this depth function. Now let's close this window and we have to see this by default. When you hold on metal mouse button to rotate the view, what happens is that it rotates around an imaginary point in the center of your screen and it rotates like that. Oftentimes what happens is that when you move out in this area, and then you start working on your model and you can see how it rotates around that empty imaginary point. Now I don't like to use that. Instead, we can make it work a little better by enabling this depth function. Now what it does is that if we close that, now wherever you middle click and rotate, it's going to rotate around that point. Now you can see that it's much easier to do. Another thing that I like to do is that if we go to preferences down here we have a zoom to mouse position. Default again, zooms into that imaginary point in the center of the screen. If we enable this function, now what happens is that it's going to zoom in wherever a three cursor is. Wherever our mouse is in this study space, we can zoom in here. And if my cursor is done here, I can just zoom in here. It's going to make it much more easy. These are the two controls that I like to tune on when I install blender. That's how you'll navigate very easily to any place you want in this street world inside blender. 6. How to Create Objects: That you have navigation controls under your belt. It's time to take a look at how you can create objects or generally in any the D modeling software, when you want to model something, you start with a very basic up, those are known as primitives. You start with something like a circle or a cube and then you turn that into a complex object that you want to create. Now default plender gives us this primitive cube and we're going to go ahead and select it by left clicking on it. And then press Delete key on the keyboard to get rid of it. To add new objects, we go to this add menu at the top of a three D Eboard. And then we have different type of objects that we can add to our three D scene. Now in this D, we'll go over the Mesh menu. You can also access the same menu by pressing Shift on your keyboard and it makes it easier and it pops up under your crys. Under Mesh, we have plain object, we have the default keep that we had in our scene. I'll go ahead and press Delete. Let's go ahead and add something like this, UV Sphere. Every time when you add an object down here, you'll see this menu. This is called operator panel. You can left click on it to open the settings for the last thing that you did. In this case, we added a U sphere. Let's just zoom in a little bit. Here on this here you can see that we have the radius to make it or small, we have our rings to add more detail to our object. Then we have the same thing here for our segments. Then we have the location and rotation of the object. Now from here, I would recommend playing around and adding some of these different objects. For example, you can add this Taurus, and then you can play around with the shape. You can add more detail and play around with these different things. You can even like add some of these other things. For example, there are these lights and stuff that you can add and play around with. 7. Selection Tools: We'll be taking a look at how to select objects in Blender. Before we do that, let's set up a three D scene a little bit. We're going to go ahead and left click on the object to select it and then we can press D to create a duplicate of it. We're going to repeat this step. Every time when you press Sif D, it's going to get attached to your cursor. This way we can have more objects in a three D scene. Now the most basic way of selecting objects in Blender is simply left clicking. When you left click on an object, it gets selected and it has this yellow outline. And it tells you that this object is selected. To deselect an object, you simply left click anywhere in empty area inside your three D Viewport. If you want to select multiple objects, you hold on shift key and then click on these objects. But you'll notice something as you're selecting more and more objects. The last selected object has this yellow border around it, but these other objects has this orange border. That's because it tells you which object is last selected. This is also called active element. Now this is important for cision functions that you'll use later in Blender. It just tells you that this was the last selected object. Now if I hold on Shift again and click on some more objects, you can see how that highlight keeps moving. Now if you want to deselect something from your selected objects, you hold on Shift key, click once and it's going to move that last selection or make it active element. And then clicking again is going to make it deselected again. If I hold on Shift and click here, it's going to make it active element. And clicking again is going to make it deselected. To deselect all of these objects, I can just click anywhere in this T area. Now to select multiple objects more easily and quickly, you can simply left click and hold and then drag out. And it's going to let you create this selection box. And anything that touches this box will be selected, something like here. Now if you drag and create another box, you can see previous objects are going to get deselected. You can add to your selection and you can remove from your selection. First we drag with our left box but and to add our objects to your selection. Now if you want to add more objects to this selection, you can hold on Shift key on your keyboard and then you can add to your selection. Now this way the previous objects are not going to be de selected. If you want to deselect something from your selection, you hold on control key and then you drag to remove from your selection. We have some additional controls, for example, if you left click and hold here on this tool. The first tool is selection box, but here you can see we have this tweak. This is going to disable the drag To select a function, you can simply left click and hold on shift key to add to your selection. Next we have the box selection, which we've already seen. Next we have circle select. With this, you can simply left click and hold and drag over objects to select them. Finally, we have lesser tool now this less create custom shapes for selection. This is helpful in cases where you want to avoid accidentally selecting certain objects. If I don't want to drag over this, I can simply left click and hold and you can see create my own custom shape for making this selection. These are all the tools for selecting objects in blender, but there is a select menu at the top. You can click here. And then we have some options to select all objects or everything in your three D world. You can click either on this all button here or you can use the keyboard shortcut A For selecting none, you have a keyboard shortcut. Old A, but I'd like to use a different keyboard shortcut. If you press a once, it's going to select everything. If you press A simultaneously, like really quickly in succession, then it's going to deselect everything. A to select everything, double press A quickly to deselect everything. Then you have invert selection. If you have something selected, I'm going to go ahead and use this box selection tool. Then you can invert your selection so that it inverts. Then you have the box select, circle select. These are the same tools that we've seen there. Then we have the loss select. Then we select types, Select objects by different types. For example, this camera and light are different type of objects. Then these mesh objects, you can go select by type and mesh, and it's only going to select these mesh objects. Then we have some more options like select random, you can click on that to randomly select from your D world. Then there are a few more options, but these are a bit advanced for now. We'll go over these later in the course. That's how you can make selections in blender. 8. Move Rotate Scale Tools: And we're ready to start moving our objects, rotate them, scale them up and down. To do that, we have a couple of different methods. We'll go over all of them and then you can use the one that you find most convenient for you. And I'll also share which method I prefer. Now before we can move our objects, let's understand how this three D world works. In the D world, you can see we have this red line and then this green line. The coordinate system that this three world uses has three axes. These xs are represented by these different colors. If you look in the top right corner of your three DV port, we have x axis, we have y and z. X is going to be our left and right, and then y is going to be front and back, and then Z is going to be up and down. Our three D world starts at the origin, which is at the center where all of these lines converge into one place. This is the origin of a three D world. Now let's go ahead and add a mash object, work on a Ad, and press Shift A, and then add a cube object. Now the most basic way of moving our object is by using your tools on our tool bar. The first tool we have is move tool, Let's go to activate that and it's going to display this chisma or manipulator. And you can see again, we have those three axes. We have x, y, and z. To move our object, we simply left click and hold and drag, and it's going to let us move our object on x, y, or z axes. Another very important thing to remember is that you can undo things in blender. So you can press control Z. And it's going to move a step back. And you can press this couple more times to go a few more steps back. This is going to be really helpful throughout this course. This is the most basic way of moving our object. You can move these objects on multiple axes at the same time. You can see that there are these boxes, these are called planes. Your left click and hold on it and it lets you move your object on two axes. It's like excluding an axis. For example, in this case we're excluding z axis and we're moving our object on the ground. Very easily, we can do the same thing here. In this case, we're moving our object along two axes, x and y, z. Actually, y and z. And then if we are with our view a little bit here, you can see we can move our object on the x and y, z axis. Just like that. I'll go ahead and press control a couple times to reset this movement. And then next we have our rotation tool. Again, we have that same gizmo. We can rotate our object on the y axis. We can do the same thing on the x axis. And finally on the z axis, if we click and hold in this middle area, we can freely rotate our object. This outer y circle is going to rotate with your view. You can rotate along your view Again, I'm going to go ahead and press control z a couple times to reset the object. Finally, we have our scale tool. Now scale tool is going to let you scale up. You simply left click and hold in this area to scale up and down uniformly. And you can also scale along one particular axis. I'm going to go ahead and press control Z. You can do the same thing here and same thing like that. Again, you have those planes if you want to. But this is really inefficient way of working implementor, you'd really use these tools because imagine switching between these different tools, like hundreds of times per day. For example, you move your object, now you need to scale, you go, here you'll be wasting a lot of time. It's highly recommended that you use keyboard shortcuts because those are really going to help you with that. We'll go and press Key to open our sidebar. Here you'll notice we have location, rotation, and scale. I'll go and press control Z so that it recess back. By default you can see everything starts at 000. This is our origin of the three D world and our object is at our world origin. We can tell that by looking at these numbers. Now to move your object, you can use and move this very precisely using these boxes left, click and hold and then drag. This lets you move your object. You can click here and you can type in, for example, 5 meters, and it's moving 5 meters. Now if you move your object to the positive side of the origin world, you can see we have this arrow pointing in that direction. It's going to be 5 meters like that. But if you want to go beyond this point of your three D world, then you type in negative five and it's going to go to the other side of the world origin. You can do the same thing for all of these different taxes. You can also enter values in all of these boxes at the same time by simply left clicking and holding and then dragging over, then maybe typing in five. The reason we have these different axes is that it gives you very fine control over the movement of your object. I'm going to go ahead and press control Z. You can see that if we move our object on the x axis like that, we know that it's about 5 meters on the x axis. And then we can do the same thing on the y. It gives us, very easily, we're able to tell where this object is in three D space. I'll go ahead and press control Z. Then we have same thing for a rotation. You can either left click and hold and drag, or you can just left click and then type a very precise value. For example here. One more thing to keep in mind is that if you want to have more precise control over this value, you can hold on shift key while you're dragging the value. It's going to give you more finer control over it. Now, the last method that we have is using keyboard shortcuts. This is my preferred way of working and this is the most easiest way. Sometimes you might want to use this side part because it gives you some really precise control over your object. But most of the time you'll be using keyboard shortcuts. Let's go to select our selection tool. We don't need to switch between these tools. Let's select our object. Now to move our object, we simply press that's going to give us grab tool and it's going to get attached to our cursor. Just simply press to grab. And then you can move your cursor, but you can see that it's not very precise and you don't have control. Like where do you want to move it? Now you can press X on your keyboard. Lock is moving to X axis. You can press Y. This is interactive, so I can press X, I can press Y and Z. You can see that it gives me very fine control over that. Now one more problem that we have is that we don't have really precise control over how much we want to move this. Now you can do this by, for example, I can press to grab along x axis. And now I can type in numeric values on my keyboard. If I press five on my numpad, it's going to move my object 5 meters on the x axis. Then I can press left mop. And to confirm that if I click, for example, to grab x and then 5 meters. But if I right click, it's going to cancel that movement. You can also press the Sca for canceling. It is in the top left corner. As I'm moving my object, it's going to show us a few details to grab x axis. I can see that it shows me that I'm moving about 2 meters. This gives you a good idea to visualize like I want to move my object here and I can get like a rough idea now I'm close to 3.2 Let's type in 3 meters, just like that. You can see that I have very fine control and very easily I'm able to move my objects. Now we can do the same thing for rotation. Let's press R to rotate. And it's a free from rotation. So we can press X axis, we can press Y or Z. And then we can type in very precise values of 45 degrees. And then Ve click to confirm that. Finally for scaling, we can press S. That's going to let you scale uniformly. But again, you can press x, y, or z. And that's going to let you constraint or lock the movement to that particular axis. Now you can see that we have three different methods for moving our objects. We can use tools on our toolbar. We can use the sidebar panel, or we can use the keyboard shortcuts. I personally like to use keyboard shortcuts because that's the most efficient way of working. Don't worry if you don't remember all of the keyboard shortcuts right away as you work over and over again in Blender, all of this becomes your second nature and you don't have to think about it as one final thing before we wrap this, speed you up. That if you move your object something like here and you want to quickly move it back to the world origin, you can press old, that's going to clear the movement. If you want to clear the rotation, you can press old R and that's going to clear the rotation. And same thing for the scaling. If you have your object scaled, you can press old and then you can also right click on these values. And here you'll find options like reset all values, default reset single value to default value. You can also do that. One final thing, you can see that done here, we have scale and dimension. Now scale is usually 11 for all three axes, Then dimension tells you the actual dimension of your object. Now if we use the scale value to something like maybe three, you can see now our object is three times as big. Now it's 6 meters. When we started it was, you can see that it was 2 meters. Now what I want you to remember is that in blender, oftentimes when you're using certain tools, you might get weird results if your scale is uneven, if your scale is something like here one or it is below, what you want to do is that if you mess around with the scale of your object, then you can press control A. And that's going to open the Apply menu and you can apply your scale and it's going to reset that back while giving you or keeping your object modified the way you wanted. You can also access the menu under Object menu. Then here under that you'll see we have apply and then you can apply scale. That's something to keep in mind. That's how you'll be able to move your objects. Now you're at a point where you know how to create optics, how to move, rotate, and scale them, and how you can very easily navigate in this three space. Now you'll be using all of these things every day in Blender. I would highly recommend spending some time and practicing so that you get a hang of it, how it works, and so that it becomes your sac in nature and you don't have to think about it. That's going to wrap up this vidiom. 9. Create a Basic Table: Now that you know how to navigate, create objects, and manipulate them, it's time to go through a quick exercise so that you can get to use some of those tools. We'll go over a quick exercise and create a very basic table. Let's go in and select this object, and then we're going to scale it along the z axis, just like that. And then we're going to scale it along x axis. Now as you're doing this, if you hold on shift key, you'll be able to control it more precisely. Just tweak it along the x axis until you're happy with the shape. I'm going to just scale it slightly more like that. Then we're going to move it up on the z axis like that. Now we're going to press Shift D and it's going to attach to a cursor. We're creating a duplicate. Now if we right click, we did duplicate this object, but it's snapped back to original position. So we can't tell if there are two objects there. Now if you look at the outliner, we have cube and then we have cube 001. That's the copy that we created. Now we're going to go ahead and scale it. Now. We can press to scale, and then we can press shift Z. That's going to exclude the Z axis. It's same as using those planes that we saw in the previous video. Or you can also just scale and then press X axis, and then you can scale along the Y axis. We're creating the table legs, but we're going to use this method because it's better scale shift z to exclude the z axis. Then we're going to scale it. Now let's press seven on the dump pad to go to the top view. Let's zoom in and then we're going to scale this slightly on the y axis to make it more square. Now let's just scale a slightly on the z axis to create the length for the table. Then we're going to move it on the Zxisow. Let's go to the top view, grab it and move it to the corner that shift to duplicate along the y axis. Just that. Now we're going to go ahead and shift, click on both to select them. Then we can press seven on the dump pad. Shift D along the x axis. Just like that. We have a very basic table, but just a quick exercise where you get to use the navigation controls, scaling, moving and rotation. A good quick exercise for that. 10. Object vs Edit Mode: Up until now we were using object mode in Blender. In object mode we move, rotate, scale, or manipulate our entire object. But to create more complex shapes or more complex objects, we use what is known as edit mode. Now if we select our object, and you can see that so far we've been moving it around. Now if you look at the top left corner, we have object mode. If you click here, it's going to open up this drop down and you can select this edit mode. As soon as you do that, the tool bar is going to expand and you'll get more tools. Also, next to this drop down, you have three different modes. The first one is called vertex selection mode. Then you have edges and finally faces. The way this three object works is that the most basic component of an object is this vertex point. This first one is going to let you select that when we connect two or more vertices, that creates what's known as edge, that's these lines. Then when you create three or more edges, that's going to give you what is known as a polygon. Now there can be polygon with three faces that are called triangles, and in this case we have a quad because it has four edges around it, there are gone. When you have more than four edges connecting to a single phase, usually you would want to avoid engons because it's a bit hard to work with that. You'll see that later. What I mean by that. Now, to be able to quickly switch between these different modes, you can press 12.31 for vertex mode, two for edges, and three for faces or polygons. These are both names used for selecting your faces or polygons. Now you can use all the selection methods we've used so far inside this edit mode, you can hold shift and click on multiple faces to select them. If you're in edges mode, you can hold shift and click on multiple edges. And same for vertex. If you select multiple of these, then you call them vertices. That's how positive your model are created. To quickly switch between your object and edit mode, you can press tab key and switch between or toggle between edit and object mode. In object mode, you basically move entire object and edit edit positive your object. Now here you can use all your movement controls. For example, we can make a selection like that. And then we can press to grab along the x axis. And you can see we can do the same thing that we did when we were initially working with our object. We'll go ahead and delete this. And just a quick exercise, it's up to you whether you want to follow this or not. I'm just going to demonstrate how you would start creating more complex shapes. If we press shift A under mesh, we're going to go ahead and add a plane object. And then we can go ahead and tap into edit mode by pressing tab key. Now you can see we have these vertex points. Now we can go ahead and press control R. And that's going to let us add these loop cuts. And then we can use our mouse scroll wheel. We're going to add these when you first left click, it's going to add these, but then you can also position these. I'm going to right click to cancel the movement that it snaps into exactly the center of the object. Now we can go ahead and select these vertex points and we can scale them, something like here. And I'm going to do same thing here. Let's press seven on the dump pad. We can grab and adjust these a little bit. We're basically manipulating these to create a shape that looks similar to the spoon, something like that. And then we're going to add an edge loop in the center here. Again, control R and then using the vertex selection mode. I'm just moving these along these different taxes. Same thing back here. Now we can go ahead and select these points and move them inwards like that. Then we can select these edge points here. Then we can press, that's for using the extrusion tool along the x axis. Then again I'm going to grab this along the x axis. And we can add a loop cut here and we can move it on the z axis link that you can see. By just using those basic movement tools, we were able to create this spoon shape. Now we can right click and shape is smooth. And then we can press control two. That's going to let us add what is known as a subdiv modifier. If we click on this wrench icon, we can click on Add Modifiers. And then under Generate, we're going to add a Solidify modifier. And we're going to drag it above our subdivision modifier. Let's change the thickness value. We can go and make sure that we have vertex points mode selected. Even though you can see that down there, if you click on this icon at the top, it's going to enable x ray mode. And then you can see these points. Let's go and select these and move it even more inverse like that. You can see how we started with a very basic plan object, but then we moved it around and play around with it, and we have the spoon. Now you can add further customization scale, this along the y axis to narrow down the inner part, you can add more detail. Again, you can make it thinner like that. That's how you start. That's the difference between object and edit mode. In object mode, you edit your entire object. You select it and move it around. You can rotate your entire object, then you can tap into edit mode and you can edit parts of your object or components of your object. You can see by just using some basic tools, we were able to create this complex looking shape out of that simple plane. This was just to demonstrate how you'll turn basic primitive shapes into more complex shapes and quick exercise. 11. Edit Mode Advanced Selections: Now that you know the difference between object mode and edit mode, we're going to take a look at some more advanced selection tools for edit mode. Let's go to tap into Edit mode and then right click and subdivide. This is going to subdivide our model. This is going to add more loops. And we're going to do this twice so that we have more edges. And we can use some of these advanced selection tools also in object mode. Let's move it above the grid and then tap back into edit mode. Our standard selection tools work in edit mode. As we've seen, you can left click on vertex point or edges or faces. All of these selection tools work across all three modes. In edit mode, you can hold on Shift and add to your selection. You can hold on Shift and click on these points to deselect them. You can drag to select. You can hold on shift while dragging to add to your selection. You can hold on control and remove from your selection. All those basic tools still work inside the edit mode, but there are more advanced selection tools. For example, let's say that I want to select this entire loop of edges that go around. This is called an edge loop because it loops around our entire model. Now you can click on one loop, hold on Shift, and keep selecting. But it's going to be very tedious and annoying. We have better ways to select these components. You can hold on an old key on your keyboard and then click on an Edge loop. And you can see that it's going to select it around your object very easily. Then you can hold on Shift key and at the same time hold on old key. That's going to let you add to your selection but entire edge loops. But if you just want to add a single edge, then you let go of the old key and just hold shift key. And just like that you can see that making more advanced selection, This is going to work in any mode. If you're in vertex selection mode, again, holding down old and clicking is going to let you do that. And then same thing for faces. Now it's going to be a little bit different with faces. If you hold on Old key and then click on this face, you can see that it's going to select the face loop. But the direction in which it's going to it will be determined by your cursor. Since this loop goes both ways, up and down this way, it loops this way, and it also goes around the object. Whichever direction your cursor is closer to, the loop is going to be selected in that direction. If I hold on old and click here, then it's going to select it this way. And same thing with the site over here like that. If my cursor is up here, then it's going to select it this way. Now let's go back to selection mode. We also have what is known as ring selection. And ring selection basically means it's going to selected in the opposite direction of the loop. For example, our loop goes this way on the object, but our ring selection is going to select all of these. To do that, we hold on Elt and Control and then click on it. And you can see how it selects that ring of edges. Again, you can add to your selection by holding down Shift key and then again clicking will remove it from your selection. Next we have what is known as class path. Now this is a really helpful way of selecting. It lets you select between two points. For example, if I click here and then I want to select everything in between until here, I can hold on control and click here. It's going to use the shortest path into that face. In this case, it's going to be like this. If I click here and then hold on Control, click up here, you can see how it selects everything in between. Next we have shrink and grow selection. To do that, let's say that I selected these four phases. I can hold on control and then use plus on the numpad. And you can keep growing the selection. Again, I can shrink it by holding down control and then using minus on my numpad. Now you can use all of these functions through this select menu. If you go to the Select menu, you'll notice that we have select more or less. You can see selecting less control minus on the numpad. And then for more control plus numpad. But it's better to use of shortcuts because that's an easy way of doing it. Then we also have some other things, like for example, if I select this loop, and I want to deselect every other phase. To do that, I can go to the Select menu, and then I have Checker de Select. You can have that deselect it. If I open the operator panel here, we can change the offset. I can change the offset if I want to Like that. These are the more advanced selection methods available to you in blender. When you combine both these advanced selection tools and the normal object made selection tools, you'll be able to make very complex selections and very easily edit your complex three objects. 12. Transform Orientation: Media will be taking a look at what is known as transform orientation. It's a really good concept and it makes your life a lot easier. So far we've seen how we have this quoting a system in our three D world where we have three xs, XY and Z. But there are certain situations where we want to change that to look at this better. Let's say that I have this object and let's go to activate the move tool. And you can see that this gizmo, or this manipulator is aligned to our world, xs, X, Y, and Z. But let's say that I want to move this object diagonally in this direction with this current manipulator, you can see that I have to do it in two steps and it's not very precise and bit annoying to do. I'm going to go out and press Control Z. That's where we can use our Transform orientation. This first button on the header is called Transform Orientation. You can click here and it's going to open up this drop down. By default you can see our manipulator is aligned to our global axis. This is our world axis. Next we have local. Each object in Blender also has its own axis. To look at this better, let's go and press R to rotate along z axis and rotate the object like this. You can see even though my object is rotated, manipulator is still aligned to world. Now we can go ahead and change that and set it to local. And you can see immediately it changes. Now we're using the quotinate system of this object that we have here. Each object also has its own local quotinate system. Now I can just very simply drag it here. We're going to go and press control D. Now if you want to do this with keyboard shortcust, that's pretty simple. You don't have to switch through this menu. If I press D to grab and then I press Y, it's going to align to the y axis. If you look at the top left corner, it says distance and then it says along global y, which means we're using our world coding system. If you press Y again, now you can see that it says along local y. And I can just move it locally on the object y axis and press control z. There are a few more options. The next one is normal. And this is a little different. Let's get rotator object back by pressing control Z. Now we're going to tap into edit mode and you can press control B. This is going to let you bevel your object. Now the reason we're doing this is so that we can get an extra phase in this area. Now if you click on this icon here, it says Mesh Edit Overlays. Down here you have normals here, you can click on this one that says Discipline Normal. Now in these three objects, we have a pointing direction of a phase. You can see that each phase has a normal. It tells you which direction this phase is pointing in. That's where you can use this third option, normal. It's useful in situations like this. If I switch to phase selection mode and select this phase now with my move tool activated, you can see that by default we're using our global. That's not going to be really helpful in this case then if we go to local, that's not helpful either. Finally, we can go to normal, and now you can see that it's properly aligned and I can move this object diagonally when I'm editing parts of my object. That's where you would want to use this normal. Let's go at and tap out of edit mode. And I'm going to go out and delete this object and add a new mesh object. Let's go to add a new cube. Next we have Gimble. This is going to be a bit advanced now, we're going to just skip over it. Next we have our view. This basically aligns it to your view. As you rotate the view, you can see how that manipulator also changes. These are some of the most commonly used ones. There's a three decursor, one that's going to align to the three decursor that you have in three world. But again, that's going to be a bit advanced for now. Most of the time you'll be using a normal local and global. That's what I use like 99% of the time. That's how you can use a transform orientation in blender. 13. Transform Pivot Point Origins: D will be taking a look at what is known as pivot point. This is a very important concept in Fred software. To understand this better, let's move this object a little above the grid. Now in Blinder, each object has its own origin point. You can tell where origin of an object is by looking at this orange dot. You can see by default, in the center of each object that we have this cube origin or this dot is in the center. Now sometimes we need to change this because a lot of the things that you didn't blender depend on this. For example, if I press to scale, you can see how object is scaling towards that origin point. Same thing with rotation. It's going to rotate around that point. You can see how scaling and rotation is dependent on that origin point. But sometimes there are scenarios where we would want to change this. If you click on the second icon on the header, it's our transform pivot point. It lets you change that by default. You can see it says median point. What it means is that if I create a copy of this by pressing shift D and move it along the X axis, then let's just create few more copies, something like here. Now if I make a selection like this, let's enable to move gizmos. You can see it better. You can see that this manipulator is now appearing in the center of my selection, but not exactly in the center. That's because it's finding a median point. The median point basically means whichever side has more object origins. So you can see we have three object origins here. This is going to move more towards these three objects if we move it towards this one. And let's make a selection again. Now it's going to be in the center. It depends on where most of your objects are. When you make selection, then this manipulator is going to be displayed there. Now if we rotate, you can see how it's rotating around. That scaling is also going to happen towards that. That's our first option, median point. Now we have this bounding box option. This is going to be like, for example, if we go here and let's make a selection. Now you can see that this is not exactly in the center because it's using median point. But if we go ahead and switch it to bounding box, now you can see it moves back to center. What's happening here is that just to demonstrate, let's press Shift to Duplicate and move it along the X axis. Then here on this object tab, you don't have to worry about it too much for now. Then down here we have Viewport display, it just changes some options for the object. Down here we have display, and we're going to show a set it to bounds. This is going to make our object just like bounds and outline. Now we're going to press to scale along x axis. Let's also move it slightly like that. And then we're going to scale it on the y axis, something like here. Blender is drawing an imaginary box like this when we make a selection. And then it's setting our manipulator or origin point to that block that's creating imaginary block. That's why we have this bonding center. I'll go ahead and get rid of that. We have three decursors going to use this three decursor that we have in our scene. We can move that three decursor to different places by holding shift and then right clicking. If I make a selection, this manipulator is going to be displayed there. If we select three decursor, you can use snaps there. And now we can use that as a rotation point. We can also scale our objects towards it. If I want to move that, I can just shift right click here, and now I can rotate my objects along this area. Bounding box is going to create an imaginary box around your object or selection, and then use that as the pivot point. Then we have this three decursor. Finally, we have individual origins. Now if we rotate our objects, you can see each object is going to use its own origin for rotation. And same thing for scaling. This can be really helpful in a lot of different situations. For example, if you have car wheels and you want to scale each wheel without moving, you can use individual origins and those kind of things. Finally, we have active elements. This is going to use your last selected object or active element if we make a selection like this. Let's shift click here. This is our active selection now. And you can see how it's moving there. But if we shift click here, that's going to move there and then we can use it. That's how you can use transform pivot point. 14. Snapping: We'll be taking a look at snapping in Blender. Snapping can be really helpful in a lot of different situations. Snapping can be accessed with this third button on our header. Now this works a little different than these two other options because it has a toggle that can be toggled on and off. You can left click to toggle, snapping on and turn it off. You can also use a keyboard shortcut shift tab to toggle it on, and shift tab again to toggle it off. Or you can also hold down control key while you're moving your object. Scaling or rotating to temporarily turn on snapping. If I go ahead and select this object, grab it along the y axis, you can see I'm able to freely move it. Snapping is not turned on. Let's go to Toggle Snapping, and then click on the options for Snapping. First we have snap it, we're going to come back to this in a second. Next we have snap too. By default, we have increments selected. What it means is that it's going to snap in increments if I move my object slightly, something like here. And then turn on snapping. Now each time I move my object, it's going to snap in increments to, relative to its previous position. The next snap is going to be somewhere here, and then the next one is going to be there. Let's press to grab along y axis. As I start moving, you can see that it's moving in increments. If we want to snap it exactly to this grid, then we can open our options and enable this absolute create snapping option. And then if we, and you can see immediately it snaps to the grid and then it's just going to snap to the grid. The next type of snapping that we have is vertex snapping. It's going to use our object vertex points for snapping. Let's go and create a copy of this object by pressing shift D and move it there. Now what's going to happen is that if we open our options, it's going to snap between vertex points. And now the snap with function is going to work. It's going to find the closest vertex point. Now we're moving this object and trying to snap it to this object. If I press to grab, then the closest vertex of this object is going to snap to the vertex point where I hover my cursor. This is going to make more sense if I press to grab and move my cursor and you can see how it snaps there. I'll go ahead and press control Z. What's happening is that it's finding the closest vertex points. In this case it's going to be this vertex point and it snaps it there. If we go ahead and move this object slightly to the site, now this vertex point is going to be the closest to that vertex points. If I pros to grab and move my cursor, you can see how that snaps there. If we move this object up a little bit, in this case this vertex point should be the closest. Let's go and drag that over there and you can see how it snaps there. The next option that we have is sent center. This is going to use the origin point of our object and snap it there to that vertex point. If we press to grab and move, you can see how it snaps it there. I'll press control Z to just show it to you. Show it to you again. Let's go and snap it there. Then the next two options that we have snap with is median and active. This is when you're snapping multiple objects. If I create a copy of this object and bit, let's set to median point now. It's going to find the median point of these two objects, which should be somewhere around here. And it's going to snap it there to that vertex point. Let's press G to grab and move there. You can see it snaps it there. Finally we have active. This is going to use our active elements. It's going to snap origin of this object to that vertex point there. Let's go and move it. Just like that. If I move my last active selection there, the snap, you can see it snaps it there. That's how these snap with options work. Let's go and set it to center so that the origin point of our object snaps there. Let's go through some of these other options. The next snapping type is edge. This is going to snap our object to the edges on the next object. Let's press you to grab and move it there. You can see how it snaps the center or origin of our object to that edge over there. Let's just scale it so we can see it a little bit better. Let's move it there. And you can see it snaps there. Next we have select the face mud. Let's go and select this big cube. Now it's going to move or snap this face top of this area. Because that's going to be the closest face, actually we set it to center. If we set closest, then that's going to be the behavior. Let's press to grab something like that. If we set center, then it's going to snap the origin point of that object to the top face like that. Now when using any of these snapping modes. Now starting with Blender region 0.0 we have a new option. For example, if I go to vertex snapping, if I prog grab, I can press B and that's going to let me pick up my snapping. It's called snapping base. You can pick up whichever edge you want to snap there. If I select that edge point there, then I can snap my object and you can set snaps there. One more thing that's new with Blender Virgin 4.0 is that if you press G two, grab as you can see that I'm between this movement action, if I want to rotate my view now, this wasn't possible prior to Blender Virgin 4.0 but starting with Blender Virgin 4.0 you can hold on El and that middle Must button and you can orbit or change your camera angle, then you can continue that movement. Now this is helpful in cases where, for example, if I press G two grab and then I press button to pick up the snapping point. Let's say that I want to pick the snapping point on the other side of this object. Now before the Blender 4.0 we would cancel out of this action and then redo it by rotating our camera. But now we can just hold on old and middle, spit in, rotate the view, pick up this point, and then we can snap it wherever we want. That's going to make it really easy and convenient. The next type of snapping that we have is volume. It's going to find volume of your object and place your objects stores. It's helpful for placing one object between or inside another object. Then we have centers. This is going to snap object to center. If we make it a bit smaller, like that Pg to grab and move, you can see that it's going to place it exactly in the center of this object's edge like that. Then we have edge perpendicular. This is going to do is that it's going to snap in perpendicular directions. In this case it's going to be like these four directions. If I prog to grab, you can tell it snaps there. But if I move it diagonally, then it's not going to snap in this area because it's only going to snap in perpendicular direction. Then finally, we have phase project and phase nearest. These are a little bit advanced because these are more helpful. We're editing parts of our objects and we have multiple elements. It's when you have really couplex shifts that you want to wrap around objects. In those situations, it would be helpful just to quickly demonstrate it a little bit. I'm going to go out and create this UV sphere and tap into edit mode. Now you don't have to follow this along, This is just to demonstrate this function. I'll go ahead and set this to face nearest. For now, I'm going to turn off snapping. Now if I start extending this object to the top axis, you can see that it's not snapping and I have to like manually scale it down. And then again repeat the same process. You can see that it becomes really annoying. In that situations, I can turn on face nearest. Now what's going to happen is that as soon as I start extending this object and press Z, you can see it's going to automatically snap there to my object. I can just keep extending very easily and quickly. It's going to automatically snap all the individual vertex points, all of these vertex points to the nearest point on the other object. Finally, we have this rotation to target and backface culling options. Let's go with those. What happens is that if we have this sphere is going to be a really good example. And let's go and add a few cone objects. And move it up like that. I have to turn our snapping and then move it up like that. Let's just scale it down slightly. Now if we select our phase selection might here. And then we start snapping this. You can see that even though it snaps to that object, but it's not rotating or aligning to spherical shape. In that case, we can turn on align rotation to target. Now if we prog to grab, you can say it aligns it to that object underneath. Then finally we have backface culling. What happens is that in three objects, we only have one side of our objects. If I select this cube and then if I go ahead and delete this, face this inside of the object like this is an empty object. Now by default, Blender has an option to display this, but I'm going to turn it off. This is what our object now looks like. Now what's going to happen is that if I try to snap this object there, you can see that it snaps there, right? Actually, let me just quickly move it up like that. Now, if I try to snap this object from underneath this area, since this is the top side of the face, which is visible, but then from the inside, this has no data, it's not visible. If I try snapping it from the bottom side, you can see that it's not going to work. But if I want to make sure that it works, then I can enable this option. Let's turn that back off. And now it snap down here. Actually we have to turn it off. You can see that it's snap there. But if you turn this backface culling, then it's not going to snap down there from the underneath. This is in very rare circumstances you would use this. Finally, we have exclude non selectablesld. Using our outliner, we can make that some objects are not selectable and you can exclude that from snapping so that it doesn't snap to those objects. To demonstrate that, we're going to go ahead and click on this filter icon, and then click on this icon. Now we can select this sphere and enable this icon here. Now what's going to happen is that we can no longer select this object. Now if we move our object, you can see it still snaps there. If we go ahead and enable this option, now, it's not going to snap there anymore. We're excluding non selectable objects. Finally, it's affecting our movement as we're moving our object. The snapping is affecting our movement. But if you want to also make it affect your rotation and scale, then you can enable those. By default, you can see if I rotate, it's not affecting it, but movement is affected by the snapping. We can go and turn on snapping for rotation and scale. Now if I rotate, you can see how it snaps there, if I rotate along the axis. And same thing with scaling. Just a quick rundown snap allows you to select the part of the object that you want to snap to the other object. Snap two is going to be which element of the next object that you're trying to snap to is going to use for snapping snap. Individual elements is a bit advanced topic for now, but it lets you snap multiple parts of your object to other objects. Then we've already seen how some of these options work here. And then finally, effect is going to let you change whether you want to snapping to affect movement, rotation or scale. Or you can enable all three of these. You can also enable multi snapping if you hold on shift and click on these, enable multiple methods. You can use them if you want to. 15. Proportional Editing: The final icon on our header is proportional editing. It works similar to snapping. We have a toggle that can be turned on and off, and you can use keyboard shortcut on your keyboard to enable or disable this. Then you can click here to change the type of Pset that you're using, or this is also called fall off for your proportional editing. This can be helpful when you're editing organic objects. Let's go and delete this cube, and we're going to add a UV sphere. And it's going to be more easy to demonstrate that here. Now if we tap into edit mode and using our vertex selection mode to this first mode here, that's going to select this vertex point, or let's just select some of these multiple vertex points. Now if we go grab for movement, you can see that this movement is very jerky and it's not smooth, it's very abruptly changing the shape of the object. If you want to change this more smoothly, that's where you would want to use proportional editing. Let's go to toggle that on if we to grab, you can see there's the circle that can be changed with scroll wheel. This is the region or also called fall off. Anything within this circle is going to slowly get affected by the movement. Anything that is really close to our selection is going to be affected the most. And then it's slowly going to wear out towards that circle. Now you can see that this movement is very organic and smooth. We can really easily, this works with one vertex point. You can select multiple vertex points, edges or faces. It works with any of this. Now, the fall off by default is set to smooth, but you can also set it to sharp, then it's going to be a very sharp fall off. You can see that it's affecting this area the most. Then in comparison, the smooth one is going to be a little different. That's how you can organically edit your object. Then we have connected only. This option is helpful in cases where if we press A to select everything and press Shift duplicate. Now if we go ahead and select this object and press to grab, you can see how it's affecting both object even though they're not connected to each other. In that case, we can enable connected only if we move it. You can see that it's going to only affect objects that are connected, like not separated. This is really helpful for creating organic shapes, how you serve this sphere. And then press L to select it and then press X to delete and vertices just to get rid of it. For example, for creating an apple, we can go ahead and select this mean vertex point. With our proportional editing enabled, we can just press to grab, then we can increase our falloff. And then we can move it slightly like that. We're going to affect it a little bit more like that. Select some of these points here to just give it more random and organic shape. Let's go ahead and select some of these points here. And change the fall off a little bit to give it a little bit random shape like that. You can see that immediately, it looks more like an apple. We can select this point down here and start moving it. Then you just play around with the shape until you're happy with the looks of your object. This is a very rough example. If you right click in the object mode and shape smooth, it's going to make the object look smooth. That's how you can use proportional editing in blender. 16. 3D Cursor: We'll be taking a look at Three decursor. Three decursor has many different uses, but the first use that we have for threecursor is adding objects. Whenever we add objects, those are added at the three decursor. By default you can see the threecursor is at the origin of a three D world. Just go to get rid of this object and then we're going to add a plain object. And you can see that it's added there at the threecursorow. To move the three decursor, you can select the threecursor tool on the tool bar and then simply left click Or a better way of doing this would be holding down shift key and then right clicking. That's going to be more easy. Now if we go ahead and add a cube object, you can see how it's added at the three cursor. But then we also have some other uses. For example, if I shift right click there to move my three decursorow, we can go to this object menu. And then under snap we have this menu. But I like to use board shortcut. Shift S is going to give you that same menu. This is called a Pi menu, and it's easier to select these definite options. We have things like cursor to the grid. What it does is that it's going to find the nearest point for the three D cursor and snap it to that intersection of the grid. Let's shift right click here. In this case, this is going to be the intersection for this three decursor shift and then cursor to grid. Actually our three is up there in the sky. Let's shift right click here. It's a little hard to get it right because this three space now, it s snap to this point. Let's snap. And you can see it snaps there. Now that this was just to demonstrate this, it usually works better if you have objects close by. So if we shift right click, you can see that it's going to be here. Now let's say that I want to move it to this intersection. I can just click here and it's going to move there. The next option that we have is cursor to world origin. It's going to snap it back to three D world. We have curse selected. This moves it to the origin of the selected object. If I select this object, it's going to move to the origin of this object. Shift cursor to selected, and it's going to snap there. This is helpful in edit mode. For example, if I want to add new object on this vertex point, I can go A and select it. And then press Shift. And then that cursor to selected, it's going to move my three decursor there. And then I can press shift A, and I can add new objects like this sphere. And then maybe I want to scale it down. You can see how easy it was for me to add it exactly what I wanted. If I didn't have this three decursor function, then I would add it and then I would move it here. It would have taken a lot more time. Then we have some other options like cursor to active. This is going to move it to the active selection. If you have multiple objects selected, this case this is going to be the active selection. So we can click here and it's going to snap there. Now we have some opposite uses of this. For example, if I have my three decursor over there and I want to move my selected object there, I can press Shift S, and then I have selection to cursor, and it's going to snap it over there. If I have multiple objects selected and I did the same thing, you can see it's going to mess it up a little bit because it's going to snap both objects to the three decursor. If that's not something that you want and you want to keep that offset of the objects, then you can press Shift, and then you can move selection to cursor, but keeping offset. Then we have some more things like selection to active. This basically moves your selection to the active point. And then you have selection to grid again, is going to find the nearest point, or in this intersection of the three D grid to snap your selection there. In this case, that point was there. Let's go to select this object and scale it down so we can see it better. Now it's going to snap to this point over here. Snap selection to grid, just like that. Now these tools are helpful both in object mode and edit mode. You can see that the three decursor has many different uses. In addition to that, you can also combine it with your transform pivot point options. For example, if I have this object up here and I want to rotate it around this origin point of the world by default, if I try to rotate, you can see that it's rotating over there. But if I go ahead and change it to three decursor now you can see that I'm able to rotate that around here. That makes it really easy and quick. That's how you can use three decursor inside blender. 17. Outliner: Now we'll be taking a look at Outliner in Blender. Outliner gives you an outline of your three world, but it has other uses too. Let's see how we can use Outliner. Now the most basic use of our Outliner would be to simply select our objects. And we can simply left click on any object in this Outliner to select it in a three Viewport. Now we can select multiple objects. Let's go and duplicate some of these objects by pressing Shift. We have more objects to work with. We can click on one object, hold on control, and click on multiple objects to select them. Or we can select between two points. If I click on this first cube, hold on Shift, and click on this cube 004, everything in between will be selected. You can rename your objects by simply double clicking and then typing in new names. For example, we can type in something like first cube. A better way of doing this is that you simply select an object in the three Viewpoard and then press two on your keyboard, and then you can type in the name here. That's how you can select and organize your scene. Now we can also create what are known as collections that are equivalent to folders on your computer to organize your scene better. By default, we have this collection and everything goes into that collection. Now to create new collections, you can either click on this icon at the top or you can write Click, and then you can click on New Collection. One more way of doing that is in the TD Viewboard, but let's just click on this icon here. And it adds a collection to, let's double click here and maybe type in something like cubes. Now to move our objects, we simply select them and then we can drag them into the collection. Now if you want to create collection from your three D viewboard, I usually do it that way. You select the objects that you want to move into the new collection. And then you press M key on your keyboard and it's going to open up. Move to collection. You'll see the list of collections that you have in your three project or you can create a new collection. In this case, we're just going to move it to the Cues collection. All of those objects are going to move into that collection. Now you'll notice that there's this gray box around our collection. This tells you the active collection. Whichever collection is active, when you add new objects, those objects are going to be added to that collection. If I add something like a sphere, you can see how that's added there. But if I click on this icon at the top, and let's just add one more sphere and you can see how that's added up there. Then we can also use this for accessing some additional functionality. For example, we can click on this icon here to enable certain filters like these. Now what that allows us to do is that the first option can be used to make some objects unselectable. For example, if there are something in the background that I don't want to accidentally select when I select or when I'm selecting objects, I can just disable my selection for that, either for individual objects or an entire collection. We can make it like this, and none of you make a selection. You can see that these cubes are not selectable. Then again, we can enable it really quickly. This is also good when you're using reference images. You can make a collection for your reference images, and then you can make it unselectable so that you don't accidentally select your reference images. Then we have visibility, We can tuggle visibility very easily on and off. Another way to do this, I like to do it this way, is that you select your object and then you press H key on your keyboard and it hides the selected object. Again, you can do this for multiple objects. Then if you want to bring all of these back, you simply press old H and it's going to unhide all your objects. One more way of doing this would be selecting the isolation met. When you have an object selected, you can press forward slash on your keyboard, or you can also press this slash key on your numpad. And it's going to enter into the user perspective local view. But I'd like to call it isolation Id because that was a trim familiar to me from Tds max that hides everything And you can work very, it hides all those distracting things around your object and you can freely work on your object. And then you can press that slash key again and it un hides everything. I prefer this over hiding objects. Sometimes next we have a hide in the viewport. This hides it in the viewport, and then this camera icon is going to hide it in rendering. When you're finally rendering out images out of Blender and you want to hide these objects in that rendering, then you can use this camera icon. Right now, it's not going to affect these objects really. I think we can test that. Okay, if we go to render and render image, you can see that it's going to open up this new window and this cube is visible and rendering happens through this camera. If we select this object and hide that in rendering, then we can render our image again. You can see that this cube is not hidden in our rendering, and there is a sphere inside that cube. It's visible there, but this cube is visible in our viewport. If we want to hide that as well, then we can just click on this icon. There's that sphere that we have in our render. You can see that Outliner can be really helpful. First, you can select your objects very easily. You can make your objects unselectable, you can hide them, show them really quickly and easily. You can create collections, and then using those collections, you can really organize your scene. As you can see that Outliner has many different uses. 18. Duplicate vs Linked Duplicate: Pd will be taking a look at a very important concept in Blender. It's called Linked Duplicates. This is a concept where you can save a lot of computer resources. The way it works is that if I select this object, and we've been familiar with creating duplicates of this object by pressing Shift D, Let's go ahead and move this along the Y axis like that. Now since we know how our outliner works, let's expand these two objects. We have our cube and then we have cube 001. Now inside our cube, we have data for our Tht object. The cube itself is a container. In Blender, all our, the objects are like containers. Then within those containers, we have object data. Since we press Shift, it's called duplicating our objects. You can see that we have this cube and then we have cube 001. These are two separate objects or two separate meshes. Now if you select this same object, and then we can go ahead and create a copy of this on this side. But instead of pressing shift D, we're going to press L. Let's move this on the Y axis. Now if we go ahead and expand it, you can see that even though it says cube 002, the inside the data itself matches to the first cube. We have cube and cube up there. The container itself is changed, but the data within it didn't change for the link duplicate. When we press LD, this would be important since it's not using new mesh data. Our computer doesn't need to do a lot of extra calculations. We can save resources there, but it has other advantages too. Now, one of the advantages since the container itself is different, we can go ahead and rotate our object. We can scale it down, but if we go into edit mode and start editing positive our object, you can see how it's connected to the object at the top. That data for our mesh is connected and if we make change to one object, it's going to affect all the instances of those objects. Now this is really helpful if we have a lot of the same buildings, trees, or those things where you want to distribute them throughout your three project, while at the same time saving a lot of resources. It's going to give you two advantages. First, you're going to save resources, Second it's going to give you convenience. If later you want to change or make a change to your object, you make change to one object and it applies across all the instances. You can see that it can be a really powerful concept for this other object. If we go into edit mode and start editing, you can see it's going to be completely separate mesh data, it's not going to affect that, but these two objects have same data for the mesh. If we make change in edit mode, it's going to affect both objects. But if we make change in the object made, then it's only going to affect our object container. That gives us freedom to freely scale and add randomization. If you have a lot of trees, you'll be able to place them at different positions. You can have different scale, different tutation. When you want to change the look of the object itself and the data of the object, then it's going to apply across all those objects because they'll be using the same data. Another thing that we can do is that if you go into edit mode for your object, you can add multiple objects data inside a single object. Here you can see we have this cube, but if we go ahead and add something like this, U sphere, we can also have that same U sphere data inside our cube. With this cube, we have two different objects inside it. Usually we don't do that, but you can see that if you want, you can do that. 19. Viewport Shading: This video will go over Port Shading. This is going to be important as you start working on more complicated and intricate objects. Let's start at this first button here. When you click here, it says selectability and visibility. You can toggle selection and visibility for different types of objects that you have in blender. For example, if we turn off selection for mesh objects, then if we make a drag selection, it's not going to select the mesh objects. It very quickly turns off selection for an entire collection or set of mesh tools, mesh objects very quickly. In easy, you'll be able to make math objects selectable. Maybe you want to hide the lights. In that case, you can see that lights are not being selected. You can do that. And you can also hide them in viewpoint if you want to. The next set of tool is Viewport Gizmos. This is going to make more sense if we enable their move tool gizmo that we have for the move tool. By default you can see we have this navigation controls on the right. Some people don't use these, I also don't use them, but for this course I kept these turned on. Then we have our active tools down here. We have Gizmos that can be enabled even if you have the selection tool enabled and you want to see the move tool at all times. I'm going to go and turn that off. Next we have a viewpoint list. This is more of an important menu that we use oftentimes. Here we can turn on things like our floor. What usually people use that if they want to have a clear look at their object, they just simply click on this icon. And you can see it hides everything, the grid. And even if you have the object selected, it's not going to display the outline around it. You can make that appear really quickly. Then within that, you have individual settings, like your floor, you have your X, Y and Z X's. We can toggle those if you want to enable the Z axis. You can also do that. Down here we have our text info. This displays the text info on the right side there. You can play a run with these. One of the important thing that you might want to use is face orientation. It tells you the direction in which your object is facing. Also, I'm going to turn out the z axis. This blue side means that it's pointing towards outside. If we go into edit mode and select this face, and then press this is going to open up the normal menu. Let's flip it Now you can see that I can very easily tell that this is pointing inside. This red color is the outside of the face. This faces inside out. I'll go a out and press control Z. Another thing that you might want to use is this wireframe option. It displays the wireframes on your objects. If we go into edit mode and right click subdivide this object couple times, you can see that it's going to display the wireframe at all times even when you're not in the edit mode. Here you can change the wireframe and also its capacity. If you want to highlight it slightly, you can hide your three. You can change the scale of your three grid. I'll go ahead and right click and reset this value to default. I'm going to go ahead and turn this off. Next we have our x ray mode. This is really helpful when you have an object that you're working on inliner inside edit mode, when you're selecting these vertex points, you make a direct selection. It's can only select what's visible on your screen. It's not going to select the vitices on the back side. If you want to select that, then in that case you can enable the x ray mode. And you can see, you'll be able to see through your object and you can make a selection like that. Now I use the keyboard shortcut LC to toggle this on and off very quickly. Next we have a wireframe mode. It displays your object in a wire frame, all of your object, your entire scene. Next we have our solid sheeting, and then we have Material Preview. This is going to display the materials on your object. For example, if we click on this Material tab and change our material color, you can see that it's visible in the material preview. But if we go to Solid sheeting, it's going to turn back to the default material. Finally, we have our rendering. With this, we can enable our rendering also, you can click on this icon and then it's going to change depending on the mode that you're currently in. If we're in solid sheeting, we can tap here, and then here we can select Madcap. Click here, and then we have a number of different choices. This is really good for looking at your object quickly in different materials. If you're working on something, cars or those kind of things, you can select these mats, for example, this very reflective one. There are more like these clay ones, it makes your object like a clay. Then down here again, you have X remote. You can toggle that on and off, and you can change the transparency amount. You can enable the backface cling. You can also change your object colors. By default it's using this material, but you can make it random. And let's go back to the studio lighting now. Every time when you create a new object, it's going to be assigned a random color. You might have seen this online a lot of the times. Then we have the wireframe color. You can set it to random object. The object color is going to match to the wireframe color. We have the background, it's using our settings or preferences theme. You can set it to your world color, or you can set it to the viewport. And then here you can change the color. This is just playing around with these different settings and stuff. Now to switch between these different modes, you can press Z key on your keyboard, and you can see it opens up this Spy menu. You can select Wireframe, Solar Shating, Rendered, and Material Preview. If you want to quickly toggle this wireframe mode, you can press Shift Z, that also does that. These are some of the settings for our Viewport shating. That's how you can play around with these. 20. Annotate and Measure tools: Three D, we will be taking a look at annotation tools in Blender. You can access your annotation tool on the tool bar here. You can left click to access the tool and then you have some settings at the top. First we have our placement. It's going to place it close to a three decursor, but we can change that, align it to our view. Now what happens is that if we make strokes by simply left clicking and holding and then dragging. Every time when we rotate our view, you can see it's aligned to our view. Let's press controls these so that we can undo these steps. If it's set to three decursor, what it means is that if we draw these shapes, it's going to be aligned to a three decursor. It's going to stain that three D space as you can see it like that. I'm going to go ahead and press control Z. Finally, we have the surface option here. What it's going to do is that if you draw, it's going to draw on the surface of the objects underneath that. We have some settings like stabilized stroke as you're drawing it's going to try and stabilize your drawing the stroke. Here we have radius. Another way to access these settings is by pressing bin to access the side bar. And then here under the view tab down here we have annutations. This can be helpful if you've already drawn stuff. And then you can see that Tegra have this layer. You can double collect to rename it. And then you can change the color of your annotation and it's going to apply to everything on that layer. If we have another stroke here and maybe I want to write something like that, we can create new layers. And then maybe I want to measure something. It's really good to scribe ideas interactively. Then to delete these, you simply just minus on the layered icons. Now what I like to do is that with my selection tool, if I hold on button on my keyboard, I can start describing this really quickly. Then to erase, I can simply right click and erase it. I find it more easier than switching to the annotation tool. You can also left click and hold and then you have notate line. This is going to let you draw state lines, hold and drag. Then you have things like eneritate polygon. You can click at one point, click on the next point, and it's going to drop between that. Finally, you have eraser, you can erase with that. Next we have these measuring tools. These measuring tools can be really helpful. I'll go ahead and delete these annotations. With this measuring tool enabled, you can left click and hold and then drag, and it's going to let you measure between two points. I'll go ahead and press control Z. If you have a recursor over here, you can see we have some keyboard shortcuts. Says drag left mouse button to make the measurements. Then if you hold on X button, if you press X while you have something selected, like this ending point, you can left click to select these. You can also left click in this middle area to add more points. But if you have something like this, selected pressing X is going to get rid of that. Same thing for these ending points. Then if you again have a recursor, you can see that if you hold on control while dragging, it's going to snap it to the surface underneath. Right now when we draw these measurements, you can see it's going to be in this three D space. But if we hold on control and then we start drawing, you can see it's going to snap there like that. This cube is 2 meters. But there's a better way of measuring the distance or size of your objects. You can see that it says if you hold on shift key while you're dragging, it's going to let you measure. It's interactive. You can see as soon as I move, micros tells me the size of my object on that axis. Again, I'm going to hold on let mouth button to start dragging Hold shift. And you can see, let me do that. This can be really helpful for quick creating these. You can create more points and stuff to get some quick measurements. Another way to check the size in things would be to access edit mode. And once you're in the edit mode a peri, you'll notice that we have Mesh Edit mode overlays. Here you have things like measurements, so you can enable edge lengths. It's going to display length of the edges. You have things like edge angles, you have face areas, it's going to display that. You can enable those. Again, we have some normal options here as well, but those are not used very often. That's how you can use some of these tools. Again, to delete these measurements, it's pretty simple. You simply select them and press button. You click on the one point edge there and you can get rid of all of these. 21. Add Interactive: Now we'll take a look at the final tool on our tool bar. It's called a interactive, it's a really good tool for blocking out here three D scene. You can left click on it to activate the tool and you can see that it changes the cursor a little bit. You can left click and hold and then drag out to create the base when you let go. And then you can define the top shape. It's really good. For example, if I'm blocking out some buildings and stuff, you can see that it makes it really easy and quick. Something like that. I can draw on these other objects. Maybe I want to set or draw an AC unit up there. I can do something like there. You can see that it's really easy and quick way to quickly block out your scene. You can left click and hold here and you have different shapes that you can select from. So if you have cursor over, it's going to display some controls. It says if you hold on left control to tagle snapping, oil dragging, you can hold on old key and it's going to dry it from the center. As I'm doing this, if I hold on old key, you can see how it expands it on all sides. If I let go to the old key, you can see that it just goes on one side. You can see effect there. If you hold on shift key then it's going to keep the proportion. You can see that it's going to make it exactly perfect square. If you hold on both old and shift, then you can start drying from the center and it's also going to keep its proportions. This is going to make it really easy and quick. That's how you can quickly block out your three D scene. 22. Join and Separate: Let's take a look at how you can join and separate objects in Blender. Here we have this object, let's press D to duplicate and move it along the X axis, something like there. Now, surgeon functions in blender only works when you have a single object. It doesn't work on two separate objects. To join two objects together, it's very simple. We select both objects. If you look in the Outliner, these are two separate objects. Let's sect three, D, Viewport, and then we can simply press control J, and it's going to join these two objects together. If you look again in the Outliner, this is a single object. Now let's tap into edge mode, using the phase selection mode. Select these two phases and press I to inset. And it's going to use this inset tool, let's say that I want to bridge these two objects together. Now this function only works when we have a single object. It doesn't work on two separate objects. To do that, we go to Edge menu and then bridge Edge loops, and it creates this bridge between these two objects. Let's go and press controls a couple times to undo a few steps to separate an object. Let's see how we can do that. Also, there's a very cool selection method called select Linked. The way it works is that you simply hover your cursor over the object that you want to select. But it only works when two objects are not connected or merged together. You'll see what I mean by that in a second. But if you have two objects that are not, like really connected or welded together, you simply have crustal over the object and press L K and it selects it. Then as you have crust over more parts of those objects and press L, it's going to keep selecting those. It's a very quick way to select. Let's press L here, and this is going to select. Then to separate, we simply press and it opens up the separate menu. We can separate by selection. It's going to separate whatever we have selected by material. If you have an object with multiple materials, it's going to separate all the different parts that has different materials. And then we have loose parts. This is a loose part. Either of these is going to give us same result. Let's go and separate by selection. In the Outliner we have two separate objects. Let's type out of the edit mode so you can select this new object and work with it. That's how you can join and separate objects. Let's take a look at merging objects. When we select two objects and we join them together by pressing control J, these objects are now a single object, but this is still not connected. Now the reason you might want to bridge two objects is that sometimes when you have organic shapes or more integrate objects and you don't merge your objects, then it creates weird art effects. Let's enable our snapping to vertex mode then if we switch to vertex selection model like this vertex point, grab it and move it there. You can see that it's going to snap right over there. Just like that. Now, even though it looks connected in these two objects are not connected. If I turn of snapping and then left click to select this vertex point to grab, you can see it's not connected. Even though it looks connected, it's not connected. And then it's going to give me weird artifacts if I have more integrate object that I'm working with. When you have something like that, you would want to merge these objects together so that they're really connected to connect these. If you make a selection like this, these are overlapping, both of these will not be selected. So it's easier if you select the x ray mode and then select to select both vertex points. And then to merge, you press M key, it opens up the merged menu. Or you can access the sender mesh menu. And then here you should be able to find Merge. Let's go and do that. Click Merge, and then we have merged by distance. Click here and down here you'll notice it says removed one vertex. We can open this distance option here, and you can see that it's a very low number. What it means is that it's only going to merge what's really close to each other, Anything that overlaps. The benefit of this option is that if even we don't select both of these, this was just to demonstrate. But if I press A to select everything in my object and then press M, and select merged by distance, you can see it removed one vertex, and that's for this vertex down here. It's only going to merge everything that is really close to each other or almost overlapping each other. That's how you can merge these objects. Now if I go ahead and select the vertex point and move, you can see that it's not connected and both objects are merged together. Let's go Ad and press controls a couple times to go a few steps back. Now if we select both of these vertex points and press M key, we have some other options like merge at center. It's going to move both of these vertices to the center and merge them. If we do that, it's going to automatically merge them at the center. Then we also have other options like merge at cursor. This is going to do it at the three cursor. And we can also move the first vertex point to the last one. Or we can move the last one to the first one like that. Or if we do this one, it's going to be opposite. That's how you can do that. First you can join two objects together, and then you can separate them if you want to. If those two objects are joined together, but they're not really connected unless you merge them. All of these different functionalities have different uses on different use cases. That's how you can join and separate objects and what it means to be a loose part or really welded together or merged object. This is something that we will be using a lot in the final project for this course. Again, we type into edit mode. We select the part of our object that we want to separate, and we press shift D to duplicate that. When we press it, duplicate it. And then it gives us control for movement. When we click, it, just cancel the movement. But we did duplicate this. Then we can just separate this by pressing separate My selection Tap out of it mode so that we can select the new object that we just duplicate it and then we can move that object. You can see very easy and quick, that's how you can separate and join objects together in Blender. 23. Parenting lol: In this video, we'll be taking a look at parenting in blender. That parenting, let's see how it works. Parenting can be a very important concept in blender. This can be used in many different scenarios. Let's first understand how it's going to work. Now let's go and create a copy of this object and move this along the X axis like that. Parenting is important when you want to connect two objects together so that they transform together without joining them together. You'll see in this matter if we do it, let's go and select the children object first, and then select our parent object as our active selection. Then we can go to the object menu. And down here we have parent, or we can press control the keyboard shortcut, and then we have the options here. Let's select this first one. As soon as we do that, you'll see this relationship line moving between these two objects. Also, if you look at the outliner, we have our parent object and then there's a hierarchy inside that. We have our children object when we parent two objects together and we select the parent object and then we start transforming it, all that transformation is going to be applied or the children object is going to be affected by the transformation of the parent. When we move the object rotate or scale, all of the transformation will be applied to the children object. This can be really important in cases. For example, if you have a car and you want to move the wheels along with it, you can't join wheels and car together because then you can't rotate the wheels individually. In this case, if we select the children object, we can rotate, we can scale, and we can do all transformation to the children object without it affecting the parent object. But when we move the parent object or do any transformation to the parent object, it will be affected on the children object. It gives us a lot of advantage in a lot of different situations. Now, there are a few things to keep in mind as you're parenting these objects together. Because if you want to unparent this object, for example, here you can see that we did move this object around a little bit after parenting these two together. If I select the children object, I want to unparent this. I can press Lp to open the clear parent menu. Now here we have clear parent, but as soon as I do that, you'll notice something. This object gets unparented from that object and it also loses all of that transformation that happened to the parent object and was inherited by this children object. If you want to keep that, when you unparent your objects, then you have another option. Let's go and select this child object again. Old, open the clear menu and then you say clear but keep transformations. Now it's unparented. If I move the parent object, you can see it's not affecting but at the same time it kept the transformation that it inherited while it was child of that object. That's something to keep in mind. There's one more thing very important if we go ahead, let's go and reset by pressing control Z a couple times. Actually, let's just delete both of these objects and create a new cube object. Let's say that I have this object here, and then we duplicate this on the x axis, and then we parent this object to this one. Let's do that. Then I move this a little bit to that place area like that, so that there's a transformation for some reason. Let's say that I want to parent this to a different object. Let's go and add a separate cube and move it up there. This object is not parented to this one for some reason. Let's say that I want to parent it here. If I select this object and then this object and the press control, and you can see something happened. What's happening here is that this object is first getting unparented from that object and moving, or reverting back to its original transformation, and then it's getting parented up there. If you don't want to do that in those situations, you would want to use the second option when parenting object while keep transforming when you're the object but at the same time keeping transformations. Now you can see that it parented object, but it kept its original transformation from that other parent object. Now these are the two options that are used often in Blender. But there's one more thing that we can go over, but I haven't had any use for it, but let's just go over it. Anyways, let's go and select all of these objects and get rid of them. Shift A to add a object, Let's add a cube object, and let's enable the wireframe mode at the top so we can see this a little bit better. Let's add a cylinder object. Let's say that I have these two objects. And I moved this cube object, and then I scale it up a little bit, and then I rotate this a little bit. Now if I select the cylinder object and then select a cube object and pairing these together, you can see that the il object didn't inherit the transformation that happened to the E before parenting these objects together. If that's something that you want to do in that before parenting, you can press control P, and then you can select this third option that says object without inverse. You can see that it inherits that I haven't had any case for that, but you might find something useful. That's how the parenting relationship works in Blender. 24. Extrude: We have entered into the modeling section of this course. In this section, we'll take a look at all the modeling tools that we have in the edit mode. Let's start at the very first tool, if we select our object and tap into edit mode. The first tool that we have on our toolbar is Extrude Region Tool. If you look closely, there is this triangle in the lower right corner and it means that there are nasty tools inside it. We can left click and hold and it gives us access to some of these additional tools. Now when you select this tool, you can see it gives you this very basic gizmo. And I wouldn't recommend using these tools from the toolbar, because then you'll have to switch between these hundreds of times per day and it's going to make you work very inefficiently. I would recommend using keyboard shortcuts because it's easier and fast. Let's select our selection tool, and let's go over this first tool. This first tool is called extrude. And you can extrude vertices, you can extrude edges and faces, all three modes. We're going to do this in the faces mode. Now to extrude an object, you simply press and it's going to let you extrude. This is adding more data, adding new regions to your object. When we press to grab, it just moves the previous object that we have. But when you extrude, you can see that it allows us to add more data to our object. This is the most basic form of extrusion and that's what you'll use 99% of the time. But when you have multiple parts selected, for example, if we select all these different parts then we use to extrude. You can see that it doesn't really work the way we want it to. That's where you can press out to open this extrude menu. And then we have the extrude faces, which we've already seen. Next. We have extrude faces along normals when we click here and then move. You can see how it moves it along each phase normal. In this case, this is something that we wanted. But you can see this shape is a little bit skewed. And if you look at the top left corner of the screen, there is an option called S or even thickness off. Every time when you're using tools from edit mode, you'll often see options available to you on this tab bar. In this case, we can enable even thickness. Let's press S to toggle that and we can again between this or we can hold on Lt and it's going to give us same result. Once we're happy with the result, we simply left click and it's pretty interactive like that. Let's go and press control S. Now if we select these faces, again, accidentally selected some of those. L open the menu again. The next option that we have is extrude individual faces. And it's going to extrude each face individually on its own nexis like that. The final option that we have can be helpful in cases where, let's say that I have this polygon here and here. If I select this face and then extrude it normally by pressing, you can see that it gives me this weird result. Now in some cases you might want to do something like this, but the last option we have here, extrude manifold. When we do that, you can see that it gives us a different result. It can have a lot of different uses. That's how you can use the extrude tool and all the tools inside it. Now there's one more thing that we can do. If you have a phase selected, you can hold on control key and then right click and it's going to keep extruding the object wherever you click. It's really good for creating pipes and quickly creating wires and those kind of things. It's a really good way you can intrude pretty much anything. For example, I can select these vertex points like this and then I can extrude them as well. For example, if I press, I can extrude it up like that. And then I can maybe extrude this a few more times. Let's move it down like that. The reason I'm doing this is that I want to show you something. If you just extrude overtices, you can see that there is no data. And you can go into edges mode and select two edges. And then press F key and it's going to fill the gap between that area. Now Blender is smart enough to figure this out, so you can select this very ending edge to fill and it's going to fill that first one. And then you can keep pressing and it's going to fill all those for you. This can be really helpful, this FK works anywhere. If I have this phase selected and I delete the phase, and then again I can just select this and press F key and it's going to fill that. You can also hold on old key, click here to select the border, and then press. And that's going to do the same thing. One other use that I have for this tool that I'm going to walk you through is a very cool one. Let's go and add a simple plane object and then inside the edit mode we can press X key. At the very bottom we have collapse edges and faces. What it does is that it's going to delete everything, combine it, collapse it at the center, we'll be left with a single vertex point. Let's do that now. It out of the edit mode, so we can move that vertex point and you can, here's that vertex point that is left there. Let's go back into edit mode and make sure that you're in the vertex selection mode. You can direct to select this vertex or you can press a key to select all the vertices, in this case just a single one. Then you can go into the front view or the right view. It's going to let you create more complicated shapes really easily and quickly. For example, I can start extruding this. You can combine this with different type of snapping modes. That's also going to give you a lot of control. You can enable grit, snapping in those kind of things. One really cool thing is that if you select a point, you can hold on control and then you can right click. You can see that if you're creating a tree and you want to quickly add branches and those kind of things, this is going to be a really efficient way of doing it. If you go to the right view, you can extrude this on the other axis like that. Holding down control, keep clicking from here. Maybe I want to extrude more branches. Same thing on this side. You can see that it's going to give me this very complicated ship very easily. Now to add data to this, we can go back to object mode, right click, and then we can convert this into a curve object. Then down here we have curve properties or this data properties. Let's go in here, Enable this geometry tab. And then under bevel we can increase the depth. Just like that. We can see we have a very quick looking trait like that. Now there is a way to make this even better. Let's go and tap into edit mode. We're going to go and select these bottom two points. Let's press old, and it's going to let us scale this up. Now before we do that, let's enable our proportional editing. And then we can press old, then it's going to let us scale. And we can increase the fall off like that. It's very quickly thicken this area and then it's going to gradually affect some of these branches up there. Then we can shaped like that. You can see very easily and quickly, we can create more complicated shapes. That's how you can use the extrude tool inside blender. 25. Inset Faces: This video, we'll be taking a look at the next tool that we have. Let's tap into edit mode. The next tool that we have after the extrusion tool is instting, insting, Let's inset faces. You'll see in a second what it means. Let's go to the face selection mode, select the tap face. To use this tool, we use keyboard shortcut I. As soon as I do that, you can see that it lets me inset the face, lets me add more data. Now if you look at the top left corner, we have some controls that we can use with this tool. If I hold on control key, you can see that it lets me control the depth. Then we have the outset feature. The way this outset feature works is that if I complete this first inset and then I start doing another inset, then I want to go beyond that first inset that I add it. You can see that it's blocked, but if I enable the outside by pressing O, you can see that it lets me do that. I can add new inset outside of the previous one. I can turn that off again. I'll press controls you to undo these. Let's start in setting again. The next option that we have is called boundary. To explain that the web boundary works is that we have to remove this space at the bottom. I'll go ahead and delete that now that there's no connected face with this one. Let's say that I'm instting this by pressing, you can see that it's creating a face at the bottom. In this case, I don't want to use that there because I want to create a door in this area. That's where you can turn off the boundary feature. You can see how that changes the behavior of the tool, just like that. Now for this feature to work, make sure there's no face down there. Then I can extrude this inverse to create a door. I'll go and press control Z. The final feature that we have is called individual. I'll guide and cancel out of that if I select all three phases like here. And then we press I to inset. You can see that it's insetting all of these connected. Also, I'm going to turn off the boundary feature by pressing a key. You can see that it's a connected inset. I don't want to do that. I'm going to press for individual, just like that. You can see I can individually control these, then I can confirm that. Maybe then we can combine it with extrude long face normals, just like that. You can see we were able to create this create like within a second. That's how you can use this inset tool in Blender. 26. Bevel: Next tool that we have on our toolbar is called Bevel tool. It lets you bevel edges. In real world, most of our objects are rounded, has rounded edges. Not every, unless you're talking about knives or things like that, we don't have very sharp 90 degrees angles or sharp corners. That's why most of the time you'll end up bevel edges on your objects. That's where you can use the Bevel tool. Now this works on vertices, edges, and faces. Let's go and select this top face, or actually let's press to select everything we can bal everything together. Now press control to activate the Bevel tool, and you can see that it's going to start beveling the object. Then you can change the distance by moving your cursor. And then to round it off, you can use your musculeo, add more edges and it's going to create this rounder edge like that. And then we can tap mode. You can see that it reflects this light really beautifully on these edges. In this case, it's quite big. Bevel, usually we keep this a bit smaller, but I just wanted to show it to you. If you right click and then select she smooth, it's going to smooth the object. And you can see how it works like that. Now if you're going to press control a couple times, if you're going to bevel vertices, then you have to press control shift and B. Because it doesn't work unless you press these keys for edges, it just works normally. You press control B and then it lets you bevel and you can use your mouse roll weel to add more cuts to make it smoother. Another use for this tool is that if you press control are to add a loop cut. Oftentimes when you have loops like these and you want to quickly divide these or two loop loops, instead of adding two, you can just press control and it's going to let you do that. Then on your Mousecl wheel, you can adjust the number of edges you need. You can divide these like that, or if you want to add more data between them, you can also do that. Oftentimes you'll find yourself using this tool a lot. That's how you can bevel objects in Blender. 27. Loop Cut: Tool that we have is called Loop cuts. It allows us to add additional geometry wherever we want on our object. Let's zoom in and tap into it mode. You can press control R, and it's going to give you a preview where you're adding this edge loop. And then you can hover your cursor on different edges to see where you want to add this. Now you can left click once and it's going to add that loop cut. But then it gives you control to position it. You get or add this and then you can position it. But in this case, I don't want to move it anywhere. I just want to add this exactly in the center of the previous edge. I can right click to cancel the movement. It's going to add exactly there in the center. Let's press control Z. When you press control R to add these loop cuts, you can use your muscular wheel to increase the number of cuts that you want to add. If you want to be more precise, you type the value on your keyboard. If I press ten on the numpad, you can see how I'm able to add ten loop cuts very easily. Again, it shows you a preview and when you left click, it adds it there, but then it gives you option to position. Then if you position these and press left click, it's going to add it wherever you positioned it. But if you press control R, and then let's type in ten, left click. Once it is going to add these, but then if you right click, it's going to add it exactly where it previewed the loops there. This is a very good way to quickly add more detail to your model. For example, if I want to add two loops this way, I can just do like that. And then I can modify the shape. Maybe I want to bevel this extruded inverse like that. I can do all that stuff very easily and quickly. 28. Knife: That we have, our tool bar is called knife tool. It's really good for adding details on your models. For example, if you're creating something, a break point in your object or a tree with cuts on it or rocks or those things, it can be a really helpful tool for that to activate it. You press key on your keyboard for knife tool and then it gives you this knife tool. Now you can left click anywhere on your model and then it starts adding points. And then you can keep left clicking to add or create custom vertex points like that. Once you're happy with your vertex shape, you can press Enter to confirm. Just like that we have the model, we can maybe select this and then extrude long normals. You can see that it gives a very beautiful sort of shape for creating rocks or creating broken window or parts of cards or anything like that. Let's press controls a couple times to undo these. Let's go over some of the controls key tool to activate the knife tool. Then as we're adding this detail, we can use certain shortcuts to make things easier. If you hold shift key, it's going to snap it exactly in the center of the edge that you're hovering over. Then you can left click to start editing. And then you can move across again holding down shift that it just snaps there. And then you can left click again if you want to cancel out of it, you can press Escape. And it's not going to add that now by default when you use the knife tool. So let's press K and you add a cut like that. And press Enter. You can see that it only has it on the front side or on the back side if you want to cut through your entire object. Then with knife tool activated, you can press C key to toggle the cut through. Then when you add the cut, it's going to add it on the bot size like that. Then enter to confirm but I'm going to press escape to cancel out of it. Let's activate a knife tool again. Another thing that you might want to do is enable the angle constraint. For example, if I start here by pressing left most part and start moving, I can press A on my keyboard and it's going to enable the angle constraint. Then I can move it between set amount of rotation. You can see down there, it lets me only move in certain angles. That can be helpful in a way. You also, when you start moving with this tool, instead of pressing A, you can press X, Y, or Z if you want to move it along one of those X in this case like that, that can be a really helpful thing. You can cut through your objects, you can add these to create any free form shape. One final thing that I'd like to Google is make sure to enable these options. If you look at the bottom status part, there are these options cut through is key and then you have angle constraint which was a you can hold control that's going to ignore the snapping your journal snapping, you can toggle shift to midpoint snap. Those, all those options are done here. You can also see the distance by pressing Sky. When you're making this you can press S key and it's going to show you the distance. Now this knife tool has a very cool use. Let's go ahead and click and hold here to enable the Bicc tool and then to select everything on our object. And then you simply left click and hold and then drag into an angle where you want to add this cut. And you can see automatically add that for you. Then it gives you this controller that you can move run. For example, I want to have a cut at this edge. Then if I open the bicect controls, you can see it says fill option. It fills that area and we can clear the inner. So you can see that it deletes that part of the object. And then this fill option is going to fill it. And we can also cut the outer part of the object like that. I often use this to create quick rocks. If we clear that area, you can see like that. We can do this really easily and quickly. Just quickly draw shape like that. And then we can enable that option. Now if you enable this option first at the top, then you don't have to do it every time after completing the action, for example like that. And we can fill it as well and we can clear the outer, let's enable those options up here. And then we can select Object. And then just like that you can see that it as the cut, let's cut and press control Z also fill the object. And now we can just really easily cut that like that. If we want to adjust it we can still do that. All fun stuff. Another thing that I often do is that if I want to have the same effect with my vertex tool, then I bavel those control shift and B, and then it lets you do the same thing. Let's go ahead and quickly do it to some of these edges down here like that. Then we do the same thing around here. If you look from a way where easily, locally rocks can be created with this tool. That's how you can use the knife tool in blender. 29. Poly Build: D, we'll be taking a look at a Polybl tool. That's the next tool on our tool bar. To take a look at this, let's go and delete the default cube and we're going to add a plan object. Let's go into edit mode. Right below our knife tool, we have the Polybild. This is often used for topology. Topology is when you have a very high density mesh and then you want to build on top of it. For example, with this plan object selected, let's right click and subdivide it a couple more times. As you can see when you sculpt objects, you'll have a lot of detail like this on your model. You'll want to create a low resolution version of it. And to do that, let's go and add a new plan object. We can scale it down in the edit mode, something like here. Then you can enable the face snapping. It just snaps if you have a more organic shape. But in this example, it's a flat plane. So we don't have that issue, but we're going to slightly move it above so you can see it a bit better. Now let's go to the top view and activate our poly bill tool. Now with poly bill tool activated, you can hover your cursor over these edges and you can see that it highlights in blue color. You simply left click and hold and then drag. This way you'll be able to very quickly rebuild a lower version of your object very easily and quickly. Another thing that you can do is that if you hold on control key, you can see that you get this preview. You can left click it, adds that triangle there, but then you, while holding down control, you can click again on this edge and it's going to let you move it around. That's going to make it a quad. Also, you can just simply hover your crusted over these vertex points and move them around. You can see that it makes it really easy and quick to add more data and you can really easily manipulate these points. For example, I can do something like here and then maybe here and move it there. Now you can also enable auto merging so that these two vertex points merge by clicking on this option icon. And then enabling auto merge. And here you have the threshold on how far these niches to be to be able to merge them. But you can see that it combines a lot of tools into one. Because you can move these vertex points by simply covering your cursor over them. You can extrude from edges and then you can hold on control key and you can quickly build shapes. This is often used for retopologi. You can see that I'm very easily able to connect shapes and build object. I can move it closer and shut merge over there. That's how I use the polybile tool in blender. 30. Spin: Tool that we'll be taking a look at is called Spin Tool. It's a really helpful tool that I use very often. The way it works is that it lets you spin your objects around an axis. For example, let's say that I select this space here and I want to rotate this around. Let's go to the top. Uses easier. It's going to use your three de cursor wherever this three cursor is. Let's hold on shift and then right click here. And then we can activate it here by left clicking on it, and it's going to display this gizmo. Now if you're in one of the views, you can see that it shows that. But you have to change this axis by clicking on these icons at the top. Let's go back to the top view, and we're going to select the axis. Now it's going to rotate around this point, we have this face selected. In this case, that's not something that we want. Let's go and select this one over here. Now we can hold on left Ppton and start rotating. And you can see how it rotates that over. Now once you do that, you can move that point, initial point where you started rotating around. You can change the arc that you created. And you can also move it up and down as well. This is helpful for creating arcs and those kind of things. For example, if I select this top phase and let's align it to the Y axis, let's go to the front view and whole shift, right click here or creating an arc. It would be better if we right click here. Now that we have that set up, let's go and rotate this like that. Then down here in the operator panel, we can increase or decrease the number of steps that's added up there. Then we can change the angle. We can also make some final adjustments. We can move aside, we can move it down a little bit. You have really fine control over that. You can see something like there. Then maybe we can extrude it again towards the bottom, and it's going to let you create arcs very easily. Now there's one more tool under it, it's called Spin duplicates. You can also enable that function while you're spinning your object. It's got to press control Z if we select this face, and then let's use z axis and we're going to rotate this. You can see as I'm rotating, all of these phases are connected. If you enable the duplicate option, it's going to only duplicate the like that it's helpful. Let's go to the top view and we're going to shift right click here. If you use the second tool, it's going to do the same thing. It's easier to just use the Spin tool and enable that duplicate For some reason. Blender has this weird bug where it does the same thing with both of these tools for me, but you enable these and turn them off. If you don't want to use that, you can see it either rotates or creates a spin separately. Or you can add more steps like that if you want to create duplicate. This is often very helpful when you rotate columns around. You want to create arcs in those things. I often find this useful in those kinds of situations. That's how you can use spin and spin duplicate tools in blender. 31. Smooth: Now we'll be taking a look at the randomized and smoothing tools in Lender. Let's go and delete this Default cube, and we're going to add a plan object. Let's tap into edit mode. We can right click and subdivide, It's going to subdivider model. Each phase will be divided four times and then we can do this multiple times to add data quickly across our entire object. Once we have this data added. The next tool that we have right under a Spin tool, we have the randomized tool. Inside this, we have so and randomized left click and hold and select between these. Let's start with randomize. When you have this tool activated, you click and hold on this icon and move your mouse left and right. You can see that it randomizes your entire object. You can hold on shift so that you have more control over how you want to randomize this. It's really helpful for quickly creating ground and those kind of things. You can open the operators panel and you can change the seed. You can also change the amount afterwards. Then you can also play around with the normal direction done here. Then if you have an object like this and you want to smooth it out, then you can use the opposite tool. The smoothing tool is going to give you opposite of randomize. Again, you hold on left mouse button. Then in the operators panel, you can increase the repeat to smooth it further, but you'll notice that as shrink towards the center. That's how you can use these two tools in Blender. 32. Edge Slide: Tool that we have on our toolbar is called edge sliding. Now, we went through a lot of tools. These tools at the very top, This first set of tools are the tools that you use almost every day. Every time when you work on some project, you'll be using these tools. But then there are some tools that you don't use often. For example, this poly built, I don't use it, I have very rare use for that. Then the spin duplicate is often used. Then the smooth, randomized, I really use those. But then we have this tool called sliding. This is the tool that I use almost every day. What I'm working on something, what it allows us to do is slide edges. If we add an edge loop by pressing control R and add a loop cut like that, let's say that I want to move it now. I can press G two, grab, and then along the y axis and move it around. But these are two steps, If you want to do this more efficiently, then let's see how this tool works. And then I can show you the keyboard shortcut, you left click and hold on this icon and move it around. Now you can do this with keyboard shortcut, and that's going to be two grab. And then again it's going to let you do the slide that makes it really easy and quick. Oftentimes what happens is that if you have a model, for example, if we rotate this slightly like that. Now if you press to grab, then you can't move this on the X or Y Xs because that's no longer align to the object. Lighting is still going to let you do that price twice. And then you can very quickly align the edge. If you need to double G just like that. That's where you can use this tool. It's a very helpful tool that I often use. Next, we have this vertex slide. It lets you do the same thing but for vertices, if you have loop of vertices selected, you can also G to move this around, just simply double price or twice. And then you can move that around. You don't necessarily need to switch to this sliding. That's how you can use a slide in blender. 33. Shrink/Fatten: The next tool that we have is called shrink and fatten. Now this tool is often used because it's a really helpful tool. Let's go ahead and get rid of the default cube and add a cylinder object. Now we're going to go ahead and select this top and bottom face. Let's go and inside these faces by pressing and then we can extrude these along normals that. Let's say that I have this pipe and I want to expand this area a little bit. I want to add more thickness to it. What we can do is that if we select this loop by holding on old and then clicking on the loop, if we use the scaling tool, you can see that it moves it uniformly in all directions. That's not something that I want to use, in this case, that's where you can use this shrink and fatten tool. Now you can use the keyboard shortcut, and that's easier to access old instead of just, it's going to only move each faces in its normal direction old. And then we can move it, it no longer moves these faces up and down or doesn't enlarge, it just moves each face outwards. In this case, you can see, I'm going to do that, something like that. Very easy and quick. Now, you can also do this with a different technique, and that would be scaling it And then pressing shift and Z, that's going to exclude the z axis, and then you can get the same result. Then you scale only on the x and y axes. But sometimes when you have object that would be like at a diagonal angle, then it would be a bit hard to do with that trick. Because now if I scale and hold down shift, press Z, you can see that it just gives me a weird result. I can press Olds and then I can still get that result very easily and quickly. Just like that. That's how you can use the shrink and fatten this push and pull tool. I haven't used this a lot, but what it does is that it pulls all vertices together. Just to show you a quick example, let's go to the top. You add this plan object, move it there. Let's create a few more copies by pressing Shift D, like that, and let's select everything, and then tap into edit mode. With this tool enabled, push and pull, we can hold onto this icon, move our curst left and right, and you can see how it pulls everything together. I haven't found any use for it. So that's how you can use shrink and Fatten tool in blender. 34. Shear: Tool that we have on our tool bar is called Share Tool. This is often used when you want to create molding or 90 angle turns for buildings and those kind of things. So let's see how it's going to work. You can activate the tool down here and then using the phase selection mode, you can select a phase. Then you get this manipulator that, let's share the object. When you do that, you can access the operator panel down here and then you can change this value. Just simply type in one for one side or you can type in negative one for the other side and it's going to give you an exact 90 angle turn. Then you can press to extrude and you can see that it goes along objects local normal. We're going to move that to Y axis like that. Let's just grab this along the Y axis model like that. Then again, we can start sharing this. Actually we have to use this axis now like that to move there. If you look in the top left corner, there's negative two. We're going to type that in negative two, just like that. And then we can extrude along the Z axis, just like that. To share this again, we can use this axis. We're going to type in negative one, just like that. You can see that I'm able to create these 90 angle turns very easily and quickly. If we had this object, let's rotate this on the y axis, 90 degrees. If I was creating a molding for my building or anything, you can see that I have these exact 90 angled turns very easily and quickly, I would something like maybe select this one, move it along the x axis like that. And now we're going to have a turn over here, this controller like that. Then I would type in the value done here, one. Then I can just extrude this. We have y axis over there. Let's extrude along the y axis. Then I can fix this again by simply using the tool. Let's type in one again, and it's going to reset that for me. Again, if I use the tool, I can type in one and then extrude it along x axis like that. You can see that it can be helpful for creating moldings or these 90 angle turns, you might find other uses for it. The next tool that we have nation inside this is a sphere to sphere. The way you use that tool is that if we create a cube object, let's go into edit mode. We're going to add some loop cuts. Let's add random loop cuts. About four or five loop cuts in all directions. Let's say that I want to turn this into a circle. To do that, I can select all of these and then this two sphere tool can be activated. We simply left click and hold in the viewport and move left or right. You can say, let's create or convert that into a sphere. You can also use this keyboard shortca. If you have your cursor it says old shift S. If you don't have the tool activated, you can simply press Old shift and then move your cursor left or right. People often use this when they want a bit of different topology of how these edges are distributed. When you create a sphere, it might look a little different. Let's go and do that. And we're going to move this along the y axis. You can see how both of these objects have different way, how these lines are moving around. This is often useful for creating characters because you can start at this point and then to create S, you select something like maybe these ones. Then you can inset these, then you can inst these inside like that. To create the nose, you would take these faces and then you can rotate these along the y axis like that. You can scale, you can play around for creating the mouth. You can select it at this area at the bottom, then like that. And then you can extrude. Now I did it very quickly and roughly, so you can see that afterwards you can click and shade smooth. And then you can also add a subdiv modifier by pressing control two on your keyboard. When you go to the gear icon, there's the subdivision modifier. Again, we'll be taking a look at how these modifiers work a little later in the course, but you can see that how quickly we were able to create that head. We have a really good topology where we can add loop cuts in this eye area to add more detail. And we can add more loop cuts in the face area to add details to our mouth area. All of this is, this math is created in a very beautiful way, distributed properly. To add these ears and stuff, we can maybe select some of these faces and extrude them outwards like that. Then maybe we can rotate these a little bit. These faces, we can insert these like that and then we can move them inwards. Very quick, quick model, but you get the idea, it's better compared to that other object. That's how you would use these two tools in blender. 35. Rip Region: The final tool that we have on our toolbar is called Prision. It's a very helpful tool, you can quickly open your optics. In this example, let's go ahead and activate the knife tool by pressing K, hold on shift key so that it snaps to the center. And then we move our cursor over there and add a loop like that. Press Enter to confirm that. Let's say that I want to cut open this from the center area. I can use this tool now. I would recommend using the keyboard shortcut, and it's V on your keyboard. The way it works is that wherever your cursor is, once you have a vertex point selected, wherever your cursor is, it's going to rip it on that side. To give you a bit better example, let's go and select this vertex point. If my cursor is down here, it's going to separate this face. Let's press V, and you can see how it separates that. Let's press control Z. If I move my cursor over here, press V, you can see how it separates from that area. If my cursor is up here, then it's going to separate from that area. Let's use that to separate these two points. I'm going to select both of them. Press V Key and move it up like that. And then I'm going to select these again and press V Key again. You can see that very quickly and easily I was able to create this open box. Now I can add a solidify modifier. Let's go to this icon, Add modifiers, generate and then solidify. It's going to, let me add thickness. I can add thickness to my object like that. Just like that. Very easily and quickly I was able to create this open box. That's how you can use the reprision tool in Blender. 36. Modifiers: We'll be taking a look at how you can use modifiers in blender. Modifiers allows you to work non destructively and make your work more efficient and easy. Let's see how it's going to work. Let's say that I'm modeling a chocolate bar. To do that, let's select this object, tap into edit mode, and scale it along the Z axis. Then in the object mode, let's move it up like that. Let's select this top face, in the face selection mode, scale it down. Move it down a little bit like that. Maybe add an inset, extrude it towards the top like that. Add one tiny extrusion again, you can see that we added this, but in real life, we have our objects that are more soft and rounded. To do that, I have to select my object, select all parts of my object, and then add a bevel. You can see that it's going to mess up it a little bit. Once I do that, you can see that it's added permanently. And if I need to go a step back, I don't have any option to go back except that I can use control Z. But let's say that after adding the bevel, I modeled this like that. Now if I want to remove that bevel, I don't have any way to go back remove that. On top of that, let's say that I need to create more pieces of this chocolate. To create a chocolate bar, I'm going to press all D so that it's a link, duplicate. And move it along the Y axis. Let's just do this more, and then along the Y axis, you can see that place. It isn't so easy to do, so we might use the snapping, but then again, that's an added step. Then let's say something like that. You can see that it can be really time consuming afterwards. Maybe I'm going to add more pieces to that. This is all manual work. Now, we can do this much more efficiently by using modifiers. Let's select everything and get rid of it by pressing delete key. And let's add a new Keb object. We're going to go ahead and scale this again in the object mode when you're working with modifier. Something to keep in mind is that if you press key, make sure that your skill is at one. Because if you scale your object in the object mode, then it's going to change and oftentimes you'll get weird artifacts. If you apply modifier and something isn't working, then make sure to check your scale. If you have skill modified and you want to move this back to the default value, that's pretty simple, just go to the object menu and then here you'll shoot fine, Apply. Then you can apply the scale. I just like to use the keyboard shortcut, that's control, and then apply scale. You can also do the same thing with location and rotation. Let's apply scale. And that's not even, let's close our sidebar. Now what we can do is that if I change a shape like that, just like before, like that, let's say that I want to add those rounded corners. Let's go to this care icon, and that's where we can add modifiers. Click on Add Modifier, and we have a few different categories. Generate, you'll be using mischief for the time, this generate category, we have a lot of these. Let's start with the first one we want to do, bevel, let's go ahead and add that. You can see immediately we see the changes on our object and we can bevel our vitices or edges. Then we have the amount. So we can change that hold on shift key while greting this so that it's a bit easier. Then you can increase the number of segments. And then we can right click and share our object smooth so that it's smoother. And you can see that it's a pretty non destructive way. We can very easily change and edit these values. Even if I start modifying the shape of my object like that, I can still go back and change any of those values very easily and quickly. Now down here we have the method. By default it levels every edge that has 30 degrees or more curve. In this case, any part of the object which has curved more than 30 angle, then it's going to level those edges. But we have other methods like bevel with that you'll see in the final project for this course. You can also do with that. Now something to keep in mind is that when you're using modifiers, the of the modifiers is important. Anything added at the top will be affected by the bottom one. You'll start from top and work towards bottom. You can use this area to drag modifiers up and down. You can collapse the setting so that if you have a lot of modifiers, you can change the name so to something more descriptive so that if you come back, you know what this modifier is doing to your object. Then here you have some icons. You can click on this and it lets you see the changes in the edit mode. You can turn that off, then you can also turn that off in the viewport. If you're not in the edit mode, you can toggle the visibility, what this modifier is doing to the object. Finally, you can hide that in rendering. If you click on this drop down, you can apply the modifier. You can create a duplicate of the modifier. Again, you can see that we can move these up and down. You can remove the modifier by clicking here. One more way to apply this modifier would be covering your cursor over it and then pressing control A. Now when you apply the modifier, all the changes that this modifier is making will be applied or baked into your object that would be finalizing your shape. Now you can see that those bevels aren't here, we just have the single edge. But if we go into object mode and you can only apply these modifiers in object mode, click on this strap down, apply the modifier, and you can see all those changes now applied. Now we will have to manually do this if we change our mind later on. What I'd like to usually do is that I create a copy of my object, cancel the movement, and hide it in the viewboard. Now if I apply the modifier and later down the road I made a mistake and I want to go back, I can just delete this object and turn on that other object that I had. You can see that allows you to work very non destructively. The Bevel modifier allows us to bevel our edges very easily and quickly. Let's go in and click on Add Modifiers. And go through some other modifiers. You can click on Ray modifier. Okay, we have some weird bug. Let's press control Z, and we can do that again. And this should let us do that. Okay, Blender is acting up a little bit. It often does that when you find cero glass. But you shouldn't have this problem. Let's go to increase or decrease the counts. So you can see that we can very easily and okay, let me just say I tapped out and tapped back in. And you can see that it's fixed now. It was just a simple weird bug. You can see that I can increase the number of counts I need with determining which side these bars needs to go. Is this relative offset? By default it's going to go on the x axis. We can do this to negative one axis like that. It's just moving one unit relative to itself. If we increase that, we can increase the gap like that. It's going to give us even spacing very easily and quickly. Let's say that I don't want to do this on the X axis, but rather on the Y axis. I can type that in just like that. Then we can add more modifiers. We can stack these. I'm going to add another modifier, but this time we're going to increase the number of counts on the x axis. You can see all of that. The great thing is that I'm still working on this first objects. If I make any change to this object, maybe I select these Vitex points and move them. You can see it applies across all those other copies that are created using modifiers Until I have applied these. Let's go ahead and go over some more modifiers. We have this bullion modifier which can be really helpful. Let's go ahead and create two cubes object. We can create one shift to duplicate, so we can use one object as a cutter for the other one. Let's go and select this object, add modifier, and regenerate. We're going to add a bullion modifier. It tells us which object we want to use for the bullion. Let's click on this eye dropper icon. Click here and it's going to cut that object. Now we can see this because this object is in the way. Let's go to Object properties and we port display as we can change that to fire, and you can see how it's cutting that object and it's pretty non destructive. We can select this object, move it around, and you can see how it's cutting through that object. That we can change the mode. That modifier, a difference, means that it subtracts the object. We can unionize, it's going to combine both objects. We can select intersect, it's going to only leave the part that is intersecting. Something like that. Let's see what other modifiers that we often use. Another great one is that let's go and hide all of these objects and add in a new cube object. Now this is a very common a modifier that often people use. Let's say that I'm modeling a car in Blender. I can go into edit mode, add a loop cut in the center like that. Select these vertices on this side and delete them. Will only model one half of the object and it's going to apply on the other side automatically. If we're going to add modifiers, generate and add a mirror modifier that we can tell it to mirror on the X axis. We can tell it to be mirrored on the Y axis. We can also select a mirror object by default is going to use the object origin. It's going to mirror object on the other side based on this origin point. In the edit mode, if we move our object, you can see it moves that. This clipping option is going to make sure, so you can't move beyond this merging point. If this is not enabled, then you can do that. Let's enable that. Let's start modeling our object a little bit. We're going to scale this on the y axis like that. We can add in a loop cut here, level that loop cut, without adding any more additional loops in the center, the top face, Make sure that the clipping is enabled. Otherwise, if we extrude this by pressing E, you can see that these will be individual objects. Make sure that this is enabled, then it wouldn't be like that. Now we can go ahead and scale it slightly like that. Move it up, then let's select this edge. Move it to the axis. Let's go select the entire loop. Click to shift. Click on these points like that. Move these on the y axis like that. We can do the same thing for the back face. You can see that I'm just modeling one part of the object and it's applying on the other one. Let's select these bottom faces control. Click over there. Move it up like that. Now we can use the bullion modifier to create the cutout for the vehicle. Let's also create the windows first. We're going to add one more loop cut here, these faces in the face selection mode. And then we can press to inset again for individual insetting. Then we can extrude these along normals like that. Let's add in a new object in the object mode. We're going to add a cylinder object. Let's reduce the resolution by changing the number of vertices to something like 16. That we have less vertices that we need to rotate. Let's rotate this along the Y axis, 90 degrees. Let's go to the front view, so we can drag it around more easily like that. Go to the side view by pressing three. Move it like that, type into edit mode and scale it down to something like that. Finally, let's go and scale this on the x axis to make it smaller like that. Then we can go into add modifiers, generate mirror modifier. We can select this car object as the mirroring, and you can see that it creates this on the other side. Then we can also enable this for the Y access. And it's going to create it over there. Shift the duplicate so we can create the vels and the bullion object. Let's hide this new copy that we just created. Then we go back to our car model, add modifiers at a bullion modifier and select this object. Now we can go to the object properties tab. Then down here under display, we can display it as a wire. Let's enable our Veles that we created and hidden and we can scale it down slightly like that. Tap into edit mode. And we're just going to work on one object and it's going to apply to all the vels. Let's press IT inset to extrudes inside IT. Inset again to extrude it outwards like that for the front side. Let's select this face, move it down slightly like that. Maybe add a bit of bevel with a little bit. Runs like that. Let's select this face. Let's press Si D, and we can separate this by selection. Now we have the separate object go back into the object mode, select that new object, type into edit mode. Select the entire object scale along z axis, and then move it down like that. And then we can extrude it to create the bumper. Select everything again, si to duplicate and grab it along the Z axis like that and then go back into the modifiers. Disable the clipping, then enable the X remote by pressing Z in the vertex selection mode, like these vertices, switch back to the normal shading and grab this along the X axis. To move it like that, then we can fill this by pressing K. Then we can do the same thing for the back side. We can move these objects to the back by pressing shift D. Move this along the Y axis like that over there, you can see that the origin point is somewhere else. If we have movement tool activity, it's going to show up there. We can simply right click and set the origin of our object to geometry. It's going to fix that for us. Here we have the open edge that we can fix very easily. Okay, there's some weird bug happening. The reason is happening is that we turned off the clipping option and we combined headlights and bumper together. We can just delete this and let's go back to the front side. We can go ahead and select everything and separate by loose parts, and this is going to give us two separate objects. Now we should be able to do that, but first let's enable clipping for the bumper. Like both of these, shift to duplicate. Again, move them along the y axis like that. Now it shouldn't give us that problem anymore. Again, we can select this face and move it a little bit like that. We're creating a very rough shape. Let's add a bit more runnesscn, use these modifiers. Let's go through some more modifiers to generate. We have things like build. It's going to slowly build your objects. Let's go ahead and add it now You can increase this start frame, builds your objects slowly over time. So it's really good for animating the build up process of your model. And then you have other things like the subdivision modifier. You can click here and it's going to round all the objects. It's going to subdivide your model to see this better. Let's add in a new cube object and move it to the side. Let's press control two. And it's going to add a subdivision modifier with level two. If you press control one, it's going to be one. Control three is going to give you three level of subdivisions. The reason why we use this is that if I go into edit mode, you can see even though this object is very round and smooth, let's right click and shade it smooth. In the object mode, editing this would be much easier. I can just select one face and move it around. But when we apply this modifier, let's click on this icon. And you can see this would be the final geometry of this object. The reason we use this often is that if you have very organic object, you can still work on a very small number of vertices. For example, let's increase this two to three. And let's say that I want to change the shape. I can select this face and move this on the x axis. You can see it's much easier. But if we go ahead and apply this modifier, and now I have to do the same thing Now, every time I want to make a small change, I have to go ahead and select all of these faces, all of these. And then I have to move them and you can see it's going to give me very weird results. And then I can use the proportional editing. It lengthens the modeling process. It's much easier to just use the septive modifier as you're working. Once you modeled object, then you can just apply this modifier. We have the solidify modifier, which is going to give you thickness or depth. So let's go ahead and select these objects, delete them, and add in a simple plan object like that. And then you can go into Add modifier, you can add solidify modifier, and you can change that. It's going to give you depth very easily and quickly. You can enable this even thickness. Sometimes when you have different shapes, you might need to enable this function. These are some of the modifiers that you use regularly. There are a few other ones, like you can bend objects and you can do things like those. But I would recommend you to experiment and play around with those. That's how you can work with modifiers in Blender. 37. Rendering Basics: We know how to model in Blender, it's time to take a look at our render settings and how rendering works in Blender. To access your render settings, you can click on this first tab in the Properties editor. Then at the very top, we have our render engines. By default, Blender has EV render. This is real time render. It's a bit faster, but you can get really realistic results with it. For that, you'll need to use cycles. You can switch your rendering type here or the render engine, and then you can use a device with cycles. You can use your CPU or processor, or you can use your graphics card or GPU. You can see this GPU. I can't use it because it's great, that's because I have to go into Edit menu preferences. Then under system we can enable the type of graphics card that we have. If you have invidious graphics card, tried to use a or this optics render, but if you're on EMD graphics card, you might see something called open GL. I think it might be this one. I don't know about that, but there should be open GL. I think it works with MD Graphics cards. I'm going to select optics. Actually, let's go with cut. Then we can close out of that and you can see that it is no longer grade out, which means I can use my graphics card down here. We have our samples. The more sample you add, the clear cleaner the image is going to become. But at the cost of more render time, we're going to leave everything a default for now. Now below this, we have our output settings. We're not going to touch these just yet because we don't need this. In this video. You can set up the resolution at which you want to render images out of your red software, in this case, Blender. You can select the file type that you'll be using, where you want to save those images and all that stuff. In this tab, let's take a look at how rendering works. The way rendering works is very similar to photography in real life, we need a camera and you can see by default Blender comes with this one. You can add multiple cameras or you can delete the ones you don't need. Then you set up lights in your scene and then you can render images out of Blender. By default, we have this camera. And to adjust this camera, there are a lot of different ways. Now you can use your standard grab and moving and rotation, but that would be very inefficient. The next method that you can use is you can press zero on the Numpad and it's going to look through that camera. This will be our final render. Anything within the Porto boundary, you can press end to open the sidebar and then under view there's an option. Let's go ahead and expand this a little bit more. There should be an option called lock a camera to view. Now, every time when you rotate with middle mouse put, when you pan around and all that stuff, your camera manipulates along with it. Now this is one way to adjust it, but I personally don't like to use this option, but it's there if you want to use it. Now what I like to do is that when I'm inside this camera view, I just press Shift plus Tilda. This tilda key is right below this Cape key. It attaches it to Mics and I can look around just like when I'm playing games. Then I can use to go forward As to go back to go left and D to go right. I can press to go down for going up. If you hold on shift, it's going to make it faster. It's just like playing a shooter game on the computer. It makes it much more easy to move the camera around. You can left click to finish the movement if you want to cancel out of it. For example, if I move my camera here and I'm not happy with that, I can just right click and it's going to cancel out it. You can see that it makes it really easy to adjust a camera. Next, we need lights in our scene. Let's go and set up a very basic scene. Let's go and press shift A under Mesh. We're going to add a plain object, let's scale it up really big like that. Let's tap into edit mode. Select this edge, then we can extrude it out on the z axis like that. Let's go and select this edge again, control B to baffle, and we can add more cuts like that to give it shape like that. And then we can right click and shade smooth. Now let's go and move this up as a platform. And we can scale it up if we want to, just a tiny bit scale down. Just adjust this a little slightly and then we can add this monkey head that let's just place it slightly that we're creating a very basic scene. By default, we have this one light that's going to illuminate this. At the top, we have our wire frame made solid, shading is the Mad that we're currently in. Then we have our material preview. When we click here, it uses a bit of default lighting. There's an STRI image, STRA are 3,600.60 degrees images that wrap around the three scene and it gives light to our three D scene. We can click on this drop done, and you can see this is the image that Blender is currently using. We can select a different type and you can see how it immediately changes the effect. We can change the rotation, and you can see how the lighting changes a little bit. This is a quick way to preview your materials, but it's not going to give you really realistic results. But it's a good way to quickly put some basic materials in your three D scene. For example, let's go and select this cube. And then click on this material icon. We have the default materials, We're going to remove that. Let's go and add a new Material slot. Click on, I think we're going to just leave this, actually just change it to something like orange color. Just yellowish. Then we're going to select this monkey head and we're going to use the same material that we just created for the cube. Just link that down here. You can see we have blur and other things like that. And then we have the world opacity. I think it just shows it in the world. You can see that the image that I was talking about, you can see wraps around our three D scene. We can also remove the blurness. If we want to, we can blur that. And then here we have the strength of the light. Then the next button that we have is for rendering that enables our rendering engine. Whichever engine is selected here is going to enable that. Let's go to start with EV and then we can start rendering. You can see immediately everything becomes dark and nice using the lights that we have in our scene instead of the default lighting that Lender comes with. You can see that is a real time lender. It's really fast, but it's not able to produce very photorealistic results. But it's good for a lot of the time. It depends on the project that you'll be working on. If you're just creating something low poly like cartoonish, then V would be much better choice than cycles. But if you want something photorealistic, then going with cycle makes more sense. Let's go and change that to cycles. Now you can see that it takes a bit more time to clean the image. By default we have this point light. Let's select that and delete that. Now we're going to press zero on the pad and it's going to move into the camera press shift Tilda. And let's just adjust the camera angle slightly. Just adjusting that. Let's move out of the camera view for now. We're going to start adding some lights and stuff. Press shift eight to open the add menu. And then under lights we have the point light, sun, spot and area. Let's start with the point light. Let's press to grab along the Z axis to move. Now point light is going to emit light in all direction. We can click on this icon here for the data at the light. And then here we have some settings. Now when you create the light, you can change the type of light that you'll be using afterwards. So you can see we have point light. Then we have the sunlight and it immediately brightens everything. Then we have the spot light. We have aerial light. With each light we have the color of the light. We have power by default is just ten watts. Just like in real life. The light decays over the distance. The further away the light from the objects and the lower the light effect will be on the objects. Let's go ahead and increase this to something like maybe 250 because we will need a lot of light power and we can move it. You can see that a mis light in all directions, the sunlight, the position of the light itself doesn't affect the light. It's just the direction. Let's reduce this pack to something like maybe one. If I press R will rotate. And as soon as I rotate, you can see how it gives us the sunset effect. And then just like in real life, the way sun works, it's going to give you the same result. Usually if you want to create sunlight, you can either create the sunlight or you can use an TRI image. By default, we don't have any GRI image in the render mode, it just appears in the material preview, we're going to see how we can set that up in the next medium. The next type of light that we have is spot light with spotlight. You can see that it's a spotlight. Let's go and increase the power to something like 500. And you can see that there's the effect we might need to increase it even more. Let's go with something 1,000 Actually, let's go with something like 5,000 As you can see that, it gives us this spotlight effect. We have the radius of the light. Then we have the area light. Aera light is like a plane. For some reason I think it's bugged again. Let's go and delight that. And we're going to create a new area light from scratch. Let's move it up. You can see that just like that, there's our area light. It's like a square shape that we can scale up. The more you kill it up, the softer the shadows are going to be. Okay, blender gleached out. I think I might need to close blender and reopen. I'll try and save the file and see if I can fix this buck. Okay. I was able to recover my skin. There's our light. The kill it up. The softer the light is going to affect your scene. And then again, we can increase the power. Let's go with really high power. Let's go with something like maybe 8,000 now, it's going to light our scene up. As I scale it down, you'll notice that the shadows become more sharp and sharp. You can increase that. It's going to give you the best result. So it's just a missed light in one direction. Usually, when you want to create studio lights, you would want to use this area lighting. You can also use this for creating ceiling lights and those kinds of things. This is use light for me in a lot of the projects that I created in blender, you can see that we can set up the lights and then when we press zero on the pad, it's going to show us our camera view. Then we can adjust some settings. Let's go to our camera in our outliner, we have the camera here. When we do that, then we have the camera tab here. We have the camera type. We can use perspective, which is going to give us that three D depth. But if you want to create orthographic view which removes that depth, you can also do that. Then we have the focal length by default is set to 50 millimeter. You get more close up shots then you can increase it if you want to get more wider. Look for example, one of the famous lens type is 35 millimeters. You can also create that. Let's go with 50 foot. Now here we have the shift. We can shift that if you need to. Here's the safe area, if you want to add that, then as you change that, you have a lot of things here. We have had this option, we highlights the area that will not be rendered in the final image and you can change the transparency for that, this is useful thing. And then we also have this depth of feel. You can enable that to add blarness to the background. And then you can select the object that you want to focus on and it's going to make it easier for you to focus on that object. Then down here you can adjust the settings stops, and these would become more technical for this course. If you want to learn more about this, I would recommend watching how miles or DSLR cameras work. A simple trail on Youtube will be enough for you to learn these basics. You can see that it's a very basic concept. We set up our camera, then we add lights to three D scene, and then we render those images out. Right now you can see that we're rendering at a full HD image. If we go back to the second tab for the output and we change it to more of a square resolution like 1080 x 108, so you can see it's going to give me more of a square. This can be good for social media and those kinds of things, but if you're rendering a video, in that case, you would want to use a resolution that is current standard. And usually people render at ten EDP. Down here we have the frame rate and those kinds of things that covers up the basics of rendering in Blender. 38. Materials Basics: Video will be taking a look at how you can work with materials in blender. I'm using the same scene file from the previous video. If you didn't know how we ended up here, I would recommend watching the previous video. To create materials in Blender, you go into this material tab in the Properties editor with the objects selected by default. We have this material here. We're going to click on this minus icon to delete that. Let's understand how this works in Blender, you can add multiple materials to a single object. We have these two buttons here, plus and minus. You can click on plus button, adds an empty material slot, and then you can click on this new button. It creates a new material and places that in this slot. If you click on this drop down, it's going to show you all the materials that you have in your three D scene and you can use one of the materials that you already have created. This is going to make more sense in a second. Let's go ahead and create a new material. Then you can either double click here or you can just click here and type in a name. We're going to type in something like maybe our red material. This is going to give us this red material. Let's go ahead and click on this base color and we can change it to red. It's applied to our monkey, so you can see that it's updating in real time. Now that we have this applied. If you want to add a second material, we can click on this plus icon and it's going to add a new slot. Now I can either create a new material or I can click on this drop down. And you can see that red material that we created is the can select it and it's going to import the same settings. Now if I make a change to the second material, since it's the same material, it's going to update across both of those. If you use the same material on multiple objects, for example, if we select this base and then click on this drop down and select that material and then we make a change, can apply across all instances, can update across all the objects that's using the same material. The material at the very top is going to be applied to your entire object. And then if you want to apply a different material, remove that. We're going to click on this minus icon. It's going to unlink that material. We can create a new one. Let's call it green. Let's go and change the color. Let's say that I want to apply this green material, but only to certain parts of this object. To do that, we simply go into edit mode. We go into the edit mode and then select the parts of the object that we want to apply this material to. Let's go to phase selection mode and maybe select these. Yes. Then with our material highlighted, we can click on a sign and it's going to assign material to that area. Now if you want to select Object based on the materials, that's pretty simple. Let's say that I want to select the area where I have this green material applied. I can highlight the material and click on Select, and it's going to select those faces. If I grab those, you can see how it makes it really easy. You can deselect those only the material area where this material is applied. Same thing with this one. If we click, it's going to select everything except for that ice area. Now let's go through some of these icons Here. You can see that we have these materials and down here we have some icons. Blender is going to delete some of the unused materials if you save your file, if you want to protect the material even if it's not used in your thre C, then you can click on this protection shield icon. Another thing that you might want to often do is that, let's say that I created this new material slot. But I want to take settings from one of the previous materials that I already created. In that case, I can say I need this red material, but now I want to create a copy of this so that when I change the settings, it's not updated in the original material. In that case, I can click on this copy icon and it's going to create this 01. Now it's a separate material, so if I make a change to it, you can see that it's not going to apply to the previous red material. That's how you can create, copy, and pick one of the previous materials as a starting point. Another thing that you might want to do is copy materials to multiple objects. And that's pretty simple. Let's say that I created a few more cubes like that. Let's create a few more copies. Now, if I want to copy materials from one of these objects, let's say that I want to copy Suzanne materials to the rest of the objects. I can select all these objects and then select the Suzanne as active selection. Then I can click on this drop down and select Copy Material to Selected. You can see that it copy those materials to all these three objects. Another way to do this would be if I press control Z, Select your object that you want to copy materials from as Active Selection and then press Control else you open the link menu and then select Link Materials. It's going to copy those materials. Let's go and get this red material. That's how you can copy these materials. Okay, now that we know how we can add and remove materials, let's go through some more settings in material, We have a preview, where we can change the type of preview that we want to see, where our material is applied. And then usually I'd like to just preview my material in the three viewports. So I have this collapsed. Then we have, by default we use the shader type which is set to principal BSDFow. This should be able to give you most of the results you need like creating plastic materials, metals in any material that you would use. Normally you'll be able to create them for more complicated materials. You can use what is called the shader editor, and we're going to see that in a second. Here you can see that we have the base color, we can set the base color, or we can click on these icons, and then we can select a different type of image that we want to use here. If you want to use an image from your computer, you would use something like image texture, you can click here and then. You can create a new image and paint inside the blender, or you can op an image from your computer. That's how you do that. Down here you can see we have metallic properties. So we can turn those on and it's going to make our object look more like a metal. Then we have the roughness slider. It allows us to make our object rough or we can make it really smooth in this case is reflecting everything and you can see that there's this dark background, so that reflects off of this monkey head. To preview this better, I would recommend going into the material preview. It's going to give you a bit better result. It's showing this black result because we set our image texture, but there's nothing in there, so we're going to go ahead and remove that. Let's reset this value. An easy way would be to simply have Arcyserup here and press back space. Now that we've removed that color, you can see that here's how we make our object metallic. And then here we have the roughness. We can make it rough or less rough. Down here we have some more properties, like if you want to make it transparent, you can increase this transmission value. But then we have to reduce the metal. It's going to make it look like a glass. And you can see that it's a frosted glass because we have a lot of roughness. As we remove, the roughness become more clear glass. You can also play around with this emission it makes so that your object emits light. It acts as a light. It's often used in roof lights where you want to change a simple plane into look like there is a light. Then you have this can be used in adding an outer coat layer on your paint. Usually used for car cards and those kind of things. These are some of the basic settings for materials in lender. If you want to create more complicated materials, then you would add a new panel like this. Then change the edit type to Shift Editor by default. You can see that here we have our principal BSDF, but you can press Shift A and then we have a lot of different types of materials. This can be a really deep topic in itself, so there can be an entire coast dedicated to creating procedural materials in Plender. We're not going to dive too deep into this, but for example, if I want to quickly create a gradient, I would go with color wrap and then add that and we can drag and plug these into the base color. It's going to give us a gradient. Also, we need to change our emission slider. Let's open that. This BSDF slider, or property, mirrors the settings we have here. It's same as that inside emission. We're going to set this back to zero. Let's also reduce our transmission because we don't want to have a transparent material like that. Now we have this ingredient that we can play around with. So we can click here and we can change the color. Then on the other side we have the black color. We can change that the way it's going to be applied to our object. We can use nodes like texture coordinate node. We can use that. And then we can combine it with something like mapping node. Again, as I said, it can be a bit complicated, but let's go with that. We can link that into the position and we want to use this object slider as you can see here. Now the black color is affecting half of the object. We can change this color to something that may be blue. Blending these two colors together, we can change how it's blending by using this mapping node. The good thing about this is that it's all procedural. So you can very quickly and easily change any of these properties. And change the look of your material in comparison to the materials that you'll create in other programs. And then bring it into the blender. That's how you would use the Sha editor. Finally, before we wrap up here, we have this tab, Cold World. And it allows you to change the image that you'll be using inside your world when you're in the render mode. You can also access that same setting, the same settings by clicking here in the shader editor and selecting world By default, you can see that we have this background that we can click and change. As we change that, you can see how changes that. But we can remove this and we can add an environment map again. Let's type that in here, environment texture. And we can link that into the surface and you can see that it immediately becomes pink. Really good source to get these images is using this website called Poly Heaven. And it's going to give you a lot of these DRI images and you can also get a lot of good textures. Let's click on Browse DRI's. They have a lot of these. And you can download all of these for free. Let's say that I want to get this sunny DRI image here. We have the resolution. Let's go with something low. For now, let's go with two K. You can use DRI or X R bit extension works. Let's go with focus. And that is a little bit better. The size of the image goes up significantly. Let's click on that. Okay, now that I've downloaded that image, we're going to go ahead and open that up. On my desktop, I have folder called DRI and I've downloaded that there, so I'm going to select that and select Open Image. And it's going to bring that in, and you can see it's just like the material preview, but now we're using it in rendering. Now even if we remove these lights that we created in blender, our scene is still going to be lit up by that DRI. You can also change that to color and other things like that, just like we had here. These are some of the basics of setting up materials in blender. 39. Making a wallpaper in blender: Now let me know how blender works. Let's get and create a quick wallpaper for a desktop using some of the tools we lens. So far, we're going to create a quick background using a plan object just like we've seen multiple times. Now let's just extrude and add few look cats like that and share the smooth. Now you can just use any random shapes. But I have and you need some reference. I have an idea. I'm going to create cylindrical disks. Then I'm going to place them or stack them on top of one another and that we'll be able to create this wallpaper. Let's go to add a solidified modifiers. We have some thickness. Reason I like the modifier is that it gives me more control sheet is smooth. Let's open our operators panel and we're going to enable out a smooth. And then let's just go ahead and quickly create more copies. Just shift to duplicate and then just scale up and experiment run. And this is a trial and error process. You play around with settings and stuff until you're happy with it, you just go back and forth, play until you're happy with it. I'll just spend a few minutes. Okay. Now that we have this shape completed, as you can see that I created some UV sphere, scale them down, and I added these shapes. You can do that using this U sphere. Now let's go and add a camera. It should be somewhere. I often forget where that is. Let's go through camera and you shift till that you move our camera. I'm going to just move it back, something like here. Just fine tune and adjust the placement of the camera. Let's add a new window so that we can look through this camera in that window. Let's just turn off all the overlays and then we can enable the rendering mode on this window. It's going to give us a quick look while we work on in this other viewport. Let's enable cycles, GPU compute. For now, we're not going to touch our sample settings. Let's just add some lights under light. I'm going to add an area light. Let's move it up. Scale it up so that we have, so shadows. Let's go for light data and increase the light to something like 8,000 Okay, as you can see on the right, I'm able to quickly see how my scene is thinning up and then I can freely work in this right viewport. Okay, so I'm happy with the shape that I turned out. So let's get and create a few more copies of these lights and then I can place them from a different direction just to give it a side angle light and make some of the darker as more soft Then same thing on the other side. I think I might need two lights for the background. I just need to rotate this light a little bit. I'm going to press Period on my keyboard to open this pivot point and then I'm going to change it to three decursor. You can do the same thing at the top. We've already seen how transform pivot point works. Just like that, a light is now set up. I'm rotating this around the predcursor in the world origin. That makes it a bit easier. Okay. I think I'm happy with the heights training out. Let's go ahead and create a few copies of these lights. I'm going to select it, move it to the back there. Let's just create one more copy. Okay, still rotating around that. I'm going to press period again and go back to the median point transform pivot point. Let's just keep rotating the light and stuff. I think I might need to play around with the light color a little bit because it's too bright. Okay, I'll go and select the light. Go to the light properties area. Let's just make it more of a reddish tone. Then let's go to this other light, and I think I'll go with some more of this cyan color. Okay. Again, as I said, it's a back and forth process because I'm creating an abstract art and I don't have an exact reference to match. It requires going back and forth, tweaking stuff that you don't like and then settling for things that you like. Let's just give it same color tones for the background lights and there's other light. Let's go ahead and select that again. I'm giving it the matching colors that I have on the front. Okay. I think I'm happy. Let's just I had a bit of final tweaks. I'm just moving this down to see if I have a plain background or do we more background where it rolls over. I think I'm happy with the results so far. So let's get and render this a quick render. I'm going to go and enable render to see how it turns out. Okay, I see a bit of problem there. We have our initial sphere that I created as a copy in case I wanted to go back. It's visible in our render. So I need to close out of this render window and fix that. Let's just do that. I'll go ahead and close out of this window. Let's just find that in Outliner and we're going to hide that in our render. Also, I'm going to increase the samples under my render samples. Let's go with something like maybe, let's go with 236. And if we need we can add more. Let's just render this again. Okay, As you can see, I think I'm pretty happy with the results. I'll go out and save this image on my desktop. All right, here's the final image. As you can see, we just spent less than 10 minutes and we created this beautiful wallpaper in three D. Here's what it looks like on my desktop. Now here's a quick exercise for you. If you follow it along with this material and you want to create the same wallpaper, I would give you a bit of challenge. You can see that we have a bit of jagged edges on these plates. Go ahead and spend some time and try and figure out how you can change this to a more rounder object without recreating this whole thing from scratch because it's quite easy to do. You can see that by just spending like 2 minutes, I was able to create this another same wallpaper, same plate, and everything was same. I just moved from this step to this one. This is a challenge for you. 40. Final Project - Base Shape: Welcome to the final project for this course. In this final project, we'll be modeling this beautiful isommetric room in blender. This room will be modeled from scratch. Everything that you see will be modeled by you step by step. Let's go ahead and get started. Let's start by pressing Abarino, Select everything, and then press Delete. This is going to delete everything that we have. Now we can press Shift to open a menu. And then under Mesh we're going to add a cube. Now we're going to press to grab along the Z axis and then 1 meter. This is going to make sure that it's placed exactly above the grid. Now we can tap into edit mode, switch to phase selection mode by pressing three on the keyboard. And we're going to select these three phases. Press X to open the delete menu and select Phases. Now we're going to select this bottom face, and then press button on the keyboard to open the separate menu. And we're going to separate by selection. Now we can tap out of added mode. Now we have these two objects, one for the floor and one for the walls. To add thickness to these objects, we're going to use Solidify Modifier because it's going to give us better control over the thickness and it's going to be non destructive. Let's click on this icon and then add Modifier Generate. We're going to go ahead and add Solidify Modifier. Since we're not modeling against a reference image, what I'd like to do is just play around with this value until I like the result and then I enter an exact amount. If this value is moving too fast, you can hold on shift and then left click and to drag this is going to give you better control over it. Let's go and click on this box. And then we're going to type in negative 0.2 just like that. We have the depth added. If we look from the top, you can see that this extrusion isn't even. We're going to make sure that even thickness is enabled. Now we just need to copy this modifier over to the floor object. To do that, we can select our floor object. Hold on Shift, click on the walls, that's this inactive selection. And then we can press control to open the link data menu and copy modifiers. Now we're going to select our floor object and change the offset so that the extrusion happens on the inside. Now we just need to apply these modifiers so we can select our object and then click on this down pointing arrow and select Apply. Or we can also have a crestor over the modifier and press control A on the keyboard. Now we're going to select our walls and add few more modifiers. Let's go and click on Add Modifier and Regenerate. We're going to add Babble Modifier immediately. You'll notice that it's going to bavel every single edge on this object. That's not something that we want, so we're going to change that now. To change that, we need to change the limit method. Right now it's baveling every that has angle of 30 degrees or more, but we're going to change that to weight. Now if we tap into edit mode A to select everything and then perhaps button to open the side bar, then we have edges data and here we have something called mean bevel weight. We're going to increase this all the way and we're basically telling blender to only beveled edges which has this bevel weight. This way we have finer control over this. Now we can tap out of added mode. And we're going to change some settings here. We're going to increase the number of segments to two and we're going to change amount to 1 meter. Then we're going to add another modifier under generate. We're going to add a subdivision surface modifier. If we look from the side, you can see that this shape is a little bit curved. We're going to fix that by going into the profile for the babble modifier and increasing this all the way. We're going to also increase the levels for the viewport to two. Just like that, we have stylized round looking, more cartoonish walls. And now we can apply these modifiers again to the floor object. So we're going to select it, hold on Shift, click on the walls, and then press control L to open the link menu and then copy modifiers. Then we're going to select the object, tap into edit mode to select everything and then add a babble weight. Now we're going to tap out of edit mode. Select the floor object and select the walls. Right click Shade. Smooth that objects a smooth shade. Now we're going to add a window in this area of the walls. Let's get and select them. Type into edit mode. Control R to add a loop. Cut left click to add it. Then if you move your mouse, you can see that you're able to move it. Right clicking will cancel the movement, but you did add the edge loop. Now if you look at the top, you can see that this is a little bit skewed. That's because it's creating an edge with an average of these two edges, but it's an easy fix. What we can do is we can press S to scale along the Y axis, and then we're going to type in zero and press Enter. Now we're going to go ahead and grab this by pressing along the Y axis, move it to this part of the wall. Then we can baffle this by pressing control B again. I'm going to move my cursor until I'm happy with result. If you look at the bottom status bar, this is the value, the width is currently close to 0.4 We're going to type that in again. You can adjust this if you want to by pressing G two, grab along the y axis. Now we're going to do the same thing for the horizontal edge. Control R and then cursor here. Left click to add, right click to cancel the movement. And then control two, bevel, I'm going to just keep moving this until I'm happy we'll go with something like 0.5 We can make slight adjustments later on if we need to. Now we can press two, grab along z axis to move it up. A little bit like that. Then we're going to add an area for tour in this area control R to add a loop cut. This time we're going to just move slightly and then left click control to pebble. Let's go with 0.25 I would say, yeah, that would be a good value. We're basically creating a stylized room, exact size doesn't really matter. Just eyeball for something that you like. And that would be good. If you make a mistake, that's not a problem. Controls to go a step back and then you can do the same thing again. We can press control B. Let's go with like 0.28 I would say. Then we can press to grab along y axis to just fine tune the positioning a little bit. Then we're going to add one more loop. Cut down here for the door. Finally, we're going to move this part a little down here. And to do that more easily, we can go ahead and switch to selection mode. Or click on this icon, select this edge, orbit the view. Hold on control. And click here. It's going to find the shortest path to that edge. It's going to select all of those, like that two grab along z axis. And we're going to move it down something here. Now we're going to go ahead and create the holes here for the door and window. Let's switch to face selection mode. And we're going to select both faces on both sides. And then control to open the edge menu. And then we're going to bridge edge loops. Now we have a bit of shading issue here because we don't have the babble weight applied. So we can press to select everything and then add babble weight. Then we're going to use same technique for selecting the door frame. Then control to open the bridge menu. Bridge edge loops to select everything and add babble weight. Tap out of that mode to high selecting so far. Okay, now we need to create the door and the window. Let's select the walls. Tap into edit mode, and make sure that you're in the face selection mode. Hold on. Old key and click here. Now make sure that you're clicking here, because if you click here, then it's going to select a different direction of face loop. We're going to click here so that the inner loop is selected. And then we're going to press ship D to duplicate. And then right click to cancel the movement. We did duplicate this, but we cancel the movement, it's snapped back to its original position. If you look down here, it says at and duplicate. We did do that. Now we can press button to open the separate menu. And we're going to separate by selection. Type out of edit mode and then select that new object that we just created. Type into it mode to select everything and then old to open the extruded menu. Now we're going to extrude along, face is normal. We're going to move our concerns outside. You can hold on shift. Actually I made a tiny mistake here. Controls to undo that. I forgot to dissolve these edges. Let's switch to the selection mode and make sure that these two edges are selected. This one and that one over there. And then press X and select Dissolve Edges, because we want a smoother door frame. Now again to select everything and then old to open the extrude menu. Extrude long face is normal and we're going to hold on shifts so that we have more finer control. Now also if you look at the top of the interface, there is an option called even thickness right now, which is set to, what we're going to do is press S key and it's going to enable that. Just like that. We're going to finish that to select everything, then we're going to scale this on the x axis. Tiny bit to scale along x axis. Just move it out of the wall like that to select everything. And then add a Bbl weight. Again, we're going to hold on Earth key and select this inner loop in the phase selection mode. And then we're going to scale this by pressing. While we're doing this, we're going to press shift X to exclude the X axis. Now it's only scaling on Z and Y axis. We're going to fix it until that tiny edge in the corner is fixed. Just like that, we have the door frame. Now we can again select this entire loop. Shift D to duplicate. Right click to cancel the movement to open the separate menu and separate by select tape out of edit mode. And then we're going to select this new object type into edit mode to select everything to fill. And then we're going to select this phase and then orbit the select on the outer face. Now we can press to inset and we're going to inset this to create the outer frame of the door. Then control to add loop cuts, let's increase loop cats to about three. Left click to add and right click to cancel the movement control. B, two level, we can hold on shift key to just fine tune a tiny bit. Then using the phase selection mode, we're going to select all of these phases on both sides. Then we're going to inset them again by pressing and just a tiny inst. Then we're going to press to extrude and right click to cancel the movement. The extrusion did happen if you look in the bottom left corner, but we didn't move that. Instead we're going to scale. Let's press and then X, just to move a tiny bit in like that, to select everything and then add babble weight. Just like that. We have a frame. Now if you want to change this depth, that's pretty simple. You just select these faces on both sides. That then to scale along x axis, just like that. Create a handle for the door. Inside the added mode, we're going to select this phase shift to duplicate. Ightlect to cancel the movement to open separate menu and separate by selection, tap out of it mode. Select the new phase that we just created. Tap into edit mode to select everything, and then we're going to scale it down just a tiny bit. Tap out of edit mode. Grab this along the by axis just to move it slightly. Tap into edit mode. And then we're going to press to extrude and then to extrude again. And then we're going to select this face, and then to extrude, link that to select everything, and then add babble weight. Just like that. We have the door handle created and now let's work on the window. We're going to use very similar, almost the same method, to create the window. Let's tap into Tm. Using the face selection mode, we're going to select this inner loop. Shift to duplicate. Click to cancel the movement to open separate menu. And separate by selection, select the new object that we created. Tap into it to select everything, then open the extrude menu face is along normals and press to enable even thickness, the shift key. And just slightly move it out like that. A to select everything scale along x axis like that and then add babble weight. Finally, select this inner loop. Again, make sure that you click on this inside so that the inner loop is selected. And we're going to fix this corner again to scale shift x to exclude the X axis. We're going to move it until that corner is fixed like that. Then we're going to create a copy of this shift D to duplicate. Right click to cancel the movement. And then we're going to separate by selection. Now we're going to select this new phase type into edit mode to select everything and then to fill. Now we're going to do this a little bit different, this time control R to add a loop cut. And we're going to add a loop cut exactly in the center. Now to select phases on both side, we have to go into a wireframe mode, or what is known as X ray mode. Because if you make a selection like this, then it only selects the parts of the object that are visible. We can either click on this icon here to tuggle the x ray, or we can press L, Z. I'm going to do that. And then switch to vertex selection mode by pressing one on the keyboard. Select vertices on both sides, and then press X and then select the Let vertices. Now we're going to press Old C again, switch to the selection mode. Zoom in a little bit, hold on Old, and click on this edge. It's going to select the entire border around this area and press to fill that. Now to select everything and then add babble weight. Now we're going to create one part of this window, and then we're going to mirror it over to the other side using a modifier That's going to make it a bit easier. Now in the face selection mode, we're going to select both pass. Then we're going to press to Inset to create the outer frame. And now we're going to add a loop cut. Then we're going to bavel these loop cuts. Something like that. And then using the face selection mode, we're going to select these faces on both sides. Now we're going to press to inset, then again to extrude, right click to cancel scale along x axis, to move them inward to select everything. And then I add babble weight. Again, you can increase this depth. I'm going to fine tune that if I need to later on. Then we just need to mirror this over to the other side. I think we should increase the depth, just a tiny bits. I'm going to go ahead and select that. And then scale along the x axis. Okay, not much better. Now, we're going to select the window, right click, and set origin to geometry. Then the origin point is in center of this. Then we're going to select the window frame. And the same thing now we're going to select the window, Go to add modifier, Generate re modifier. Scroll down and then click on this eye dropper icon. And we're going to click on the window frame. Then we're going to enable the Y axis and disabled X axis. Then we just need to create the handle for the window. Tap into edit this phase D to duplicate. Click to cancel the movement to separate, open separate menu. And we're going to separate that by selection. Let's go in and select that object that we just created. We're going to go into the vertex selection mode, Select these two vertices, and then we're going to scale them along z axis in type zero. This is going to fix the screwed angle, scale z and then zero. And press Enter. And now we're going to press A to select everything. Scale it down just a tiny bit. Then we're going to move this along the Y axis. I think I'm going to scale this even more on the Y axis. Like that also scale it a little bit on the Z axis. Now we can press to extrude and then to extrude it again. And then select this outer phase and extrude this to this side to select everything and add pebble weight. If you need to tweak any of that parameters, you can easily do that. We can select these edges to do this more easily. We can go to the side view by pressing one and then enable the x ray mode by pressing LC and then selecting these edges. Or if you want to fix this middle part, you can select that and then grab this along x axis like that. We're going to select everything as a whole. Grab this along x axis to make it bit mode thinner like that. And then we're going to go back into the normal sheeting mode just like that. We have the handles for the window. Finally, we're going to create some tiles down here. We're going to select the floor object. Right click, set origin to geometry so that the origin is in the center. Type into edit mode using fish selection mode. We're going to select this phase shift D to duplicate, right click to cancel, then we're going to separate that. Now select that new object, type into edit mode. Control R to add a loop cut. And we're going to enter ten loop cuts, typing in ten on the keyboard. And press Enter, and then right click to cancel the movement. Now we're going to go ahead and press control B and hold on shift key. And add a tiny bbl like this. And then press X to open the delete menu and select Faces. Now press seven on the Numpad to go to the top view, we're going to add some loop cuts. Control R to add a loop cut. And use more scroll wheel to increase the number of cuts that we are adding. Then we're going to add them. And then right click to cancel the movement. Now we're going to use the same technique over and over again to add more and more loop cuts. We're creating random tiling control R and then add the loop cuts just like that. Then while in the top view we're going to hold on shift key and just make a quick selection over the edge loops that we just added. Just a few more edge loops, then we can just go closer to it control to bevel and hold on shift key. And make sure that it's just a tiny bevel, like that extra open the delete menu and delete the faces. Now we're going to press a to select everything and then to ex, we're going to ext like that and then and press to select everything again. And then add bevel, weight and tap out of that mode. Just like that. We have tiling added into our scene. Also, I'm going to go ahead and scale this a little bit on the x axis, the window itself as to scale along x axis. Just a tiny bit like that. Same thing for this door to actually, we have to set the origin points. Right click. Set origin, origin, deeometry scale along x axis. Like that. W we messed up a little bit of the handle, we need to grab this along the x axis. Same thing for these handles. Right click, set origin, point, deeometry, grab along x axis and move it closer like that. There we have it, that's the base shape completed. We have a window, door, and frame for them, tiles, walls. What I like to do when I reach a point like this, I save my file so that if something unexpected happens, like blender crashes or anything, we can always revert back to this step. We're going to go ahead and save this file, and then we're going to continue. We're going to save this in an incremental way. Go to File menu and then Save. Now I have a folder on my desktop called Final Project. We're going to save it here. You can use any naming convention that's easier for you to remember, but what I'd like to do is type in base shape completed. I can also add a number at the start, so that's going to make it easier for me to remember it's 01 ship completed. And I'm going to save this blender file. Now if anything unexpected happens, I can always go back to that step and start over again instead of starting all the way from scratch. 41. Final Project - Modeling PC Desk: We have the file saved, we can go ahead and continue working. We're going to start adding a computer desk in this area. Let's go ahead and stop with that. Now what I'd like to do is take objects from the previous objects that we have here, because then we don't have to reapply these modifiers. Let's select our wall Tap into edit mode. And then using the face selection mode, we're going to select this face shift to duplicate, click to cancel, and then press P and separate the object. Now we can go a and tap into edit mode with that new object that we just copied. Then we're going to press to select everything. And then we're going to scale this along the y axis to make it smaller. We're creating a drawer. And then in the object mode, we can right click Set Origin pointed geometry. And then we can just move it slightly up like that. We're going to move this on the y axis closer to this part. Tap into edit mode. We're going to move this slightly on the X axis like that. Again, I'm just fine tuning the position. Then we're going to extrude this out. To extrude it out like that, to select everything at Bible weight. Then we're going to select this front face to inset and move this inward so that we have. Now I'm creating a stylized room. I want to make sure everything is cute and rounded. That's why we're adding these really thick edges and stuff. And then we're going to press to extrude. We're going to keep moving it until it disappears there. And we're just going to move it slightly back like that. Left click to finish, to select everything at Bible weight. Now we're going to select that face in the back shift to duplicate. Right click to cancel the movement. And then separate by selection. By now you should have a pretty good idea how we're doing this. Then we're going to grab this along x axis to move it to the front like that, tap into edit more. Then we're going to go ahead and add some loop cuts. Let's add about four loop cuts and we're going to cancel the movement. Now we're going to enable x ray mode to verte selection mode, select these vertices and then we're going to press X and then delete these vertices. Now we're going to turn off the x ray mode to select everything, add babble weight. Then we're going to press to extrude, let's just add an extrusion like this. Again to select everything and add babble weight. Then we're going to add a loop cut in the center like this. And we're going to increase that to two cuts. Left click to finish and then cancel the movement. We're going to do the same thing again. We're going to scale this along the y axis, just like that. Again, if you make a selection from the front, it's only going to select what's visible to you and not the vertices on the back. To make a selection like that, make sure that you're in the X frame mode or wire frame mode. Then we're going to make a selection like that and grab along z axis to select everything at babble weight. Again, we're going to fine tune the shape a little bit until we're happy with the result. Now we're going to grab this along the x axis to move it in like that. Then we're going to add a modifier and regenerate. We're going to add a modifier, scroll down. Then by default it's adding new objects on the X axis, we're going to set that to zero. We're going to enable this onto negative one for the Z axis that is adding towards the bottom. And then we can just increase the number of cuts, a number of copies, just like that. We have this drawer completed now. We can tap into edit mode for the drawer, copy this top face, and then separate that by selection. Tap into edit mode with that new object. We're going to select this edge, grab this along the y axis to move it all the way to that end of the wall like that. Then we're going to select everything to extrude, Add the thickness again. We can fine tune the thickness later on if we need to. Then we're going to select everything and add the babble weight. Okay, then we're going to add an edge loop closer to this part. Select this phase to select everything, and then add weight to add selection mode. And select this edge loop here. And then control to bevel. And we're going to increase the number of cuts. Let's go with 3455 lo cuts. And we're going to make it more under like that. Now we're going to click on this edge loop, so that this part is selected, hold on Shift and Old. And click on this to select both of these, and then increase the Bible weight. Just like that, we have the table top now we need to create two legs for this table. And to do that more easily, let's go to the top view. Shift right click on this area so that the new object is added here. And then we're going to press shift eight to open and add a circle. Let's click on the operators panel and change the site to about eight. That is easier to work with this later on. If we need to add more detail, we can add a subtive modifier. Finally, we can tap into edit mode to select everything and then scale it down. We're going to scale it even further like that now. We can just grab this, a long Z access to move it to the bottom side like that. Now we're going to tap into edit mode to fill this. Then we're going to press to extrude, make sure that you're in the edit mode to fill, and then to extrude. And we're going to move this to the bottom like that and then tap out of edit mode. And then also we can add subdive modifier by pressing control two on the keyboard. And it's going to add a subdivemdifier like that. Then we just need to fix this slightly by adding an edge loop and then leveling that. We're going to decrease the number of cuts. Just like that. Again, we just tweak this slightly. If we need to go into the vertex selection mode, select these vertices and move it slightly upwards like that. Then we're going to go to the top view to create a linked duplicate. And then we're going to move this along the y axis to something like here. Now the reason we did a link duplicate is that if we make change to one of the object, for example, if I start moving this round, you can see how both of those objects are edited. Since these are the same, we can just use a link duplicate. And then for this tile phase, I'm going to select this one. And then move this slightly on the y axis and go into the side view. And then enable x ray mode. And using the vertex selection mode, we're going to select this part like that and then grab this along x axis slightly. If we need to increase the thickness, we can just use phase selection mode to select these phases and then grab this along the x axis, z axis, like that. There we have it, we have the table completed. Let's create a bookshelf in this area. To do that, we're going to select the tile. And then select this tile phase, You have DT duplicate. And then we can separate that by selection. Select that new phase. We're going to scale this along the X axis, it's something like here. Then we're going to scale this along the Y axis slightly. Again, I'm just fine tuning the shape until I'm happy with it. Let's just grab and move it slightly like that. Let's just scale it down slightly. Okay, so we have the shape control ow to add loop cuts. And we're going to add two look cuts. Then we're going to bubble these slightly and then delete the faces. Now we're going to press to select everything, and then extrude to select everything and add babble weight. Okay? And then right click, Sets origin pointed geometry. Then again tap into edit mode. Duplicate this phase and then create. Separate that by selection and then select that new phase. We're going to scale it down along the y axis to make it more square. Then we can just scale it down even more. Okay, now go to the top to grab and move it closer to this part of the object. We can just grab it slightly to the ground like that. Then we can press to extrude and move it up like that to select everything and add pebble weight. I think it's too thick. Let's cut and scale this by pressing S and then shift Z to exclude the Z axis. That's only scaling on two axes. Then we're going to move this slightly up like that. I think I should increase the thickness a little bit to make it more acute. Again, we're going to go to the top. This is some thing that, where you find tune it a little bit so that until it looks better, you just eyeball it. Then we can just set origin points back to geometry so that it's easier to work with these. Then we're going to add a mere modifier to this. Let's go a ungeneratedd a mere modifier. Then for the object, we're going to use these, we're going to enable this on the Y Xs two. Then for this we can add in a ray modifier ungenerate. Let's add in a ray modifier, then we're going to set this x value to zero. And then for z, let's hold down the most and move it up like that and increase the number of copies. And then we can just keep fine tuning this until we're happy with this. We can grab it a little bit like that. Again, I think the size might be a bit, not like the way we like it. So we can just fine tune it if we need to. Later on, it's going to be pretty simple. We just select everything and then we just scale this, excluding the z axis, then we will be able to do it shift z, I'm going to cancel out of it. Because when we create more objects, then we'll be able to determine the size a bit better. I think we can also. A few books on the bookshelf. That's going to be pretty easy. Let's go and tap into edit mode. Select the center face duplicate and separate by selection. And then select that new object. Type into edit mode, select everything. And then we're going to scale it slightly on the y axis like that. And then we're going to extrude it just a tiny bit like that. We have a ray modifier, we're going to go ahead and get rid of that from this new object here to select everything and then add pebble weight. Again, we're going to fine tune the size a little bit until we're happy with it. Now we can go ahead and press forward slash the key next to Shift key on the keyboard. And then we're going to select these three faces. Shift to duplicate, click to cancel, and then separate by select that new object, it isolates our selection and it's easier to work with it. And then we can press that key again. Now we can tap into that new object to select everything extrude a long face is normal to enable even thickness. Let's go with something like that to select everything and add babble weight. I think I'm going to increase the size a little bit. Again, I'm going to go into isolation mode by pressing forward. Then we can to shrink and fatten even thickness chin down. And then we can increase so that it looks a bit better. Then we can end isolation mode. Now we're going to go ahead and select this inner part. And we're going to scale it slightly. Actually click and set origin point to center. And then we can scale it down slightly excluding the Z axis that now with that inner part selected, we're going to click Shift, Click on the outer part and then press control to open the parent menu. And then we're going to parent this. What happens is that now if we select this outer object and move it around, you can see that the inner part is going to move along with it. Now we just need to position this better. Let's R to rotate along x axis. And we're going to press 90 negative, that is 90 degrees above the, something like that. And then we're going to grab this along the z axis, rotate this along axis 90 degrees. And we're going to set origin to geometry again. I'm going to rotate this 180 degrees. We can press to grab shift Z so that it doesn't move on the Z axis and only on the X and Y axis, so that it's easier to move it on the ground like that. And then we can create more copies by pressing shift shift again. We're going to move it closer here. And then we can rotate this a little bit on the Y axis like that. Then we can move it a bit closer up like that. Let's select, oops, we didn't create a copy for the inner part. What we can do for this one, it's easy. We just move it like that. For this one, let's just get rid of this. And then select both of these. Shift, duplicate, grab along the x axis and then rotate along the y axis a little bit. Then we select these books. Shi, da, duplicate along z axis like that. Then here we can rotate this along the Y axis 90 degrees. Then we're going to make sure that these are placed properly like that. And then we just rotate along z axis slightly. And just keep moving it on the ground like that. Let's go ahead and select this book. Rotate this, whoops. This one is still linked to this object, so we're going to press LP to separate and clear the parent. Sops P and select the second option, clear and keep transform. And then we can just repairing this to this new object link that. Then we just select this object and rotate this along the Z axis like that. And then create one more copy and move it up like that. Rotate that again. Again, I forgot that. The inner thing, I didn't know why I keep forgetting that. Let's move it up like that and then we're going to or that like that. I think that's too much. Let's go ahead and get rid of this one. Okay, I think this looks better. And then we can add more objects for decoration up here. We have our table and bookshelf created. Again, I'm going to go ahead and save the file, and then we can continue. 42. Final Project - Modeling Clock, Painting & More: Now that we had the basic completed, and you've seen how we're modeling this so far. Moving on from this point, I will not be seeing out the keyboard shortcuts so that we can model this at a more moderate speed. Also, as you've seen, we're adding these different modifiers and it takes some time to go through this menu and add these modifiers. What I would like you to do is click on Add Modifier, and then add some of these modifiers that we're using over and over again to your favorite menu. And to do that, you simply right click and then you can add the modifier. If I right click here, you can see that it says Add to Quick Favorites. Now I've already added these and you can't reorder these or rearrange these. Add them in order that's easier for you. For example, if I press button on the keyboard, you can see that it opens up my quick favorites. Here I have set origin, array modifier, bevel, mirror, solidify and subdivision. It's really easy to access all of that with one key. We don't have to look for these modifiers in the modifiers menu. With that out of the way, let's start modeling. Will cut and select our walls, tap into edit mode using the face selection mode. We're going to duplicate this and then separate this from the selection. Now with that new object selected, tap into edit mode and select everything. And then we're going to scale it. I'm creating paintings on this area of the wall. We're just going to eyeball the size. And then we're going to grab this, we're going to move it to that part of the wall. I'm going to make it a little small like that, and now we can get a bit closer. We're going to extrude it and then we're going to insert it and then extrude it in words, select everything and then add mean Bbl weight. Now we're going to write click, and set our origin point to geometry. We're going to create a few more copies of this. Move it up slightly like that. Create one more copy and move it down. Let's sect both of these and scale them down just a tiny bit that now we're going to create a clock on this area of the wall. And to do that, it would be easier to add three decor here, Fight, Click to move that there. Then we're going to go ahead and add a circle. Let's change our size to something like ten. Then we're going to rotate this along the y axis, 90 degrees. Tap into edit mode and scale it down something like that. Just ipale the size. You can tweak this if you want to later on. Now we can zoom in here, tap into edit mode to fill this. Now we're going to just extrude it. Actually, I was not in edit mode. Then we can just extrude it slightly and then scale it up. Extrude one more time and scale it up more. Then we can add a subdiv modifier shape it smooth. Then we're going to add one loop cut in this area to preserve a bit of that shape there. Now we can add one more circle. We have sides already set up. We're going to just scale it down. Also, we're going to rotate this 90 degrees on the Y axis, We might need to move this slightly on the X axis, we can scale it down. Let's go to the side view by pressing three on the Numpad and then using the vertex selection mode. We're going to go ahead and select these vertices and move them up on the z axis like that. Select everything, fill the face, and then extrude it out like that. Add a loop cut in the center like that. And then add a subitive modifier and shade is smooth. Now we're going to go ahead and click and set our origin to a geometry. It's going to move that to the center. And then if we go to our tool options under here, we have effects only, and we're going to select origins. Now what's going to happen is that it's going to only move the origin even when we're using the move tool. Now we can go ahead and press G to grab along z axis. And you can see we're changing the origin point. We'll move that down there, and then we can turn it off. Now what happens is that if we go to the side view and then rotate, it's going to be really easy to rotate this, then we just need to create a copy of this. We're going to duplicate that and then enable x ray mode. Tap into edit mode and select some of these top vertices. And then move it down slightly like that. Then we can just rotate this like that. And then we need to move this slightly on the x axis. Now we're going to create some flower pots for this area. Let's shift to move this three decursor back to the world origin. And then we're going to add a circle. Move it up and scale it down. Actually, I'm going to scale it down in the edit more then we're going to fill it up. Now we're going to move to this area. The easiest way would be to enable snapping and set it to fish snapping more. And then we can just grab it and it's going to just stick there on the surface like that. Turn off the snapping again. We just need to tweak the positioning a little bit, then we can scale it down. Then we're just going to ex it up like that. In set. Just a tiny bit like that, Extrude it inwards, and then scale it down slightly. We might need to add some supporting loops. Then we can add acceptive modifier Share. It's smooth. We're going to add face here. If you want to move this face to the side, you can just press G twice and that edge slide. That's going to give you that control more easily. Then we're going to select this centerface. Duplicate that, and separate by selection. Now with that face selected to select that face, we can hide this. Then select that face, old edge to unhide everything. And then shift click on this twice to deselect this. And that's going to leave us with that object selected. Another way to do this is that you can hide this by pressing H and then select this and move it slightly up, and then unhide everything that way. It's going to be a little above the previous place and easier to select. Let's type into edit mode, scale it down like that, and then extrude it out. Add some supporting loops. Switch to x ray mode using the vertex selection mode. Select these top vertices, enable the proportional editing with smooth fall off. And then we're going to start scaling it down. We're going to make sure our fall off circle is to the top site like that. Then we can move it down slightly like that. Now let's create a leaf. We're going to go ahead and add a plan object and then we're going to move it above the ground type into edit mode and scale it down. Let's go to the top view and scale it a little bit on the x axis and then add three loop cuts. Then we just need to modify a shape so that it looks more like a leaf. Just keep changing the shape a little bit like that. Then we're going to add a loop cut in the middle, like that. Select this vertex point and move it slightly on the y axis. Scale it even more. Then we're going to select these two loops and level these and make sure to add one cut between them using the mouse cl wheel like that. Then using the vertex selection mode, move it mode to the end of the face. And same thing here. Then we're going to go and select this inner part. And move it down like that. Let's press control Z. We're going to leave this one and move it like that. Now we're going to press Q to open our Quick Fit menu, Solidify modifier, and change the settings to add bit more depth like that shape this object smooth, and add a level two subdivision. Then we're going to go ahead and apply the solidify modifier and select these spaces. Extrude them out like that, scale it down and then extrude it again. To increase this depth we can go into the Te and select these edge loops in the center. Then we can just move them even more on the axis like that. Now to give it more of a curve shape, we're going to enable proportional editing with a more sharp file of. Then in the verte selected mode we're going to select these two vertices. Let's go to the right view, then we're going to go ahead and grab this on the axis. Actually it's not turned on, so let's make sure you turn it on. And then we can increase the fall off like that. And then we can turn it off. Press period on the Nupato. Zoom in on the leaf. Think it looks good enough. And now we just need to scale it down slightly. I would do it in added mode so that we didn't mess up the scale. And then we can right click, set origin to geometry. Let's go to the top. Move it closer to this area, then we're going to move it up on the axis. Since we're going to need this rotating around this part, let's make it even smaller like that. Whoops. Okay, let's play around with the size a little bit like that. Just adjust so that it's placed like that. Now we need to move this origin point here. And the easiest way would be to tap into edit mode using the x ray mode. Then select these two phases here. Shift as to open this pi menu and then cursor to select it. That's going to move our three cursor to that part of the object. Then to move that origin point, we can go into the object mode and set origin. Into three decursor. That's going to move it there. That's the easiest way to do it. Let's go to the top. We're going to create a copy of this and put it to the side. And then using this one we can create more copies. So DT duplicate. And then we can just rotate that. We're going to do this a few more times, that let's randomize the positioning a little bit. We're going to move it like that, all of these shot duplicate and then rotate, add randomization. Let's move it up even more, scale it down slightly. We're going to randomly scale these so that it looks a bit better. And let's go ahead and add one more batch. Okay, let's look from side view. I think it looks good enough. And now we can, I think we should scale up these leaves a little bit. So let's go ahead and select some of these randomly, and then scale these up. We're going to use this leaf as a reference for creating a particle system. Let's create a pot here. And to do that, let's just take this edge loop. In that mode DT duplicate, and then we're going to select that loop that we just copied. Scale it down, extrude a couple times, then we're going to inset the face. We're basically just extruding and instting face a couple more times like that. And then in the face selection mode, we're going to scale, extrude these along the face is normal. Let's add a supporting look cut there. Now for this one we're going to create this stem part, a little different click to move the three decursorn. Let's add a path from the curve. Then we're going to rotate this on the y access 90 degrees. We're going to scale it down. Let's move it to the top like that, and scale it even more. Now let's go to the right view. Select these points like that, and then grab these to move. And you can see that there's this path and we just need to rotate that and move it down there. We need to select and just keep grabbing and rotating this. Now we can go to the front view to add a bit more randomization. Select some of these points and rotate these. Okay, that's going to give us this path. And then we can use this leaf and place it along it. And to do that, we're going to go ahead and go to this data tab. Enable the geometry and add bit of depth to it. Then select this point in the edit mode, old as to shrink and fatten. Actually, we have to enable the proportional editing so that we can apply it gradually to the curve. Just like that, it's going to give us a bit of thinner end. Now we can create a copy of this and hide it in case we need it. And then we can select the one here. We're going to go and convert it, Convey to Mesh. That's going to give us access to this particle system, to click on this particle, then click on this button here to add any particle system. We're going to change it from image to here and enable advanced options. Then under render, we're going to change it from path to an object. Then for the instance object, we're going to click on this eye dropper icon and select that leaf over there. And that's going to apply it all the way over to the curve. We need to change some settings. First we're going to change this number to something like maybe 100. Let's go a little higher. Let's go with 150. Then under our render settings, we're going to change the scale randomization. And this scior depends on the leaf that we have out there. Let's just increase that a little bit here. We also have the rotation, enable that and expand the settings. And then here we have the randomization for that. Also under velocity, we can change how some of the rotation for the leaf works. We might need to play around with these settings a little bit. We're going to go and randomize it slightly like that. I think it's good. We're going to leave it there. We can hide these reference objects later on. Now, we're just going to keep it there. Just like that. We have some of the props completed at this point. I think we can go ahead and save our file. 43. Final Project - Modeling Monitor, Switch & Keyboard: Going to model a few things for the computer desk. Let's go and zoom in here. We're going to take apart from this wall so that we have the modifiers applied. We're going to duplicate that part and then move it up. Let's set our origin to geometry, and then let's move it like that. Now in that mode, we're going to go ahead and extrude it. Then we're going to set an inset, then using the vertex selection mode, we're going to select this bottom vertex, this one. Then we're going to, actually, we have to turn off the proportional heating. And then we can just move it up to give it a bit of a chin. Select everything, add bubble weight. Then select this face, and add an extrusion. Select everything. Add babble weight for this face. You can just suggest the depth using the scale. On the x axis, you can grab it or scale it. Okay, we're going to enter into isolation mode by pressing the pole with slash key. Select this back face, Duplicate that and then select the face, tap into it mode and scale it down. We're going to add an extrusion like that. Add another extrusion like this bottom face. Now we can add the isolation mode. Eyeball the stand. So we're going to extrude it until we reach that ground part like that. And then add a loop cut. Move it closer to the ground. Select this face and extrude it out. Select everything and add a babble weight. Select the monitor and move it down slightly. And then select the stand. Click on the monitor and press control and parent the object. Then we can scale both of these down slightly and move it down and adjust the placement a little bit. We're going to go ahead and grab it and adjust the placement like that. Let's go ahead and create a keyboard in this area. To do that, we can take a piece from the stand and then separate that. Select that piece and move it on the x axis. Set our origin point to geometry. We might need to clear the parent Alt to open the clear Parent menu and then clear the Parent and keep transform type into edit mode. Select everything and scale it up. We're going to zoom out so that we can eyeball the size and then scale it on the x axis. Now we can add an extrusion like that, Add an inset, and then add an extrusion towards the bottom. Like that, select everything at the pebble weight. Let's go to the front view by pressing one on the numpad. Enable the x ray mode, switch to the vertex selection mode, select these two topics and move the map like that to give it a bit of an angle. Okay, let's take a look. I think the size is a little too big for my liking, so we're going to just make it a bit smaller. Now we're going to select this bottom phase. Duplicate that separate by selection and select that new face tap into edit mode to add a loop cut and type ten look cuts on the keyboard. And we're going to go ahead and add these. Then let's add about four loop cuts on this side. We're going to add a just a tiny bit, let's add a tiny bit pebble with no loop cuts between them like that. And we're going to go ahead and delete these faces. Let's go to the top view and select these edges. We just need to select these edges and then we can add a tiny bit bubble. Let's add a tiny bubble just like the other one. And then get rid of these faces. Select everything and extrude it up like that. Select everything, add bubble weight to it. I'll click anywhere in the empty area to deselect everything. And then to create keys. For example, we need to create 01:00 A.M. big space bar in this area. What we can do is a cursor over the button and press L button. That's going to select Linked. Which means that you can select the parts that are inside an object but are not connected with each other. This is going to make it really easy to go over these buttons and select them, and then we can just delete these vertices. Then we can select this face, and then we can just move it and adjust it to create a bigger button if it's a little too laggy. What you can do for now, you can disable the subdivision surface and then it should be more smoother to work with, then we can enable it afterwards. For this button, I'm just going to go ahead and select it and get rid of it. Select this face and grab it to adjust it a little bit this side face. And make this button a bit tinier. And then move this one out like that. Now we can enable our subtive modifier. Then in the front view, we might need to rotate this just slightly like that and then move it slightly up. Okay, let's just adjust our position a little bit. Places something like that. And then we're going to create a mousepad and a mouse in this area. To do that, we can just take one of the phase from this button and let's just move it on the y axis and set our origin point to geometry. Select everything and scale it up. Then we're going to add an extrusion like that at the pebble weight like this, top face. And scale it just a tiny bit down. And move it on the C axis. And then move it up. Then we're just going to adjust the position like that for the mouse. I think we can add, we can scale it back up and move it down because it's a little too thick. Then for the mouse, we can create that using a plan object, or we can also do that using a circle. Let's add a circle with ten sides and then we're going to scale it down and go to the top. Then in the vertex selection mode, we're going to select these vertices and move them along the x axis like that. Just adjust the position a little bit, fill it, and then move it out like that. And then scale. Just adjust the position a little bit. And then add acceptive modifier shape the object smooth, add a loop cut to keep a shape. And then select some of these front vertices and move them on the x axis slightly. Now that we have the mouse and keyboard created, let's just zoom in here. Shift right click to move our three decursor and add a circle. And then using that mode, we're going to scale it down, fill it up, and extrude it up like that. Then we're going to inset that now if you're moving this by extruding it down, and you can see the inside with Blender 4.0 we have a new feature where you can hold on old key and then middle mouse button. And that's going to let you move your camera even when you're doing something like extrusion now. Can just adjust it and then click to finish it. Now we're going to go ahead and add about five loop cuts. And then we're going to select these two phases to open the edge menu and bridge edge loops. And let's increase the number of cuts. Let's go with about eight loop cuts. Then we're going to add a septive modifier and shade the smooth. Now we just need to add some supporting loop cuts. Let's add about two loop cuts in this area. And then add a single loop cut in this area. One up here for the handle. Then maybe add a single loop cut here. And then we can just level that. Maybe we can also add one down there, one up here. Now we're going to go ahead and create a giving console down there. Let's go and zoom in on this area. Shift right click to move our three decursor, add a plain object, and then in that It mode, we're going to go ahead and scale it down. Scale it even further down like that. Then we're going to shift, click on walls and copy the modifiers. Now with that new object selected, we're going to go ahead and ext it up, select everything, add Bible weight to it. Let's just scale it down on the X axis slightly. Also, let's just show it smooth. Then we can go ahead and select these two edges. Then we're going to go ahead and bavel these with two loop cuts. Let's just create a button in this area. Let's select all three faces and then add an inset. Let's make sure that there is no babble weight applied to these. Then we can add in tiny extrusion like this. Then we're going to go ahead and select this face and duplicate it separate by selection, Tap into edit mode. Select it and then extrude it out and then add the bubble weight to it. I think this is a little too thick. Let's just go to tre mode. Select some of these vertices and move them slightly on the y axis like that. Then we're going to do the same thing for this object. Let's set our origin point to geometry controller, this part of the controller. And add a mirror modifier. Turn off the x axis and use this as the mirror object and set it to Y axis. Let's go and create some buttons in this area and shift Frank. Click on top of this, add a circle with ten sides and then we can just scale it down, fill it up, extrude just a tiny bit like that. Then we can babble it with maybe two loop cuts, and then add a septive modifier and shoot it smooth, and add a supporting loop towards the bottom side like that. Let's move it slightly inwards. Let's go to the top view. We're going to duplicate this button, like both of these buttons, and duplicate them again. Let's click here, add a circle, and then add it mode. We're going to scale it down, fill it up, extrude it out like this. Add a tiny inset. Extrude it out, scale it up, Add, add another extrusion, and then add an inset and then extrusion towards the inside. And scale it down. And then add one more inset. Let's apt modifier smooth. Then we just need to add some supporting loops. Let's add one down there, one towards the top, one in this area. And just kill it down a little bit. A sad one in this area, maybe down here, and a few loop cuts in this area. Now in the extreme mode, let's go to vertic selection modes, like these top vertices and move it down. And I think we can scale it down, select everything and scale it down just a tiny bit. Move it down a little bit. In the top view, we're going to move it like that. Now, at this point, you just need to adjust and add minor tweaks. We're going to select this centerface control plus to add to our selection. And then we can just move it slightly up. We need to grow even more a little bit. Selection to control plus and then just move it out like that. Just fine tune the shape to your liking until you're happy with it. It just takes a little extra time when you're fine tuning these things, let's select all of these buttons. Click on the controller and control and select parent that actually we should have copied this over, but Okay, it's okay. We're going to clear the parents. Let's select all of these shifted to duplicate along the Y axis. Move it there, and then rotate along the Z axis 180 degrees in the top. We just need to adjust the positioning a little bit. Let's just drag it on the X axis, slightly like that. Then we're going to go ahead and clear the parent and keep the transformation. Then with the selected, we're going to select this part. Let's just parent that control P and parent. It's a little messy, but it's not a problem since we're going to parent this to the screen anyways. Let's go ahead and do that. We're going to be moving this using this screen. Now, let's duplicate the screen, separate by selection. And then we're going to rotate this along the Y axis, 90 degrees. Let's move it up like that, add a bit of extrusion and add a bubble weight. We're going to go ahead and add a loop, cut down there. This space extruded out like that, like this face, extrude it up, select everything at the Bbl weight using the X remote. We might need to adjust this slightly like that. Let's just select some of these vertices and move them slightly down. Okay, then we can select the console itself, Rotate along the y axis 90 degrees, move it along the z axis, grab along the X axis, to just position that inside the stand. And maybe we can just select the controller and parent it to the stand. Now we just select it and grab it, let's just place it there. Let's just skill everything up slightly so that it looks a little more cute. Also, I think I'm going to skill up the mousel just a tiny bit. Okay. And I think we can go ahead and save our file now. 44. Final Project - Modeling Chairs: All right, and now we need to create a chair in this area. Now we might need to experiment a little bit because I'm leaning towards gaming cheer and then also some office cheer. But we're going to see how it turns out. Let's press C so that the cursor is centered. And let's add a plane, move it above the ground. And we're going to scale it down. Let's go to the top view. And let's move it closer to this area that we have a little bit better idea on how it's going to turn out. Now tap into edit mode and add a loop cut in the center. And then select these two vertex points and then delete them. We're going to use mirror modifier so that we just model one side and the other one will be taken care of. Let's add a mirror modifier, enable clipping and set Y axis. Now we're going to go ahead and rotate this along the Y axis, 90 degrees. Let's move it up, let's move it up along the axis even more. I think it's a little too thick on the Y axis, so we're going to make it a bit thinner. Now, let's add two Lucas on this side and three Lucas on this side. Now you can also do, what I like to do is call it iterative changes. What I do often is that I create a copy of the object that I'm working with and then I move it out of the way. Now I can start working on this. And if I mess up something or the thing that I'm trying to experiment with doesn't turn out to be good, then I can just take that back. Instead of starting from scratch, we're going to start working on this one. Let's go and add a solidify modifier. And we're going to move it to the back side that is easier to work with these points from the front side. We're going to also add a sceptive modifier. Let's share a smooth. Now we just need to play on with the shape. Let's select these two vitices, Move it to the top. Elect this one, and add bit more roundness. Same thing with this one. We're creating a rounder shape. Whoops. Okay, I accidentally press and go to solid shaping view. Let's select all of these vertex points and move them down since the chair is becoming too long. Let's select these two vertex points, enable our proportional editing. And set our fall off to smooth and move it on the x axis to give it a bit more curve like that. With proportional editing, let's just start tweaking this a little bit. We're going to move this one up slightly like that. Okay, I think I like the shape. And then since we have solidified modifier, the thickness is going to be non destructive. Let's tap into edit mode. In the selection mode, we're going to select this edge control. Click here, so that it selects the shortest path. And we're going to just hold on control and click on some of these vertices a few more times. Then we're going to press Shift to Duplicate and separate that by selection. Now with that new object that we just duplicated, we're going to turn off the viewpoint for the solidified modifier so that we can see it a little bit better. Tap into edit mode, select everything, and add a bit of extrusion. Then we're going to scale it down like that. This basically added that extrusion and now we can enable our solidified modifier and she is smooth. This is going to give us this outer ring. Now we can go to the side view by pressing three on the numpad. We have this object in the way. Let's press H to hide it. Select this sheep in the x ray mode. We can use the vertex selection mode to select some of these vertices here and move them slightly. Let's make sure you turn off the proportional editing, just to round off this area a little bit. Let's move it a little on the x axis that it's easier to work with it. Okay, there we have it. This is one back style. If we go down here, we need to do a bit of organization in this area. We're going to unhide by clicking on this icon for the second piece. Now if you want to create more of a gaming cheer, then what you can do is move these points up a little bit like that. Then we're going to apply the same modifier. Let's add a solidified modifier to the backside like that auptive modifier, then shade it smooth. Now you just need to play around with these vets, let's grab them along the X axis to give it bit of a rounder shape down there. And select these two points, and grab them along the X axis, and then just move them slightly on the y axis like that. To pronounce this crease a little more, you can add a loop cut in this area like that, and it's going to give you a more pronounced cut there. Let's select these two points enable proportional editing and increase the fall off area and give it a bit of a cut like that. Then you can play around with the. Solidify modifier. Now you can see that we have two different backs. This can be used for a gaming chair. For the bottom part, it's going to be mostly same, just minor tweaks, but we're going to move it out of the way for now. And if we need to, we can attach and create two chairs. And then we can hide one and make two renders out of it. One with the office chair, one with the gaming chair. Okay, let's go ahead and add another plane object and we're going to move it up and then we can scale it down. Make sure to turn out this proportional editing, I keep forgetting about it for some reason. Let's go to the top view. And then move this object on the y axis so that it's center on, centered on this. And then we can just scale it down. Let's move it out like that, a little on this bottom side. Then we can go a, add an extrusion, add two loop, cut this way. Two loop cuts this way. And maybe one loop cut to the bottom side like that. And then add a subdive modifier and shade is smooth. Let's go and add a bit more thickness on the Z axis. Enable x ray mode and using the vertex selection mode, select these back vertices, then we can go ahead and move these on the x axis to give it a bit of a shape towards that side. You can select some of these vertices with proportional editing and start adding bumps in those kind of things. A little bit to that. Let's create a copy of this and move it down. Select everything and scale it on the Z axis to create a bottom plate. And we're going to scale it just a tiny bit down. Okay, then we're going to also create this for the gaming cheer, but in just a second, let's create the base first slick here and then add a circle with about ten sides. Let's scale it down, make sure to turn up proportional editing, move it out of the ground and scale it even more. Then we can go ahead and extrude it out like this. Actually, I didn't fill it. Let's fill it first, and then extrude it out again in true out. Insert again and then extrude out one more time. Let's just eyeball, I think this bottom part is a little too big. Let's go into tree mode. Let's just make it a bit tinier, Share a smooth add aceptive modifier. And then we might need to add some controlling loops. Let's just add a few of these controlling loop cuts. Let's add a plan object type into added mode and scale it down. Move it above the ground on the x axis. And we're going to scale it on the Y axis, like that, like these two points. And just grab play on with the scale until you're happy with it. And then we're going to extrude it out like that, like this face and scale it down. Then move it down on the z axis to give it a bit of curve. Also, let's just add a tiny bit curve here. By using this loop cut, let's add acceptive modifier. She is smooth. And then we need to add some supporting loops. Let's babble this loop cut and add a loop cut towards the end there. And maybe one loop cut around this area. Now rotating this around, we can use a technique using the ray modifier that's going to make it much easier. First, we're going to select this base object, tap into edit mode. Let's enter into the isolation mode so that it's easier to select this bottom face. Then we're going to press shift S to open this Pi menu. And then we're going to move curse, select it. That's going to snap our three D cursor to this face. Then we can go ahead and tap out of the edit mode. Right click and set. Actually we have to end the isolation mode. Now we need to select this part of the cheer. And then right click, Set Origin Origin to three decursor. That's going to move the origin point to that three decursor there. And we can then shift a to add menu. Let's add a empty object. This empty object is just going to be used for controlling. Now we can select our cheer and we need to add an array modifier. I'm going to use the Quick menu and add an array modifier. Let's turn off the relative offset. Increase the number of copies to about five. Enable this object offset and expand its settings. Then full object, we're going to use this MT. Now what we can do is select this empty object. For us are to rotate along the axis. And you can see that it's going to give us a very easy way to rotate this. Now the good thing about this is that it's non destructive. If we make change to the cheer, you can see how it's going to apply to all of the parts of the chair. Let's just move this slightly on the X axis like that. It's pretty non destructive this way. At any given time we can rotate this and we can also increase the number of copies using the modifiers. It's going to add more and more. We're going to adjust the scale a little later. Let's go ahead and add a circle. And rotate this along the x axis 90 degrees. And then go to the front view by pressing one on the numpad. And then you can scale it down like that. Let's grab and move it to the side here. Let's select this base part, and this empty. And move it above the ground so that it's easier to see the wheel again, I'm going to go to the front view. Scale it down a little more. We can adjust the origin point when we move object in the edit mode, it just keeps the origin point in the previous locations. That messes up a little bit. Okay, now in that mode, we're going to fill it up, add an extrusion and select everything, and then just align it under this area. Okay, I think I like the shape. Let's add a loop cut and then bavel that. Now in that selection mode, we're going to select these two loop cuts and then bavel them. Now we can extrude these along the faces normal like that. Let's add a sepdive modifier and shape this object smooth. If we want, we can add inset on these two faces. Maybe let's add an extrusion and then scale it along the y axis. Then let's add one more inset so that it can keep its shape. Now we're going to go ahead and click on this face control. Click up here, so that we're selecting the shortest path and control. Click here, duplicate and separate by selection. Then select everything extrude, pass along normals to give it a bit more depth. Then we can add one loop cut here. Select everything scale along the y axis that now if you want, you can add a loop cut here. And that's going to fix this roundness. But I like this, I'm going to keep it. Finally we can select this loop cut at the top and bevel it just a tiny bit. Then we have this face here and that we can extude up. Then let's switch to extra mode and add a supporting loop cut like that. We might need to add one down here. Let's go to select the veal parented to the handle part, and then we're going to go to the top view. Actually, we have to make sure that heel and this top part is selected. That can go to the top view. And then we just need to create more copies of this. Now we can enable X mode so that we can see it more better. And we're going to use linked duplicates. That's going to give us control so that we can change the rotation of the object in the object mode. But at the same time, if we make any change in edit mode, that's going to apply over to all copies. Shift D to copy or create a linked duplicate, and we're going to place it like that. Then again, D, now we can just rotate this if we need to and adjust the positioning a little bit. D again, place it there at random rotation old and place it there at some random rotation. Okay, now we can go ahead and select all of these top parts of the wheels. And select this base part, and then that's going to be connected to that, and then we can parent that together. Now what happens is that if we select this base part and move it around, it should be able to actually have forgot about this empty, So make sure to parent that as well. Now if we select this base part and then move it, you can see everything moves together and we can scale it together. We're going to scale it down a little bit. Let's go ahead and select our chair and its parts. And parent everything to this cushion. And then select this base part. And parent that to the cushion as well. But first, let's adjust the positioning so we can place it. Let's go to the front feature, that is easier. Let's go to the side view and move it along the y axis like that. Okay, I think I'd like the size and everything. We can make minor tweaks if we need to. For the most part is completed, let's select this base part and parent this to the cushion control and parent to the object. Now we can work on the second chair. Let's move it closer to this. I'm going to move it to the very similar area. I think it's a little too small for liking to select and scale just to scale it up just a tiny bit on the y axis like that. Let's go ahead and move it on the X axis back there. Let's go ahead and select this base. And then hold Shift and click on the right bracket. And it's going to select all of the children objects and shift to duplicate. And move it along the x axis like that. Now we're going to go ahead and clear the parents from this top object old and then clear parents and keep transform. Now it soon separate object, let's go in, select both of these and move them out the x axis. Now we're going to create the base parts. Let's go into Shift. Click here and add a plain object. Move it above the ground, like that. Type into edit mode and scale it down. Let's adjust the position a little bit, okay, Move it on the x axis that set the origin to the center of the object. Type into edit mode. Add an extrusion like that. Add subdipmdifier shaded mode, and then add an edge loop like that. Let's add some controlling loop cuts. We're going to babble these and then add a loop cut this way and bubble it as well. Let's add two more loop cuts this way. Let's add two more loop cuts this way. Let's, let's select this area of the object. Duplicate that. And separate from selection, select both cushions. And move them down a little bit. Okay, now with this one, we're going to add a solidified modifier and center the origin point. Move it on the y axis like that. And we're going to play around with the solidified modifier a little bit, move it like that. Now let's go to the front view so that it's easier to work with this. And then using the verte selection mode, we're going to select these top vertices and start moving a little bit up to give it more of a shape that we want to like these and move it slightly on the x axis like that. We might need to move the solidify above the subdivision so that it fixes this sheeting issue that we have here. And let's move it closer to the cushion. Now let's add a mirror modifier and set the cushion as a mirror object. And make sure to enable the y axis and not the x. And then we're going to hide this object and then select this base again. Let's select these faces again and duplicate it. And separate by selection. Now we're going to move it up like that. Let's select everything and scale it on the x axis to make it smaller. And then go back to the side view. Select these two vertex points, enable proportional editing. And move it up to give it more of a curve like that. Move it down center the origin point. Let's add the solidified modifier and move it above the subdivision modifier, then we can play around with the thickness. I think I'm happy with the weight looks. Let's go and select this part. And let us add a mirror modifier so that we don't have to add it again for the y axis and the cushion. Then we're going to select the centerface. Duplicate it, and separate by selection, let's hide it. And select that new object that we created, this bottom edge. And turn off the proportional titing, and then drag it on the z axis like that. Add a loop cut and then babble it so that we have more control over the shape. Now we can go out and press old edge and it's going to unhide everything. Let's move the shape tiny bit down. We might need to change the solidification just a tiny bit. Then move it on the y axis like that, like bit objects and move them on the y axis like that. Again, if you want to change the thickness of this top part, you just need to select these vertices and move them on the z axis, slightly like that. Now you can keep this in one shape, or if you want to, you can add like a loop cut and then move it out. Then if you extrude this part down, it's going to be a little thinner. If we extrude it, you can see it's going to be thinner. But I like the shape, I'm going to control that. Plus period on the path to zoom in on this object. Now you can see that if we extrude it, it's going to have a bit of weird effect. To fix that, we need to apply the solidified modifier. So make sure that you're happy with the thickness. Now you can change it after it, but it's going to be a bit annoying to do that. We're going to apply the solidification and now we can just select this face here and extrude it towards the inside. I'm going to press period again on the nath to recenter that. Let's go to the extra mode and select these points and move them down slightly like that. We're adjusting this and we need to add some supporting look cuts. Finally, we can select this cushion and select these two front vertices enable proportional editing. And move it along the z axis a little bit. Actually, let's select everything and scale it on the z axis tiny bit, so that is a little more thinner, thicker. Actually, let's go and enable x ray mode. Turn off this proportional editing for now. Select some of these vertex points, enable proportional editing. And start moving this on the y axis slightly. To move it inwards, we might need to do same thing on the other side. It's a bit of back and forth process because we're going for this stylized look and we need to tweak some of the shapes and stuff. We can do same thing for this shape, but since it has re modifier we just need to do it for one side and the rest of it will be taken care of. Let's just move it inwards like that. Let's go ahead and select some of these points. We're just basically tweaking the shape a little bit to our liking. Okay. And finally, we're going to select the cushion front part. And maybe select these two points in these two and just start moving them. Moving these to give it a bit of bump on the front side. Let's go and select these two points and move it down a little bit. Maybe add a little bit of bump on the back side here. Now if you want, you can expand the size of this to hide that part on the inside. But I like it the other way. You can also create a basic cover using the same technique if you want to, but I like the look of it so far. Now we have two cheers, and now depending on which one you like more, you can keep that one in your scene. Also, let's just create a quick handle test in this area. So duplicate and separate that by selection. Move it up like that, and we're going to scale it. I don't know why I keep forgetting this. I think I'm going to just extrude it so that I can get a bit better idea on how it's going to look up, select everything and scale it up on the x is just a tiny bit. Then in the extra mode, we're going to select this, enable the proportional editing and give it a bit of curve. Now move it down. Okay, I'm not sure if this is what I want, but I wanted to give it a bit of try. We're going to keep it there anyways. Let's go and add a mirror modifier, that cushion as the mirror object for the y axis. We can decide on if we need these handles or not. Now we have these two chairs, and finally, we need to adjust this a little bit. Let's go ahead and select all of these parts and paring them to the cushion control parent. And then we're going to adjust it from the side view that it just sits on that area. Let's go to the right view, and it's already centered there. We can select the base. And paring that to the cushion. Now just click on this cushion and you can move it around. We're going to, for now, I'm going to move this gaming chair out of the way and put it onto the side area. Grab it on the ground and put it here. Then when we're doing our organization and stuff. And then we can hide and create collections and all of that stuff. Now I usually like to just rename stuff as I'm doing that, But in this case, I wanted to just keep it unorganized so that we can go over how I organize the things. There we have it, we have the chair completed. Actually two chairs completed. Now we can go and sever file. 45. Final Project - Modeling Tablet, Controller, Plants & More: We have the chairs completed, it's time to start adding more items to this room. Let's start by adding a heating system down here. I'm going to select the floor tiles and duplicate this face. And I'm going to go ahead and select it. Then we can scale it along x axis. I have proportional thing turned on. I'm going to make sure that it's turned off and make it a bit thin like this, and then extude it up something like here, and add the pebble weight. I'm going to make it a bit more thinner, a bit shorter. Also, I'm going to make it a bit short on the y axis. We're fine tuning this a little bit, let's just move it to the site here. And then add in a modifier. Let's increase the number of, let's give it a bit more spacing like that and place it around this area. Then we're going to go ahead and select this plant and flower pot. Duplicate that and move it down. An easy way to do this would be to just go to the side view and then pick it up and place it there. I'm using X mode so that I can see through this chair. Just adjust this positioning a little bit more. Then I'm going to select this plant and duplicate it. And then rotate this in random direction a few times. Just rotate this a little bit. Okay, let's rotate this slightly like that. Let's place it down there. Then I'm going to go ahead and select all of these leaves in the entire plant. And I'm going to move it down there as well. Let's go to the front view, and then we're going to make a selection like that. Now we can hold on control and select some of the items that we accidentally selected while making a selection around this. Okay, I think we got everything. Let's shift T duplicate and then again go to the side view and enable Xtra mode. Take it and move it down here. And then go to the front view and move it there. Now we can just scale it up, place it above the ground. And then for this inner part, I think we can just scale it up. Let's enter into isolation model like this bottom face, and move our cursor to the selection, and then set our origin point to that part of the plant. If we scale it up, actually accidentally clicked on geometry. Let's go to three decursor and then scale it up. Just a tiny bit like that. And then select some of these random leaves. Create a copy of it. Move it up there, rotate along the Z axis like that. Select maybe this, create few more copies. And rotate them like that. Okay, now we need to create a plank up here for putting some item on its. Let's create a duplicate of that. We're going to scale it down like that. Then we're going to scale it like that. And then let's just grab it and move it up here. Also center the origin points, that's easier to move it. We're going to move it out like that. Let's add the pebble weight. I'm going to scale it a little bit more. Create a copy of it. Move it down, and then slightly to the Xs. Now let's zoom in here and add some more items. Shift right click to move a three decursor, and then add a plane object. And we're going to scale it down. Let's kill it on the y axis. A tiny bit like that. Extrude it up. Now in edge selection mode, we can hold on control and Lt. And click here. And it's going to select the ring of edges. Then we can go ahead and bavel it. Let's add more cuts so that it's more rounder shape this top face. And move it down so that it's a bit thinner. Finally we can go ahead and add a pebble modifier. Then let's adjust the pebble amount and increase the number of cuts. Then we can shot it smooth. Then finally set like this top face and add an inset, just a tiny inset like that for the screen. Let's create a pencil in this area. Shift right click so that it's above this tablet. And then we can add a circle, change the size to something like ten. Then we can go ahead and scale it down. Fill the circle that we just created, extrude it out, and scale it up a little bit. Then extrude again, and then add another extrusion like that, and just a tiny extrusion for the supporting loop. Now add acceptive modifier and she is smooth. Let's add one more loop, cut here, then we're going to move the entire pencil a little above like that. Let's go ahead and select this bottom face, Add an inset, move it down on the Z axis, add an inset, and move it again on the z axis like that. So we might need to play around with the shape a little bit like that. Let's make this a more pronounced, okay, Then we can just rotate this on the X axis. Let's go with 90 degrees negative. Then Xs, we can just rotate this maybe ten. Let's go with 25. Let's rotate this again. 50. Actually I messed it up. Rotate along the axis 50 and negative. And then we're just going to place it down like there. I think it's a little too thick for my liking. So we're going to go into editing mode like that. Select everything, and then we're going to start scaling it to exclude the z axis. We're going to press shift z twice so that it excludes the local axis of the object and not the global, just like that. You're doing that, You should be able to see it up there. I think it's a little too long. So let's select this. We're going to press to grab, and then if we press X axis, you can see it twice. If you look at the top left corner, when you press these buttons, you can see if we press z twice, it's going to move it along the local z axis. And that's the object axis. Let's select our monitor DT duplicate. And then we're going to move it on the y axis like that over there. Then we might need to unparent this and a P and then clear part keep transformation. And then we're going to rotate this top screen. Rotate this along x axis, 90 degrees negative so that this edge, this bigger side on this side, you can also move it to the other side. It really depends on the look that you're going for. Then we can maybe like everything and scale it just a tiny bit down and then move it down like that. Now we can go ahead and parent to stand again. Now we just need to place it, so we're going to rotate this on the z axis and then we just move it. Let's fine tune it a little bit. Okay, I think I'd like the look of it, so I'm going to keep it there. And let's create a tiny Mac computer, Add a plan object type into edit mode, and scale it down to extrude, Move it up like that, add a septive modifier, shade it smooth, and then I think we can just do it manually. So we're going to remove some of the edge loops. Same thing on this side. I think we can select these two edge loops and then actually scale them on the axis. For the most part, Mac is just like a cube. We don't need to add any other details. Let's also add a gaming controller. Ship right click here. And then add a plane object. Scale it down. Go to the top of you and we're going to scale it on the y axis even more. Then we're going to add a loop cut in the middle. And let's get rid of these vertices. And then we can add a re modifier on the X axis and make sure to enable the clipping. Then we can add a loop cut here. And then select this edge, loop edge. And then we can extrude it on the Y axis like that. I think we might need to move this slightly on the x axis, that let's select this tex point. And we're going to move it on the x axis. Just a tiny bit to this side, select everything and add an extrusion. We're blocking out the shape. Let's maybe add two loop cuts on this side, a supporting loop cut on this area. Maybe two loop cuts around here. Now we can add a subdiv modifier smooth. Let's go ahead and select these faces. Scale them on the axis tiny bit. Move them down on the Z axis a little bit. Let's select this edge and move it up. Also, select this one and move both of these up a little bit like that. Let's select these two vertex points and scale them slightly to give it more of a rounder look. Same thing up here for these two points. Just scale to give it a bit more rounded look. Let's also select these loops. Scale them on the x axis, just a tiny bit. Then we're going to select these two and move them slightly on the y axis like that. Also select these ones. We're just fine tuning the shape so that it looks a bit more rounded. This loop down here, we're going to also move this on the x axis to give it a bit more rounded look. Let's move the entire controller above the floor so that it's easier to work with it. Let's go and select, maybe select this edge and then select this one by control clicking here. And then move it tiny bit down. Let's move this edge a little bit above that. Let's select these two points. And move it out on the y axis, just a tiny bit to give it more rounded look. Then I think we might need to select these points in the middle and move it slightly on the y axis. Whoops. Okay, I messed it up by moving it a little too much, then select these points. And move it up on the Z axis a tiny bit. And then move it on the y axis to give it more rounded look. Okay, let's enable proportional editing and select these points here. Then we can move it on the y axis as we're doing this, let's go to the top you. It's going to be a bit easier there. Let's go and grab it. And we're going to change the fall off, Let's limit it to the Y axis. Let's select the entire model and do not proportional editing, scale it on the y axis to make it a bit smaller again. Okay, there's a bit of bulk here. We might need to separate this angle a little bit on the x axis. Okay, I think it looks good for now. If we need, we can add more details later. Let's create some controlling points at the top shift, right click, and add a circle with ten sides for the circle. We're going to scale it down, fill it up. Let's extrude it up. We're going to move it in like that. And let's add an inset, extrude it out, scale it up again, add another extrusion, and then add an inset. Extrude it inwards, add an inset, let's add a sepdive modifier. And then we're going to add some supporting loops there. One up here, and then one loop here. And then we can just pavel it with no segments. Let's click on this to select the entire loop. Control plus to add to our selection. If we press control minus and plus, you can see we're just selecting that loop. And then we can scale it down inwards a little bit. Move it up on the axis To reduce that a little bit. Then we're going to add one more loop, cut here and make it more thinner. Then also, let's just move it down slightly like that. Let's move it on the y axis, the tiny bit, a tiny bit on the Z axis like that to duplicate along the x axis and put it here for the buttons. We're going to shift rightly here and add a circle, make it small, that fill it extrude. Then we're going to go ahead and bubble it with one loop, I think in between. And at deceptive modifier, let's add a supporting loop down there. Move it inwards, go back to the top view, and so DT duplicate, put it here. And then so DT duplicate again. Then we're going to shift, right click here at a plane object and scale it down like that. Now we're going to go ahead and add two loop cuts this way and two loop cuts this way. Now we can go and select these faces and delete them. Select everything, and then extrude it up. Add a sebdivemdifier. Then we just need to add some controlling loops. Let's add one there, one close here. We're basically adding few loop controlling loop cuts so that we can keep this plus shape. Let's shape smooth everything we might need to select this entire edge loop and babble it with no segments. Then finally, if you want, you can select this inner part. And then let's go to the top and enable x ray mode. Using the vertex selection mode, we can go ahead and select this entire inner part and enable proportional editing. Now we can go ahead and grab it on the Z axis to give it, let's select everything and move it up. Now with that selection, we can give it a bit of shape like this. Let's move it down. We're going to grab it slightly to this side. Let's just also create a button in this area. We're going to go ahead and add a Inst like this and turn off the proportional editing. Let's scale it up on the x axis a little bit, local x. We're going to scale it up a little bit again, and then we can extrude it out like that. And then add a loop cut here for supporting. Now we can go ahead and add a loop cut here to give it a bit more shape like that. But I think I'm okay with the shape. If you want, you can add more detail to it and play around with the shape, But I'm okay with the shape. I like it. I'm going to select everything and select the control the body, and then parent everything together. It's a little too small to make it more rounded and cute. I'm going to scale up. Okay, there we have it. There's the controller. Maybe we can now go ahead and select this keyboard and this controller. Let's select this controller and the shift bracket to select all of its children. That's going to make sure everything is selected. Then we can select the keyboard on both parts of the keyboard shift to duplicate. Then we're going to go ahead and move them on the x axis like that, grab them on the z axis, Just place it closer to this rack area. Then same thing for this keyboard. Now we can rotate this 90 degrees negative. Let's also rotate this 50 degrees. Let's just make sure that it's placed properly up there. And then again, I'm going to move it slightly on the y axis like that. Again, I'm going to select controller and shift right bracket to select the controller churn. Then we can create one more copy of this keyboard. Shift D, move it on the Z axis and X axis like that. If you want you can add more props to this rack area and maybe move some of the plants up there. But I think I'm happy with how it is right now. Also, we're going to select this tablet and add a bit of rotation to it so that it looks better. Place it here. Also, I'm going to scale up this console a little bit. Just fine tuning this, I think. I'm going to also scale up this stand a little bit on the Y axis. Same thing here. I'm going to scale this and then if I press Y twice, it's going to make sure that it's on the local y axis. There we go. I think we've completed the modeling phase. Now, if you want to add some wires for the keyboard and mouse, that's pretty simple. You just add a Bezier curve, just like we did with these plants, and then you just move those controlling points. One mode thing that you can do is that if you go to the tape, let's shift right click here and then you can add as path or curve, it doesn't really matter. And then tap into edit mode and delete all of the vertices. Now on the toolbar, you can select this drawing tool and then you can simply draw the wire. Now it's going to make it really easy. Now if you look down there, we have that point that we just made. Then under the properties, you can go ahead and add a bit of thickness just like that, you'll have wires. You can also now from this point on, start editing it again, you can select these points and start moving them down, maybe adding more extrusions. By pressing and moving it more towards the bottom side. You can do the same thing for the mouse if you want to, or you can just simply duplicate this and move it on the y axis. Then select some of these points and move them on the ground. Finally, this point here, Let's go ahead and move it on the ground. Add bit of rotation to it, like this point here, a bit of rotation, just like that. You can see we have some cables and wires on the desk. I think it's going to make it look a little bit better. There we have it. Now let's go ahead and save file, and then we can move on to organizing and setting up everything properly. 46. Final Project - Organizing Scene: That we've completed modeling, it's time to organize a scene so that we can easily tell where everything is and we can easily hide and show certain parts of the room. We're going to create a lot of collection, rename a lot of the items and stuff. Also, I created this tiny light, if you want to create it is just a circle. Extrude it, and then if I tap into it, it you can see that I inserted this a little bit and then extruded it down. It's going to give you a bit of exercise to do it on your own. Then I also rotated this controller a tiny bit. Now we can go ahead and start organizing this stuff. Right now you can see we have this collection and everything is inside this collection. Now an easy way to organize this is to just simply select our objects in the three D Viewpoard and then start adding names by pressing two on the keyboard. And you can see we can type in the name here. We can also move them to a new collection. We can put like one collection for the furniture, for all of the stuff on the computer top and those things. That's going to make it easier. Let's start with our room itself. We're going to select the floor and then the tiles and the walls. Let's also select our window frame, window, window handle, and all of these items. If we press to grab and start moving it around, I think we got everything right. Click to cancel the movement. Now we can press M on the keyboard, and it's going to say Move to Collection. And we can click on New Collection. Let's type in a Room. And then we can press Enter. And that's going to move all of those objects into this new room collection. And these are all the objects. Now let's start with renaming. So we're going to select our walls, press two, and we can type in walls. Then we're going to select this window, window. Then we can select the window frame. And let's type in window underscore frame. Then for the window, we're going to go ahead and select these handles. We can also rename these windows handle. Then we're going to select the handle. And let's select the window, that's the selective element. And then we're going to parent it. Now if we look down here, here's our window. And then here's the window handle. If we move the window, it's going to move the handle along with it. And then here we have the frame. Let's do the same thing with the door. So we're going to type in the door frame. Then here we have the door handle. So we're going to type in handle. Then again, we're going to select the door as an active element and then parent it to that. I'm going to press control S, I think I accidentally selected something else. Let's go ahead and select, actually the pivot point is origin point is here that we're going to center that to the geometry and then we can parent that again. Okay, then we have two more things. This is going to be the tiles and then we're going to select the floor and rename this two floor. Just like that, we have a room completed now we can hide it. Also, there are some filters up here. If we enable this filter, then we can make it unselectible that we don't accidentally select it. We can show and hide that very easily by clicking on this icon. Next, we're going to go ahead and put all of this furniture into a new collection. We're going to go ahead and select our computer drawer and this tabletop. Select these two legs for the table. Let's also select this bookshelf. Okay, maybe also put this heating system in there. Then I think we can make one more collection for the props that we have, the books and everything else can go into that. Again, I'm going to press to grab and try moving that and make sure that I got everything, then cancel the movement. And I'm going to press M and New Collection and we can type in furniture. Now we can start renaming these. I'm going to type in heating system. Then we're going to go ahead and do we have this parent together? Let's open it up. No, we're going to go and select the bookshelf, and we can go ahead and parent these together. And then we can select the outer part and rename this to bookshelf. For this, we can rename it to just rename them to something that you can easily remember. As long as you can remember it, I think that's going to be fine. Let's rename this to Tabletop. Then I'm going to clear any parenting that I did before. Then you can re parent everything together. I'm going to select all of these P and then clear parent and transforms. Now we can start renaming these. First I'm going to select this outer frame and parent this to the drawer. Then we're going to select these table legs. I think we can parent these to the tabletop. That then we can also parent this drawer to the tabletop as well. Now everything is inside this tabletop, and then here we have table leg. And then we can type in left. And then for the other one, we're going to do the same thing, table leg, and then right. Then here we have the drawer finally, for this front part, I'm going to type in drawer front. Now we have the second collection completed. And we can easily make it unselectable or we can hide it. I think we can make the cheers into a different collection that we have separate control over it. Okay, let's start selecting some of these objects here, and then we have the MT for controlling the rotation. We're going to select all of these. Okay, let's start moving it. I'm going to turn off the snapping. I have that turned on. Okay. I think I got everything. I'm going to move that to a new collection called As. I think we can also move this one. But first let's just go over this so we can parent everything properly. Let's go ahead and select everything in this collection. And then shift right bracket to select all the children. I think unparent everything so that we can re parent everything more properly. We're going to go ahead and wheels to this base point. I'm going to also select this empty and parent all of these items to this object. Then I'm going to parent this to the cushion. Then we can also select the rest of these objects. Parent them to the cushion as well. Here we have the chair. Let's go ahead and rename that. Then here we have the chair arms, and then we have the chair back frame. Okay, this is going to be the chair itself. And then down here we have the chair base. I'm going to type it. Chair cylinder, and then maybe chairs, legs. I think I'm going to leave the rest of it. I don't need to rename each wheel because it's going to take more time. And I don't need to do it because my chair is already organized and I can quickly hide it if I need to. Then I think we can do the same thing with this chair, since it's out here. We can just quick select everything and then unparent. Okay, that is also completed. Let's go and rename some of these plants and things. I'll go to the front view and then make a box selection like this to select all of these plants. Whoops. Okay, let's do that again. Then deselect some of these objects by control dragging over these, that should give me access to this plant. I'm going to deselect this base part of the flower, and then I'm going to shift, click here to make it an active selection. And then I'm going to parent all of these leaves to this stem. And then I'm going to parent that to the pot. We can easily move it around For the leave, I'm not going to rename every single one, but for this flower pot, we can just rename it to pot. Let's go with big, I guess, and We can do same thing for that one up there. Then we can also do same thing for these ones small. And then we can do the same thing for these ones up here. We're going to go and select this and that, and then we're going to patent these together. Let's rename it to flower pot Small. And then we can type in two, we can move it around. I'm going to hide it temporarily, and here I have the reference. I'm going to move it to a new collection and create any reference collection that is there. And then I can hide the visibility and make it unselectible as well. And then we're going to do the same thing for this leaf. We're going to move it to this reference. We can also rename it to leaf reference. Make this entire collection unselectible and hide it. Let's go ahead and select this entire thing. Since we already have that unselectable our room, we're not going to accidentally select it anyway. Then again, we can de select the base pot and select this stem as an active selection. Parent everything together and then parent that to the pot itself. Then here we have some books. Again, I'm going to select all of these books. Parent these, I'm just clearing the parents and then I'm going to do it again. Let's go ahead and select this book and parent it together. Same thing here then. I don't know if I should put this what? Let's just put everything into its own collection. We're going to go ahead and make a quick selection like this. Then we can move it to a new collection called Books. Then I think we can just go for renaming these two book 123 and so on. So we're going to just start at the top. There we go. Now we can easily hide the books if we need to. Most of the items are now completed. I think I should also like move these plans and I'm going to go ahead and select these plans. Add all of these to the selection. Same thing for this one shift. Right click, right bracket to select the children. Then I think we can move it into its own collection. Move it into flowers, or let's go with plants. Finally, we can reorganize some of this stuff on the computer desk. We have everything organized as you can see. We have a lot of these different collections and we can very easily go through these. Now you can see the first collection contains all of our decoration items on the computer desk, paintings and bookshelves and stuff. And then we have the room itself. Then we have the furniture, and then we have the chairs. Then we also have one for the books. Finally one for the plants. I'm going to go ahead and save my file now. 47. Final Project - Adding Materials: Now that we've completed modeling, it's time to start adding lights and materials to make this soon look amazing. Let's start by hiding our sidebar panel and then we're going to head over to our render settings. And then for render engine, we're going to be using cycles. And then for device I'm going to be using my graphics card, but you can use either. Now that we have our render settings set up, we can either click on this icon at the top, or we can press Z and then select Rendered. This is going to start rendering immediately. You'll notice everything turns dark. That's because we have no lights in the scene. We're going to press Shift C to center our three D cursor. Then we're going to add an area light. Let's see, we can add Menu and then add an area light. Now we're going to move it along the Z axis. Then we're going to scale it up so that we have softer shadows. Then under our light settings, we're going to increase the power. Now we have some lights in our scene, and it's time to start adding materials. Now this keyboard is floating up, so I'm going to just try and move it just a tiny bit down. We can start adding material from this keyboard. We're going to select the keyboard ahead of the two materials tab Here we can add new slots. By default, we're going to click on this new to create a new material. This material is going to be automatically applied to our entire object since it's the first in order. And then we can type in a name like keyboard in. Now to add additional materials, we just click on this plus icon to add a slot. And then we can either create a new material or pick one from our existing materials. In this case, we need a new material. And then we're going to rename this two keyboard accent. We're going to change it to something like this, blue color. Finally, we're going to add one more slot and create a new material, and this is going to be keyboard escape. Now you can use a different naming convention. Just use something that's easier for you to remember. We're going to make it red color. Now this fast material is automatically applied to our entire object. But if we want to apply these other materials, we have to tell Blender where we want these materials. We're going to tap into edit mode using the face selection mode. We can, however, recur serve over these buttons and then use link selection by pressing L. This is going to allow us to select these buttons very easily. Then with this material selected, we can click a sign and it's going to be applied. Then we're going to left click here to de select previous selection. Then press L again to make a selection. And then select this red material and apply. Just like that, we have the material applied. And then we're going to select the outer part of the keyboard. And we're going to use that existing keyboard accent. We're not going to create a new one for it, just like that. We have the material applied also. I'm going to apply the material to some of these inside buttons. I'm going to go ahead and select, make a selection around these buttons. And then I'm going to use my accent color there. Now we're going to use the same process for these two keyboards because there's a minor change that I'd like to go over. We're going to zoom in here on this keyboard, for our keyboard main, we're going to use the same material and then we're going to add a new slot. We're going to use our keyboard accent. And finally, one more slot. And we're going to use the keyboard K. We're using our existing materials. It's time to assign them again, using the same technique. We're going to go ahead and make a selection around these buttons and then apply our accent color. And then the same thing with this escape. Let's select our outer frame and assign our keyboard accent. Now you can see that both keyboards have same material, but if we change the material that we assign, since it's using the same material, it's going to apply across both objects. That's not something that we want. We're going to control Z that now. If we want to use settings from our previous materials, just like here, then we can create a copy of this existing material. Since we already selected that, all we have to do is just click on this icon, and you can see it says Keyboard as 001. Now it's a different material than the one that we initially created. Now we can just simply go ahead and add the color. Then for the keyboard, we're going to change that to the accent color. Just link that. Now we can use the technique for coloring this second keyboard. Now before we move on to that, I'd like to go over coloring multiple objects. In this case, you can see that each individual leaf is a separate object to apply same material over and over again. That's going to be a bit annoying. We're going to go over that first. I'm going to enable the selection for some of these collections at the top. Now if we go back to, you can go to this material preview to make it a bit easier to work with since it doesn't need a rendering. If we select one of the leaf and then create a new material for it, and we're going to change roughness to about 0.8 let's give it a green color, reduce the brightness a little bit. Now that we have this material, if we want to apply to across all of these objects, it's going to be pretty simple. We're going to select the stem since it's the parent object. And then we're going to press Shift right bracket to select all the children. Then we're going to shift click on this leaf which has the material. Whichever object you want to copy the materials from, you have to make sure it's an active selection. And then you can press control L, and then you can link the materials, or you can also just click on this button and select Copy Material to Selected. Just like that. We have that for the bottom object. We're going to create a new material. Called floor part. Then we're going to create one more material, this is going to be for the dirt, and we're going to add roughness so that there's reflection. And then we're going to tap into edit mode using the face selection mode. We're going to select this interface to look at it better enable the Xray mode. There's the interface and we can press a control plus to add to a selection so that we can select both parts like that. And then we're going to turn off the X ray mode and select the dirt material as sign. Now we can play on with the material now using the very same technique we're going to apply to the other objects. I'm going to go ahead and select these stems. And then select one of this object. And then copy the material over. Now the Leaf Sound material, because we're using a particle system, we need to add material to the reference object. We're going to go ahead and copy the material again. Select the parent object, use the shift right bracket and then copy the materials over. For the pot object, we're just going to type in flower pot for the main material and then for the dirt we're going to use just like that. Then again, using the face selection mode, we can use gross selection option and then assign the material. Then I'm going to use the same technique for rest of these objects. From here I'll go over and speed through this because I want you to do it yourself so that the room that you make looks completely unique and different. Because you'll have the exercise and fun challenge to go over this since you already know how it's going to work. Okay, so for this Nintendo Switch, adding materials are going to be a little bit different. We need to apply these modifiers because right now it's a single object and I want to apply materials to both parts of this object. Since it's a combined object, you can see I have to apply these modifiers to make each part individual God, and press control A to apply all these. Now you can see that these are two separate parts. And then using the link selection, I will be able to apply this material. Let's add a new material slot. We can type in the name for this one. Let's go ahead and add the second material. We're going to go ahead and copy this material name and paste it. Here we have the same material and we're going to create a copy of that. Let's change our name to right this second material and the first one you can see, let's go and change the colors first. And it's going to apply on the page size of the console. And then we can change the second material color, tap into edit mode and we can use L to link, select, select the second material and assign it. Just like that, we have two separate colors for this console. All right, so we're almost done with the adding materials. You can see that I've added almost all of the materials. Let's go and make one for walls and then I'm going to click on the color. I am going with this blue color. Let's go with this ocean color. All right, also let's just add some base below the room so that it looks better when we render out our images. Let's add a simple plain object, and then we can just scale it up that we might need to make some minor adjustments here. Just like that. Okay, let's just take a look at how it's looking so far. Not bad. Now to add these painting materials, you can click on this color box, select open, and then select the image from your computer. Once you have the image applied, you can see that we need to assign it in edit mode. I'm going to assign this painting material to this one phase of this object. Now we can go ahead and switch to UV editing because we need to make some minor adjustment here. Let's just zoom in real quick onto this painting. I think we can just use scroll wheel to scroll and then go to Material Preview so that we can see it in our Viewport. To be able to use this texture properly, we need to press to open Unwrap menu and Smart UV Project, and then select Ok. You can see that on the left side we've got this plan at the top, we have few modes here. Let's go to phase selection mode. There's line selection mode, it's going to give you a similar effect. Then we can select edges or vertices, in this case, I'm going to go with phase selection. Then we can use the standard controls like to grab or to rotate, and we can also scale it. Let's rotate this 180 degrees on the right side. You can see that. I can see how it's raining out on that side to grab and move it. Align it there as to scale. Let's just align it there. Just like that. We have painting now let's use that same technique for adding material or this painting material to second painting. Let's go and select Material Tab. Click on the new slot, New Material, and then let's type in the name. Now for the base color, we're just going to click on this button image texture, then click button, select the texture from our computer. With that texture loaded, let's go ahead and tap into edit mode. Select that face and assign this new painting material. Now we need to unwrap it. Let's go back into edit mode. We have this face, but it's not proper. Let's press you smart project, okay, and we got that face. Let's just adjust this arch, rotate 180 degrees to scale. And then we can just move it slightly and adjust it until we're happy. Just like that, we have this applied. Let's repeat the same process for the final painting. Okay, there we have it, all the paintings and everything added. Now from here, we can just change colors and render this scene in a lot of different styles. It's going to be really easy once we apply these materials. Also, I'm going to go ahead and move this chair to a new collection. So I'm going to select using the same children's selection technique. Let's go ahead and move this into a new gaming chair collection that I can hide it in the final render more easily. Just like that, we can hide the chair and we have our materials added. 48. Final Project - Rendering: That we have materials and colors added to our scene, it's time to set up our camera and render up the scene. Now this is thing that you have to tweak and change until you like the final scene, we'll set up camera and see how rendering works. And then you can go ahead and spend some time and change the material colors and stuff. And I'm going to do the same thing. All right, so let's go and strike adding stuff. So we're going to go ahead and press Shift to open the Add menu. Add a camera. Let's press zero on the Numpad. And then press Shift Till, so that we can move the camera. And let's just move it out like that. Now if you want to render the final images for your computer desktop, then this default resolution might work good for you, but I'm going to change that. Let's go to our output settings, and in a resolution I'm going to go ahead and change this to 108 x 1080. Because I want more of a square resolution for the final image for the FPS. I think 24 is going to do fine. Let's just change a few more camera settings. Let's go to our camera settings. Here we have this perspective. It displays a scene in three D and it has this depth. But if we change this to orthographic view, then you can see that removes that