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Adobe Dimension CC 2020 Beginners Course

teacher avatar IVito ., Helping You Learn Creative Skills!

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Intro

      1:21

    • 2.

      Exercise Files

      0:55

    • 3.

      Dimension CC Interface Tour

      6:11

    • 4.

      Selecting, Moving, Rotating & Scaling Objects

      13:42

    • 5.

      How to Change Views

      9:14

    • 6.

      Importing 3D Models

      5:10

    • 7.

      Starter Content

      7:37

    • 8.

      Scene and Action Panel

      5:19

    • 9.

      Detailed Look at Tools

      11:29

    • 10.

      Menus

      7:11

    • 11.

      Introduction to materials

      10:02

    • 12.

      Working with Materials & Graphics

      9:42

    • 13.

      Lighting

      7:56

    • 14.

      Examples

      3:14

    • 15.

      Rendering & Post Processing

      7:40

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About This Class

You already think in 3D. Now design in it.

No 3D experience? No problem. An intuitive and familiar UI makes Dimension perfect for graphic designers.

Hello Everyone! My name is Vito and welcome to Adobe Dimension cc Beginners Course Are you a graphic designer or someone who wants to know how to work with 3D graphics? Adobe Dimension CC is a great place to start. No 3D experience? No problem. An intuitive and familiar UI makes Dimension perfect for graphic designers.This easy-to-use application can help graphic designers of all skill levels Create product mock-ups, brand visualizations, packaging designs, and more with easy 3D tools. With Adobe Dimension, graphic designers can compose, adjust, and render photorealistic images all in the same app.

Achieve 3D photorealistic effects in advertising projects, photography, abstract art and more. In this comprehensive course, We’ll begin by exploring the basics of dimension cc step by step. And help you feel comfortable with dimensions, we’ll start with an overview of the interface and tools. Next we will learn the basics like selecting, moving and rotating objects. Next we will explore camera controls. Once we have a solid foundation we’ll move to the materials section where we will learn how to add materials and change its properties and how to work with graphics in dimension then we’ll set up lighting and finally render photorealistic images and move them into photoshop for some final touches.

Using Dimension you can Publish high-impact marketing materials, product mock-ups, abstract artwork, and more in 3D. Dimension makes it fast and easy to share your work online. So we have a lot to cover let’s go ahead and get started

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

IVito .

Helping You Learn Creative Skills!

Teacher

Hi! My name is Vito and I make videos to help you bring your creativity to life. Learn new skills and create projects you love.

Professionally produced, highly focused online video training that will teach and inspire you. The Vito style is different :)

See full profile

Level: Beginner

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Transcripts

1. Intro: Hello everyone, my name is Vito and welcome to Adobe dimension CC beginners course. Are your graphic designer or someone who wants to know how to work with 3D graphics. Ew dimensions you see is a great place to start. If you don't have any 3D experience, no problem. And intuitive and familiarity. Why mix dimension perfect for graphic designers? This easy to use application can help graphic designers of all skill levels create product markets, rent visualization, packaging designs, and more with easy 3D tools. We developed a dimension graphic designers can compose, adjust, and render photorealistic images all in the same app. In this comprehensive course, we will begin by exploring the basics of dimension CC step-by-step and helped me feel comfortable with dimension. We'll start with an overview of the interface and tools. Next we'll learn the basics Links selecting, moving and rotating objects. Next we'll explore the camera controls. Once we have a solid foundation, will move to the material section, where we will learn how to add materials and change its properties and how to work with graphics in dimension. Then we will set up lighting and arsine. And finally, we will render photorealistic images and move them into Photoshop for some final touches. Using dimension, you can publish high-impact marketing material, product mockups, abstract art, and more inferiorly. You mentioned mix it fast and easy to share their work online. So we have a lot to cover. Let's go ahead and get started. 2. Exercise Files: You can download the exercise files for this course in the resources section of this video. Once you download the exercise files, you'll get a zip file similar to this one. If you're on Mac OS, you can simply double-click on the zip file to extract its content. And if you're using Windows, then you can use in applications such as windrow or 7-Zip to extract the content. In this case, I'm using wind R4. So I can right-click here and then select, Extract Content or extra content to this folder. Once I have the content extracted, you can see that we have this folder. I'll go ahead and open this up. And these are the files that we'll be using throughout this course. So these are different acids. As we progress through the course, we'll be using different assets from this folder. You can also use your own assets if you want to create something different. So go ahead and download the Exercise Files and then you'll be able to follow along with the course by the end of this course when you create something in dimension, I'd love to see your designs. You can share them on the projects page here on skill share. 3. Dimension CC Interface Tour: Hi everyone and welcome to this first video in the course. In this video, we will take an overview of the dimension CSI interface. This will get you familiar with the interface and leader to discourse when I reference at different areas of the interface. For example, when I say, you can use a scene panel, you know, we're seeing panel is and what it does briefly. So this will be a quick introduction to the interface. And later we'll discover each area in a lot more detail. So when you first open a dimension, you'll see the welcome screen. Here on the welcome screen in the center area, you'll access new learning which reel. And then below this you can see that we have some additional tutorials and learning material. You also have this Recent tab which allows you to access the recent projects that you've been working on. So you can access those here. And then here on the left side of our interface we have two buttons here. Now the Create New button will allow you to create a new document in dimension with default settings. You can also click on these three dots here, and this opens up new Document dialogue. Now here you can customize the settings before creating a new document. For example, you can type in a name here. You can change your canvas size and can within its resolution and some additional settings. You can also set these settings as your default. And if you have any files on your computer that were created, eating, or be dimension that are not listed under your recent documents. You can access those using the Open button. For now, we'll go ahead and click on create new to open or create a new document. Okay, so here we can see that this is the default interface of dimension. We'll start with this top area. So starting with this top area, we have these menus. And this top area is called a menu bar. So when I say, for example, open the camera menu, you'll know that I'm talking about this menu, so you'll just simply click on it. So starting with the File menu, and this is the most self-explanatory menu. You can create a new document. You can create a new document with custom settings. You can open an existing document from your computer. You can access your recent documents. You can change or access the current document settings. Close this document and go back to the welcome screen. Save this document or save this as you can also input 3D models, images, and some other stuff. And then we'll come back to this in a lot more detail later in the course. You can also export your objects, 3D objects, out of a dimension. Next we have the Edit menu. So this allows you to access some of the frequently used commands, such as undo, redo, cut, copy, paste, duplicate, delete, and you can also access your preferences here. You'll also notice the hotkeys listed right here on the right side of the command. So you can also use these hotkeys to quickly access these commands. Next we have Object, menu, image and so on. So we'll cover these in more detail as we will be learning dimension will have to use these different menus. And we'll learn this in a lot more detail. Below this, we have our design and when they're temps, Design tab is where we will be working most of the time and working on a 3D shots, render images and all those kind of things. Once we have our setup completed and we want to export final images out of dimension, then we can access the renderer menu. Now this allows us to render the final images and exploit those into maybe Photoshop for some final touches, or maybe uploading to social media networks or anything like that. So if we go ahead and switch back to the Design tab, here in the center, we have what is called Canvas. So this is our 3D view. This is the area where we will spend 99% of our time working on 3D models. On the left side of her 3D Canvas, we have our starter content. So this allows us to access the content that it will be provided with this application. And there's tons of content. So you have 3D models, you have materials, you have lighting, analog more stuff. Again, we'll be covering these in a lot more detail. How you can create an access does change settings and all that fun stuff. Now, on the very left of our interface here we have our toolbar. So all of our tools are, tools are listed over here. Now the tools are grouped into different categories. And so at the top here we have our movement tools. Then we have some tools for selecting or having a consistent look across her objects. And then we have some kind of camera controls down here. No dimension by nature is designed so that it is really easy to learn and simple to use application. So you don't have a lot of tools, but at the same time you have a lot of functionality. As we learned this in by the end of this course, you'll see how powerful this application is, yet how simple it is. So here on the far right we have some panels called seen panel. This will give you an outline of your scenes. So as you add more and more objects, you'll be able to keep track of those objects here. It allows you to select those objects, change some properties. So those kind of things. And here we have actions and Properties panel. Now, these panels are context sensitive, so the content that it displays will change depending on what type of acid or object you currently have selected. For example, if we go ahead and click on this camera here, you can see how it changes these settings here we can select environment and we'd see different settings. This will change depending on type of acid or object that you're currently working with. Okay, so this is our properties and action panels. Next we have some of these controls here. So these are for controlling our camera. One thing to note here is that a dimension has same functionality available in multiple places. For example, we have these iconic views. If you want to prefer using iconic view, you can use these. Or if you don't want to use these, then you can also access same functionality and little camera menu. So you'll see a lot of functionality available in multiple places. So this was a quick overview of the interface. Just to recap, at the very top here we have our menu bar. Below this we have our design and when they tabs. And then here in the center, we have our 3D Canvas. On the left, we have our standard content and toolbar. On the right here we have our scene, action and Properties panel. Now, this gives you a quick overview. You just need to remember some of these names here. For example, action panel Properties panel. Later as we progress through the course, we'll be covering each area in a lot more detail. So we'll begin with each step by step and then we will also look at examples. So we'll create some real-world examples using it. I'll be dimension. So it's gonna be a lot of fun. 4. Selecting, Moving, Rotating & Scaling Objects: Now that you're a little bit more familiar with interface for dimension, we'll take a look at how we can add basic objects into 3D Canvas. How we can manipulate those objects. For example, moving, rotating, selecting, and scaling. So that you can easily work with your objects to add an object from the standard content into your 3D Canvas is really simple. You can simply left-click on an object and it will get added into your scene. You can also left click and hold on one of the object and drag it. And as you drag this into the 3D Canvas, you can see that it shows a preview where this object will be added. And if we release our click, you can tell that object is added. Ok, so we have these two objects added. To select an object. You can simply go ahead and left click on it and it's selected object and you have this blue outline. It tells you that this object is currently selected. Now to deselect an update, you can simply left click outside anywhere in this empty area and it deselects your object. You can select multiple objects by left clicking and holding and dragging out. It allows you to create what is called marquee selection. So you can see that both objects in our selected, again, clicking on this empty area, will these linked your objects? So if you have multiple objects in your scene, what happens is some time, for example, if I go ahead and add this coffee cup in the background here. If you drag using the left mouse button, you can see you also select all of the objects. Or sometime what happens is that you want to select certain objects while leaving some objects and selected. In that case, you can click on an object and then hold down shift key, and then click on the next object. And you can see both objects are selected. Holding down Shift key, clicking on the next object will select all of these objects. Same thing goes for the selecting. So if you hold down Shift button on your keyboard and then click on an object, it gets de-selected. So you can use this method to select multiple objects. For these selecting again, you can click anywhere on this empty area. You can also combine this hotkey or keyboard shortcut with your marquee selection. So for example, if you have this object selected, you can hold down Shift button and then create a marquee selection so you can see it as the selection. And you can also subtract from your selection. Something like here. So really easy. Now, we also have some settings for our selection. So if we go ahead and right-click here on this very top tool here. So also, another thing to keep in mind is that when you hover your cursor on any of the tool here, it displays a tooltip so you can see that it tells you the name of the tool, in this case is our select tool. You can also see the hotkey which you can use to quickly switch to the tool instead of moving to the toolbar here. So you can left click and hold here to access initial settings. Or you can also right-click to access the same minimum. Now this is a multi-purpose tool, so it includes selection or move, rotate and scale tools on it. Those are located up here. And then we also have some mudstone here. So you can see that when we have our selection tool selected or the multi-purpose tool, and we have our selection modes here. And by default, the behavior is set to new selection. It means that when you select an object and then click on the next object, the previous one gets the selected. But if you right-click here and then add to your selection, you can click on an object and you can see it keeps adding to your selection instead of selecting the previous object. And you can subtract from your selection. And this can be a bit time consuming if you go back and forth switching between different modes. So it's more preferable if you use the Shift button hotkey. So if I hover cursor on one of the tools here, you can see that it says Add to selection shift. So we can use Shift button on our keyboard to easily do that. And everything related to this tool is that we have this partial marquee selection. So what this means is that when you draw a murky box, you can see that even if your box of touches the object, it gets selected. So this is the default behavior, but sometimes people want to keep it in a different way. For example, sometimes people want that once an object is completely within this bunks, then it should get selected. So if you want something like that, then you can right-click here and two enough partial marquee selection. Now, if you draw a box here, you can see that you want select the objects that are not fully within this bunks. So you'll have to draw and include your object within this box. And then it will get selected, something like here. And I'll go ahead and right-click here and turn this back on. Okay, so now that you know how to select your objects, next step is moving your object. So when you click on an object, you can see that it displays this gizmo or this manipulator. This allows you to manipulate an object, manipulate your object. So this is a multi-purpose tool. It means that you can use it to move, rotate, and scalar objects. You can also right-click here and then select these tools individually. Good access, some additional functionality using these tools. Now, you can see that if you go back and forth between these two, it can consume a lot of time. Imagine doing this about a 100 times a day. So it's more preferable to learn the Han keys and then use those. It really speeds up your workflow. So to access these tools using the hotkeys you can use, you can press V on your keyboard to select this selection tool, and then you can press S to access the scale tool R to rotate. So really easy, v2, such bacterium selection tool as for scale on a full rotation, really easy. Once you have this tool activated, you can see that you have these three arrows here, and these are called axes are 3D world. Let me just move this on the side here. So this is our 3D world. It starts at this point here called origin CRM. This is when all of the values of our optics are set to 0. This will make more sense when we take a look at the Properties panel. So are all starts here and then it has three axis. And you can identify those axes by looking down here in the left, lower left corner of your 3D Canvas. So we have x, y, and z axes. So the red one is X axis and then green for y and blue for Z axis. You can move your objects onto any of these axes. You can left click and hold on one of the arrow and then move your mouse. And you can see it allows you to move your object in that axis. Now if you want to rotate the ending, but using these circles here so you can rotate this way. You can also wrote heater and object this way. And finally this way. So this is for rotation and for scaling, you can use these boxes here. So you can scale your object uniformly up and down. If you want to scale your object and specific axis to distort your object, then you'll have to use the Scale tool. Or you can also use the Properties panel. So you can see that this is the default tool. Also you can click and hold here in the middle sort of point of your object. And it allows you to move your object and align it to a different objects. So for example, as you left click and hold here and then move your object, it will look for surface below it and it aligned itself to that surface. This can be really handy for placing your objects. Ok, so this is the default selection tools. So when we right-click here, so this is the selection tool here. Next we have our move, rotate and scale tool. So you can click here to access the movement tool. And this has some additional controls. So we have seen how we can use these arrows to move your mover objects. We also have what are called planes. So this allows us to move an object into axes at once. For example, let's say that I want to quickly move my object on the ground here. I can use this plane here, and it allows me to do that. I can move this way, so up and down. And this way I can do same thing here for this side. So you can see this is some extra functionality. It can't be accessed if I'm on the default and tool. Next we have our rotation tool. So here again we have these axes that allows us to rotate our object on when specific axis. Or we can also click on this empty area and it allows us to rotate an object freely in any direction. Next, we have our scale tool. So again here we can scale up and down on two axes at once. And we also have these standard axes which allows us to scale up and up and down on one specific axis. So let's go ahead and select all of these objects and then we can press Delete on the keyboard to get rid of these objects. And let's add a simple coffee cup here. And let's recap what we just went through. When you add an object, you can simply select your object by left clicking on it. And you can deselect an object by simply clicking outside on this empty area. You can left click and hold and drag to select, create a box of selection. And it allows you to select multiple objects. If you have multiple objects in your scene, you can use your marquee selection to select multiple objects. Or you can select your first object and then hold down Shift button on your keyboard and click on the next object. And same thing for the selecting. What do you have an object selected and you want to move the object, you can right-click here to access the settings for the tools and select your movement tool. And then you get this gizmo, which allows you to move your object in any axis. You can also rotate your object. And you can also scale up and down your object. You can also access individual tools for these different commands, which gives you some extra functionality. For example, if you press R, It allows you to access the write it as for scaling and we back to selection tool. So this was a quick overview at moving objects. Now, this is a pretty good method of moving objects, but a little bit of problem with this tool is that it's not precise. For example, let's say that I want to move my object in a numeric value so that I have even distance, the distance between multiple objects. Or let's say that I want to rotate to a certain degree. I don't have that fine control if I use this gizmo or manipulator. And for the rotation you can hold down Shift button and then wrote it. And you can see that it sort of snaps between five increment, actually 15 increments. And you can sort of hold on that. It makes it easy to snap your object and rotate that exactly 90 degrees. But more precise way of doing this would be to use our properties panel. Once we select an object, you can see that we have some settings related to the subject. So the first setting we have is our pivot point. So this is where this gizmo appears correctly selected or sent to bottom. So we can see that manipulator at the bottom here. Next we have centered and we also have top. For now we'll go ahead and select bottom. Next we have the position. So just like in the start of this video, I said our world starts at this point here. So this is the origin. So if we go ahead and click on one of the box here and type in 0, you can see that it allows us to type in numeric values. We can go ahead and everything, and you can see it moves back to the origin. So this is where our 3D world stance. We can, as we move around objects using any of these arrows, you can see the value updates here on the Properties panel. So it's showing that our object is about 24 centimeters away from its origin on the z-axis. If I move it this way, you can see that it tells me same thing. It makes it really easy to precisely move your object to any location in your fully world security. We have our y-axis from moving up and down. Now to change this value, you have two options. You can left click and then type in a precise numeric value. Or you can also left click and hold here and then drag to interactively change that value. You can hold on shift burdens to speed this value up while dragging. So it gives you a fine control over movement of your object. And then we also have rotation, x, y, and z axes. We also have scale and size. Now scaling works a little bit different. Next skill, and you'll see this chain I can, if it's unchecked, then when you change one of the value, it only updates that value. So you can see you, you'll be able to change one specific axis of your object. So this allows you to distort your object. But if you want to uniformly scale up and down your object, then you can link these values. And then when you type in a value, you can see all of these values will update and your object will scale up or scale down uniformly. Something like here. And then down here we have our sites. So this is the actual size in centimeters, and now scale is just a factor. So you can multiply your size by simply typing in one value here. So if we scale that up, you can see it makes it really easy to sort of scale up and down your objects. These are four different values that we can access here. So it makes it really easy. For example, if I go ahead and reset the rotation of the object, let's say that I want to rotate this object onto this angle. So I wanted to tilt it little bit. So that's going to be z axis. We can go ahead and left click and hold here just to get a rough idea. And then when we are happy with the value, we can go ahead and type that in here. So let's say that I want to rotate this object about 45 degrees. I can type in negative 45. One thing to note here is that you can type in negative and positive numbers. For example, if we move this year on this side of the arrow, you can see that this value will be in the positive side. If we move it against the arrow, it will be in the negative value, and then once we are at the origin, it will be 0. So anything on this side of the origin will be in the positive number and then anything on that side. Same goes for this site here some XML you can see are changes to negative and positive. So for example, if I want to rotate this the other way, I'll need to remove the negative signs. So I'll just type in 45 degrees and you can see it for it. It's, so you can see that dimension controls are really easy. Now here I would recommend stopping for a minute and practicing with the tools you'll then so I'd recommend clicking on some of the objects here and then try moving those objects around so that you have just a bit of Hang how this works. And then we'll move on. 5. How to Change Views: Now that you know how to work with objects in dimension, it's time to look at the camera controls. Camera control allows you to move your camera or this 3D view to any angle so that he can easily view your objects from any angle you want. Let's begin by adding a simple objects. So I'll go ahead and left-click here on this coffee cup and it's added into the scene. So up until now we've been looking at an objects from one static angle to access our camera tools. They are located here on the left side of her toolbar. So this sort of group here is for controlling our camera. So the first of all here is our orbitals. So this allows us to rotate our view. Next we have the Pan tool, and finally we have the dolly tool. Let's begin with the orbital, so we'll go ahead and click on it. And it selects the tool. And then we can left click and hold here and then rotate. So left click and hold and move the mouse to rotate in our view, to view or object from any angle. So we can move up and down left flight, diagnose. It allows us to view our object from any angle. Next we have the Pen tool, so let's go ahead and click on it and it allows us to pan the view. For that we have a dolly tool which allows us to zoom in and out. So this is not actually zooming of the lens, but instant movie, but instead moving the physical camera closer and further away. So these are three different tools. Now, there are hierarchies for accessing these tools. So that would make your workflow a lot faster. Because if you go back and forth between selecting these tools, for example, let's say I want to rotate my view. I'll select the tool and then rotate the view. Let's say that I want to scale this object. I will go ahead and select the tool. So if you do keep doing this multiple times throughout the day, you'll waste a lot of time switching between the tools if you want to work efficiently, I'd recommend spending some time and remembering the hotkeys. So as you work with the hotkeys, it will become your second nature and you won't have to think about the hotkeys. It just needs a little bit of practice. So another faster way of doing this would be to simply access the tools using the hotkeys. So if you press one on your keyboard, it allows us to allow you to access the orbital. And if you press on the keyboard, it allows you to access the Pen tool. Three for Dolly tool, so one to rotate and then two to select the different tool, three for zooming in and out. So this is the second method of doing this. And finally, we have a method where we don't select the tools themselves, but instead just use the keyboard shortcut. So I'll go ahead and select the default selection tool here. Now if I want to just rotate the view, I can hold down the right mouse button and it allows me to rotate the view. So it makes it really easy without going to select any of these tools here. So holding them right most button and then moving the view. And then if you wanted to paint the view, you can hold down the middle mouse button and it allows you to pin the view. There's also another Heikki. If you hover your cursor here, you can see that this is space plus right mouse button. So you can also use that if you don't have the middle mouse button or if you don't want to use that, you can hold on space and right mouse button at the same time to pin the view. And finally, you have the dolly tool so you can use your mouse scroll wheel to zoom in and out. So this is more of a incremental zoom. If you want to have more smoother resume, then you can use this hard case. You have to hold down the Control key. And so you have to hold down Shift Space and bypass button. So space shift and right mouse button and then you can zoom in and out. So let's go through this one more time. You can hold down right mouse button to orbit here, view around here, something like here. And then if you want to pin your view, you can hold on the middle mouse button or you can also hold down space and then right mouse button. And then for zooming in and out, you can use your mouse scroll wheel or you can hold on space shift and right mouse button. Once you have these three tools so you can move your 3D camera to anywhere within your scene, for example, let's say that I want to zoom out real quickly. I can go ahead and hold on space shift and right mouse button and zoom out. I can rotate the view. I can zoom back in here. I can paint the view. So you can see that it makes it really easy. We also have some additional functionality that can be accessed under camera menu and also using this iconic view. So we'll first go through this iconic view and then we'll take a look at the camera menu. So we can go ahead and click here on this button here, click and hold to access this menu here. Or we can also right-click to access the same menu. So within this, we have three options. We have framed a frame selection, we have frame all, and we also have frame all end reset Cameron. Let's start with the first one. Was we have an object selected. We can right-click here and then select frame all. Or we can also use the keyboard shortcut f. It frames that object within our view. If we have multiple objects in the scene and multiple objects are selected, let's just move this out of the view. Although the Shift key and select this object. And we can click on it and you can see it frames both objects. We can also right-click here and then click on frame all it frames all of the objects even if they're not selected. So let's add another object outside of the view. And then we can zoom in here, click on the empty space to de-select everything, right-click and then select frame all. And you can see it frames all of these objects into the view. And finally we have frame OT and reset camera frames all of the objects, and then move our camera back to the default position where we started with dimension. Ok, so these are three controls located on here. Next we have camera, undo and redo. So if you move your camera and then you think, oops, it was a mistake. I think I should go back to the previous angle. You can click on this button. It takes you a step back. You can do this multiple times. You can redo the camera. So let's say that I move my camera a little bit here and then I undo the camera. I think, oops, this was a mistake. Let's go back to that angle so I can redo that. So undo and redo them. Next we have our camera bookmarks. We can click here to access this panel. It allows us to bookmark different angles so that we can easily access those and bookmarks. So to create a bookmark, let's say that I want bookmark of this angle where I have all of these objects in sort of this angle. We can go ahead and click on this plus symbol and it creates a view. We can type in a name here, or we can just simply left click out here to leave the default name later. If we need to rename this, we can double click here on the name and it allows us to rename. And if we have workers, so you can see we have some buttons here so we can delete the bookmark and we can update the bookmark. So let's say that I need to make a slight adjustment. I can go ahead and zoom in a little bit here. And then I can click on this button here and it updates that view so that I have updated bookmark. Next lesson that I want to move my view to sort of this top angle. And then I can create a new bookmark. So now that I have two bookmarks, I can easily switch between these by simply left clicking on it. So this is really helpful where you need to render multiple images from different angles. You can easily set up different bookmarks. You can also delete the bookmarks and also you have what is called a home view. So you can see that you have this little symbol of home next to one of your view. Let's go ahead and add one more bookmarks or that it is easier to switch between these. And to update the home view, you can click on this Home icon next to one of the viewport. So let's say that I have this set as home. If I move my cursor out here, we can click on these three dots here. And you can see it is switched to the home view and I can click here and it switches to that particular bookmark. If I update, update this home view, I can switch to them that when here. And when we click on this freelancer, we have some additional functionality such as Update home to current view. So this is same as clicking on this button here. And then we also have new bookmark from current view. So this is same as clicking on this button here, and that may also asterisk to previous and next bookmarks, so it allows you to cycle through your bookmarks. Now all of this functionality in that we have seen here in this iconic view can be accessed and under the camera minimum. So you have your camera undo redo, frame selection options here. And then you also have that menu that you can access under these three dots here. And finally, you have your camera view so you can quickly switch to different angles. For example, top view. You can also switch to left field. So it makes it really easy to switch to these views or you can use the keyboard shortcuts. And finally, you have this button here which enables the render preview. Now this will be really helpful when we were working in the material section where you need to test your materials because this is just the default view to view your objects. More realistic vendor, what your final image will look like, you need to enable this. And this is bit resources intensive on your computer so you can turn it on all the time. But it's more helpful when you're working on lighting and material. So that's where you'll need it most. So these are our navigation controls. If you just go through these, I spent some time and get comfortable with it. You'll be able to navigate to any area and it's different angles for your shots in anything like that. 6. Importing 3D Models: In this video, we will go to adding models from different sources. So we've seen how we can add an object from the starter content by clicking on it. Let's go through some other methods of adding antics interior scene. So we have a lot of 3D models included with dimension, and they begin to use in a 3D scene, you can simply left-click on one of the object and it gets added into your scene. So this is pretty basic. Let's say you have a model on your computer or how you can access some models from Internet. So if you go ahead and click on this plus symbol, you can see that you have what is called Adobe's OK. You can go to and click on it. And then you have a free collection. You can click on it and it opens up Adobe's website. So Adobe has a lot of model available on their website. So these are optimized to work in dimension. So you don't have to go to a lot of steps. You can download these easily and then import them into dimension. So you can see that we have quite a big sort of catalog here of different 3D models. We have couple of pages here. Then you can go through we have tons of objects and that you can download here and then access or work with them in dimension. You can also search in Google, for example, free 3D models. So you can search for free 3D models and there are a lot of website that you can use to download free 3D models. Now each absolute has different teams in condition and licensing, so you'll have to go through those. You can also use a service by Google called poly dot google.com. It has some basic objects that you can also use. For example, let's say that we are looking for a cup. We can type that in here. And you can see we have some of these objects here. Let's say that I won this cup here, so I can go ahead and click on it. And it sort of starts loading in here. Once we have the object loaded, we can view it from any angle. And then you can click on the download button here. And it allows us to download multiple file formats. We need the OBJ file. You can go and download it and you can see that it tells you the license. And then it can download the file and then import into dimension. For now, we'll go ahead and download one of the object from Adobe Stock website. So let's say that we are looking for an object. Let's go through some of these objects and maybe we want an object, something like, for example, this triangular fish tank. Ok, so we can go and click on license for free and it should ask for RAW AD. We can go ahead and sign in with our Adobe ID. Okay, so you can see that I've logged in with my account and now if I go and click on license for free, it can add it into my Adobe ID so you can see that it says licensed and then we can go and download the model. So it is redownload for free. The download has started. You can see that down here, or I can just read downloaded by clicking on this button here. So it's about 15 megabytes. It should just download. And then we can click on this button here and show it in folder. Oh, case it's downloaded. We can go ahead and click here and then extract its content. And we have this folder here that we can access. So these are some of the objects, I think Yes, this, and these are the objects that were extracted from this file here. So we have a rectangular fish tank OBJ file, and then we also have this material file. If we access the folder, you can see that it contains the textures. Now, dimensional will automatically input these textures because it has MDL file. So you can simply drag your object from here into Adobe dimension and it should import the object. So you can see we have fish tank imported into dimension. You can also import this using the menu so you can go ahead and click on the File menu. And then under importing and select 3D model, you can also click on this plus symbol. And then under import your content. You can select 3d model. It opens up your file explorer and navigate to the lecture. We're, if you have your 3D objects, in this case we have downloads. So we'll go and select that object, click on open, and it opens up that object and it will be added and the origin of the 3D world. So you can see that we have our tank added. Now it looks a bit dull because we are not in the render preview mode. So if I go ahead and enable it, you can see that it looks better now. It's still pretty simple because we don't have a lot of lighting and stuff like that setup. So that's something that we'll be looking at later in the course. But that's how you import an object from your computer using either the file menu or simply dragging and dropping. And you can also download your models from Adobe stock free collection. You can use Google to search for 3D models. You can also create your own 3D models in different 3D modeling applications such as 3DS, Max, blender, Maya, or any kind of 3D modeling applications. So you can import those in here. But usually most of the time when you're working on product shots or things like that. Dimension has pretty good amount of 3D models already included. You can use to create those shots. 7. Starter Content: Now we'll go through the starter contents so we've seen how we can work with our content briefly, but unless dive a lot deeper on how the standard content works. So at the very bottom of our interface here on the lower left-hand corner, you'll notice that we have this contact button which allows us to disable or enable this panel. If you need some extra estate to work with your 3D objects, you can do that. So once you access your starter content at the very time periods in click to access your starter content or your CC libraries. You have the three dark but interior that allows you to toggle between the grid endless stream. And then down here you have a search bar which allows you to search for assets. For example, if I'm looking for a bottle, I could just type that in here. So as I start typing in bottle, it should filter out all the bottles. If I'm searching for a material, for example, glass, I can start typing that in here. And you can see we have all three type of glass objects. So it makes it really easy. Next we have filter. You can filter 3D objects by clicking on this model filter here you have materials, you have lighting and images. And you also have these downward pointing arrows that you can click to collapse or expand these different sections. So at the very top here we have our basic shapes. You can go ahead and click on one of the object and it gets added into your scene. You can also drag and drop your objects to add them to a specific place or location in the 3D view. So let's go through some of the objects. The first object we have is a 3D text. Once we add the text, let me just move my view here. We can go ahead and select it and then access is settings. So the basic shapes and additional controls compared to the models. Models have only their movement, rotation, and scaling properties. But the basic shapes has some additional functionality you can use it to create and different things such as platforms for your products and different things like that. So once we ended 3D text, you can see that we have the controls. So these are the universal control across both type of objects. We have our position, we have a rotation scale and size. Below this, you can see that these are specific to different objects. So in this case, we are working with text. So we have our text. We can select our text here and type in something like, for example, Adobe. And let's move our view a bit closer here. Next we have the type of font that we're using, styles of that font. We have the line spacing so we can increase or decrease that. We have. We also have actually used the letter spacing and then we also have the line spacing. If you have multiple lines of text, you can also change the alignment of your text, left, center, and right. And here you have the size of the text. You can, you can increase or decrease that. You have the depth. So this is the extrusion of the text. Let's go with something like two centimeters. You can left click and hold and then drag on any of the Valley or you can type in a specific number. Next, we have the Babel controls set by default. We don't have any bevel applied to the text. You can enable it here. And you can see we have this beveled edge here. So we can go down here. We have a lot of presets that you can select and can use it as a starting point. And then we can also achieve some properties. So for example, let's say that I go with this round shape and we have the width here. So we can increase or decrease the width. We have the angle. We have repeat. So if we want to repeat the bevel multiple times. We also have the space. We can increase or decrease the spacing. And these properties will change in different tasks, sort of create different effects depending on the preset that you're using. So for example, we can increase and decrease the space. And you can tell it sort of creates that space. You can also repeat multiple times. You can change the angle a little bit. You can also change the width. Okay, so let's get rid of the text here. Let's add a basic cube object. And we can press F on the keyboard to frame this object within the view. And then down here we have our keep setting. So we have the width of the cube, we have height of the cube, we have depth, and we also have bevel. So if we want to have soft or rounded corners, we can enable the levels. We can increase or decrease the radius value. And we can also increase or decrease the signs. So let's decides the more boxy sharp shape and the more science, the more rounder the sheep. Let's add a sphere. So we have type of the sphere. We have multiple type of type here for the sphere. We also have our radius. So this is the size of the sphere and we have subdivision. So when we increase the subdivision, it creates more smoother object. We have a torus, again, similar settings here, so you can see some of the settings here. And then we have a common plane and a cylinder objects. So these are some objects that will leave to you to explore. And then down here we have our pre-built models. We can add a square bottle. We have food pouch, we have drinking coke, cartoon, we have Q box, we have tissues, we have LED sign, and we have bus tend. We also have some splash. And then we also have some of these shapes here such as pyramid. We also have a drop here, we have a pipe. So all of these objects can be added here, but you can see that we don't have any additional settings except for the basic properties or parameters. Let's get rid of this object. Down here we have our Adobe standard materials. Now, just to give you an idea on how you can add your materials, you can simply left click and hold and then drag it onto your object and will be added to your object. For example, if I drag and drop the metal material, you can tell it gets added little Explorer settings and stuff like that in the more detail. You can also enable the render previews to see it a bit better. For example, if I go ahead and drag in dropped water texture or the material. You can see I'm curious that material and let's change our plastic bottle. I'll go ahead and turn off the render premium. And then we have some additional materials. So these are from substance materials. And then we have a lighting. The lighting can be really easily accessed by these presets. You can left click on one of the preset in content changes the look of your scene entirely. And if you enable the vendor preview mode, it gives you a better idea on how the final lighting or the final vendor will look like. So we'd recommend or suggest playing around with these different lighting setup. So you can just simply left click on one of the setup, any changes the look of your scene. Next we have images. These can be added as your background, so you can click on one of the image and you can see how it gets added. And then you can also click on this mat image button and it allows you to match your objects to the image so you can click on, okay, this is just to get you started later, we'll release option in a lot more detail for now, just so that you have a little bit of fun playing around with different things. I would recommend taking out some of these different answers that we have here in the starter content. So we have a 3D models, we have our materials, we have lighting presets, we have images. So here's spent some time play around with different models, try creating some basic shapes at materials. Have some fun with the vendor preview, and then we'll continue. 8. Scene and Action Panel: And now we'll take a look at the actions and seen panel. Let's begin by adding a simple object. So we'll go ahead and add the square bottle into the scene. So let's begin with the scene panel. So as we add more and more objects, those objects will be displayed within the scene panel. And it can be used to select those objects. We can left click on any of the Name here and select that particular acid. For example, there's curb bottle. Once we select the bottle, you can see that we have our action panel displaying some settings and also the properties panel. Also when we hover your cursor, you can see we have some controls next to the objects. So we can click on this lock icon to lock an object. What it means is that we won't be able to select r objects even when we try to marquee select or left-click to select. So this object is luck is really helpful when you have objects in the background and you want to lock those objects so that you don't accidentally select and move those objects. It can be really helpful. Next, you also have an icon which allows you to hide your object temporarily. So if you're working on something and it comes in your view, you can go in and hide it. And then later you can click on these buttons again to unlock and maybe even unhide your object. You can click on your object and it gets, it gets enacted. Now your object has different components or parts of it. This you can see we have an entire bottle and then we also have its lid. So when you click on your object in the 3D view, you can tell it expands here. But when you select your object in the scene panel, it doesn't expand. So to expand your object and click on this folder icon and you can see it expands the parts of your object. And we have the lid of your object, you have the bottle, you have the safety ring. And this will change depending on different type of objects. And if you hover your cursor on an object part, so not the object itself, but part of that object. You can see you have some controls here so you can hide or locked doors, those individual parts. And you can also access this material. So you can click on this arrow here. And it takes you to the materials part of that object. So under seen panel, you'll see all the different materials or graphics that you have on that model. You can click on this back button to go back a step. Also, when you have an object selected, you can access some actions here, so you can delete your object quickly. You can duplicate that object. You can group your object. You can also move it to ground. So if your object is above the ground, you can click on this button and it snaps it to the ground. Grouping allows you to group multiple objects and will come to this in a moment. And duplicate allows you to duplicate an object so really easily. And you can also delete your objects. So if you have an object duplicated, it can go ahead and delete it. If you select multiple objects, you can click on Group button and it creates a new group that he can collapse. And you can see it contains three different objects. So we can click here and you can see all of these three objects. And really in this group said we can double click here on the name of the group. And we can type in something like bottles, so it allows us to organize. We can double-click on any of the name here for any object to rename it so that it's more descriptive and were able to recognize that object. Okay, so you can see that we have a group and group and others to move multiple objects at once. And we didn't select them and then move them really easily. But if we want to select part of that object, we can go ahead and use something like here, so we can expand the group itself and then select an object or its part of the object from seeing panel. And if you click here on your object, you can see it selects the entire group. So if you want to change this behavior, you can right-click on the Selection Tool Settings. And then you can see that it says group select. You can turn it off, and then you can select the individual parts of your object. I'll go ahead and turn it back on. Okay, so we have our bottles, and then within bottles we have all of these objects. So let's say that I want to go through with this group. So to get rid of this group, I have to select it and then click on the object menu. And then we have group option here. So this is for grouping if you don't want to use this button. And then you can ungroup your objects. And you can also lock and unlock your objects using this menu. So this is something that we'll cover in the menus video where we will go through all of these menus in a lot more detail. So let's go then ungroup these objects, and it gets to that group disappears. And we have three bottles here. Once you have a part of an object selected, we have the similar controls here such as delete, duplicate group, and moved to ground. But we have two additional controls here. So we have pleased graphic on model. It allows us to add graphics on the selected model. We can also click on this button to access the material instead of going and clicking on this arrow here. So let's go ahead and recap what we just went through. You can select your objects using your scene panel. By simply left click on your object. You can rename your objects by double-clicking on them. So double clicking on the name of that object, you can expand or collapse your objects by clicking on this folder button. You can hide and lock your objects. You can select the parts of your object and then you can access this material, or again, Haydn, logged data object or part of their object. And using the action panel, you can access some of the frequently accessed actions really easily and conveniently in one single place. 9. Detailed Look at Tools: And now we'll take a look at the tools in a lot more detail. So let's begin with this first button here on the toolbar. When we click on it, it allows us to access this data content CC libraries, import menu. We can also access Adobe Stock. We can also access it or be substance source. Below this, we have our selection tool. We can right-click to access these settings. We have the selection tool, select the Move, Rotate, and Scale tools. We've already seen how these tools work. We can access some additional fatality down here. We know how the group select works. Align to scene is something that we haven't seen. So let's go ahead and turn it on. And we can add a coffee cup here into the scene. Now if I go ahead and rotate this object, you can see that the gizmo is still aligned it to the world axis. It means that if I want to move my object in this diagonal angle, I won't be able to, so I'll have to go this way and then this way. So it can be tedious in certain scenarios. So in those kind of scenarios, you can turn off a line too soon and then it will align it to your object. So when you rotate your object, the manipulator will also rotated with your object. And then it makes it really easy to move your object. And these diagonal angles. We'll go ahead and turn it on. We've already seen how partial marquee selection works. Let's move to the next tool. So the next tool is the magic wand tool. So this is a great tool because it allows you to select parts of an object. So when you import more complex object in two-dimension from other 3D applications, you'll be able to select parts of those objects. So to explain this better, let's go ahead and add a more complex object. So that can be maybe this bus tenths. So let's go ahead and add it. And then we can press F on the keyboard to frame this into the view. Okay, so once we have that framed, and let's scroll down here. And let's say that I want to add in this damaged glass material. When I and click on the material, you can see that it gets applied to the entire object. So let's say that I don't want to do that, but instead I went to apply materials to different parts of this object. So that's where I can use the magic wand tool. I can right-click to access the settings. These are pretty basic settings, so we can change the selection mode again, we can hold on shared burden to add or subtract from the selection. And we have our selection size. Also, this will work differently on different objects because it uses Adobe senses to recognize your object and select parts of it. Now we can go ahead and click on the part of our object. And then let's say that I want to apply this different material, maybe this strip material. And you can see that it only applies to the selected area. I can go ahead and select this part and maybe this backside by holding down Shift button. And then we can add in the strip material. So you can see how it gets applied. And then for the top part, we can go in and select it. Also hold down Shift button to select this very Tom part. And then maybe add this plastic. Let's add metal. And you can see that it makes it really easy to select parts of your object and then apply the material. You can change the selection size by dragging and dropping this slider. So when you have larger selection, it means when you click on an area, you can see it selects more area. And I'll just leave this as small. Below this, we have the assembler tool. Now this is a pretty good tool because it allows you to have consistent look across your objects. To look at this better, let's go ahead and select the object and get rid of it. And then frame back on this object here. Let's take a look at the object and move it on the side here frame again here. Actually deselect everything and press F2 frame all objects. Okay, so let's go in and select the sampler to right-click on it to access the settings. Now we have the sample type so we can sample the material or the color. So what it means is that if we select the material, it means that we want to sample the material of one object and then apply it on the other object. If we sample the color, it means that we want to sample the color of this area and then apply that on the other object. And then for the modes here we have sample and then apply. You can select either of these. And then when you hold down Alt or option, it allows you to switch to the other one. So if you have the sample selected, it means that you'll sample first and then you hold down the OK button to apply that assembled material. Or you can also switch the mode here in this tool. So let's drag and drop this strip material here. And let's say that I want to sample this material and then apply it on the other object. So to do this, I can left click here to sample them and drill. And you can see that it samples the material over here. And then if we hold down the open and you can see it switches the cursor, we can left click and you can see how it applies the same material over there. And there's a bug in this tool that I discovered recently is that if I try to sample the color here, you can see even though my cursory set to the sample type, when it left click, you can see it actually applies the material. So this is a bug that I think it'll be and doesn't know about. So you can see it shouldn't apply. The material is rather sample it because I was not holding the ALT button to apply the material, but rather I was trying to sample. But because this part of my object is selected, is trying to sort of sample that material over down here. So to get rid of this, you'll need to select your selection tool, this lecture object, and then switch back to the top here. So it allows you to sample the color and then you can apply it. So let's say that I want to sample this column. I first need to deselect the object and then switch back to the tool, and then left-click to sample the color, although an old burden and apply the material. So there's a little bit of bug in this tool. So you can see that it makes it really easy if you have a material applied from here and maybe you have made some changes and you wanted to apply that material to other objects quickly without going through all the hassle of recreating that material. Next, we have our camera controls. As you have seen how the arbiter will works, but we have some additional settings. So by default, R RB tool allows us to arbitrary camera up and down, left and right. So if you want to constrain this to one egg angle, you can select that here. So constraint horizontally or vertically. You can also orbit around the cursor fun. Because now it orbits around sort of the center of your object, object that you have currently framed on. So if you select an object and then press F on your keyboard, it frames on that object and then it sort of orbits around that object. So if you want to orbit around your cursor, you can turn that on down here. Next we have what is called a tripod mode. So in this, in this mode, you can look around with your orbitals, so you can left click and hold and then look around. Next, you have the horizon tool. When you add images into dimension, sometime what happens is that it'll be doesn't recognize your image properly and then you can tell it where the horizon line of that images. And you also have the role Camera tool which allows you to roll the camera. Next you have the pen tool so you can right-click here to access. And you have been under cursors similar to the orbit tool. You have the dolly tool. So in the dolly tool you have settings such as dolly towards the cursor. You can also do it towards the cursor and only towards the center. So it's sort of dollies towards the center of the view. So if I can see sort of move to the center of the screen instead of the cursor. So if we switch back to the cursor mode, then if we Dolly, you can switch to, there's some kind of bug here. Let's see the tooltip. So you can see towards the mouse cursor and away from the center of the screen. But it's not happening because there is some kind of bugging this tool. I think this one should work. Yep, this one is working. And this should be the similar behavior of this one, but it's not working for some reason because both Cs and towards, towards and away from the cursor, mouse cursor. And then it says, the only towards the mouse cursor and away from the center of the screen. And then we have some additional settings such as the reversing our scroll wheel direction and all the Drank direction. And we can also access some additional options here such as dolly zoom tool, and we also have failed a few field if you will change the actual field of view. So it's like zooming in and out of our actual lens. Lens. And we also have the dolly zoom tool. So you can see sort of changes the perspective. And then we have a zoomed who here so we can click on it and it allows us to zoom in and out onto the canvas itself. So not within this 3D view, but rather on the canvas. So we can left click here and you can tell sort of zooms into the canvas. We can also left click and hold and then drag and area of the box. So zooms out. We can right-click here, zoom out. And let's zoom out a little bit by left clicking on some of the area here. Now, to do this more quickly, you can click on this drop-down here and you can see it is fit canvas and you can also zoom quickly to different percentage, but you can also do this using the plus sort of tool here. Say if you have a zoom tool selected, you can left click to zoom in or out. You can also left click and hold and drag the box and then it will zoom into this sparks something like here. So this is not actually zooming and the 3D view, but rather the actual canvas that we are working with. So this sort of Canvas is zoomed in instead of the 3D view. And then you also have the hand tool which allows you to sort of pin around if you have your zoom level set to something like maybe a 100% or so, you'll be able to use the hand tool. Okay, so these are some controls. So you can see how we went through these tools and these are some of the behaviors of the tool and that there is a slight bug in the dolly tool and also a little bit of a simpler tool that everything works as expected. Now, zooming off your canvas would be more efficient if you do it from this drop-down menu instead of the zoom tool, because it's, I find it a bit buggy because it's not working. It's not easy to zoom in and out using this tool. So if you zoomed in, you have to go and switch back to the tool. Or you can also use the hotkey. So if you hold an alphabet and you can do that, but it's more easy to just simply use this drop-down menu. The hand tool is helpful because if you're zoomed in, it makes it really easy to sort of pin around the canvas. Ok, so these are the tools of dimension. You might need to spend a little bit of time with these tools to get comfortable. So I would recommend playing around with different optics, add them, and then experiment with different materials and try using the magic one tool. You can often put an object from your computer and then use the magic wand tool on that object and see how it works, what kind of part of that objects are selected using the tool. And you can also tweak the size of the selection and those kind of things. 10. Menus: Okay, we have almost all of the basics covered. Let's go through all the little details that we haven't seen yet. So we'll go through all of the menus at the top here. So some of the things that we haven't seen yet and some of the other things that we've missed in the other areas. Let's begin by adding this wrong bottle into the view. So starting with the File menu, we know that we can create a new document with this one. We can create a new document and accesses settings before creating it, we can open an existing document accessor Recent Documents, change the setting of our current document cluster document and go back to the Welcome Screen for our document. Save as or revert to safes. If you're working with a file which you have changed, you can go back to the saved versions. So instead of closing and then reopening, you can click on this button. You can use input menu to input 3D models, images as background, images as lighting. So this is called image-based lighting or SDI. Images can be used it used ender lights will see this in more detail in the lighting section. You can place material on the selection for exploiting. You can export your 3D models scene and selected for arrow. It can show you to this scene for review and quit dimension. Next you have edit menu. So undo, redo, you can cut copy paste, peace, a peace has instance. So this is really helpful when you peace there's instance. So for example, if we copy this object and then we can paste it as an instance and just move it on the site here. So what happens is that when if you have a type of object that you'll be adding multiple times in your scene. And then when you change the material of one of their object, all of those other objects will stay unchanged. So if you want to create an object where you change the material of the original object, all of the other objects change themselves. So this can be really helpful in that kind of sense. So we have an instance, an instance of an object here. So if we go ahead and drag and drop immaterial on to the original object, you can see how it applies onto that instance. So without going through changes on the olive optics, we can just ps r objects as instances. So this can be really helpful. Let's switch back to the design tab here. Next we have duplicate, we have delete. You can also access your keyboard shortcuts. So this opens up this menu and you can access your general settings from here. Or you can also click on the preferences menu here. So within Preferences menu, you have your UI language, you have theme. You can also go to a darker theme. You have your UI spacing condensed all comfortable. You have enable snap to ground. You have reduced noise and rendering. You have viewport, anti aliasing and some of the basic settings. You can also reset your viewport settings. So there is a little bit of bug here. So let's go ahead and access their preferences. Select a dark theme and then the light theme, and then cancel out of it. Ok. Next we have our Object menu. We can group our objects using this menu, we can ungroup these objects. And you might have noticed that once we have an object and we want to hide that object. And let's say that we have these two objects. We can't hide these all at once. We have to either group these objects and then hide that group. Both objects at once. Or we can use this menu here. So we can use this menu to hide or show selected objects. They can t it hides those objects. So it's really helpful for doing this for multiple objects. And we can click again to show those optics. We can answer, lock and unlock multiple objects or a single object. We have high CIO and selected objects. So if you have a lot of objects in your scene, but you just want to keep few objects. You can select it and then you can use this option to hide all the unselected objects. You also have option to show all of the objects that are hidden. You have moved to ground and dropped a grant. And then you also have aligned to seen option here. And now the alliances in option is same as clicking on this button here. So this is that next we have the image menu, which allows you to resize the canvas. You can click here and then you can resize your canvas. You can also do the same thing by clicking on these pixels at the top of your canvas. Next you have the camera menu. We went through this menu so you know everything in this menu. Next we have the Select menu, which can be used to select all of the objects, de-select all or in virtual selection. For example, if we have maybe three objects in the scene, and they say that I have one of the objects selected. And I went to inverse this election. I want to select other objects and then deselect this one. I can easily do that using this menu. And you can see inverse my selection X, we have the View menu so we can access same thing as clicking on this area, zoom to fit Canvas and we can also zoom in and out incrementally. We have enable snap to ground. This is really helpful when you move your object up and down. So you can see it sort of snaps automatically to the ground. And if it's turned off, then it means that it won't snap to the ground, but instead go into the ground. I'll go ahead and make sure that it's enabled. You also have toggled grid. So this is really helpful for rendering. You can hide the grid. And you also have reset gizmo size and increase in decrease the gizmo sites. If you press plus on the keyboard, it allows you to scale up the gizmo size. And if you want to reset it, you can click on this button here to recent. Under Window menu, you have some basic options such as a hide and show the render Preview menu, which can be accessed here. You have the content panels which can be shown or hidden here you have the tool option. So it allows you to hide and show some of the panels here so that you have extra space to work in. And finally, we have the help menu which can be used to learn more about your Adobe dimension. You have some basics such as camera tutorials and few basic tutorials you can check for update, manage your account in some basic settings like that. And then we have this Home button here, which allows you to switch back to the welcome screen really quickly. So here we have this toolbar. We went through this. We know the starter content in the center, we have our canvas. We know the iconic views here, and we have some panels on the right here that we went through. Finally, we have some buttons at the top here. So this is for the hearing is 3D view. So you can snapshot as PNG file published really seen, export your selected 3D models. And you can also access health through this furniture. So these are the basics of dimension. By now you know everything about dimension. So you can import 3D models outside of dimension from your computer or download from websites and then input into dimension, you know how to select, Move, Rotate scalar objects. You know how to control the camera or navigate within dimension, you know about different places or panels in dimension. You know all the tools and how they work. So you have all of the basics that are needed to work in dimension. Next, we'll work on the materials. So we'll move to the material section where we will learn how to add materials and how to work with them. So the fun stuff like adding materials, graphics, creating product shards, abstract art, and you can create a lot of things in dimension. 11. Introduction to materials: In the teal section will start working with the materials. So let's begin by adding an object into a 3D Canvas. I'll start with the wrong bottle. He can add any object that you're like. Once we have the object ended, let's go ahead and filter objects or SSB material. Okay, so here we have a big collection of materials already created for us. So we can go ahead and use these materials, or we can also use these as a starting point. And then literal change is properties are parameters to further customize it. 200 liking. So we have two type of materials. We have Adobe standard material. So we don't have a lot of control over how these materials are. So we can't change a lot of parameters. If we collapse this section, we have our substance materials. So these are created in substance. It's a, it's a different application, which I'll be recently quite. So. We have a bunch of materials from that application. You can also use that application to create your own custom materials and then impose those materials here in dimension. But we have a long collection of materials are really included here, so we can add these and then we can change these parameters. We have more controls with these materials. We, which we will see in a moment. Okay, let's begin by looking at how we can add the material. So there are two methods of adding materials onto our object. And the first map it is to select the object or parts of an object. And then we can simply click on an object, actually the material, and it will be applied onto those selected parts or objects. In this case, you can see that I've selected the lead safety ring and bottles. So when I clicked on the material, it got applied to the entire parts or all of the parts that were selected. So this way you can select multiple objects and click on a material. It will be applied across those objects. Or you can also drag and drop your material. So if I go ahead and deselect the object and then scroll down a little bit. So let's say that I want to add in this plastic material. I can drag this material. And as I'm dragging this, you'll notice that I get this blue outline which tells me where this material will be applied. In this case, we are applying it to the bottle. So let's go ahead and release our click. And you can see it gets applied over here. So that's how we can apply material either by dragging or selecting or object and then clicking on the material. Once we have a material applied to access his settings, we can select the object. And then you can see that here we have different paths, so each part has its own separate material. And we can click on this arrow to access the material. Or we can select the part. And then down here we have, uh, but in for accessing the material. So let's click on the bottle and accesses material. So here you can see we have this base material. So this will be the base material. And then we can keep adding multiple graphics on top of this base materials. So those can be different graphics, for example, logo, some graphics on top of the bottle and things like that. We have a button here that says, please graphics on a model. And we can also drag and drop the graphics on the model. And then down here we have settings. And these sort of settings are for the standard dropping material. And then down here we have our substance material. So these materials have different setting depending on the material that you're using. For the W materials, you'll see these sort of universal settings. So at the very top here we have the base color, we can click here. And then it allows us to change the color. If you don't want to use a color, you can also use an image. So you can click on this area to open an image from your computer. So it will take a look at this in more detail in the next video. Okay, so you have the color option. Next you have the offset value. So offset and repeat allows you to play around with the movement of your texture. And this will make more sense if we apply a different material which has something like something with a stripe or things like that. So something that we are able to see. Okay, so I'll go ahead and drag and this material here onto the selected part of this object. And you can see here that it's applied over here. And then under our properties, we have the offset value. So the x value will change our x-axis. And then for the Y axis is up and down here. So x axis won't make a lot of sense because you can see if I rotate the view, we have this sort of infinite loop of the material. So even if it changes, we wouldn't be able to see it. So let's start with the y axis and you can tell we are able to move or offset detector up and down. We also have this rotation value, so this allows us to rotate. So you can see that it allows us to rotate the texture. Here we have the repeat values. So this allows us to repeat the texture. And this wouldn't make sense to use with a substance material because it has its own settings for repeating the texture. But a use of, but it's useful with images input from your computer or with Adobe standard materials. So go ahead and reset this value. So these are the sort of universal parameters, which means that you'll be able to access those across different materials. And then down here, these are specific to this particular material. So we have a stripe count. We have stripe width. We also have a stripe softness. We have stripe emboss. We also have invert embarrassing. So if we want to change that, we have scratches. If we want to add those, you can see how it sort of add is as those scratches here. So we have more of a rough surface. And then down here we have additional settings such as stripe one, so we can change the color of that if we want to. Let's go ahead and select the material I accidentally clicked out. So and then we have the stripe too, so we can change the color of that as soon as this sort of part of the texture, we could change the roughness. We can change the metallic value so we can increase or decrease that. We can also change the roughness to make it more shiny or may get more rougher. And here we have this crisis. We can reduce that a little bit. So you can see we have fine control over the parameters and we have a lot of parameters here. So we can really play around with these parameters to get the material that we're aiming for. And we also have some specific settings here, so resolution, we can increase that to get higher resolution texture. Okay, let's play around with female textures. So I'll go ahead and duplicate this object and move it to the side here. And we can add some more materials here. So here we have this one of the wood texture I think let's go ahead and add this onto the object so you can see that my entire object was selected, so textured got applied to the entire object. Go ahead and press Control Z to go step back, deselect the object, and then drag and drop them trail again here on the bottom part of this object. So here again we have our offset value, we have their peak value, and this time around we have the color value. So we can go in and change the color if we want to. And then you have white lines. We can enable those if we want to. We have a wrap_parameters here, so you can see how it sort of changes this bit of area. You can also try these materials with your render preview. And we also have we also have balanced so we can use those. We have amount of tasks, so we can change that amount on the x-axis. We can chain that on the y axis. So we have a lot of control over the material. We have technical parameters, luminosity, we have contrast, hue shift and things like that. So I was just playing around with different materials. So as you drag and drop more and more materials, you'll be able to play around with the parameters down here. So you can see we have a brushed aluminum material here. So we have the brush, brushed intensity, we have rotation of that. We also have the roughness. So I would recommend playing around with different materials and settings because it's a lot of fun. You have a lot of materials that you can play around with and get the surfaces or type of object that you're trying to create. So add some more objects like sphere and try to add different materials such as this clean gold. And so you can see we have a lot of control over here. We can also add our standard materials. We still have a lot of control with that. So let's call up here. And then we can drag and drop this glass material maybe here. So here you can see that we have the opacity of the material. We can increase or decrease that we have the roughness. If we want more of a rough surface, we can increase to make it a metallic object. We have the glow. We want to make it like it's emitting light. And we also have a normal map area. Also, you can use images instead of these sliders if you're bringing an object from a 3D application, most of the time those objects include what are called maps. So you can click on the base color here and then you can import the texture here. So this will be the base image or Albedo map. And then you have opacity, you have roughness, metallic losses. You can use images in these fields instead of this slider here. So these are sort of universal settings which you'll find across some standard materials. So for example, if we drag and drop this one here, you can see that all other parameters are similar. And here you can see that this material includes all of these maps here that I was talking about. And then he has substance a materials which includes parameters that allow you to have fine control over the surface. So you have to play around with different materials to get the result that you're looking for. So that's how we add a material and some of the basic properties. In the next video, we'll spend some time adding graphics from our computer and creating an actual object. So for example, an example project shot. 12. Working with Materials & Graphics: Okay, now we will spend some time working with graphics and how we can create an actual product shot. So this will be an example shot. Let's begin by adding an object. So in this case, I'll scroll down a little bit here and then squeeze tube into the scene. Let's arbitrary view a little bit here and then zoom in. So I will be using the base and the plastic material as a base. So and then I add my textures on top of this. So here you can see that it's added. We can go ahead and select the body and access this material. Now here we can either click on this button here. You can see that it opens the file explorer secure. We have our exercise files and the texture that we have here. Let's begin by adding a green gradient. And you can see that it's added on top of firm trail. So we have the body material here and then we have the Graphic important from our computer. And as we add more and more graphics, those will be stacked here. And one thing to note here is that the order of these graphics will matter. So anything that is at the very top will cover everything beneath it. So you have to be careful with that. Okay, so here we have our graphics, we have the image. We can click here to change the image. If we want to. We can place it as a DKL decal or as a texture. So you can see it sort of fills our object. For the decay. We can play around with the scale factor here, so we can change the scale to scale it up and down uniformly. B can also rotate this, or you can also use this gizmo. So you can left click and hold here, and then it allows you to move the texture. And you can also click on this area. It allows you to rotate the texture. And you can also scale up and down on sort of one axis, so to distort your texture. Okay, so let's go ahead and start sort of playing around with the texture, something like here. And then we can tweak the texture and move it up here. Let's rotate this a little bit on this side. Okay, so it's a very basic gradient. Scale it down a little bit. Right? Let us access the body again here. So select the graphic and I went to scale it up a little bit in slightly down here. And we also need to tweak the sort of rotation of this a little bit. Okay, so something like here. Now let's go ahead and open the file explorer. So this time we will drag and drop or a texture. So I want to drag and drop this leaf image. So let's go ahead and drag this into dimension. And we can let go on the model and you can see that it's placed above or graphic. So we can left click and hold here and rearrange the order and you can see how it goes beneath that. So you can play around with that. Let's move it down here. Next we can go there and click on please graphic button and we can add in the text here. So for the text we can go ahead and scale it up a little bit. Move it down slightly. So it's all about playing around with it. And then we can also select the body material. So this was the base material and we can play around with it, for example, we can make it more shiny. We can make it metallic. In this case, it wouldn't make sense. But you can see that we still have control over that. We can also change the base color and we can go back and we can also access the material for the lid. For example, if we want to change the color or anything like that. Okay, so we have one object completed. Let's go ahead and create a duplicate of this object. And then we can move it on this axis here. And let us access the body here. And for the graphics, we can go in and change it or we can get rid of this and then add a new graphic. In this case, let's go and change it. So let's add the ingredient. So it changes the gradient on the top. So you can see that if we change the image, it allows us to sort of keep our image movement so we don't have to rearrange the image once we import it again. And then we can keep the name of the brand here and then fold this graphic wrinkly and go ahead and delete it. And let's click on place in your graphic and we'll import the flowers. Let's move it slightly down here, something like here. And we can create another duplicate of this object and move it on this side here. Let's change some of the materials settings. So we'll change the gradient to the blue gradient. And then for the flowers, we can get rid of these. And then please, in your graphic symbol and these lemons at the bottom here. Okay, so once we have these added, let's add few more objects. So we'll scroll down here. We have displeasure as drag and drop this. And then you can hold the central point here and move it to the back here. We can also add multiple splash. We can agitation. We can scale these up. So it's going to scale that up to twice the size. Actually didn't link the scale factor. So let's get to link it and then we can something like here. Okay, let's add a bit of rotation. We might need to tweak around. So it's all about tweaking around backing, going back and forth. And then we can filter the materials. Let's scroll up a little bit here and we have the water material is going to drag and drop this so that we have bit of a freshness sort of feel. We can also select these bottles and then drag them a little bit in the background here. Now you can see that we created this object and the Water Agency that water looks. But often, that's because we're not using the vendor pv mode. So that's where the renderer preview mode is important. Once you have sort of Bs should model of your product shot completed, you can enable the render preview and it displays what the final image will look like. So you can see that it wanted and it looks a bit better. So we have to play around with the scale of the water and changes movement. But you can see that we were able to create this amazing product shop within a few minutes. So we just imported few gradiants created in Photoshop. We also added some graphics at the bottom here, and you can see that we are able to create this so we didn't have to set up any lighting or anything like that. We can also click on this sort of outside the area and turn off the grid. And then it creates a different result. And we haven't tweaked any lighting or anything like that. But you can see that within few minutes we created this image. Also in the exercise final, you'll find the PSD files that were used to create these graphics. So you can play around with this. We can also add additional graphics such as more gradients on sort of this area. But I think it looks beautiful. This was a quick example. We can go ahead and save the file if we want to. And we can also create additional examples. So I'll go ahead and save the file and then we can create another example. Ok, so let's work on another example. Now, we can create abstract arms, we can create products charts, we can create 3D text. We have a lot of flexibility. Let's go ahead and add it really text. And then we can change the text here to something like Adobe. And let's reposition the camera. We can also play around with the bookmarks. Let's add a simple cube. We can go ahead and link the scale factor here and scale it down a little bit. Let's add few duplicates of this objects so we can duplicate it couple of times, maybe about four times. And then we can go ahead and move and these duplicates here. Okay, so now here we'll take a look at another tool. Because when you're working with multiple objects, instead of using these values to precisely align your objects, you can select all of your objects are, and once you have multiple objects selected under Actions panel, you will see what is called a line and distribute. So when you click on it, it displays this gizmo here, which makes it really easy to align your objects properly. So let's say that if we want to have even spacing between these objects, we can click on this line here and you can see that it does that for us. And now we can change the spacing by dragging from the center. We can also drag from one of the edge here. So it allows us to change the spacing, something like here. And we can do the same thing for their side. And then we can also do same things for this site. So if we wanted to remove our objects in one way, we can do that. So you can see that how it allows us to do that. We can click on the central line, absolutely. Central point and it sort of centers everything. And center will line will allow us to have even spacing if we have objects in this direction. And we can do same thing for moving up and down. So you can see something like here. So you can see that it makes it really, really easy to align your objects and distribute multiple objects. So let's go ahead and align these objects. And then using the movement tool, we can go ahead and move this down here. So go ahead and spend some time at some materials and play around with the scene a little bit. 13. Lighting: And now we'll take a look at the lighting. Now for learning, it's important that he used a renter preview. Because if you're not using the vendor preview, you can see that in the previous example where we were working with water, we were not able to see the water. So it makes a big difference between your final image and your standard view here in 2D canvas. To work with materials or lighting, you can turn on the renderer preview and then you can start working with the lighting. So make sure to filter the lights here. And then if we scroll all the way up here, we have our directional lights and these are to create more of natural lights. For example, you can simulate sunlight eating, have a three-point lighting. Now this is a very famous lighting technique where you have three lines. So you have a key light, which lights up your subject, and then you have a fill light and then also impact light. You have a square light, you have circle light, and then you have some environmental lights. Environmental lights or image-based lighting is where you take image and apply or wrap it around your scene. And then that image, based on that image, you have lighting in your scene. So we have a lot of presses down here, but you can also import our own images. So there's this amazing website called HDR. I haven't that you can open in your web browser. And then at the very top here you can click on St. arise. And you can see that they have a big catalog of SGA images. So you can select a category up here. You can also search for NHGRI image. And you can also scroll through these images here. So they have a lot of fMRI images that you can download. If you like an image and you want to download that image, you can simply click on it. And then you can see a preview of that image. And they also included an example where it shows how this HRA image will look on different objects. So we have metal, plastic, ARAF object, a glass objects. So we have a lot of examples down here. We can also download these images up to 16 care resolution. So you can go and click on one of the image and it's downloaded. There are few images included in the exercise files under Sri folder, so you can also use these. Okay, so that's where you can get a DRA images. Once we have those images, to apply those images. And let's go through on a lighting step-by-step. So at the very top here of our scene panel, we have our environment. So this is the background. This is not the lighting image and the background that we're using here. So we have this background, we can click on this box here, and we can select a different color. So we can even go with a reddish color and we can select any color, or we can use an image instead. So we can go ahead and click here and then we can import an image from our computer. We can use one of them included image. So we can click on this image here and you can see that it will get applied over here. And then we have this checkmark that allows us to toggle between color or image. Also, when we add an image, we have this button here that says match him is we can click here and it says resize canvas to image aspect ratio. So we can do that. We can also emit size. We can also select that. We can create lights. So this will create lights and match are seen to the image that we're using. And we can also match the camera perspective. We can uncheck any of these options. But if we have, if we have this check, we can click OK. And it gives her tries to match the perspective of the objects and the image. So here in this case, you can see that Adobe isn't able to do a pretty good job here, so we'll have to do it manually. For now. I'll just going to press Control Z to go a step back. And let's turn off the background. Now down here we have our global lighting. We can turn it off and you can see everything immediately becomes dark. So you can turn that on. And then we have the intensity of the global lighting. We also have the rotation if we want to rotate it so that we have lighting from a different angle. I'll also go ahead and change color back to default. Then here we have the ground plane. We can turn it off if we don't need the ground plane. If we have the ground plane turned on, we can increase the capacity for the reflection and we will be able to see the reflections on the floor down here. So let's increase it all the way. And we can also increase the roughness for the reflection. So that is more rough shared reflection down here. Now you can see that we have this great debt is a bit distracting. So let's go and click on this outside empty area to access our setting for the canvas. And then here we have the great, let's train it off. Okay, let's go in and select our environment. And so here we have the shadow. We can turn off the shadows if we don't need them. We can also turn back on. We can also turn our shadows back on. So we can turn down the reflection, a roughness. And you can see we have beautiful looking reflections down here. And this image has a bit of noise. But when we render our final image, which will be much cleaner. Next we have our environment flights were using this image. So this is one of the preset that we're using. So here one of the studio preset, we can click here and open an image. Let's click on the SDI folders and select NHGRI image. And then here we have these images. Let's select maybe this circus Irina. And you'll immediately notice the change of the linings. And now we're using this image for the lighting. So you can see are seen logins. She just entirely. And let's go ahead and select a different image. So let's go with this, maybe this one. Now you can see that we have a different look. So we're using these images for the lighting. And here we have the intensity of that lighting. We can increase or decrease that. We can also rotate our image so that we have different area of image pointing at the front side here. So we'll be able to play around with that. Let's decrease the intensity a little bit here. And we can also call arise. So we can add a color tint if we want to see here. But I'll go ahead and turn off the color tint. We can also create additional lights. For example, if we click on the three-point lighting, you can see that it creates three additional lights. We have key light, we have the fill light and also a backlight, so we can go in and select those nights. We can change the color and we can change the intensity here. We have the rotation. We can also change the height, and then we have the shape of the light. So we're using a square light, we have the aspect ratio of that light, we have the corner radius. We can also change the size of that light. We have edge softness. So we can play around with these parameters to get the desired look. So these are precess and that we can use most of the time these will get the job done, but if you need to tweak the lighting, you can use one of the presets and then tweak the settings. Or you can also import your own custom environmental image from HER I haven't or from your computer. And then you'll be able to use those images to light up you're seeing. In this case, I've messed up the lighting of the scene, so let's go ahead and get rid of these lights. So I'll go ahead and select it and then delete these lines. Also one more thing. When you select a light, you can see that we have this button here that says in light points. So we can click here and we can aim the light at a different object or different direction. So in this case, we can turn down the intensity a little bit or maybe even delete this slide. So lighting will depend on the type of scene that you're working with and what kind of final style or design and you'll be creating. So depending on that, you will play around with different lighting precess and its settings to adjust your lighting. 14. Examples: Okay, and now let's go through a few examples that have created in few minutes within dimension, if you spend extra time, you'll be able to create some amazing results. And these examples were created as spending a little bit of time. Ok, so the first example is within the exercise file and the coffee dot d and file. When you open this file up, you can see that we have these three standard coffee cups. So these are within the dimension coffee cups. So this one here. So what I did was then I created these coffee cups. I added this logo on top of the coffee cup. I change the material on the lead here. And then I also change the color. This this cap here. And I added a splash, added the water material and change its color 2 for reddish tone. And if we turn on the vendor pv mode, you can see that it looks beautiful. So this example was created in less than five minutes. And you can see these cups are floating up. We can easily adjust that. So if we go ahead and select the capture except for the water or this coffee here, click on move to ground. And then we can select it mentally and sort of drag it down. Okay, so you can see that it looks beautiful and it's a really simple design. So if I just sort of orbit my view round. So the latest sort of flying up here to create an impression that we have sort of spill off the coffee. Let's take a look at a few more examples. So I have this lemon hand spray. So here in this example you can see I have this bottle here. So this was also from the starter content. So we have this flip LET bottle. It was added here. I added a bit of rotation. I added a transparent material here on the bottom part of the bottle. I added a logo and then I downloaded these lemon slices from Adobe stock free collection. And I resize some of these slices and edit here. We have this seems pleasure. And you can see that we are able to create this beautiful scene. Again, this was created really quickly because in dimension we can do that very easily. Let's take a look at few more examples. Next we have the material examples. So this is similar to what we created in the graphics video where we started learning about how to place graphics. But it's a bit different because I used a gradient in a little bit different way so that I can show you that even if you have same graphics, you can, even, you can still create different designs. So in this case you can see we have this sort of gradient at the bottom and then we also have this sort of as gradient at that top edge here. I added the same splash and this time around, I spent some time to trigging display size. And you can see that it looks better in this example. So we can turn off the grid and you can see it looks pretty good. So by just using some simple starter content and some simple graphics from your computer, you'll be able to create some amazing results. So these are some products shots. You can also create abstract art. I would love to see what you create with dimension. You can upload your projects or vendors on the projects page of skill. Sure. 15. Rendering & Post Processing: And finally, it's time to render images. So I'll be using this coffee example. So from the exercise file, I've opened the file and treat the lighting a little bit and I've changed the position. So these are now near to the crowd here. I've turned off the grid. You can either do that under the View menu or you can also click on this empty area and toggle the grid off here. Okay, so once you have your scene setup and you want to render it, you can set up multiple angles using the bookmarks. In this case, I just need a single image. You can also preview your final render, what your final image will look like using the render preview. So once you're ready to render your images, you can go ahead and switch to the render tab. And then here on the right side we have settings. You can render your images locally or you can use it. Hobbes Cloud render service. Down here you have the name for the export file, file name. So you can type that in here and then you have the quality. So using quality, you can select three different colonies. So you have low, medium, and high. So the locality we'll first set the low quality will render really fast, but you'll have a little bit of noise in the Final Render. You can also try medium and high. So it will depend on the work. For example, if you're sending someone a quick sort of view, you can render at low. And for the final production rendering, you can render at high. In this case, I'll select low so that it renders quickly for the purpose of the video. Now, here we have two type of file formats. We can export PSD and PNG. Now I'll go ahead and enable both so we can see the differences between them. And we also have the directory where these will be saved. I'll go ahead and switch this to different folder. So you can see that I've selected vendors folder here on my desktop. And I can go ahead and select the folder, and then we can click on the render button. Now as this rendering, you will see the preview here and we can scroll down a little bit. And as this gets, sort of starts getting cleaner and cleaner and the noise will eventually go away. And here you can see the progress of your renders. So we have a render status. You can also take an image of the current state. So if you like this image, you can take an image or a screenshot of this process here or progress. Okay, so you can see that our render has completed and we can see the message here that says your render has finished and saved. And we can see that it took about 48 seconds for this image to render. So here we have our final image. You can see that we have bit of noise in this shadow area. And we can use a higher preset to get rid of that noise. Let's go ahead and open the folder where these images were rendered. So here we have the PNG file. We can go ahead and open it up. So this is our final image. Now PNG image is just a single image, so you can do a lot of changes in this image. But with PSD file, let's go ahead and open it up in Photoshop. Okay, so here the image is opened in Photoshop and you can see that we have some additional layers with a, with this image. So we can turn on and off and the background image. So if we need a different image, we can go ahead and create, for example, in nuclear. And then using the Paint Bucket tool, we can fill that layer and you can see we have different backend and we have a bigger problem you would shadows. And, but if we fine tune this, we'll be able to create that. So here you can see that we were able to do this. And then we have rendered image, so we can add a color correction on top of this, let's go ahead and click on the Effects here. And let's add maybe Curves. Adjustment. We can hold on alt button on the keyboard, or that would be option if you're using Mac OS and then click here between the layers so that it only affects this rendered image. And let's play around with this image so we can play around with the contrast. So we have our highlights up here. Let's take our highlights a little bit sort of down here. We have the shadow, shadows down here. Let's make them a bit more, sort of brighter. Actually, we need to tweak it a little bit here. Okay, so we made it a bit improved unbelief, we spend some extra time. You'll be able to create a much better result. This is just by dragging to sliders and you can see that we have a bit of improved image if we turn this on enough. So your before and after, we still need to work on some of these entities here and stuff like that, but it takes time so you can work on your final render. So let's go ahead and turn this off for a moment. And here we can see that we have some additional layers. Let's go in and turn it on. We have material selection, we have objects selection, and we have depth information. So we have three different additional layers. These layers makes it really easy to select your object and make changes. For example, if we go ahead and turn it off, even though Adobe has come a long way in allowing you to select your objects or more complex objects easily. It still takes a lot of time. For example, if we go ahead and select our quick selection tool and start selecting this object, you can see that can be difficult. Select our object. Let's increase the size of the brush a little bit here. And you can see that it takes a bit of time. So instead of this, we can use these additional layers to easily select objects. I'll go ahead and press Control D, or that would be Command D on a MacOS. Okay, so let's turn on these layers. Will user material selection layers to select the objects. We can go ahead and click on select. We can select color range and click on this object here. And you can see that it selects that. We can hold down Shift button and keep clicking on these different areas. So it makes it really easy to select r objects and to preview what we have selected, we can go then enable the grayscale here. The white areas are selected and black areas are not selected. We can further refine our selection using the fuzziness slider up here. And select OK. And if we turn off these layers, you can see we have a pretty good selection, so it made it really easy to select the objects. For now, let's go ahead and maybe de-select Some of these objects here. So let's say that I want to separate just this object here. So we can make sure that is selected and we can select the rendered image. And we can add a layer mask. So you can see that it's isolated here. We can hold down the alt button on Windows or option on the Mac. Click here to add opposite. Lear mask. We can also separate the subject and sort of create a copy of this object by creating a second layer here by pressing control j or Command Z on the Mac OS. So it creates a copy of that object. So if we turn it off, you can see it's still there. Now what it allows you to do is you can create some pretty good looking effects with that. For example, if we go ahead and access the text tool and add a syntax like coffee, let's scale it up a little bit. Okay, so it's added up here. Let's drag it down here. And we can add some effects on top of this. So maybe color overlay. We can also move this and you can see how we're able to add it behind the coffee cup. Now, if we select these coffee cups, we can do same thing for this one. So these additional layers will allow you to work with your objects a lot easier. So you'll be able to do a lot of post-processing on your image. You'll be able to have a pretty good-looking effects. You can even add 3D text in Photoshop and that will be sort of ended behind your object. You can add gradients in the background. So it takes some time. And depending on the project that you're working with, you'll be able to create some amazing things if you render your images in PSD, and it makes it really easy.