Animated Textures in Procreate | Tips & Tricks for Adding Motion to Texture | Tracey Capone | Skillshare
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Animated Textures in Procreate | Tips & Tricks for Adding Motion to Texture

teacher avatar Tracey Capone, Illustrator, Photographer & Designer

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Welcome to Class!

      2:38

    • 2.

      The Class Project

      0:39

    • 3.

      Downloads & Resources

      1:15

    • 4.

      Creating & Adjusting Textures in Procreate

      8:56

    • 5.

      A Simple Texture Animation

      10:19

    • 6.

      Animating a Textured Background

      8:16

    • 7.

      Animating Texture with Masks

      12:16

    • 8.

      Complex Animations Pt 1: Setting up the Canvas

      3:59

    • 9.

      Complex Animations Pt 2: Texture Plan

      6:38

    • 10.

      Complex Animations Pt 3 Adding Texture (Animated Texture in Procreate)

      5:34

    • 11.

      Complex Illustration Pt 4 Grouping and Animating Layers (Animated Texture in Procreate)

      7:12

    • 12.

      Export Options

      4:26

    • 13.

      Final Thoughts

      1:33

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About This Class

In this class, by artist and Top Teacher Tracey Capone, you'll learn tips and tricks for animating textures right on your iPad, using Procreate. These textures can be used to create fun, textured GIFs, as well as textured animations for your website, social media and more. 

Hi everyone! Welcome to class.

I am so excited to share tips and tricks for how to create animated textures on your iPad, using Procreate. If you know me, and my work, you know I have a deep love of textures, and being able to animate the textures I've created, has allowed me to create one of a kind GIF stickers, and animations for my classes, website and social media. Together, in class, we'll walk step by step, together through how to animate your own favorite textures in Procreate.

  • How to pull in, or create, texture in Procreate 
  • How to tweak textures using Procreate's built in Adjustment Tools
  • How to create a frame by frame texture animation on a single shape
  • The ins and outs of creating an animated background in Procreate
  • How to add multiple textures to a single object using masks
  • Best practices for grouping layers when adding and animating multiple textures within a complex illustration.

The best part? What you learn in this class can be applied to just about any object you animate in Procreate, not just textures!

  • a set of 14 seamless handmade paper and ink textures I created from analog texture sources
  • the flat files I will be animating in class. (you're welcome to follow along using these, or your own!)

The class downloads can be found in the Projects and Resources section of class. You will need to access them through a browser and not through the Skillshare app. The password to access the downloads will be shared in the Downloads & Resources section of class.

Hi there! I'm Tracey. I'm an illustrator, photographer and Top Teacher here on Skillshare, located in the Chicagoland area. You can find my full Skillshare profile, including all of my classes, here. I've been a full time artist for over a decade, after leaving the corporate world behind in 2011. My work can be found online, and in select stores around the country.

In my daily work, I use both iPad and desktop apps from the Affinity Suite, Adobe, and Procreate and love being able to share my knowledge of those apps, here on Skillshare, as well as in short form tutorials that complement those classes, here on YouTube.

To say I love texture is putting it mildly. I have been texture in my work, both photography and illustration, for many years and, over those years have created thousands of my own textures from analog sources I create in my studio. When used with intention, I think texture can not only add depth and dimension, it can help guide the viewers eye and tell a story. I love being able to animate my textures using apps like Procreate, and can't wait to share my tips and tricks with you.

If you have any questions about the class, or would like feedback on your project, please feel free to let me know in the Discussion section of class, or by emailing me at hello@traceycapone.com.

I look forward to seeing you in class!

Music Credit: "Let Your Light Shine," by the David Roy Collective on artlist.io.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Tracey Capone

Illustrator, Photographer & Designer

Top Teacher

Hello and welcome to my Skillshare channel! I'm so happy you're here!

My name is Tracey. I'm an illustrator, photographer, teacher and self-proclaimed digital art nerd who loves all the apps, and sharing everything I know. Being able to help students understand more complex applications, like Affinity Designer, and hearing about that moment of clarity when everything came together for them is truly satisfying.

not just the how, but also the why... I believe understanding why I take certain approaches, or use particular tools, will help you absorb what you learn and better prepare you to work on your own later. to embrace the perfectly imperfect... in my mind, it's the best way to develop that sometimes elusive creative voice!

and finally... See full profile

Level: Beginner

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Transcripts

1. Welcome to Class!: [MUSIC] My love of texture is deep and it's real. When used with intention, texture can take flat illustrations to new depths adding beautiful dimension. Now with animation features and apps like Procreate, you can take those textures even further with motion right on your iPad. Hi everyone. I'm Tracey Capone. I'm an illustrator, photographer, and top teacher here on Skillshare. Together in class, we're going to animate texture in Procreate. All the basic concepts of frame-by-frame animation in Procreate are the same regardless of what you're animating. In this class, we're going to take some approaches to our animations that quite literally push Procreate's boundaries and take a little planning and consideration when setting up the animations. We'll walk step-by-step through all of those together in class. I've created thousands of textures over the course of my career and while I'm not a motion designer by trade, being able to animate those textures has allowed me to create fun textured gifts stickers, as well as textured animations for my classes, social media, and illustrations. I'm going to share all my tips and tricks on how to create your own animated textures using Procreate. We'll start by looking at the various ways to add texture, as well as how to use Procreate's adjustment tools when they need a bit of a boost. Next, we'll create a simple animation using a single texture on a single shape, which is the building block for all other animations. Then we'll take that animation a bit further by creating an animated background, which is one of those boundary-pushing scenarios I mentioned previously. We'll move on to animating multiple textures and blending them seamlessly using masks. Finally, I'll walk you through a more complex multi-layered animation and show you how I plan out and set up my animations using all the principles we covered in class. The best part? What you learn in class can be applied to just about any object you animate and Procreate, not just textures. When you join this class, you'll receive a set of handmade textures I've created, as well as the flat illustrations I'll be animating. You're welcome to follow along using those or create your own. Now, this class is beginner friendly, but it does assume some familiarity with Procreate. If you're brand new to the app, I recommend starting with any of the amazing beginner Procreate classes you'll find here on Skillshare. Are you ready to push the boundaries of Procreate's animation feature? Do you want to add a little movement to your favorite textures? If so, grab your iPad, come join me in class, and let's get started. 2. The Class Project: [MUSIC] The project for this class is to create your own animated texture illustrations using the methods we cover in class. Save your animations in GIF format and upload them to the projects and resources page on the browser version of the class. I'd love to see what you create plus sharing your project and leaving a review, not only help others see what they'll learn when they take the class, it also helps more students find the class. Next up, we'll access the downloads for class. I'll see you there [MUSIC] 3. Downloads & Resources: [MUSIC] The downloads for this class include a set of seamless handmade paper textures that I've created just for the class. I've also included the flat illustration files I'll be animating in the upcoming lessons. You're welcome to use those or your on. Finally, I've included a link to an interactive guide I've created, which goes through the ins and outs of the animation features in Procreate. You'll find a description of all the tools and how they work, as well as short-form tutorials throughout. The link to the downloads can be found in the projects and resources section of the class. Just be sure you're accessing Skillshare through a browser, and not through the app. You'll need a password to access the downloads, which I'll put up on the screen right now. [MUSIC] Next up, we'll look at ways to pull in, create, and adjust textures for animation in Procreate. I'll see you there. [MUSIC] 4. Creating & Adjusting Textures in Procreate: [MUSIC] In this lesson, we're going to look at ways that you can add texture to your animation, such as texture image files, brushes, and adjustment layers. We're also going to look at ways that you can adjust the textures themselves if they don't quite read the way that you want them to. Let's take a closer look. There are a few different ways you can either pull in or create texture layers for your animations. The first and most straightforward is to pull in an image file in the Actions menu. I'll head up to the wrench icon and make sure Add is selected. Now my textures are in my files, but you can also pull them from your photo app on your iPad or take a photograph. I'll select "Insert a file" and choose one of my textures. Now when you pull it in, the Transform tool is going to be active and you can size this up and down however you need to. We'll touch more on this in the next lesson, but for now just make sure that your texture is larger than the shape that you're adding it to but not larger than your canvas, otherwise Procreate is going to automatically delete anything that stretches outside of the bounds. Now I'm going to go up to my Layer panel, select "My layer" and tap it, and choose clipping mask. This is a nondestructive add, which means that I can grab my Transform tool and freely move this around within the shape, and that's the start of the frame-by-frame animation for the texture. Now one final thing I'm going to do is change my blend mode to something like color burn. I think I'm going to leave the opacity where it's at. Another way to add texture is to create your own on a blank layer using a textured brush. I'm going to add a blank layer above my shape layer and I'm not going to clip it into place just yet. I have pure black chosen as my color, but you can select whatever color you'd like. I'm going to choose the rusted decay brush that's built into Procreate's industrial category. I'll just start adding texture across the entire layer. I'm going to vary my pressure settings to give myself a little more contrast on top of what the brush itself provides. Now don't worry about going to the edges of the canvas because now that we're done, we're going to grab the Transform tool and I'm going to size this down. Again, I want this to be larger than the shape that I'm adding it to but not larger than the canvas itself. I'm going to size it until I have enough room to move around within my canvas. I'll go back up to my Layers panel, clip this into place, and while I'm here I'm going to change my blend mode to overlay. Once again, I have a nondestructive texture that I can freely move around within my shape and easily animate. A third way to add texture is to use some of the creative adjustments that are built into Procreate. Again, I'll go ahead and add a blank layer above my shape layer, but I'm not going to clip it into place just yet. I'm going to drop white into that layer, but you can choose whatever color you'd like. I'm going to head up to the Adjustments panel and choose glitch. I want to drag this all the way up to 100 percent. I'm going to bring the zoom down to somewhere between 50 and 60. Now these are the settings that I like. However, try out the different settings at the bottom here and see what works best for you. I'll go ahead and accept this. Now I could use this as is. I can clip it into place, change the blend mode, and animate it like any other texture. But what I'm going to do instead is stack another adjustment on top of this. With that same layer selected, I'm going to go back up to my adjustments, and this time I'm going to choose halftone. Now, I know that I like the screen print setting, but again just try out different combinations to see what works best for your creation. I'll just drag this up. Let me just zoom in here so you can see what's happening. Now, wherever there were glitch artifacts, the halftone is concentrating in those areas and I'm getting this spotty, dotty texture. Now again, I want to use my Transform tool, and I'm going to size this down so that it's larger than the shape but not larger than the canvas. I'll go back up to my Layer panel, click this into place, and I'm going to change this to overlay to get this nice dark pink. Now once again, I have a nondestructive texture added to my shape that I can easily move around and animate. If you pulled in your texture and you've played with the blend modes and opacities and it's still not reading quite the way that you want, try using an adjustment on the layer. The top 4 adjustments here, hue, saturation, and brightness, color balance, curves, and gradient map, are all going to help you tweak the strength or color of your texture. Let's take a look at a couple of examples. I've pulled in this image of a gel plate texture that I created and I really like the texture, but the color is a little bit intense. Keep in mind if you pulled a texture with color depending on what blend mode you use, it's potentially going to impact the color of the shape that you're adding it to. For example, if I go into that layer and I change this to overlay, you can see that I'm getting some of those oranges and yellows in addition to the pink. If you want the texture without the potential color shift, try using a hue, saturation, and brightness adjustment on it. I'll go ahead and tap that and I'm going to drag my saturation all the way down. Now I have the texture, but I don't have any of that color shift. The only problem is it lost a little bit of its contrast. With that texture selected again, I'm going to go back up to my adjustments and this time choose a curves adjustment, and I'll just drag this down a little bit here and up here so I'm giving it a slight S curve. That's going to give me a nice contrast in my texture, but again it's not impacting the color of the shape beneath it. Let's look at the curves adjustment in another example. I'm going to pull in the kraft paper texture that I provided with class and I'll just clip this into place. I'm not going to worry about sizing it down for this particular exercise. I want to change the blend mode to color burn because I liked that it gives me that dark red texture. The problem is it knocked out a lot of those finer details and the texture as soon as I changed the blend mode. I can bring some of that intensity back by adding a curves adjustment. So with that layer selected, I'll go back up to my adjustments, choose curves, and on the Gamma channel, I'm going to drag down on the left side here. As I do that, you can see that it's bringing up more of that fine detail. One final thing to note, if you're going to make any of the adjustments that we just talked about, make sure that you do it before you duplicate your texture for the frame-by-frame animation. That way you make sure to capture the exact same adjustment in every frame. Otherwise, you're going to have to go through your entire layer panel and make sure that each texture is adjusted exactly. Otherwise, as you run through the animation, you're going to see a very different look on each frame, and that's great if that's what you're aiming for. But if not, it's a good idea to do all of that upfront. This is one of the reasons that I find it very helpful to set up your layers before beginning your animation process. This allows you to think through the process and make sure that everything is in place before you pull the timeline in and begin creating your additional frames. Texture can be added by pulling in an image file via the Actions menu or by creating your own texture layer using brushes and adjustments built into Procreate. Regardless of how you add your texture, make sure that the layer is larger than the shape that you added to but not larger than the actual canvas. Always use nondestructive clipping masks to attach your texture layer to your shape layer so that you can move your texture freely with each new frame. When you're using the creative effects in the Adjustments panel such as halftone, don't be afraid to experiment and add more than one because you never know what you'll come up with. Remember, texture with color can potentially shift the color of your shape. If you want the texture without the color shift, desaturate your layer with a hue saturation and brightness adjustment. Finally, if your texture needs a contrast pump, try adding a curves adjustment to give it more depth. Next up, we're going to start with a simple texture animation. I'll see you there. [MUSIC] 5. A Simple Texture Animation: [MUSIC] In this lesson, we're going to create a simple frame-by-frame animation where we animate a single texture inside a single shape. This is the building block for all of our upcoming animations in this class. Let's get started. I have a screen-sized canvas setup here. There's no need to start with a really large canvas. We're going to be sharing this online and not printing it. Whenever I create an animation in Procreate, I always begin by setting up my layers first before I even turn on animation assist. This allows me to map everything out and make sure that my layer hierarchy and groupings are correct so that everything runs smoothly once I turn on the animation. Now, because the timeline is directly tied to the layers panel, anything that I add here, whether it's a duplicate layer or group or even a new one, it's automatically going to appear in the timeline once I turn on animation assist. In the previous lesson, we talked about the various ways to add texture to your shape, whether it's adding an empty layer and using an adjustment or a textured brush or pulling an image violin via the Actions menu. Regardless of which method you choose, just a few reminders, make sure that your texture is larger than the shape that you're adding it to. This is going to give you plenty of room to move around the shape frame by frame either by dragging your texture manually or using the flip functions in the Transform tool. This is also going to help you avoid any patterning. Because the more room you have to move on your texture, the more random your movements can be. Finally, while the texture needs to be larger than the shape that you're adding it to, you want to make sure that you have enough room to move within the canvas. Because if you move your texture layer outside of your canvas, as soon as you release that Transform tool, everything outside of the bounds will automatically be deleted, and this is going to be important piece to remember in the next lesson where we create an animated texture background. For the purposes of this lesson, I'm going to use an image file. I'll go up to Actions and add and insert a file, and I'm going to use the kraft paper texture. I'll go ahead and size this down. But again, I want to make sure that is larger than the shape. I'll clip it inside of my shape, and I'm going to change the blend mode to color burn, and that knocked away a lot of that texture, again, I can just go ahead and add a curves adjustment. Now, I mentioned previously that I don't typically turn on my animation assist until after my layers are fully set up. However, for this lesson, I wanted to set it up ahead of time so that you can see what happens when we begin duplicating our layers. The first thing to note is that frames are added to the timeline either by duplicating a layer or a group of layers with an exception. Let's go up to the Layers panel. I'm going to select and duplicate my parent layer. Now, it created a new frame at the bottom, which is great, but it didn't duplicate the clipped texture. I'm going to zoom in. Watch what happens when I scrub on the timeline. If I scrub back and forth, it's not moving, it's blinking because there's no texture on this frame, but there is texture on this one. Let's go ahead and back up. This time I'm going to duplicate the texture. Again, keep an eye on the timeline. I duplicated the texture, and while it intensified the texture, it didn't give me a new frame because the parent layer being duplicated will add a new frame, but a clipped layer will not. Let's go ahead and back up again. I need to group those two layers together and duplicate the entire group for the texture to follow the shape. I'll go ahead and duplicate this group. Now, you can see that the texture didn't get intensified because it's inside of a group. I'll go ahead and grab this texture, and with my Transform tool, just move it slightly. Now, if I scrub on the timeline, you can see that I have movement because there's texture on both frames and the second frame was slightly moved. At this point, the rest of the animation works exactly the same. We're going to duplicate our group, select the texture and move it slightly. Now before I do that, I want to note something, I did change the name of my group to frame 1, frame 2, and I'm going to change this one to frame 3. I highly recommend, especially when you're working with more complex animations like we will be later in the class, that you keep track of your layers and groups and you rename them wherever possible. That way you know exactly which layers need animation and which ones you're working with. I haven't animated this third frame yet, and I can see that because if I scrub my timeline, it holds. I'm going to go in, select my layer, grab my Transform tool, and I'm going to make the canvas a little bit smaller here. I want to move this as randomly as possible because again, we're trying to avoid any patterning. I moved down into the right the last time. I'm going to move maybe to the left and up a little bit, and I think I'm going to flip that vertical. You can use any combination that you want. In fact, the more combinations you use, the more random your movements will be. I'll go ahead and release that, and now when I scrub through the timeline, I have three frames of movement. I'm going to add one more, I think. I went over and up and then I flipped, so I think this time I'm going to flip horizontal and maybe go down into the left. I want to make sure that I don't go past that circle, it's right here, and now I can scrub through my timeline. Now you can add anywhere between three and six, works very nicely with this simple type animation. In fact, I think I'm going to go ahead and speed this up and add two more frames of random movement. [MUSIC] I have a total of six frames here and I can scrub across on my timeline. I'm going to go ahead and hit ''Play'' and just see how it's running. I do like this, however, the way that I moved things wasn't quite as random as I thought it was. You can see a circular pattern forming here, and where you're going to see that is with the bigger bits within your texture. There's a couple of ways that I can handle this. I can go into my layers and I can drag my texture around some more. Or with a simple animation like this, the easiest way is just to take some of your frames and randomly move them around. Now, one thing about doing it this way is that's going to knock out the order of the frames in your layers panel so you're going to need to renumber them. But it's a really quick and easy way of getting rid of some of that patterning without having to do a lot of rework. Now, there's a couple of more things that I wanted to show you. The first is if you duplicate a frame, I'm just going to go randomly duplicate a frame, and you forget to move your texture, when you scrub through on your timeline, you're going to see it hold, and if you do it slowly, it's a lot easier to see it. You can see it's holding on these two frames, which means I didn't move my texture. I just need to find that frame, go into my layers group, grab that texture and move it. I'm actually going to delete that because I don't need it in this case. The second thing that I wanted to show you is what I mentioned in the lesson previously. If you're going to make adjustments to your texture, make sure that you adjust the texture before you create your frames. Because if I go in, for example, to frame 6 here and I add a curves adjustment and hit ''Play'', you can see that it's not automatically going to make the adjustment to every frame, just frame 6, so it's going to be very obvious. Again, it's really important that if you're going to adjust the texture, you do it upfront. I have all six frames set up here and I think they're running very smoothly. I liked the frames per second, but if I didn't, I could go into my settings and I can change that. I could also change my playback mode, but I'm really happy with how both of those are running. I'm going to go ahead and call this one done. Setting up your layers before turning on animation assist allows you to map out your animation and ensure your layer hierarchy and groupings are correct before your timeline is present. Your timeline and layer panel are directly tied. So for the most part, whatever you add in the layer panel will automatically show up in the timeline once animation assist is on. Frames are added by duplicating a parent layer or group of layers but not a single clipped object, so be sure to group your texture with its parent layer before duplicating. For a more effective frame-by-frame animation, make sure your texture layer is larger than the shape you're adding it to. This will give you plenty of room to move around more freely. Just be sure that your texture layer stays within the bounds of the canvas as Procreate will permanently delete anything that goes beyond it. When moving your texture around across a series of frames, the more random the shifts, the less patterning will occur, so use a combination of both the vertical and horizontal flip as well as manually dragging your layer. If you do see patterns during playback, try adjusting the order of your frames in your timeline. A simple reorder can make a huge difference. Next up, we're going to take our simple animation of a level by animating across an entire background. I'll see you there. [MUSIC] 6. Animating a Textured Background: [MUSIC] In this lesson we're going to take animating texture on a shape a step further, and animate texture on an entire background. But because of the way procreate is set up, this isn't as straightforward as animating texture on a regular shape. Let's go ahead and take a closer look. For this lesson, I'm going to create a background that I can use on an Instagram story post. I need a tall, narrow rectangle and I'm going to animate the texture frame-by-frame like we did in the previous exercise. Now the difference with this animation, is that we need the texture to extend across the entire canvas. But remember for an effective animation, the texture has to be larger than the shape it's being clipped to. But procreate cuts off anything that goes outside the bounds of the canvas. We'll need to give ourselves room to work. Now I've already set up a canvas here at 3500 by 3500 pixels at 72 dpi. This is going to be more than I need, but it'll give me enough room to move my texture around effectively. What I'm going to do is create a template within my canvas, so I know exactly where my texture is going to be. Of course I have a separate layer here. I'll grab my selection tool, and I have rectangle and color fill on. I'll just drag out a tall, narrow rectangle. Now I'm not going to worry about the exact dimensions because instead I'm going to grab my transform tool, tap one of the corners, and I'm going to release the link between these two, and key in 1080 by 1920. That's going to give me the exact size that I need so that I know exactly where I'm going to animate my texture. I'll go ahead and release that. At this point adding texture works exactly the way it did in the previous exercise. You can add it with an empty layer, and a built in brush or adjustment. Or you can pull an image file and via the options menu, I'm going to go ahead and create one using one of the artistic brushes on an empty layer. I will add a layer, and again, I'm not going to clip it into place just yet. I'm going use white, black, and gray to add a variety of dark, and light areas across my layer. I'll select my gouache brush and I'm going to start with the white, and I'm just running it around the canvas again, varying my pressure and building up in certain spots, just to give myself a little variety. I'll grab my gray, and I'm layering this. You don't have to hit every spot on the canvas because even the empty areas provide their own texture. The black, I'm going to use sparingly because it can really be jarring, not liking either one of those. Let's try that again. Then you do one final layer of white just to lighten up some areas. Then I'll grab my transform tool, and I'm going to size this down, again so that it's larger than the shape, but not larger than the canvas. I'll clip it into place, and I'm going to change my bland mode to overlay. Alright, I like how that looks, but I think it could have a little more intensity. I'll add a curves adjustment, and I'm just going to drag down on that. I think I'll just, maybe create a slight S-curve here. At this point, the animation process works exactly the same as the previous lesson. I'm going to duplicate my groups, and as I duplicate them, I'll move my texture frame-by-frame to give myself some nice random movement. I'm going to speed it up since you've already seen me do that once, and I'll see you on the other side. [MUSIC] I have my six frames in place, and I've manually scrubbed. I'm actually going to turn on play here, and turn my frames per second down to about, I think three that tends to work best for this particular one. I'm not seeing any weird patterning, but I feel like it's moving across so maybe there is. I'm going to randomly move some of my frames around. Now you may have seen I added all of my groups first before renaming them. I moved my texture, then I went back and renamed my groups, and then turn my animation assist on once everything was in place. Let's go ahead and hit Play again. Alright, I like that much better. Now at this point, the animation itself is done. I could export this as is, but if I export it now with the canvas site at the size as that, even if I turn the background off, which I'll do, I have this transparent padding around my rectangle. While that's not a problem with Instagram, I can just zoom in if I wanted to use this shape elsewhere, like on my Skillshare profile, I would be left with a ton of unusable space around my shape. Before you export it, I'm going to crop into the shape itself, and remove any excess background. I'll go up to my actions menu in canvas and choose crop and resize. I'm going to go up to my settings, and I'll change my settings to 1080 by 1920. My dpi, is fine and I'm going to turn snapping on, and hit done. Now you can see that the crop box moved down here so I'm just going to drag it up to my shape, and I had centered my shapes, so I knew exactly where I was going. I need to crop in a little bit more because I can see some of my background peeking out of there. It's not a perfect snapping. I'm going to hit settings and I want to lock that into place, and I'm going to re-sample my canvas, so that when I pull my corners in just slightly, it's going to keep it at 1080 by 1920. Had I not re-sampled my canvas, as I scrunched in, it would change the size, but keep the ratio so I wanted to stay at a nice 1080 by 1920. Now I can go ahead, and hit done. I'm left with just the background, with no extra canvas. As you can see, the animation works exactly the way it's supposed to. [MUSIC] Because this animation pushes the texture outside of the bounds of the canvas, the original canvas size should be set to larger than the one you intend to export. Once you have your canvas in place, make a template the exact size you plan to export, so you have boundaries to work within. That template will ultimately become your final canvas. The frame-by-frame animation process works the same as any other animation, once the canvas is set up properly. You don't need to crop away the excess canvas from the one you plan to export but if you don't, you're going to be left with a permanent transparent padding around your animation. To avoid that padding, once you've created all of your frames, go to the Canvas settings and the actions menu and choose Crop and Resize. Set your bound to the exact size you plan to export, and adjust your animation so it sits within those bounds. Next up, we're going to animate multiple textures on a single shape seamlessly using masks. I'll see you there. [MUSIC] 7. Animating Texture with Masks : [MUSIC] In this lesson, we're going to create a multi-texture animation, and blend those textures seamlessly using masks. Let's get started. This is the final animation that we'll be creating. By using masks to animate our texture, we can add two or more textures to what appears to be the same shape and animate them separately. While we will be animating these textures separately, we're also going to create a nice seamlessly blended transition between the two with masks. I provided the flat illustration file that I'll be animating in this class with the downloads. You're welcome to use that and follow along or create your own. I have this broken down into two layers, a foreground and a background. A foreground element, the face, is going to be a static foreground, which means it doesn't have to be animated and therefore doesn't take away from our layers that are available to us. We are going to use one copy of the sun layer as a background. Again, it'll be static, which means it doesn't need to be animated and therefore doesn't take away from our layers. But I'm going to duplicate this twice because we're going to use two duplicates to create the middle section, and then the outer rays. I've turned off my foreground, and background layers because we don't need them for the animation process and I renamed my other two layers, middle and rays. This layer is going to be the center where the face is going to sit and this is going to be the rays. They're each going to have their own texture, which I'll go ahead and add now. For the rays, I'll select it and go up to add and insert a file, and I'm going to use the what's left behind texture that I provided with class. I want to make this a little taller. Again, I need to make sure it's larger than the sudden shape and then I'll clip that into place. Then I want to use the lichen texture for the middle section. I'm going to make this a lot smaller because I actually want those little dotted parts to be a lot smaller. I just need it to be larger than the center. I'll make this a little bit taller and I'll clip this into place. Now right now, this looks a little bit funny because we have one texture sitting on top of the other, and this is where the masks are going to come into play. I want to add empty masks to both of my layers. With the middle layer selected, I'll tap mask and I'll select my rays layer and do that as well. Now you can see that the textures that we added have remained clip textures, which is perfect because we're going to be animating those. What I need to do now is to create a shape that I can use to add to these masks so that I can cut away anything outside the center for this layer, and cut away anything inside the center for the rays. Technically, I can draw right onto my layer masks, but I want a little more control over what I'm creating. So instead, I'm going to add a layer. I want to create a circle shape on this layer that I'm going to then copy and paste into each of those layer masks. I have my monoline brush created. If you want to create something with texture, you can. However, we're going to be blurring them out so you're going to lose that. I'm just sticking with something pretty smooth. I have black selected and I'll just create a perfect circle. Create the circle, and hold and then tap my finger down. I'm going to fill this with black. Now because this is on its own layer, I'm just going to center this up a little bit, just makes it easier. I want to three finger swipe down and copy, and at this point I can delete that layer. I don't need it anymore. I'll tap my layer mask for the middle part. Three fingers swipe down and paste, and you can see it's created a mask there, and I'll do the same thing for the rates. At this point, it's knocked things out that I don't want because I need to invert at least one of these layers. I'm going to go up to my layer mask from the middle, tap the layer mask itself, and hit "Invert". That's going to give me that nice center with that texture and it's going to knock everything out inside of the circle from my rays. We have our masks in place, but they're a little too perfect to crisp. So as soon as I animate these, there's going to be a very distinct line of demarcation between the two. I want to fix that by blurring my masks out a little bit with a Gaussian blur. I also want to adjust the level of my texture with blend modes and possibly a curves adjustment. But remember what we talked about in the previous lessons. If you're going to make any adjustments to your layers, you want to make sure that you do it on the initial group of layers before you begin duplicating them. Otherwise, you're potentially going to see a difference as the animation runs through. Let's start with the blend modes. I'm going to change the one for the middle to soft light and I'll add a curves adjustment. Just going to drop this down a little bit. I want to change this one too. I think I'll go with overlay for this one and maybe drop the opacity just a touch, but also add a curves adjustment just to bring out some of those darker areas a little bit. I like the blend modes and opacity, but again I still have those really crisp masks. I'll go in to my layer mask for my middle, go up to my adjustments, and choose Gaussian blur. I'm going to bring this up to about nine or 10. You're going to see this little inner shadow type thing form when you do that. I'll do the same thing with my layer mask. You want to make sure that you've chosen the layer mask and not anything else. Again, I'll add a Gaussian blur. Now I have that nice transition between the two, but what it's also added is this faint gray mark around the edges, and that's where the blurs are having. This is what the background is for. So if I turn this on, you can see that disappears and I have that nice seamless transition between the two, and I'm ready to begin grouping these and animating them. Whenever you're working with multiple layers of texture or regular layers, it's a really good idea to be as organized as possible. We renamed our layers, but we also want to group them so we can keep track of them. What I'm going to do is select all of my ray layers and I'll group them and then rename this rays. Then I'll do the same thing with my middle. Then I want to do one final grouping to create the actual frame. I'll select those two groups and group them together. I've duplicated my original frame group three times and I renamed them one through four. At this point, I'm ready to begin animating them. Now, since this is a little bit more complicated, I'm actually going to turn on animation assist at this point. I want you to see what's going to happen with the foreground and the background elements. So if I turn on animation assist, you can see that a bunch of stuff gets knocked out, and that gray comes back again. The reason for that is the background and the foreground aren't designated as that. I'll go ahead and tap this frame and turn that to foreground and now that face comes back, and then I'll tap the bottom layer and hit Background, and now that gray mark is gone. It's really important to note though that your foreground and your background have to be either the top most layer or the bottom most layer. It can't be included in-between. At this point, the animation process runs exactly the same as the others did. The only difference is I have two textures with each frame rather than one. Let's just start with this first one. I'll go into Frame 2, I'm going to flip this and maybe move it up and over, and then I'll go into my rays texture and I'll flip it horizontal and maybe down and to the side. I'm going to speed up going through three and four, and I'll see you on the other side. [MUSIC] I've adjusted my textures for all four groups, and if I scrub through this, I like how it looks. I don't think I need to add any more groups. If I needed to, I could certainly just continue duplicating and doing that. Let's hit "Play" and see how it looks. I think this is reading quite nice, so let me just zoom in here. It has a nice transition. I'm not seeing any funny spots where the transition is different because again we did those blurs with the very first group and didn't do them after we duplicated everything. The animation part is done and I'm almost ready to export. But one final thing I decided to do is I'm going to add a blush on either side of his cheeks and I need to add that to the foreground, but watch what happens when I add a new layer. It's going to knock everything out because that's set as my foreground, but it's not tied to that. I need to select both of these and group them, and I'll rename this foreground. As soon as I group them, everything underneath it comes back because that new layer became part of the foreground element that's marked down here. I'm going to select that layer. I just have an air brush selected, and nice little pink color. I'll just draw some little blush here. Now one final thing, my canvas is really large and I really don't need it to be this large. I only had that in place so that I had room to move my textures. I want to crop into this a little bit. This is going to be a little bit different than the previous one. I'll go up to my Actions menu and crop and resize. In my settings, I already have my DPI at 72. When you turn snapping on, I want to key in 1,000 by 1,000 and I'm just going to hit "Done". I'm not going to resample this because I'm not going to be pulling this in anymore. I'm just going to move this up into the middle and hit "Done". With the previous background texture, I needed to scrunch in a little bit more just to make sure that the entire background was clipped away, but I wanted to to maintain the exact ratio. In this case, since I didn't need to do that, I didn't resample. Let me turn my background color off. Let's hit "Play". I really like how this is looking. It's all set to export as a GIF and I can load it onto Giphy. When animating with masks, it's best to plan out your layers ahead of time regardless of complexity. This is going to allow you to determine how many masks you'll need, where they need to be placed, and if any adjustments are necessary upfront. During the planning phase, also determine how many duplicate shapes you'll need and duplicate them before you do anything else. Duplicating before you add anything means you'll have a clean layer with no unnecessary masks and adjustments to remove. When creating your masks, keep it simple. If you can create your transition using a duplicate and inverted copy of an existing mask, that will save you time in the long run. If you see gaps created by the blur in your masks, add a duplicate of the main shape as the background layer to fill them in. Finally, determine what layer or layers will be your background and foreground in advance and turn them off while you create your animation so they don't interfere with your masks. Remember to set them as foreground and background in your timeline once you turn on animation assist. Next up, we're going to take a look at a more complex texture animation. I'll see you there. [MUSIC] 8. Complex Animations Pt 1: Setting up the Canvas: [MUSIC] Over the next few lessons, we're going to talk about complex texture animations, where we animate multiple textures across multiple layers. We'll begin by discussing canvas setup and layer availability, which can help direct the course of our animation. Next, we'll create a texture and animation plan, so that we can balance layer availability with our final vision. Finally, we'll add our textures, group our layers, and create our animation. Let's get started. I've provided the flat illustration that I'll be using over the next few lessons with the downloads. You're more than welcome to use that and follow along, or create your own complex animation. This is the final animation that we'll be creating over the next few lessons. It's a multi-layered illustration and we'll be adding multiple textures, some will be animated, and others are going to remain static. In this lesson, we're going to focus on setting up our canvas to prepare it to add and animate our textures. A few important notes when it comes to your canvas and these more complex animations. The first, is I always work on a duplicate of my original flat illustration. That way as I'm adding my layers if I find that I'm running into trouble or I need to shift gears, I don't have to do a lot of backward and remove textures or worry about lost layers to consolidation, I have a beginning point I can easily go back to. The second is that the number of layers Procreate provides depends on the iPad you're working on, as well as the size document you're working in. When it comes to these complex multi-layered animations, you may find that if Procreate doesn't provide enough layers, you need to forego some of your planned approaches or consolidate layers wherever possible. We're going to be creating multiple groups of layers with multiple textures within those groups. Keep in mind, each of those groups needs to be duplicated to create the animation and that's going to chew away at your available layers. This is why planning and setting up your initial layers before you begin the actual animation process is extremely helpful. That way, you'll know pretty early on in the process before you get to that third or fourth duplicate layer group, that you won't have enough layers available and need to adjust your approach. One final note, as our iPads might be different, we may get a different number of layers to start with, regardless of whether our canvas size is the same. Throughout the next few lessons, I'm going to be consolidating layers wherever possible, and also targeting as many as I can for the foreground and background elements, so they don't have to be duplicated. Let's start by changing our canvas size to give ourselves more room to work with. Right now my canvas ends right about there, and that's not going to give me enough room to animate my background textures. I'll go up to Actions menu, and under Canvas hit Crop and Resize. Now if I go into Settings, I have 1,000 by 1,000 pixel canvas at 300 DPI. The first thing I'm going to change is my DPI to 72. I created this at 300, but I'm not going to print it, I'm going to share it online, so 72 is just fine. Now, that's not going to change the number of layers available to me. However, it will impact the final file size. The next thing I want to do is give myself that padding, so I'm going to change this to 1,500 by 1,500. That's going to give me enough room to move my textures without taking away too many available layers, so I'll turn Snapping on. I want to move my canvas into place over the center, and I'll go ahead and hit Done. Let me turn my background on. I'm going to change my background color to something that I'm not using in my animation, just so that I can easily see my textures. That's it. My canvas is all setup and ready to begin adding my textures. Next up, we're going to create a texture and animation game plan. I'll see you there. [MUSIC] 9. Complex Animations Pt 2: Texture Plan: [MUSIC] Now that my Canvas is in place and it's been extended so I can begin adding my textures, I want to plan out my animation and set up all of my layers before I turn on animation assist. Let's start by talking about which layers are going to be foreground and background elements as they're static and won't need to be animated. I know that I'm going to add texture to my sky layer, and I'm actually going to use the masking method that we covered in the last lesson. Where I animate two different textures in the background just to give it a little bit more depth and that means I'm going to need a total of three sky layers, and one of those layers is going to become the background that's going to fill in any gaps left by blurring my masks. Now that background doesn't need to be animated across the timeline, I can actually set this bottom-most layer as background and then these two sky layers are going to be added to the animation group. Let's take a look at our foreground elements next. I know that I'm going to be animating texture on my three frame layers so they need to remain as is. My stars and my moon are going to have a bloom adjustment added to them to light them up, but I'm not going to be animating any texture on them. These two can become part of my foreground group. I'm going to select both of them and pull them out, and I'll drop them just below my frame. Now the frame is also going to have static texture added to it, which means that I can designate this as part of my foreground layer as well. That's another layer that doesn't need to be duplicated and therefore won't take away from my layers available. Finally, I am going to add texture to my rocket ship, but while I will be animating the flames beneath it, I'm not going to animate the ship itself, so I can take all four of these layers and group them and I'll rename this group foreground. That leaves everything from the yellow flame down to this second sky layer. That's going to become part of my animation group. I'm going to add something to my illustration. In addition to the animations and textures, I want to create a paper-cut effect. Now that means that I'm going to need to create duplicates from every layer except my sky layers, to a form that drop shadow, and the drop shadows that are added to my flame layers are going to become part of that animation group. Now, while the duplicates won't need texture and they don't need to be animated, they are going to need to stay with their original layers so the drop shadow effect works. Therefore, I can't designate any of them backgrounds. This is one of those scenarios where as you're setting up if you decide to add something, you need to take a look at the layers available and decide if you're going to be able to accommodate the idea. If not, you might need to shift gears. You can find the number of layers available under the Actions menu in Canvas, and then Canvas information in layers. Now, I know in my case, I have plenty of layers available to me. But if I was concerned about that, what it would do is take a look at how many layers I already have. Determine how many more layers I need to add, and don't forget we're going to be adding drop shadows plus texture, and then consider how many layers are going to become part of that original frame layer. Let's say I have a total of 10 layers in my original frame and I know I want to create three frames. That's going to be a total of 30 layers. I need to decide if I have enough layers available to me to create that. If not, I might need to shift gears. I'm going to go ahead and create my duplicates here. I know that I can accommodate the drop shadow and I'm just going to duplicate everything again except for the sky layers. Then with black selected, I'm just going to two-finger swipe to turn on Alpha lock in to fill the layer, make sure that you undo that. [MUSIC] Right now I have all of my background layers behind the original layers, I just need to create drop shadows out of them. I'm actually going to do that off camera, but all I'm going to do is let's, for example, take the rocket. I'm just going to move that down, and to the right, I want to determine which way I want my shadows to run, and then I'll go up to my adjustments and use a Gaussian blur on it. I'll just bring it out to about, I think six or seven and then change my blend mode to multiply. I'm going to do the rest of the layers off camera in the interest of time and I'll come right back once that's done. All of my drop shadows are set up for the paper cut effect and of course, it's added some layers, some of which are going to need to be duplicated, but I should be able to accommodate that without any problem. Before we wrap up this lesson, let's take a look at the layers outside of the foreground and background element and talk about a texture plan for those. For my flames, I mentioned that I'm going to add a texture to those and animate them. I'm going to end up clipping textures to these three layers, and then for the sky layer, I want to do what we did in the last lesson where we added masks and created seamless textures. Let me go ahead and create a mask that I can use. I have my monoline brush selected in black and I'm using a pretty big one. I'm just going to go ahead and create a swirl here and maybe here. Try that one again. I'll just do one across this way. That's all on one layer. I'll three-finger swipe down and copy and I can turn this off. I don't need it. I'm going to add a mask to both. I'll go ahead and three-finger swipe down and paste. Now, you're not going to see any change because we haven't added texture to it yet, and I'm going to leave it as is and not blur it until the texture is in place. Let me go ahead and add to this one and I need to invert this one. All of my layers are now set up to begin adding texture to them, grouping them, and animating them. In the next lesson, we're going to keep going with this illustration and add our textures. I'll see you there. 10. Complex Animations Pt 3 Adding Texture (Animated Texture in Procreate): In this lesson, we're going to focus on adding our textures, both static and animated to our layers. I'm going to start from the top-down, beginning with my foreground elements. I mentioned previously that I'm going to add a static texture to my frame, which means that I can clip it into place, set my blend mode and opacity, make any adjustments I need to, and then I can merge the two layers together, which is going to save me a layer. I'll go ahead and pull my texture in and I'm going to use the handmade paper 28. Now, I don't need to size this up because again, it's going to be static and not animated. I do, however, need to clip it into place. It's really important that if you're going to merge layers, especially if you have something like a cutout here, you want to clip it first and then merge it. Otherwise, if I had just pinched it together as is, the texture would stay exactly as it was. I will go ahead and change my blend mode. I think I'll change it to multiply. I'm not going to make any further adjustments to this, but I am going to go ahead and pinch these two together. With my stars and my moon, I'm going to add a bloom adjustments. I'm not going to add textures, but I am going to go up to my adjustment layers bloom and I'll just drag this up. I want them to be lit enough that you can see them, but not so much that they take all of the attention away. I'll just adjust my burns settings and size. Then I'll do the same thing with my moon layer. Then finally for my rocket, just like with the frame, I'm going to add a static texture to it. This time I'm going to use the craft paper texture. Size this down. I'm going to clip it into place and change the blend mode to, I think, darken. I don't want a ton of texture. All of my foreground elements are all set. Now that my foreground elements are in place, I need to add the textures to those that I plan to animate. I'm going to start with my flame layers. For the flames, just like previously, I'm going to pull textures in. But in this case I'm simply going to clip them and not merge them. I'll start with my yellow flame. I can go up and add and insert a file. I'm going to use this grunge scratches. I'm trying to size this down. It's a rather small layer. But again, I still need it to be larger than the shape itself so I can animate it. I'll clip this into place and change the blend mode to color burn. I think I'm going to boost this with a curves adjustment. With my orange flame, I'm going to use the craft paper texture again. I'm going to add a curves adjustment to it this time just to make it a little grittier than it was on the rocket. I'll clip it into place. Again, I'm going to change this to color burn. Then finally I will choose my blue flame. I'm going to use the newsprint and light texture. I want to make sure it's larger than the shape. I'm going to give it a curves adjustment again. Finally, I'm going to change my blend mode to color burn. Now that we have our flame layers in place, let's take a look at our two sky layers. In the previous lesson, we added masks to our layers. In this lesson we're going to add our textures and clip them into place. For the bottom one, I'm going to add the halftone texture. I want to create a starry effect out of this. The sinus is down. It needs to be larger than this canvas, but again, smaller than the main one. I'll clip it into place. I want to invert this because I want all of these bits to get a little brighter when I change this to add. Then I'm going to boost it further with a curves adjustment. But this time instead of dragging down, I'm going to drag up. For my other layer, I'm going to add an empty layer. I'm going to use white and the aurora brush from the artistic category. I'm going to create clouds. I'm going to use pressure in certain spots just to build up. It's like that background lesson. Then I'll drag this in, clip it into place. I'm going to change my blend mode to overlay. Our textures are in place, but our masks are too perfect into crisp. We need to use a Gaussian blur again to blend our textures together. I'll start with this mask. I'm going to go up to adjustments and Gaussian blur. I'll just drag it up to about eight or nine. Then I'm going to do the same thing with the other one. Again, we have that background layer that's going to remain a static layer that's filling in any gaps behind these too. All of our textures are in place and we're ready to begin grouping our layers and finishing our animation, which we're going to do next. I'll see you there. 11. Complex Illustration Pt 4 Grouping and Animating Layers (Animated Texture in Procreate): We are almost there with this animation. In this lesson, we're going to focus on grouping and animating our textures. Let's start with the foreground group. Now, this is pretty much already set. We have it grouped together. Again, this is a static layer, so we don't need to do anything to animate it. If you want, you can group your original layers with their drop shadows. But since everything is already set in this group, I'm going to leave that as is. Our background layer is also all set, so I don't need to do anything with those. What we want to focus on, however, are our flame and sky layers. Let's start with our sky layers. I just mentioned that the background layer is going to get designated as one once we turn on animation assist. But what we want to do is take the other sky layers and group them with their mask as well as their texture. I'm going to go ahead and group this and rename it stars. I'll do this one and group it and I'm just going to rename it aurora, and then I'll do the same thing with my flames. You don't technically have to do this because we're going to be grouping everything together at the end. But again, if you're dealing with something really complex like this, it's a really good idea to stay as organized as possible because you're going to have to go into each of these groups and adjust their textures. If you already have them grouped off, it just makes it a lot easier. This is the final one and I'm all set. I just need to take these five groups then, group them together, and I'm going to rename this Frame 1. Now at this point, it's going to work exactly as it did in the previous lessons. I'm going to take this Frame 1 layer and I'm going to duplicate it three times. I'll change the names of each to 2, 3, and 4. At this point, I'm going to turn on my animation assist so we can begin animating our layers. Now the first thing I want to do, of course, is designate my background and my foreground layers just to bring everything back. I'll tap and turn on foreground, and then tap and turn on background. Now one thing you'll notice now that I've turned the background is I have this red color shift here. This isn't a problem with the layers. What this actually is, is if I go to my settings, my onion skins are on. Procreate designates colors for any layers before and after the current one, and that's what's showing up there. Now I don't need onion skins for this particular animation, so I'm just going to turn them off and you'll see that completely disappears. Now that everything is grouped and designated, I'm going to go in, and starting with Frame 2, I'm going to begin shifting my texture. I'll start with my yellow flame, going to work from the top down. I'll go ahead and select my Transform tool. Again, I want to be as random as possible. I'll close that and go into the orange one. I like to close the groups that I created just so I know that I'm done. Then finally, I need to do the two sky layers as well. If I scrub back and forth, see, I have a nice animation starting there. Now, I'm going to go ahead and speed this up for three and four because it's going to be the exact same process, so I'll see you on the other side. [MUSIC] Now that our shifts are done, let's go ahead and hit play and see how it looks. Now, first of all, that's a little too fast. I'm going to bring this down to about five, maybe four. I'm not seeing any patterns. But if I needed to, of course, I could stop this and I can just drag my frame layers around. Or if I wanted to, I could scrub through slowly and see if I can find a problem spot and then go into my layers and make a change. Now that I have everything in place, I want to adjust my canvas size back down to the smaller size. I'll go up to my canvas, crop and resize, and in settings, I'm going to change this to 1,000 by 1,000 pixels. I don't need to do anything to the DPI. I'll turn on snapping and I just want to drag this up into the middle and I'll hit Done. I'm all set. I just need to turn off my background layer because I don't want to export that. Let's go ahead and hit Play. Everything is running exactly as expected, and that's it. We have a multi-layered illustration with multiple animated textures that's all ready for export. Always work on a duplicate of your original flat illustration. That way if you run into difficulty, rather than removing a lot of textures or worrying about consolidated layers, you have a fresh starting point to go back to. The number of layers Procreate provides depends on your iPad and the size of your document. It's important to take this into consideration when you're planning and executing your complex animations. If you find you don't have enough layers available, you'll either need to shift your plans or consolidate layers wherever possible. Designating foreground and background elements will go a long way in conserving your available layers. If you don't need to animate or duplicate them and they can sit either above or below all other layers, include them in your foreground and background instead. Merging your layers is another way to save layers. If it's going to be static, clip it in place, make your adjustments, and merge your layers. Just be sure to click the layer before you merge it so it takes on the shape it's being added to. Finally, organization is key when it comes to animating multiple textures across multiple layers. You don't have to create subgroups within your animated frame groups, but they do go a long way in keeping you on track while animating. Next up, we're going to take a look at the export options for exporting your textured animations. I'll see you there. [MUSIC] 12. Export Options: [MUSIC] In this lesson, we'll take a quick look at the animated export options in Procreate and which will work best for your animated texture illustrations. Let's get started. For this class, I'm going to give an overview of the two best options for exporting your textured animations specifically. However, if you'd like a detailed breakdown on all of the export options, you can find it in my other class, Animation Basics in Procreate, which I've linked in the about section. You'll also find a full breakdown in the interactive guide that I provided with class. The most versatile and therefore common export option is the GIF format. Now, this format is going to allow you to upload your animation to sites like Giphy and use them in your Instagram stories, messaging, or even on some sites like Skillshare who accept GIFs as image uploads. This is a more archaic and lower-quality format. However, in most cases, you're going to be using GIFs at such a small size that doesn't create issues. To export a GIF, I'll go up to the actions menu and make sure share is selected. I'll scroll down to the animated export options. I'll select animated GIF, and I'm given a few options to change. You can choose between max resolution and web ready, which is going to impact the size of your file. You'll see the size up here at the top-right. If I tap web ready, you can see that it's significantly smaller. Now personally, I only use web ready if I know I need a really small file. Otherwise, I stick with max resolution as long as it doesn't create a really large, cumbersome file. You can also change your frames per second here rather than going back into the settings in your canvas. Dithering and per frame color palette are going to impact the colors in your animation. If you find they're not reading quite right, you can try turning them on. Now personally, I rarely use either as I find they either adjust the colors too much or have no impact at all. When you're exporting a GIF that doesn't go to the edges of the canvas like this sticker, you're going to be given the option to turn your transparent background on or off. If I turn this off, you can see that the color background that I chose in my canvas is now showing up. That's what's going to get exported. Now, if you're working with a canvas that's the exact size of what you're being exported, such as our background textures, this option isn't even going to be provided. Finally, the alpha threshold is going to set the padding around the edges of your illustration. GIFs don't handle transparencies well and don't accommodate partial transparencies like drop shadows at all. A padding is added around your animation so that the actual illustration isn't degraded by what's called anti-aliasing. If you've ever seen a GIF on Instagram or in messaging that has a thin white line around it or looks choppy around the edges. That's what alpha threshold is adjusting. Now, while this matters when you're creating a GIF sticker like we did here, it doesn't matter when it comes to exporting a full background. As again, there's no need for transparency since the entire canvas is being exported. Now personally, I find Procreate handles transparencies even on stickers like this really cleanly, so I keep my alpha threshold relatively low. If I pull this all the way up to 100 percent, you can see it's creating some issues with my actual illustration. I'm going to bring that back down. If I need to, I can always come back in and adjust it and re-export. The other common export option is MP4. Now, this is the required export option for Instagram posts, not stories or reels, but the post within your feed and for Facebook, because their file sizes tend to be rather small. You're not given a lot of options to adjust when it comes to MP4s, you can change your max resolution to web ready and of course adjust your frames per second, but that's it. You're not going to see any transparency options with MP4s because they use what are called JPEG encoding and therefore don't accommodate transparencies of any kind, full or partial. Now, this isn't an option that I would use for a sticker because unless the animation goes to the very edges of the canvas, it's going to export with a white background, even though you don't see it here in the preview window. At the end of the day, the best option is going to be the one that works for your particular scenario. In other words, where do you plan to post it? What does the site accept? Do you need transparency or not? Next up, we're going to wrap up class with a few final thoughts. I'll see you there. [MUSIC] 13. Final Thoughts: [MUSIC] We've reached the end of class and I'd like to thank you for trusting me with your time and creativity. I hope you enjoy creating your own animated textures in Procreate. I'd love to see what you create, so be sure to share your project to the class projects and resources page. Remember sharing your project and leaving a review not only help future students see what they learn when they take the class, it helps more students find the class. If you share your project on social media, tag me at the handle on my screen as I'd love to share it on my own feed. I have lots of new classes in the works, so hit my profile and hit follow, so you're always notified whenever I post a class. You'll also find my entire lineup of existing classes in digital illustration in photography, information about my Facebook group dedicated to all things digital texture where you can share your work, ask questions, learn tips and tricks, or share your own, all in a friendly non-judgmental environment. You'll find a link to my YouTube channel where I share lots of short-form tutorials that complement my Skillshare lineup. Finally, you'll find a link to my newsletter. When you sign up, you'll receive my big gritty grungy texture pack and regular freebies. If you have any questions about what you learned in class or you'd like feedback on your approach, please let me know in the discussion section below, or by emailing me. You'll find the email on the about page of the class. Thanks so much for joining me and happy creating [MUSIC]